Walking Cities, potential for retirees

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quantAndHold
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by quantAndHold » Wed Jun 05, 2019 1:21 pm

IMO wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 11:17 am
FireProof wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 4:11 am
This website has information on the walkability of larger cities, by city and neighborhood:
https://www.walkscore.com/cities-and-neighborhoods/
Can' attest to how good it is, but probably no worse than random anecdotes.
So the example I gave above that essentially would one to have essentially all the necessary things with the right home gets a walkable score of 18 (probably because there is no mass transit).
Possibly because nobody else considers walking across six lanes of traffic to then walk across a Super Walmart parking lot in 100 degree weather to be “walkable”.

Walkscore.com gives separate transit and bike scores. Their walking algorithm takes everything within a 20 minute walk into consideration. I suspect that some of the places you personally can walk to are more than a 20 minute walk. Places with high walk scores have a much higher density of things to walk to than a place where there’s a Super Walmart within the walk zone.

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dodecahedron
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by dodecahedron » Wed Jun 05, 2019 1:35 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 8:53 am
Boston and Cambridge are quite good for walking, but cold.

Victoria
True in the admittedly long winter, but Boston and Cambridge are often very nice in spring/summer/fall. It can be especially nice to walk along the ocean front parts when it is warm.

Grew up in DC and still have family in the general area. I loved walking there as a child/teen and still like to walk when I visit DC but it can be unpleasantly humid and polluted in the summer. At least pollution is less than when I was a child.

Upstate NY has some nice walkable places in spring/summer/fall. Saratoga Springs, for instance. Downtown Troy, Albany, and Schenectady are all improving in being walkable places. I found some nice walkable neighborhoods in Rochester NY a couple years ago.

Cycle
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by Cycle » Wed Jun 05, 2019 3:27 pm

JMacDonald wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:27 am
LiveSimple
Agree if I cannot walk in my shorts, tee, sandals then it is not in my criteria as "walking city
Southern California is probably the best location for that attire, but there are times of the year when that doesn't work. This May and now June have been unusually cool for shorts and tee. Good luck finding the perfect place.
Perhals Cali Colombia. Great transit and perfect weather year round. Really cheap too.

Downtown Honolulu, Hawaii has walk scores of 99. Pretty affordable 2br/2ba condos with high but reasonable association fees.

As someone who bike commutes in Minneapolis winter where it got to -34F this year, I take any criticism of socal's cool weather with a grain of salt.

ohai
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by ohai » Wed Jun 05, 2019 3:41 pm

Some places I've been - Berkeley, CA, Princeton, New York City of course, Palo Alto (sort of). You'll own a car though, in all these places except New York.

Capricorn51
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by Capricorn51 » Wed Jun 05, 2019 4:39 pm

adamthesmythe wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 12:56 pm
It's easy enough to find neighborhoods that meet this requirements in many northeast cities, that were built up with relatively high density before cars were common.

But ice and snow part of the year can make walking unsafe. Where I lived uncleared sidewalks could only have been called treacherous. Winter weather can make it unpleasant to be outdoors for very long.

There is also the issue of whether particular cities offer the recreation choices of interest.

...And. Let's not forget cost, and maybe safety.
and sunbelt cities often have oppressive heat and/or humidity in the summer.

I'll pitch for many neighborhoods in Philadelphia

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IMO
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by IMO » Wed Jun 05, 2019 5:04 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 1:21 pm
IMO wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 11:17 am
FireProof wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 4:11 am
This website has information on the walkability of larger cities, by city and neighborhood:
https://www.walkscore.com/cities-and-neighborhoods/
Can' attest to how good it is, but probably no worse than random anecdotes.
So the example I gave above that essentially would one to have essentially all the necessary things with the right home gets a walkable score of 18 (probably because there is no mass transit).
Possibly because nobody else considers walking across six lanes of traffic to then walk across a Super Walmart parking lot in 100 degree weather to be “walkable”.

Walkscore.com gives separate transit and bike scores. Their walking algorithm takes everything within a 20 minute walk into consideration. I suspect that some of the places you personally can walk to are more than a 20 minute walk. Places with high walk scores have a much higher density of things to walk to than a place where there’s a Super Walmart within the walk zone.
Huh? You cross 6 lanes of an interstate over an overpass with a sidewalk to get to the Super Walmart. Sure it's hot in the summer, but you can go early/late just as people play golf early/late in the summer. One could say the same thing about walking in the winter, it's 72 degrees and other parts of the country have snow/ice covered roads with weather in the 20's-30's. But again, there are 2 other markets (Safeway/Fry's) that one wouldn't have to cross over the overpass.

