James Lee Burke - Nelson Demille

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LadyIJ
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Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:00 pm

James Lee Burke - Nelson Demille

Post by LadyIJ » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:59 pm

If someone we want to send a gift to likes James Lee Burke, would he like Nelson DeMille as well?

MP173
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Re: James Lee Burke - Nelson Demille

Post by MP173 » Mon Jan 14, 2019 6:04 pm

More than likely.

James Lee Burke is probably the finest pure writer we have today in the mystery genre. I also like Michael Connelly but Burke is so special.

He has the ability to craft words together which is difficult to describe. It goes beyond telling a good story, which he does.

Demille is pretty good. So is Dennis LeHane - two of his books have been very good movies - "Mystic River" and "Gone Baby Gone".

Burke describes life in the rural Louisiana quite well, to the point you can feel the culture. LeHane is very similarly talented in his description of Boston.

Ed

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LadyIJ
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Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:00 pm

Re: James Lee Burke - Nelson Demille

Post by LadyIJ » Mon Jan 14, 2019 6:08 pm

MP173 wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 6:04 pm
More than likely.

James Lee Burke is probably the finest pure writer we have today in the mystery genre. I also like Michael Connelly but Burke is so special.

He has the ability to craft words together which is difficult to describe. It goes beyond telling a good story, which he does.

Demille is pretty good. So is Dennis LeHane - two of his books have been very good movies - "Mystic River" and "Gone Baby Gone".

Burke describes life in the rural Louisiana quite well, to the point you can feel the culture. LeHane is very similarly talented in his description of Boston.

Ed
thanks - I realize it may be difficult to find someone who has read both Burke and DeMille. For instance, my husband loves DeMille, other people like Burke, LeHane - sounds like Burke and DeMille may indeed appeal to different audiences.

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BarbaricYawp
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Re: James Lee Burke - Nelson Demille

Post by BarbaricYawp » Mon Jan 14, 2019 6:13 pm

MP173 wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 6:04 pm
More than likely.

James Lee Burke is probably the finest pure writer we have today in the mystery genre. I also like Michael Connelly but Burke is so special.

He has the ability to craft words together which is difficult to describe. It goes beyond telling a good story, which he does.


Ed
I describe it as the intersection of poetry and prose... he is indeed amazing. I enjoy Demille as well, FWIW, but Burke stands on his own.
"The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity." --Dorothy Parker

stlrick
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Re: James Lee Burke - Nelson Demille

Post by stlrick » Tue Jan 15, 2019 8:42 am

A key feature of James Lee Burke is that he writes a series - Detective Robicheaux. If you friend likes series, he may not like free-standing novels. For authors who do both, I read only the series.

I like Burke, and also like Michael Connelly, John Lescroart, John Sanford, Robert Parker, Robert Crais, Harlan Coben, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

duplin county
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Re: James Lee Burke - Nelson Demille

Post by duplin county » Tue Jan 15, 2019 8:58 am

I like Craig Johnson's Longmire novels. James Lee Burke is still my favorite.

Valuethinker
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Re: James Lee Burke - Nelson Demille

Post by Valuethinker » Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:15 am

stlrick wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 8:42 am
A key feature of James Lee Burke is that he writes a series - Detective Robicheaux. If you friend likes series, he may not like free-standing novels. For authors who do both, I read only the series.

I like Burke, and also like Michael Connelly, John Lescroart, John Sanford, Robert Parker, Robert Crais, Harlan Coben, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
George V Higgins - the early ones - for his mastery of Boston lowlife and especially the language (he was a criminal attorney in Boston) - Friends of Eddie Coyle, Rat on Fire in particularly

Raymond Chandler - the language is unsurpassed and the dimly-seen character of the narrator, Philip Marlowe

(I still have not managed to crack Dashiell Hammett)

Chester Himes - for his gritty and brutal realism of early 1960s Harlem

Ross Thomas (for his wry look at things - Thomas may or may not have been a former CIA agent)

Alan Furst (for his grasp of 1930s-40s history; the novels vary in quality)

Eric Ambler - for taking the spy thriller out of the hands of the James Bond types (before there was an Ian Fleming and James Bond) and putting it into the hands of the hapless individual caught up in the gears of nations. Journey into Fear is now almost a cliche, but that's because Ambler had already written it. Mask of Demetrios/ Coffin for Demetrios

There was an old BBC tv series "The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes" - stories written by other Victorian writers, and some memorably characters - Max Carados, the blind detective, for example.

William Hope Hodgson for his Carnaki the Ghostfinder stories, about a detective of the supernatural

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