What Book Are YOU Currently Reading? PART III (12/11/2009)

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What Book Are YOU Currently Reading? PART III (12/11/2009)

Post by Tall Grass » Fri Dec 11, 2009 9:44 pm

This thread is the continuation of What Book Are YOU Currently Reading? PART II

Just started "The Tourist" by Olen Steinhauer...just finished "The Symbol" by Dan Brown. The research information was interesting, but IMO it wasn't up to the entertainment level of "The Da Vinci Code" and "Angels and Demons".

According to the jacket notes, the film rights to "The Tourist" have been optioned by Warner Brothers for George Clooney.

*************************************************************

Here is the content of the very first post on the original thread dated April 7, 2007:

I see a LOT of books quoted on the forum [that is good]. I wonder, what book are YOU currently reading?

I will start.

Currently reading:
a. Larry Swedroe's Only Guide To A Winning Investment Strategy
b. Larry Swedroe's Only Guide To A Winning Bond Strategy

And note that I have read the books, but I continue to read both as a good refresher.

Now it is your turn. Thanks.

cfs



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Post by ruralavalon » Sat Dec 12, 2009 3:52 pm

"Treasure Island", by Robert Louis Stevenson.

I have started re-reading old classics off of my own bookshelf, and am enjoying it immensely.

BTW, I just could not resist the impulse to get in at the start of one of these monster threads :) .
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Post by dc5vt05 » Sat Dec 12, 2009 4:08 pm

From Army Green to Corporate Gray By Carl S. Savino and Ronald L. Kranich. Pretty short but a lot of good advice.

Just finished Glenn Beck's Common Sense.

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Post by Tall Grass » Sat Dec 12, 2009 6:52 pm

dc5vt05 wrote:From Army Green to Corporate Gray By Carl S. Savino and Ronald L. Kranich. Pretty short but a lot of good advice.

Just finished Glenn Beck's Common Sense.
I see that your address is Camp Taji, Iraq...does the military over there get plenty of good books to read? If not, is there an address where we Bogleheads could send books that we would be willing to share with the troops?
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Post by nisiprius » Sat Dec 12, 2009 7:17 pm

Am reading Dean King, Patrick O'Brian: A Life Revealed. O'Brian is the author of the Aubrey/Maturin series (Master and Commander, etc.) Having read all twenty books in the series (and the unfinished 21) I'm now feeling somewhat at a loss. I haven't decided whether to re-read my way through the C. S. Forester Horatio Hornblower series (again), or try some of O'Brian's other books.

I did reread Commodore Hornblower and loved it--after a period of adjustment. It's really amazing: the Aubrey/Maturin series is truly great, the Horatio Hornblower series is truly great, but if you read a book in one series after you've read one from the other series, it seems just awful for the first four or five chapters. It's sort of like kosher dill pickles and chocolate: both wonderful but the first bite of one after the other is disgusting.

I'd love to read a good piece of fan fiction in which Aubrey and Hornblower meet. They would hate each other. Aubrey would regard Hornblower as a posturing poppinjay, unreasonably concerned with the impression he makes on others, while Hornblower would regard Aubrey as reckless, relying on luck and instinct and never planning carefully.
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Post by dc5vt05 » Sun Dec 13, 2009 3:15 pm

I see that your address is Camp Taji, Iraq...does the military over there get plenty of good books to read? If not, is there an address where we Bogleheads could send books that we would be willing to share with the troops?
I am actually at Al Asad now but the military exchange has a small selection of fiction and military books. The same day that I responded to this post a couple of us were talking about the various books we had read.

I think there were only two of us that liked reading financial/investment books. Probably because we were both Economics majors.

If you want to send books, I am sure the Soldiers that are here would appreciate it. The address is:

CPT Tim Fong
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Post by RAVEN » Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:46 pm

"Troublesome Young Men" by Lynne Olson.

It covers the anti-appeasement group in England during the 1930's. It was faction separate from the Churchill anti-appeasement group which had a much smaller membership. Their nominal chosen leader was Anthony Eden.

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Post by Steelersfan » Mon Dec 14, 2009 6:05 pm

"Too Big To Fail" by Andrew Ross Sorkin.