No the places I noted are not more than 20 minutes walking so long as you buy a home/condo/rent apartment near the shopping areas and the healthcare services. In other words, if a parent with macular degeneration could not legally drive, then they could simply walk to what I noted. Add in the "bikeability" aspect if you want to and it would be even easier to take a quick ride.

I listed the services readily available (and forgot multiple vets), it's odd how someone will make an argument against what is actually a fact.

My parents live in a city that list about 70 (corrected) as the walkable score in SoCal. Sure only if you happen to live in a home right next to the downtown area and even that doesn't compare to services available to the area I noted. No way in hell my parents can appreciate an "70" in the part of the community they and many others live in that same town. Bike? Nope too hard of a ride.

Score is fine if that's what one wants to use, but it's hardly not flawed.

Also, lets not confuse "walkable" to having to walk or take mass transit to get to something. Maybe one feels better waiting 10-20 minutes for a bus/metro and then having to take a ride to get somewhere and then walk farther to get to one's final location. Plenty of big cities in this country where one can deal with that hassle. Just don't step in human feces or on hypodermic needles on your walk.
Last edited by IMO on Wed Jun 05, 2019 5:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

JimMolony
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by JimMolony » Wed Jun 05, 2019 5:10 pm

San Luis Obispo, CA

And you can do it year round without putting on boots or a winter coat:)

IMO
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by IMO » Wed Jun 05, 2019 5:20 pm

JimMolony wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 5:10 pm
San Luis Obispo, CA

And you can do it year round without putting on boots or a winter coat:)
Nope sorry that's just a 51.

btenny
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by btenny » Wed Jun 05, 2019 5:53 pm

I think these walking score evaluaters versus a specific neighborhood are just not very accurate. Especially for suburban modern cities. As I said about Phoenix, it is a car city. BUT certain small locations near major shopping centers are very walkable.

My PV Mall area house gets a walking score of 36. That is just wrong. My house is a 5 minute walk from two bus stops that will connect you to all of Phoenix. Many people ride those buses every day. It is a 10 minutes walk via local small streets and sidewalks to a Traders Joe's and a Whole Foods and 5 restaurants and several other stores all on one corner. The other corner shopping center contains a giant Fry's Signature grocery store and department store. The third corner shopping center contains 10 or so stores and 15 or so restaurants and 3 fitness stores. The fourth corner contains a giant medical office complex with lots of doctors and dentists and medical testing offices.

Then in the other direction from my house is (15 minute walk) a second giant mall area with a Costco, Macy's, Penny's and dozens of other stores and restaurants. The city library is in that mall area. We walk by a nice golf course to get to that mall area. Yes we do cross a major big street and some parking lots to get to these stores.

Plus we have a city park right in my subdivision that is about 4 blocks from my house. It has a kid play ground and a BB court and a soccer field and a volleyball court. It also has a nice walking trial around the perimeter and lot of trees and grass.

So I think this walking score thing is almost worthless. These people need to really understand how suburbs and strip malls work.

Good Luck.

btenny
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by btenny » Wed Jun 05, 2019 7:13 pm

I did some more research on walking distances around my neighborhood in PV mall area of Phoenix. I used Google maps to calculate distances. It uses streets to calculate distance instead of sidewalks and short cutting through alleys and going in back doors and so forth so I figure it is worst case.

Here is what I found. It is 0.8 miles from my door to Whole Foods. It is 1.6 miles from my door to Costco. It is 0.9 miles to Walmart (I forgot this was there). It is 1.2 miles to the Library. It is 0.9 miles to Frys Marketplace. All these stores have other stores and restaurants next door and in the same centers. The bus stop is .5 miles as is LA Fitness and the golf course. The city park is .5 miles. So all this stuff is within a 15 to 35 minute walk from my door. I think that is pretty walkable but the Walkscore is 36. GO figure.

So as I said earlier, The Walkscore evaluator is just wrong and inaccurate. It does not even have half of these stores and restaurants in the data base for this area of Phoenix. And no this is not a new part of town. Plus it does not show the bus stops or show how the Phoenix bus system interconnects and works to get around town. So that analysis is also suspect.

