FTSE UK indexes

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FTSE (Financial Times and Stock Exchange)[1] provides index coverage of stocks in the United Kingdom through a suite of free-float market capitalization indexes. The FT Actuaries All-Share Index, FTSE's initial index, was created in 1962.[note 1] This index is now known as the FTSE-All-Share Index.

FTSE provides two categories of gilt indexes.[note 2] The "British Government Stocks" indexes cover conventional gilts; the "British Government Index-linked Stocks" indexes cover index-linked gilts.

In December 2011, The London Stock Exchange (LSE) purchased FTSE and now completely owns the index provider.[2]


FTSE stock market indexes

The FTSE UK indexes include the following:[3]

  • FTSE All-Share Index: This index represents 98-99% of UK market capitalisation, FTSE All-Share is the aggregation of the FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and FTSE Small Cap Indices.[4]
  • FTSE 100 Index: This index (inception on January 3, 1984) comprises the 100 most highly capitalised blue chip companies, representing approximately 81% of the UK market.[5]
  • FTSE 250 Index: This index (inception on October 12, 1992) comprises mid-capitalised companies not covered by the FTSE 100, and represents approximately 15% of UK market capitalisation.[6]
  • FTSE 350 Index: This index is a combination of the FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 indices.[7]
  • FTSE Small Cap Index: The index consists of companies outside of the FTSE 350 Index and represents approximately 2% of the UK market capitalisation.[8]
  • FTSE Fledgling Index: This index is for UK companies listed on the main market of the London Stock Exchange that are too small to be included in the FTSE All-Share.[9]
  • FTSE All-Small Index: The index (inception year 1999) consists of companies in the FTSE Small Cap and FTSE Flegling indices.[10]

FTSE also provides style indices measuring the growth and value segments of the FTSE 350 index.

The FTSE All-Share, FTSE 100, and FTSE 250 indexes are common choices for index tracker funds.

Stock index returns

The following table provides total returns for the FTSE UK indexes.

FTSE UK stock indices


(View Google Spreadsheet in browser, then File --> Download as to download the file.)

FTSE bond market indexes

FTSE provides price and yield indexes that cover both conventional and inflation-linked gilts. The "All stocks" indexes are market wide gilt indexes. FTSE also supplies subindexes that cover specific maturity ranges for both classifications of bonds, as detailed in the table below.[11]

FTSE Actuaries UK Gilts Index Series
Conventional Gilts Index-linked Gilts
  • All stocks – Gilts with all outstanding terms
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of up to 5 years
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of over 5 years
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of 5 - 10 years
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of 10 - 15 years
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of 5 - 15 years
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of up to 15 years
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of over 15 years
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of up to 20 years
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of 15 - 25 years
  • Gilts with an assumed outstanding term of over 25 years
  • Irredeemables – undated gilts
  • All stocks – Gilts with all outstanding terms
  • Gilts with an outstanding term of up to 5 years
  • Gilts with an outstanding term of 5 - 15 years
  • Gilts with an outstanding term of 5 - 25 years
  • Gilts with an outstanding term of over 5 years

The FTSE Actuaries UK Conventional Gilts All Stocks Index is the most common FTSE bond index tracked by index tracker funds. IShares also tracks the FTSE UK Conventional Gilts - Up To 5 Years Index.

Bond index returns

The following table provides returns data for FTSE UK Gilt indexes:

FTSE UK bond indexes


(View Google Spreadsheet in browser, then File --> Download as to download the file.)

Notes

  1. The FT Actuaries All-Share Index was a price only index, excluding dividends. The index was subsequently enhanced with the addition of two new sub-indices, the FTSE 100 in January 1984 and the FTSE 250 in October 1992. The FTSE-All-Share Index began reporting returns on total return basis in 1993.
  2. Gilts are bonds that are issued by the British government and generally considered low risk. Gilts are the U.K. equivalent to U.S. Treasury securities.

References

External links