Excellent book with an hour by hour, sometimes minute by minute, account of the bailout of the financial system in 2008. The profiles that emerge of the political leaders and the heads of Wall Street firms is fascinating.

How he got all those people to open up to him is beyond belief. In some ways it reminds me of Bob Woodward's books on politics in Washington D.C.

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Post by DonnaB » Mon Dec 14, 2009 9:24 pm

I also recently read "Too big to fail" and am reading Michal Crichton's "State of Fear." Both are captivating.

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Post by RJB » Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:51 pm

Security Analysis, 6th edition by Benjamin Graham and David Dodd, foreword by Warren Buffett.

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Post by Fbone » Tue Dec 15, 2009 3:02 am

Investing for Change- Profit from Responsible Investment by Landier & Nair. Just started the first few chapters but enjoying it.

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Post by Igglesman » Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:21 am

"The Help" by Kathryn Stockett. Great read.

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Post by Dutchgirl » Tue Dec 15, 2009 5:33 pm

I am reading "The Orientalist" by Tom Reiss. I'm only on p.25, but so far I find it (and the Introduction)fascinating. A recent book I loved was "Deaf Sentence" by David Lodge (a favorite author). For anyone experiencing hearing problems, this is a gem of a book!

Yoka

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Post by bryanv » Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:11 pm

Chasing Hubble's Shadows - Jeff Kanipe
Your Money & Your Brain - Jason Zweig

Picked both up today, haven't cracked then open yet.

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Post by traineeinvestor » Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:22 pm

bryanv wrote:Chasing Hubble's Shadows - Jeff Kanipe
Your Money & Your Brain - Jason Zweig

Picked both up today, haven't cracked then open yet.
Your Money & Your Brain is excellent - and useful.

Currently reading "The Myth of the Rational Market" by Justin Fox.

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Post by joe8d » Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:48 pm

AARP Retirement Survial Guide by Judie Jason.
All the Best, | Joe

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Post by market timer » Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:48 pm

"Women" by Charles Bukowski

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Post by chaz » Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:23 pm

"Partners In Crime" by J. A. Jance.
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Post by TheEternalVortex » Wed Dec 16, 2009 8:00 pm

traineeinvestor wrote:
Your Money & Your Brain is excellent - and useful.
But see this.

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Post by DonnaB » Wed Dec 16, 2009 8:40 pm

Dutchgirl wrote: A recent book I loved was "Deaf Sentence" by David Lodge (a favorite author). For anyone experiencing hearing problems, this is a gem of a book!
Thanks for mentioning this - David Lodge is a favorite of mine too, and I didn't realize he had a new book out. It is available for kindle so I just downloaded a sample.

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Post by traineeinvestor » Wed Dec 16, 2009 8:59 pm

TheEternalVortex wrote:
traineeinvestor wrote:
Your Money & Your Brain is excellent - and useful.
But see this.
Thanks. That was an interesting thread.

My only gripe with Your Money & Your Brain was that Zweig included the much quoted but fatally flawed psychology experiment involving supposedly equivalent decisions about either saving part of a population from a disease or allowing part of the population to die.

Even so, it was an interesting read - and practical.

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Post by Tall Grass » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:50 am

"The Tourist" by Olen Steinhauer was excellent...starting "The Appeal" by John Grisham, haven't read him in quite a while.
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Post by TheWhiteSwan » Sat Dec 19, 2009 4:38 pm

Attention span for reading real books (and on Kindle) vanished about Thanksgiving; I expect it to return after New Year's. I'm reading forums much like this one, and computer manuals to improve my Mac skills and learn just what all it is that my wonderful new iPod Touch can do. Listening to unabridged audiobook, "Middlesex" on CDs.

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Post by Tall Grass » Sat Dec 19, 2009 5:00 pm

Tall Grass wrote:"The Tourist" by Olen Steinhauer was excellent...starting "The Appeal" by John Grisham, haven't read him in quite a while.
"The Appeal" was at best so-so. I think John is just churning them out for his publisher at this point. He has rarely matched his first book "A Time To Kill".