So OP I suggest you find some other method to look at towns for walkability and convenience and going semi car-less.

Good Luck...

quantAndHold
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by quantAndHold » Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:00 pm

I think that the people who think that crossing freeways and walking through big box parking lots is “walkable” may not have ever lived anyplace that’s actually walkable.

How many other people do you see out walking in these places? I suspect you see a few on the greenways getting exercise, but when people need to go shopping, they drive.

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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by AlphaLess » Wed Jun 05, 2019 11:07 pm

New York
Chicago
Santa Monica

Consult the "Walk Score" in any zip code.
It is extremely accurate.
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Kitty Telltales
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by Kitty Telltales » Fri Jun 14, 2019 12:53 pm

JMacDonald wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 1:43 pm
There is a website for that:
https://www.walkscore.com/cities-and-neighborhoods/
When I typed in my address, the score was 86. I agree because there are many places I can walk to if I choose.
What a fun link!! My city scored a 99 and it's so true. I know so many people who don't own cars, and could well afford one. Problem is that when friends need to go to IKEA, they ask me for a lift because I just can't seem to give up my car. I once saw someone loading up a taxi with plants at the garden shop. Not a bad idea really.

What we love about our city is that it is surrounded by walking trails in the surround hills that are just a short distance from most residences. The views up there are lovely.

If the OP would consider moving to Germany, send a message and I'll let you in on our secret paradise. :wink:

7eight9
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by 7eight9 » Fri Jun 14, 2019 1:02 pm

Walk Score: 19
Transit Score: 34
Bike Score: 45

Probably pretty accurate. Nearest grocery (Trader Joe's) is about 1.4 miles away. Smith's is 1.7 miles. But is is already 92 degrees today with an expected high of 97. We all know what they say about mad dogs and Englishmen. Nobody who can afford to do otherwise walks around here. Air conditioned house > air conditioned car > air conditioned store. Reverse and repeat.

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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by caffeperfavore » Fri Jun 14, 2019 1:17 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:00 pm
I think that the people who think that crossing freeways and walking through big box parking lots is “walkable” may not have ever lived anyplace that’s actually walkable.

How many other people do you see out walking in these places? I suspect you see a few on the greenways getting exercise, but when people need to go shopping, they drive.
Bingo. Some of the responses here are... interesting. Things look very different on foot or on a bike than in a car. I hope the OP spends some time in his/her final picks wandering around to get a feel for how walk-able it really is. Clearly, walkability is not a well understood term.

Truly walk-able areas that would be high on my list because I know them fairly well: DC neighborhoods of Cleveland Park, DuPont, Friendship Heights, Georgetown (although pricey). Northern VA suburbs: Ballston, Virginia Square, Clarendon, Court House, and Old Town Alexandria (again, $$$). (Btw, unless something has radically changed in the last few years since I've been there, Tyson's Corner is the antithesis of walkability). Obviously, Boston, NYC, and Chicago, but not the suburbs (especially Chicago burbs). Charleston south of 17-ish, although grocery stores are few and far between. You would need a car for a number of things.

Someone mentioned Raleigh. Really not true unless you're looking at the Cameron Village area or near downtown, even then, you'll want a car. It's getting better though.

A lot of college towns would apply if you want something smaller.

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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by nisiprius » Fri Jun 14, 2019 4:44 pm

I think the "walk scores" I checked out accord quite well with my subjective judgement. We live in a suburb of a big city. We actually decided not to move in retirement because of our realization, that despite a somewhat high cost-of-living, our house was within 1/4 mile of a train station, and within a mile of a bus station, a full-sized supermarket, a 24-hour drugstore, the public library, the police and fire stations, a bargain clothing store, several fast-food chain restaurants, several sub shops and pizzerias, several pretty good local sit-down restaurants, a tire shop, several auto mechanics, barbers, a hardware store, a dollar store. Most streets have sidewalks. You see people walking.

It's not record-breaking in walkability, but it's darned good. We can survive if we reach a point where we can't drive.

And the website says "65, somewhat walkable."

But walkability is much more related to the exact address than to the city as a whole. If I type in a friend's address in the same town, it shows me "34, car-dependent, most errands require a car."

