Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
DaftInvestor
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by DaftInvestor » Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:23 pm

Shallowpockets wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:38 am
This whole debate is crazy. Without the discipline none of it matters.
The OP says he has no discipline. With all the disparate views posted here he may only see it as a diversion to actually starting to work on his weight loss.

OPs original post has to do with discipline and the replies have not focused on that, but have diverted into a battle between diet and exercise. Discipline comes out of motivation, and perhaps people should post how a person can be motivated.
Why wouldn't someone try both diet and exercise at the same time. It is not rocket science.
This thread should be locked.
We have a winner. There is a common theme with all the various diets, methods, etc. - the folks that are successful have followed them with discipline. That's why every methodology/latest-fad-diet has numerous people that claimed that (insert favorite fad-diet) worked great for them - they could have followed almost ANY of the methods - the fact was - they chose to be disciplined enough to follow a method. Some methods might be less healthy for you than others - but any of them can work with discipline. (Pick a method that Counts Carbs or Calories or Fats - or some combo - - or - I see someone is now talking about Carbon Atoms! - but you must be disciplined).

OP: read through all the answers. Pick whatever method you want - but whatever it is - it won't success without discipline.

stoptothink
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by stoptothink » Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:24 pm

livesoft wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:13 pm
I like this 20 min explanation from a physicist about calories and the carbon atoms in the things we eat:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuIlsN32WaE
In a nutshell, the only way to get rid of carbon atoms found in our weight is to breath it out as carbon dioxide. Of course, if we don't let those carbon atoms get added to our weight in the first place, then that helps.

Not in the video, but the microbes in your gut can get some of your food calories, reproduce (make more microbes) and you can poop them out.
I've published an article on this very topic. It is fascinating, but adipose doesn't magically disappear, we actually exhale it.

Cycle
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Cycle » Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:45 pm

Pizza_and_Beer wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:18 pm
Cycle wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:58 pm
Exercise? just sell you car and bike to work
Don't want to exercise today? Well you'll be fired for not showing up, so looks like it's another obligatory exercise day.
Exactly what I did.

Obligatory 60 minutes of daily exercise 5 days a week just with the simple act of going to work and then going home.
I've seen even people with long commutes do this... Car Bike combo.

You just park 5-7 miles from work and bike the rest of the way.

There are nice bike racks from saris or u can get a brompton folding bike and throw it in the trunk.

I actually do a bike / bus combo, ie I bike to an Express bus, then ride that for 15 minutes to my megacorp in the suburbs. I just practice Spanish on Duolingo on the bus and sip coffee.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

Cycle
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Location: Minneapolis

Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Cycle » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:08 pm

DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:23 pm
Shallowpockets wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:38 am
This whole debate is crazy. Without the discipline none of it matters.
The OP says he has no discipline. With all the disparate views posted here he may only see it as a diversion to actually starting to work on his weight loss.

OPs original post has to do with discipline and the replies have not focused on that, but have diverted into a battle between diet and exercise. Discipline comes out of motivation, and perhaps people should post how a person can be motivated.
Why wouldn't someone try both diet and exercise at the same time. It is not rocket science.
This thread should be locked.
We have a winner. There is a common theme with all the various diets, methods, etc. - the folks that are successful have followed them with discipline. That's why every methodology/latest-fad-diet has numerous people that claimed that (insert favorite fad-diet) worked great for them - they could have followed almost ANY of the methods - the fact was - they chose to be disciplined enough to follow a method. Some methods might be less healthy for you than others - but any of them can work with discipline. (Pick a method that Counts Carbs or Calories or Fats - or some combo - - or - I see someone is now talking about Carbon Atoms! - but you must be disciplined).

OP: read through all the answers. Pick whatever method you want - but whatever it is - it won't success without discipline.
I get 45 minutes of biking exercise per day and that doesn't take any discipline since I don't have a car.

I could take the bus in theory, but that takes forever and I'm far too lazy to do that, so I just bike.

I could buy a car, but I'm too much of a tree hugger and cheapskate, no discipline there.

I'd bet 100 dollars if op sold his car and started biking 10 miles a day (every day), op would be looking like David hasselhoff in 3 months. Plenty of stories on r/bikecommuting to corroborate my claim. Also theres the mens stats on Americans obesity (32.2) vs the Dutch(14.2).

Show me an obese daily bike commuter and I'll show u a hidden motor.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

DaftInvestor
Posts: 4735
Joined: Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:11 am

Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by DaftInvestor » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:10 pm

Cycle wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:08 pm
DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:23 pm
Shallowpockets wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:38 am
This whole debate is crazy. Without the discipline none of it matters.
The OP says he has no discipline. With all the disparate views posted here he may only see it as a diversion to actually starting to work on his weight loss.