Now reading "Await Your Reply" by Dan Chaon...
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Post by nisiprius » Sat Dec 19, 2009 7:40 pm

Fordlandia, by Greg Grandin, and so far (p. 135 of 400) it is a fascinating read. A nonfiction book about Henry Ford's spectacularly failed attempt, in 1927, to create a city deep in Brazil, on the Amazon river. It would not only produce rubber--a great concern to U. S. carmakers--but would also bring the American way of life to the Amazon wilderness, with hospitals, schools, electricity, golf courses, ice cream shops, and Model T's running down its streets.

A spectacular failure, and all-but-forgotten until, I suppose, this book was published.

It is (of course) a sort of biography of Ford, refracted through the prism of this episode. And it reminds me of the sort of belief system, still quite alive in the 1950s, that the United States was going to redeem the world through electricity, automobiles, capitalism, and white picket fences.
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Post by Fletch » Sat Dec 19, 2009 8:41 pm

How to Argue with an Idiot by Glenn Beck. He does have some very interesting perspectives about "progressives" :D

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Post by Goldfinger » Sun Dec 20, 2009 1:07 am

Liar's Poker by Michael Lewis. This is one enjoyable book, I must say. Michael Lewis is one of those rare writers who possesses the ability to make you think you're right there in the middle of it all.

It's been on my radar for a long time. Nice to finally be reading it.

--Mark
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Post by Petrocelli » Sun Dec 20, 2009 1:31 am

Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut.
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Post by Petrocelli » Sun Dec 20, 2009 1:32 am

market timer wrote:"Women" by Charles Bukowski
Easily my favorite poet.
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Post by VictoriaF » Sun Dec 20, 2009 7:58 am

Fletch wrote:How to Argue with an Idiot by Glenn Beck. He does have some very interesting perspectives about "progressives" :D

Fletch
From the Amazon.com profile of Arguing with Idiots: How to Stop Small Minds and Big Government :
Amazon.com wrote:About the Author
Glenn Beck, the nationally syndicated radio and Fox News television show host, is the author of five previous #1 New York Times bestsellers: Arguing With Idiots, An Inconvenient Book, Glenn Beck's Common Sense, The Christmas Sweater, and his children's version of The Christmas Sweater. America's March to Socialism is available now from Simon & Schuster Audio or downloadable from Simon & Schuster Online. He is also the author of The Real America and publisher of Fusion magazine. Visit www.glennbeck.com.
Reader ratings:
262 - 5-star
26 - 4-star
15 - 3-star
14 - 2-star
99 - 1-star

Question: How many of them are "idiots"?

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Post by hudson » Sun Dec 20, 2009 8:17 am

UR...eBook by Stephen King, Kindle Edition, I read this $3 short story on my computer using the Kindle for PC software. I read the book from both my desktop pc and netbook...pretty neat. No Kindle needed?

I liked it...but read the reviews below before you click.

http://www.amazon.com/UR-ebook/dp/B001RF3U9K

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Post by nisiprius » Sun Dec 20, 2009 9:27 am

hudson wrote:UR...eBook by Stephen King, Kindle Edition, I read this $3 short story on my computer using the Kindle for PC software. I read the book from both my desktop pc and netbook...pretty neat. No Kindle needed?

I liked it...but read the reviews below before you click.

http://www.amazon.com/UR-ebook/dp/B001RF3U9K
I mostly like Stephen King, although I think he's getting lazy and self-indulgent and cranking out potboilers... and I'm still annoyed at him for not finishing The Plant despite my faithfully sending in shareware payments. I was doubly annoyed because on one of the chapters, I paid once, and, due to numerous software glitches--they were fiddling with formats and ZIP files and so forth--personally downloaded one of the chapters several times and only paid once. And later he used the excess of downloads-to-payments as an excuse for cutting it off.

Anyway. Sounds like a good test run of the Kindle software on my iPod Touch.

I've read every one of the Dark Tower books... and was annoyed by every one of them... but kept reading. It points out a fault in his books: he is so not J. R. R. Tolkien, he never convinces me that I'm in a real world with consistent rules, he always makes me aware that he's making it up as he goes along. He always strikes me as being like a little kid making up an interminable story and stopping every few minutes to say, "Oh, I forgot to tell you, he had a magic wand. So..."