Now, a state highway runs through our town--its your typical four-lane road, 40 mph speed limit, densely packed with businesses on both sides, and with perhaps four usable pedestrian crossings in five miles. Some of the nicer and spiffier houses are on the other side. Lovely residential district, quiet roads, safe for kids... but... Walk score "14, car-dependent, almost all errands require a car."
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by tennisplyr » Fri Jun 14, 2019 5:05 pm

Well these aren't small but how about San Francisco, New York City, and Chicago.
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Starfish
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by Starfish » Fri Jun 14, 2019 5:35 pm

Is is walkable if you have to jump over the homeless and puddles of urine?
The problem with walk-able american cities is that they are not a pleasure to walk, with very few exceptions.
To me walkable means not a place where you COULD walk to a grocery store if you had to, but a place where it's a pleasure to walk. This means things to do and see, people around etc. Not just a purely functional neighborhood with sidewalk next to a loud road.

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Bogle7
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Walkable neighborhods, potential for retirees

Post by Bogle7 » Fri Jun 14, 2019 5:57 pm

Don't think walkable cities, think walkable neighborhoods.
Our western city was designed around the car, for the most part.
But, we live in a [former] street car neighborhood with all of these within 6 blocks of our house:
* 45+ restaurants
* 5 breweries
* 9 bars
* 2 dry cleaners
* 6 clothing stores
* 2 supermarkets
* massage, acupuncture, yoga, gym, liquor stores, etc.

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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by livesoft » Fri Jun 14, 2019 6:11 pm

^I guess if one has a job in one of those places or likes to drink alcohol, then your neighborhood would be very walkable. :)

I can walk to public parks containing all together almost 2 dozen different slides for kids, so my neighborhood is in a different kind of walkable location. :)
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Re: Walkable neighborhods, potential for retirees

Post by simmias » Fri Jun 14, 2019 6:19 pm

Bogle7 wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 5:57 pm
Don't think walkable cities, think walkable neighborhoods.
Yup. My city (Charlotte) has a walk score of 26, which is pretty accurate. However, my neighborhood (Fourth Ward in downtown Charlotte) has a walk score of 82 and is within a half mile pleasant walk of almost anything I'd ever need. In fact, having a car down here is starting to feel like it did for me when I lived in Chicago - more of a hindrance than a help. I won't get another one when this car bites the dust.

WS1
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by WS1 » Fri Jun 14, 2019 6:57 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:00 pm
I think that the people who think that crossing freeways and walking through big box parking lots is “walkable” may not have ever lived anyplace that’s actually walkable.

How many other people do you see out walking in these places? I suspect you see a few on the greenways getting exercise, but when people need to go shopping, they drive.
This 10000x. Real walkability is usually only in a pre ww2 street grid.

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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by 4nwestsaylng » Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:04 pm

btenny wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 2:14 pm
I live in the PV mall area of Phoenix. Everything in the city is close. It is not exactly walkable in the classic case but very convenient. We are maybe 3 blocks from three grocery stores and about 30 restaurants in one direction. Then we are 5 blocks in the other direction from a big clothing mall and a Costco and the public library and a bunch more food places. So stuff is close. But mostly we have to use a car to get to these places. All the approaches are from parking lots and busy streets. Walking is possible and some people do this but you are on a sidewalk right next to a busy street. So not many people walk.

Plus this area of town has freeway access that leads to city center and all the other parts of town. This is about a mile away. So again it is just convenient.

Good Luck.
I lived in the Chandler/Mesa area of Phoenix. City blocks are quite long, and very few people walk to nearby stores for the above reason but also because for many months of the year it is very hot, there is no shade on the sidewalks, and there is risk of dehydration. Difficult to walk when it is 110! You have to walk at 6 am when it is only 80. Dehydration often gives little warning.

Similarly, Tucson is not really walkable. Santa Fe, Prescott AZ, Sedona AZ, Payson AZ, but again more if you live close to the center of town.

quantAndHold
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Re: Walkable neighborhods, potential for retirees

Post by quantAndHold » Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:14 pm

Bogle7 wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 5:57 pm
Don't think walkable cities, think walkable neighborhoods.
Our western city was designed around the car, for the most part.
But, we live in a [former] street car neighborhood with all of these within 6 blocks of our house:
* 45+ restaurants
* 5 breweries
* 9 bars
* 2 dry cleaners
* 6 clothing stores
* 2 supermarkets
* massage, acupuncture, yoga, gym, liquor stores, etc.
I think we might live in the same zip code. Overall city (San Diego) walk score is 51. Walk score for my zip code is 84. Walk score for my block is 94. The next block over is a 99.