OPs original post has to do with discipline and the replies have not focused on that, but have diverted into a battle between diet and exercise. Discipline comes out of motivation, and perhaps people should post how a person can be motivated.
Why wouldn't someone try both diet and exercise at the same time. It is not rocket science.
This thread should be locked.
We have a winner. There is a common theme with all the various diets, methods, etc. - the folks that are successful have followed them with discipline. That's why every methodology/latest-fad-diet has numerous people that claimed that (insert favorite fad-diet) worked great for them - they could have followed almost ANY of the methods - the fact was - they chose to be disciplined enough to follow a method. Some methods might be less healthy for you than others - but any of them can work with discipline. (Pick a method that Counts Carbs or Calories or Fats - or some combo - - or - I see someone is now talking about Carbon Atoms! - but you must be disciplined).

OP: read through all the answers. Pick whatever method you want - but whatever it is - it won't success without discipline.
I get 45 minutes of biking exercise per day and that doesn't take any discipline since I don't have a car.

I could take the bus in theory, but that takes forever and I'm far too lazy to do that, so I just bike.

I could buy a car, but I'm too much of a tree hugger and cheapskate, no discipline there.

I'd bet 100 dollars if op sold his car and started biking 10 miles a day (every day), op would be looking like David hasselhoff in 3 months. Plenty of stories on r/bikecommuting to corroborate my claim. Also theres the mens stats on Americans obesity (32.2) vs the Dutch(14.2).

Show me an obese daily bike commuter and I'll show u a hidden motor.
What if he works from home? My commute to my home office is only about 30 steps.

Cycle
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Location: Minneapolis

Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Cycle » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:20 pm

DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:10 pm
What if he works from home? My commute to my home office is only about 30 steps.
Then my solid gold advice doesn't apply unless op is willing to get a new job. Personally I wouldnt want to work from home since I enjoy bike commuting so much, it's the best part of my day.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

Hug401k
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Hug401k » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:23 pm

Asking Bogleheads about diet is almost as bad as asking for fashion advice. Maybe next we could visit a personal debt forum and tell them not to spend money. Or we could visit the AA site and tell them they just shouldn't have a drink. :beer

randomguy
Posts: 8228
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2014 9:00 am

Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by randomguy » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:27 pm

fortfun wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:05 pm
seligsoj wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 5:00 pm
Any bogleheads any diet wisdom? I've always been disciplined with saving money but can't seem to apply the same discipline to my diet. I have tried weight watchers, Jenny Craig, beach body, keto, my fitness pal...I lack discipline and get hungry. Just this week I decided to start eating the same thing for breakfast and lunch (all healthy, clean foods) and prepping these meals ahead of time. I love exercising but can't always squeeze it in at night (working full time and have 2 young kids). I'm not terribly overweight but would look and feel better if I lost 15 pounds
Not sure if anyone has mention this but muscle is very important. Just as you investments make money while you sleep, muscle will burn calories while you sleep. If sticking to a low calorie diet is hard for you, consider spending some time lifting weights, etc. and that will help burn the extra calories that you consume. Staying away from sugar and crappy carbs will probably have the biggest payoff, as far as diet is concerned.
1 lb of muscle burns about 6 calories/day. You will see a bunch of old stuff talking about 50 calories/lb and the like but that is just urban legend unfortunately. With the 30-40lbs of muscle max that most people can gain after 5 or so years of really working out hard with very good diets, you aren't getting much of a benefit in terms of staying lean. Now actually building that muscle would require a lot of gym time that would burn calories and there is plenty of benefits to being somewhat strong in normal life.

DaftInvestor
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Joined: Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:11 am

Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by DaftInvestor » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:28 pm

Cycle wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:20 pm
DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:10 pm
What if he works from home? My commute to my home office is only about 30 steps.
Then my advice doesn't apply unless op is willing to get a new job.
Its great that you don't need discipline because you bike to work every day. I know some folks that do it in the NorthEast (even on days when the weather is down into the teams; the snow/ice being the only killing factor) - perhaps you are one of them :). I think for many folks (40 mile drive all highway; work-from-home; etc.) it just isn't practical. Discipline to eat well and get daily exercise (I hit the gym) are key for many of us.