You read about Robert Heinlein making charts of his future history, and Sinclair Lewis drawing maps of Winnemac, and C. S. Forester agonizing about the historical sequence of the Hornblower novels and his thrill at discovering a nine-month gap in Hornblower's résumé where he could fit in another novel. I'd bet money that King has never bothered to do anything like that. His books never have satisfying endings. Just about the time you'd like to see some loose ends get tied up, he tries to distract you with a grand finale of fire and exploding heads and flying guts.

Still, I never see sparrows congregating without thinking of "The Dark Half."

In the Dark Tower books, I was especially annoyed by the way familiar-sounding names kept popping up... Maturin, oh, like the surgeon in the Patrick O'Brian novels. Shardik, hmmm, isn't that the bear in the Richard Adams book I never read? And at some point in one of his forwards he basically 'fessed up to stealing those names from the sources I thought they might be stolen from. No, he wasn't implying his fictional world had hyperspace tunnels to other fictional worlds, he was just lazy and stole the names. Well, why not, he stole the series title from Browning and the name of the hero from Johnny Cash.

And despite his disarming remark that he didn't much like the ending of the series himself, I didn't much like the ending of the series. I feel that "commodious vicus of recirculation" plot has already been used.*

Oh, well, at least it didn't end with "And then the Man In Black woke up... and it was all a dream!"

*No, I've never read Finnegan's Wake. I once thought that "When Finnegans Wake" would be a good title for a sci-fi movie, though.
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Post by hudson » Sun Dec 20, 2009 10:41 am

nisiprius:

I know what you're talking about as I've had the same thoughts.

I've read everything he's published, and if he publishes his laundry list, I'll preorder it on Amazon. For most authors, I can wait till it shows up at the used book store.

The Plant! I hope that he finishes! I'll have to send SK an email or letter.

In "UR" their are ties to the Tower and the Rose.

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Post by hudson » Sun Dec 20, 2009 7:56 pm

nispirus:
From SK's website:

http://www.stephenking.com/library/nove ... g_the.html

"Plant: Zenith Rising, The
Formats: eBook/Limited Edition
First Edition Release Date: 2000
Synopsis: Things aren't going well for Zenith House, Publishers. Their sales are failing and the company is about to go under when they are approached by Carlos Detweiller who has a book called True Tales of Demon Infestations he would like them to publish. After having his book rejected, Carlos sends them a "gift"--an ivy plant which is taken in and cared for by Riddley Walker (the company's mail clerk who pretends to be less educated than he is). The company experiences a sudden turnaround of fates but, as always, success doesn't come without a price.
Notes:
This was published in six installments and distributed through Stephen's web site as an e-book on the honor system for payment. The novel has not yet been completed. If the inspiration does return, at some time in the future this project will be completed but the format for its publication may be different."

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Post by nisiprius » Mon Dec 21, 2009 11:07 am

I've just got to put in another plug for Fordlandia, by Greg Grandin. Just finished it. Stunning. It's the story of Ford's failed attempt to grow rubber in Brazil, and a sort of biography of Ford centered around that attempt. Good beyond praise. Wonderfully nuanced, Henry Ford comes off neither as a saint nor a demon. Makes you think a great deal about "Fordism" and "industrial capitalism."

It's somewhat reminiscent of Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible and Paul Theroux's The Mosquito Coast--except that it's not fiction.

There are too many books about great successes. This is a fantastic book about a great failure.
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Post by metalman » Mon Dec 21, 2009 1:37 pm

Stephen King is a good writer executing far below his ability.
Glenn Beck is a moron living up to his fullest potential.

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Post by Tall Grass » Tue Dec 22, 2009 9:54 pm

metalman wrote:Stephen King is a good writer executing far below his ability.
Glenn Beck is a moron living up to his fullest potential.
Examples of unacceptable topics:

- US or world economic, political, tax, health care and climate policies
- conspiracy theories of any type including oil price manipulation
- whines and rants about the crimes, shortcomings or stupidity of politicians, celebrities, CEOs, Fed chairmen, subprime mortgage borrowers, federal "bailout" recipients, etc.