WS1
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by WS1 » Sat Jun 15, 2019 8:59 am

You might get some ideas here

The AARP has been making a push into what I would call quality urban planning
https://www.aarp.org/livable-communities/

Some other launch points
American Planning Association Great Places winners
https://planning.org/greatplaces/
https://www.cnu.org/

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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by JackoC » Sat Jun 15, 2019 9:55 am

quantAndHold wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:00 pm
I think that the people who think that crossing freeways and walking through big box parking lots is “walkable” may not have ever lived anyplace that’s actually walkable.

How many other people do you see out walking in these places? I suspect you see a few on the greenways getting exercise, but when people need to go shopping, they drive.
This is what strikes me often if applying our habit of walking at home (with supposed 95 score, some neighborhoods across the river in Manhattan have 100 scores though I'm not sure what that difference is) when we are elsewhere. We are walking along busy roads and across parking lots to get to stores or restaurants near the motel...but nobody else is. :D Or even walking around in/near small town centers. The fact that the people there *don't* walk, IME, is one of many differences between those places and here.

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dodecahedron
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by dodecahedron » Sat Jun 15, 2019 10:25 am

livesoft wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 6:11 pm
^I guess if one has a job in one of those places or likes to drink alcohol, then your neighborhood would be very walkable. :)

I can walk to public parks containing all together almost 2 dozen different slides for kids, so my neighborhood is in a different kind of walkable location. :)
My home has a walk score of 5, but

-1) I can easily walk to several playgrounds and parks with nature trails, a bird sanctuary, a Nature Conservancy owned nature preserve, and a nearby farm where cows peacefully graze and they have a small farmstand selling a few veggies. Also, a lovely specialized private research library that is open to the public. All within 1/2 mile or so on bucolic low traffic suburban streets.

-2) The only commercial enterprise within a mile of me (not counting the farmstand) is a gas station convenience store, BUT there is a bus stop a block from my home with regular service (every 30 minutes) and a five minute ride gets me to a small area with a bunch of nice cafes, restaurants, and a handy urgent care, a 10 minute ride gets me to a supermarket, pharmacies, and my workplace, a 15 minute ride gets me to downtown nearby city with many cultural attractions (including traveling Broadway productions in a beautiful old restored theater, concerts in many indoor and outdoor venues, festivals celebrating many ethnicities, etc.), Amtrak station and Greyhound bus station. (Bus fare is 65 cents for seniors and $1.30 for younger adults. There are some very good deals for teens in the summer.)

-3) My young adult daughter who lives with me gets along very well without a car (uses the bus to get to work and recreation, occasionally supplemented by bikeshare in nice weather). She passes by a grocery store on her way home from work daily and often picks up stuff we need. (Since we are a small household, we don´t need huge amounts of groceries.) She has a license but does not use it. I have a standing offer to give her my second car (low mileage 2003 Honda Accord that runs great) and she would just have to pay for her own insurance as well as gas, repairs, etc., which she appreciates as an option (e.g., if she got a different job) but she feels no need to exercise the option at this time, so she just does not drive. (She is still listed on my policy but does not drive. If and when she decides to take me up on the offer of the car, she will take refresher driving lessons.) Since she was young, she has been a committed environmentalist and practices what she preaches when she can. Her example inspires me (though I do drive some!)

-4) We moved to this home almost 30 years ago and I managed to live here for the first two years with two young children without my driving AT ALL. (Admittedly, my husband--who enjoyed shopping--did all the grocery shopping, but I was the one to get the kids to all their various activities, story hour, gymnastics, medical and dental appointments, etc.) The second child had some developmental delays and was slow to walk so I was carrying her around in a backpack for quite some time. As she got bigger and heavier to carryaround, I did eventually learn to drive.

-5) Cab service has long been terrible around here, but Uber & LYFT finally arrived in 2017 and have been a game-changer. Also many large supermarkets provide grocery delivery services at a modest charge.

I could easily go car free. Main thing that stops me is that some of my destinations are places where I am fine waiting for the bus or an Uber/LYFT in daylight but not so comfortable being alone there after dark. If more folks would join me in taking the bus, I would be just fine. A 65-year-old woman waiting by herself at a deserted bus stop in the dark is just too easy a target.

Walk score of 5 just does not capture our reality of living here. That said, most of my neighbors drive EVERYWHERE. In fact, most is really virtually all. My daughter and I are viewed as eccentric folks for walking, biking, and using the bus. Other folks seem to view walking as something you do with your dog or for exercise, not for going to destinations.