(Another factor on bicycling is safety depending upon where you live. Personally - when I was younger - I got run-off-the-road a couple of times in Boston (badly injured once) and that was enough for me to decide it wasn't worth the risk to bicycle into the city on city streets. There are still deaths in Boston/Cambridge every year (Couple of hundred incidents a year; a couple of deaths).

livesoft
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by livesoft » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:35 pm

DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:10 pm
What if he works from home? My commute to my home office is only about 30 steps.
Since you don't commute, you could ride a bike 20 miles before starting work. I used to do that when I had a job close to my home.
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Cycle
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Cycle » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:36 pm

DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:28 pm
Cycle wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:20 pm
DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:10 pm
What if he works from home? My commute to my home office is only about 30 steps.
Then my advice doesn't apply unless op is willing to get a new job.
Its great that you don't need discipline because you bike to work every day. I know some folks that do it in the NorthEast (even on days when the weather is down into the teams; the snow/ice being the only killing factor) - perhaps you are one of them :). I think for many folks (40 mile drive all highway; work-from-home; etc.) it just isn't practical. Discipline to eat well and get daily exercise (I hit the gym) are key for many of us.

(Another factor on bicycling is safety depending upon where you live. Personally - when I was younger - I got run-off-the-road a couple of times in Boston (badly injured once) and that was enough for me to decide it wasn't worth the risk to bicycle into the city on city streets. There are still deaths in Boston/Cambridge every year (Couple of hundred incidents a year; a couple of deaths).
Infrastructure is a legitimate excuse... In some cases. Cambridge has great infrastructure, but could use improvement. Boston has terrible bikeability.

Minneapolis is far colder than anywhere in the NE, but we have better infrastructure here. Appropriate layering makes weather a non-issue. It's weather, people have been dealing with it since we've been people.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

DaftInvestor
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by DaftInvestor » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:38 pm

livesoft wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:35 pm
DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:10 pm
What if he works from home? My commute to my home office is only about 30 steps.
Since you don't commute, you could ride a bike 20 miles before starting work. I used to do that when I had a job close to my home.
That takes discipline though.

livesoft
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by livesoft » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:40 pm

DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:38 pm
That takes discipline though.
Yep.

Here is one of the annual January pieces on learning to love to exercise (it's a quick read or a podcast listen):
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-sho ... e-exercise
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stoptothink
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by stoptothink » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:41 pm

randomguy wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:27 pm
fortfun wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:05 pm
seligsoj wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 5:00 pm
Any bogleheads any diet wisdom? I've always been disciplined with saving money but can't seem to apply the same discipline to my diet. I have tried weight watchers, Jenny Craig, beach body, keto, my fitness pal...I lack discipline and get hungry. Just this week I decided to start eating the same thing for breakfast and lunch (all healthy, clean foods) and prepping these meals ahead of time. I love exercising but can't always squeeze it in at night (working full time and have 2 young kids). I'm not terribly overweight but would look and feel better if I lost 15 pounds
Not sure if anyone has mention this but muscle is very important. Just as you investments make money while you sleep, muscle will burn calories while you sleep. If sticking to a low calorie diet is hard for you, consider spending some time lifting weights, etc. and that will help burn the extra calories that you consume. Staying away from sugar and crappy carbs will probably have the biggest payoff, as far as diet is concerned.
1 lb of muscle burns about 6 calories/day. You will see a bunch of old stuff talking about 50 calories/lb and the like but that is just urban legend unfortunately. With the 30-40lbs of muscle max that most people can gain after 5 or so years of really working out hard with very good diets, you aren't getting much of a benefit in terms of staying lean. Now actually building that muscle would require a lot of gym time that would burn calories and there is plenty of benefits to being somewhat strong in normal life.
Everybody should be doing some resistance training simply to maintain functional movement patterns and fight off sarcopenia, but this is the unfortunate truth. The real metabolic advantage of strength training comes from EPOC, not necessarily the metabolic activity of that lean tissue (which takes years and years to develop).

Cycle
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Location: Minneapolis

Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Cycle » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:43 pm

livesoft wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:35 pm
DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:10 pm
What if he works from home? My commute to my home office is only about 30 steps.
Since you don't commute, you could ride a bike 20 miles before starting work. I used to do that when I had a job close to my home.
Op has no discipline, so that's a non starter for them and frankly 99.9% of the population
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

randomguy
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Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2014 9:00 am

Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by randomguy » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:46 pm

DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:23 pm
Shallowpockets wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:38 am
This whole debate is crazy. Without the discipline none of it matters.
The OP says he has no discipline. With all the disparate views posted here he may only see it as a diversion to actually starting to work on his weight loss.