Could we leave personal opinions about people out of this discussion? This is a thread for discussing book choices.

I have never read a book written by Glenn Beck, but I see that he is a best-selling author (as were Dr. Seuss, Adolf Hitler, C.S. Lewis, and Madonna); he evidently has an audience.

If you have read a Glenn Beck book, perhaps you would care to discuss it? 8)
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Post by kyuss » Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:17 am

DeLillo - Underworld

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What book are you reading now?

Post by Macmungo » Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:47 am

Nicholas Thompson's The Hawk and the Dove: Paul Nitze, George Kennan, and the History of the Cold War. A wonderfully readable and very clear account of the convoluted, haphazard and elitist manner "grand strategy" used to be (and probably still is) made in Washington.

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Post by gkaplan » Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:35 pm

P. D. James' Original Sin
Gordon

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Post by hudson » Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:14 pm

Pursuit of Honor by Vince Flynn

I've completed about 100 pages and it's good so far.

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Post by p14175 » Thu Dec 24, 2009 2:35 pm

You Can Trust the Communists (to do exactly as they say!) by Dr. Fred Schwarz. The book was published in 1960.

Dr. Schwarz (1913-2009) was an expert on Marxist-Leninist philosophy. He founded and was the chairman of the not-for-profit Christian Anti-Communism Crusade (CACC).

I found an autographed copy of the book in my library. I am not sure where it came from. It's a short book. I should finish it in a couple of days.

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What Book are you reading Now?

Post by Rob54keep » Thu Dec 24, 2009 3:18 pm

Wealth to Last by Larry Burkett & Ron Blue and The New Savage Number by Terry Savage.....I guess I'm getting closer to the "Rehirement" Stage of Life. :P

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Post by bknol656 » Sun Dec 27, 2009 3:31 pm

Man's Search for Meaning (currently)

To read:
The Alchemy of Finance- George Soros
The Wealth of Nations- Adam Smith

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Post by chaz » Sun Dec 27, 2009 3:42 pm

Just finished"Eyes of Prey" by John Sandford. Next is "Cross Country" by James Patterson.
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Post by nisiprius » Sun Dec 27, 2009 4:11 pm

Forward the Foundation by Isaac Asimov.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

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Post by GeekedOut » Sun Dec 27, 2009 5:02 pm

nisiprius wrote:I've read every one of the Dark Tower books... and was annoyed by every one of them... but kept reading. It points out a fault in his books: he is so not J. R. R. Tolkien, he never convinces me that I'm in a real world with consistent rules, he always makes me aware that he's making it up as he goes along. He always strikes me as being like a little kid making up an interminable story and stopping every few minutes to say, "Oh, I forgot to tell you, he had a magic wand. So..."
I did the same, and thought the same. Even King admits in the 6th book that he's making it up as he goes along, particularly with the thought process about killing Jake in the first because he didn't have anything else for the boy to do. Then bringing him back later.

Oh, and to keep in the theme of the thread, Designing Great Beers: The Ultimate Guide to Brewing Classic Beer Styles & In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex.

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Post by Tall Grass » Sun Dec 27, 2009 7:42 pm

Tall Grass wrote:
Tall Grass wrote:"The Tourist" by Olen Steinhauer was excellent...starting "The Appeal" by John Grisham, haven't read him in quite a while.
"The Appeal" was at best so-so. I think John is just churning them out for his publisher at this point. He has rarely matched his first book "A Time To Kill".

Now reading "Await Your Reply" by Dan Chaon...
Excellent read; will give you nightmares about identity theft. Lots of surprises...
"A wise man should have money in his head, but not in his heart." - Jonathan Swift

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Post by johnoutk » Sun Dec 27, 2009 8:16 pm

Superfreakonomics by Levitt and Dubner
The Demon-Haunted World by Carl Sagan

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Post by SpaceMonkey » Mon Dec 28, 2009 10:00 am

I just started David McCullough's biography of John Adams.

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