Edited to add: I could move a few miles away and live in neighborhoods with walks scores in the 90s. Unfortunately, those are the same neighborhoods where I am afraid to wait alone for a bus late at night. It takes a critical mass of other pedestrians on the street to feel safe.

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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by JPM » Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:01 pm

Downtown Sarasota fits most of your criteria.

Library check
Whole Foods Check
Beach check
Marina check
Shorts and sandals check, maybe not in January
Churches Check
Arts check
Theater check
Restaurants check
Live music check

Any and all of the above are an easy walk from any of the others. Local college is a bit more of a hike but doable. Good medical.

Pricey for nice housing but not California outrageous. Don't know if there is a car sharing service there. Hot and humid summers.

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siamond
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by siamond » Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:16 pm

I am spending a few days in San Francisco, I found a nice Airbnb in the Noe Valley neighborhood, close to Mission District. This perfectly fits the OP's description. That is, if you don't mind walking up and down the hill!

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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by UpperNwGuy » Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:49 pm

fru-gal wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:38 pm
DC has a high crime rate, according to a friend who is there frequently for business.
Your friend is mistaken. I live in DC.

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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by LiveSimple » Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:52 pm

siamond wrote:
Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:16 pm
I am spending a few days in San Francisco, I found a nice Airbnb in the Noe Valley neighborhood, close to Mission District. This perfectly fits the OP's description. That is, if you don't mind walking up and down the hill!
Beautiful, will check

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LiveSimple
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by LiveSimple » Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:52 pm

JPM wrote:
Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:01 pm
Downtown Sarasota fits most of your criteria.

Library check
Whole Foods Check
Beach check
Marina check
Shorts and sandals check, maybe not in January
Churches Check
Arts check
Theater check
Restaurants check
Live music check

Any and all of the above are an easy walk from any of the others. Local college is a bit more of a hike but doable. Good medical.

Pricey for nice housing but not California outrageous. Don't know if there is a car sharing service there. Hot and humid summers.
Will check

finite_difference
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by finite_difference » Sat Jun 15, 2019 1:03 pm

Beautiful suburbs of NYC (NY, NJ, CT).

NYC. DC. Boston.

Florence, Italy.

Most European cities.
The most precious gift we can offer anyone is our attention. - Thich Nhat Hanh

finite_difference
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by finite_difference » Sat Jun 15, 2019 1:05 pm

UpperNwGuy wrote:
Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:49 pm
fru-gal wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:38 pm
DC has a high crime rate, according to a friend who is there frequently for business.
Your friend is mistaken. I live in DC.
Probably depends on where. Definitely the parts of DC around the White House are really nice as of at least 2010. Although I heard back in the day some of those areas were not so nice.
The most precious gift we can offer anyone is our attention. - Thich Nhat Hanh

testing321
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Location: kansas city

Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by testing321 » Sat Jun 15, 2019 1:13 pm

I got to give my vote to Pacific Grove, CA. Its one of the most pleasant cities to walk around in. The climate is good for walking year round. The downside is high home prices.There is a downtown area with a small pricey grocery store and a shopping area about a mile away with Trader Joe's, Safeway and other stores.

Carefreeap
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Location: SF Bay Area

Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by Carefreeap » Sat Jun 15, 2019 5:10 pm

btenny wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 7:13 pm
I did some more research on walking distances around my neighborhood in PV mall area of Phoenix. I used Google maps to calculate distances. It uses streets to calculate distance instead of sidewalks and short cutting through alleys and going in back doors and so forth so I figure it is worst case.

Here is what I found. It is 0.8 miles from my door to Whole Foods. It is 1.6 miles from my door to Costco. It is 0.9 miles to Walmart (I forgot this was there). It is 1.2 miles to the Library. It is 0.9 miles to Frys Marketplace. All these stores have other stores and restaurants next door and in the same centers. The bus stop is .5 miles as is LA Fitness and the golf course. The city park is .5 miles. So all this stuff is within a 15 to 35 minute walk from my door. I think that is pretty walkable but the Walkscore is 36. GO figure.

So as I said earlier, The Walkscore evaluator is just wrong and inaccurate. It does not even have half of these stores and restaurants in the data base for this area of Phoenix. And no this is not a new part of town. Plus it does not show the bus stops or show how the Phoenix bus system interconnects and works to get around town. So that analysis is also suspect.