OPs original post has to do with discipline and the replies have not focused on that, but have diverted into a battle between diet and exercise. Discipline comes out of motivation, and perhaps people should post how a person can be motivated.
Why wouldn't someone try both diet and exercise at the same time. It is not rocket science.
This thread should be locked.
We have a winner. There is a common theme with all the various diets, methods, etc. - the folks that are successful have followed them with discipline. That's why every methodology/latest-fad-diet has numerous people that claimed that (insert favorite fad-diet) worked great for them - they could have followed almost ANY of the methods - the fact was - they chose to be disciplined enough to follow a method. Some methods might be less healthy for you than others - but any of them can work with discipline. (Pick a method that Counts Carbs or Calories or Fats - or some combo - - or - I see someone is now talking about Carbon Atoms! - but you must be disciplined).

OP: read through all the answers. Pick whatever method you want - but whatever it is - it won't success without discipline.
Yes but the level of discipline varies between plans. I could give you an investment plan that required you to trade every 60 mins and you would find it almost impossible to execute no matter what your level of discipline. If I give you a plan that requires you to rebalance once per year, you would find it much easier to follow. Diets are the same. You need to find a life style where the discipline required is doable for you. Off loading thinking to routine (i.e. roll out of bed at 6 and get the exercise done by 7:30, make the same lunch every day, avoiding buying stuff you don't want to be eating), is a common way of doing that. Figuring out if you do better on high fat, low fat, fasting, lots of small meals,... is something you need to play with. The fact that science suggests that all of them work when followed doesn't mean that one or the other approaches isn't better for you.

H-Town
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by H-Town » Mon Jan 14, 2019 5:00 pm

DaftInvestor wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:23 pm
OP: read through all the answers. Pick whatever method you want - but whatever it is - it won't success without discipline.
I have a different perspective. It's a matter of habit. OP has established good habits with his or her finances. OP can do the same thing with a healthy lifestyle.

Below is an excerpt from the book I mentioned earlier.
She was the scientists’ favorite participant.

Lisa Allen, according to her file, was thirty-four years old, had started smoking and drinking when she was sixteen, and had struggled with obesity for most of her life. At one point, in her mid-twenties, collection agencies were hounding her to recover $10,000 in debts. An old résumé listed her longest job as lasting less than a year.

The woman in front of the researchers today, however, was lean and vibrant, with the toned legs of a runner. She looked a decade younger than the photos in her chart and like she could out-exercise anyone in the room. According to the most recent report in her file, Lisa had no outstanding debts, didn’t drink, and was in her thirty-ninth month at a graphic design firm.

“How long since your last cigarette?” one of the physicians asked, starting down the list of questions Lisa answered every time she came to this laboratory outside Bethesda, Maryland.
“Almost four years,” she said, “and I’ve lost sixty pounds and run a marathon since then.” She’d also started a master’s degree and bought a home. It had been an eventful stretch.

The scientists in the room included neurologists, psychologists, geneticists, and a sociologist. For the past three years, with funding from the National Institutes of Health, they had poked and prodded Lisa and more than two dozen other former smokers, chronic overeaters, problem drinkers, obsessive shoppers, and people with other destructive habits. All of the participants had one thing in common: They had remade their lives in relatively short periods of time. The researchers wanted to understand how. So they measured subjects’ vital signs, installed video cameras inside their homes to watch their daily routines, sequenced portions of their DNA, and, with technologies that allowed them to peer inside people’s skulls in real time, watched as blood and electrical impulses flowed through their brains while they were exposed to temptations such as cigarette smoke and lavish meals.prl.1 The researchers’ goal was to figure out how habits work on a neurological level—and what it took to make them change.

“I know you’ve told this story a dozen times,” the doctor said to Lisa, “but some of my colleagues have only heard it secondhand. Would you mind describing again how you gave up cigarettes?”
“Sure,” Lisa said. “It started in Cairo.” The vacation had been something of a rash decision, she explained. A few months earlier, her husband had come home from work and announced that he was leaving her because he was in love with another woman. It took Lisa a while to process the betrayal and absorb the fact that she was actually getting a divorce. There was a period of mourning, then a period of obsessively spying on him, following his new girlfriend around town, calling her after midnight and hanging up. Then there was the evening Lisa showed up at the girlfriend’s house, drunk, pounding on her door and screaming that she was going to burn the condo down.