So OP I suggest you find some other method to look at towns for walkability and convenience and going semi car-less.

Good Luck...
My house in the Carefree plat is showing a walk score of 22. The house is a half mile to Basha's, hardware store, downtown Carefree, restaurants and shops. We bought that location back in 2003 BECAUSE it was walkable. However I noticed that the ranking is based on proximity to Downtown Scottsdale! During the six years we lived there the only times I went to Downtown Scottsdale was for a class and to show it to two visitors. :oops:

We walked even during the summer. Temps aren't too bad before 9am and after six when we would walk to restaurants. We had relocated from Coastal San Mateo County where summer temps are in the 60s. It's amazing how quickly the body adapts.

My suggestion to the OP is to get some boots on the ground and check stuff out yourself.

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beyou
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Location: Northeastern US

Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by beyou » Sat Jun 15, 2019 5:18 pm

I cant imangine I would just look literally anywhere. Would at least be a region close to someone (kids etc) wherr Inwould narrow it down, and then look at options within a certain distance.

02nz
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by 02nz » Sat Jun 15, 2019 5:38 pm

fru-gal wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:38 pm
DC has a high crime rate, according to a friend who is there frequently for business.
DC is certainly not free of crime, but most areas are reasonably safe from violent crime. Like anywhere else, you need to exercise common sense, and nowhere in this country is one entirely safe from gun violence. In addition to being highly walkable and having good public transport, DC also has the advantage of a ton of free cultural events. But the summers are muggy and it does have winter weather.

teniralc
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by teniralc » Sat Jun 15, 2019 5:44 pm

LiveSimple wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 12:40 pm
Please share your knowledge of any city, that is a walk able city. ( No need to take the car, for coffee, library, small grocery, etc ) and also retiree friendly.

Just looking for ideas to research and understand better
Not sure if you like the south, but Knoxville has a very nice small downtown area. There are some very nice condos where there is no need to drive to local restaurants, theater, symphony-much is walkable. It might be worth a weekend trip there to visit. https://www.downtownknoxville.org

MathIsMyWayr
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Location: CA

Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by MathIsMyWayr » Sat Jun 15, 2019 8:20 pm

LiveSimple wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 12:40 pm
Please share your knowledge of any city, that is a walk able city. ( No need to take the car, for coffee, library, small grocery, etc ) and also retiree friendly.
Unfortunately none of U.S. cities/towns are truly for walking. Due to lack of adequate public transportation, you have to rely on autos occasionally. Many Asian cities are ideal for walking and people do walk all the time. Public transportation is also frequent and its coverage is usually extensive. Taxis are also very affordable. Even in Boston, you may need an auto to and from T-stops or bus stops. Asian cities may not be an option for the OP.

Northern Flicker
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by Northern Flicker » Sat Jun 15, 2019 10:04 pm

While it is commonly known that one does not need to own a car to have a diverse life in these US cities: NYC, San Francisco, Boston, DC, Seattle, or Chicago, this is also true in places that are less well known for that:
Boulder, CO
Burlington, VT
Bloomington, IN
Minneapolis
Portland, OR
Santa Fe, NM
Las Vegas, NM
Davis, CA
Chico, CA
Berkeley/Oakland
Santa Cruz
Madison, WI
No doubt there are others.

MDfan
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by MDfan » Sun Jun 16, 2019 6:24 am

Slapshot wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 1:21 pm
We just spent 3 days in Greenville, SC. Some nice downtown condos with everything within walking distance, including bars and restaurants, a Fenway Park replica minor league baseball stadium, and a 15,000 seat arena that houses a minor league hockey team and numerous big time concerts.
Probably my (smaller) favorite city on the East Coast.

senex
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Re: Walking Cities, potential for retirees

Post by senex » Mon Jun 17, 2019 4:01 pm

nisiprius wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 4:44 pm
But walkability is much more related to the exact address than to the city as a whole. If I type in a friend's address in the same town, it shows me "34, car-dependent, most errands require a car."
+1

I've known people in auto-centric locales like suburban Detroit and Southern California who lived years without a car, because their particular neighborhood had shopping & medical within a few blocks.

Conversely, I've known people in Manhattan who rarely walked because the sidewalks were acoustic nightmares that reeked of urine, steaming garbage, and diesel fumes.

Your mileage may vary. Try a short-term rental and see how suitable it is to your priorities.

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