“It wasn’t a great time for me,” Lisa said. “I had always wanted to see the pyramids, and my credit cards weren’t maxed out yet, so … ”

On her first morning in Cairo, Lisa woke at dawn to the sound of the call to prayer from a nearby mosque. It was pitch black inside her hotel room. Half blind and jet-lagged, she reached for a cigarette.
She was so disoriented that she didn’t realize—until she smelled burning plastic—that she was trying to light a pen, not a Marlboro. She had spent the past four months crying, binge eating, unable to sleep, and feeling ashamed, helpless, depressed, and angry, all at once. Lying in bed, she broke down. “It was like this wave of sadness,” she said. “I felt like everything I had ever wanted had crumbled. I couldn’t even smoke right.

“And then I started thinking about my ex-husband, and how hard it would be to find another job when I got back, and how much I was going to hate it and how unhealthy I felt all the time. I got up and knocked over a water jug and it shattered on the floor, and I started crying even harder. I felt desperate, like I had to change something, at least one thing I could control.”

She showered and left the hotel. As she rode through Cairo’s rutted streets in a taxi and then onto the dirt roads leading to the Sphinx, the pyramids of Giza, and the vast, endless desert around them, her self-pity, for a brief moment, gave way. She needed a goal in her life, she thought. Something to work toward.

So she decided, sitting in the taxi, that she would come back to Egypt and trek through the desert.

It was a crazy idea, Lisa knew. She was out of shape, overweight, with no money in the bank. She didn’t know the name of the desert she was looking at or if such a trip was possible. None of that mattered, though. She needed something to focus on. Lisa decided that she would give herself one year to prepare. And to survive such an expedition, she was certain she would have to make sacrifices.
In particular, she would need to quit smoking.

When Lisa finally made her way across the desert eleven months later—in an air-conditioned and motorized tour with a half-dozen other people, mind you—the caravan carried so much water, food, tents, maps, global positioning systems, and two-way radios that throwing in a carton of cigarettes wouldn’t have made much of a difference.

But in the taxi, Lisa didn’t know that. And to the scientists at the laboratory, the details of her trek weren’t relevant. Because for reasons they were just beginning to understand, that one small shift in Lisa’s perception that day in Cairo—the conviction that she had to give up smoking to accomplish her goal—had touched off a series of changes that would ultimately radiate out to every part of her life. Over the next six months, she would replace smoking with jogging, and that, in turn, changed how she ate, worked, slept, saved money, scheduled her workdays, planned for the future, and so on. She would start running half-marathons, and then a marathon, go back to school, buy a house, and get engaged. Eventually she was recruited into the scientists’ study, and when researchers began examining images of Lisa’s brain, they saw something remarkable: One set of neurological patterns—her old habits—had been overridden by new patterns. They could still see the neural activity of her old behaviors, but those impulses were crowded out by new urges. As Lisa’s habits changed, so had her brain.

It wasn’t the trip to Cairo that had caused the shift, scientists were convinced, or the divorce or desert trek. It was that Lisa had focused on changing just one habit—smoking—at first. Everyone in the study had gone through a similar process. By focusing on one pattern—what is known as a “keystone habit”—Lisa had taught herself how to reprogram the other routines in her life, as well.

It’s not just individuals who are capable of such shifts. When companies focus on changing habits, whole organizations can transform. Firms such as Procter & Gamble, Starbucks, Alcoa, and Target have seized on this insight to influence how work gets done, how employees communicate, and—without customers realizing it—the way people shop.

“I want to show you one of your most recent scans,” a researcher told Lisa near the end of her exam. He pulled up a picture on a computer screen that showed images from inside her head. “When you see food, these areas”—he pointed to a place near the center of her brain—“which are associated with craving and hunger, are still active. Your brain still produces the urges that made you overeat.
“However, there’s new activity in this area”—he pointed to the region closest to her forehead—“where we believe behavioral inhibition and self-discipline starts. That activity has become more pronounced each time you’ve come in.”

Lisa was the scientists’ favorite participant because her brain scans were so compelling, so useful in creating a map of where behavioral patterns—habits—reside within our minds. “You’re helping us understand how a decision becomes an automatic behavior,” the doctor told her.

Everyone in the room felt like they were on the brink of something important. And they were.

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seligsoj
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by seligsoj » Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:21 pm

Op here....I. an overwhelmed by all the awesome responses and helpful tips. I am going to spend time re-reading all of them as I develop my weight loss strategy. I will check back in and let you know how I'm doing with the weight loss!

greger
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by greger » Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:30 pm

When I was bed ridden with a broken shoulder, I watched doctor after doctor on PBS TV say the Std. Am. Diet was horrible for your health. I was 68 y-o and decided to believe them even though I've never had a systemic problem besides the extra 30-35 pounds since college days. I chose to follow the Keto style doctor after checking the Dr. out. I only ate green veggies and meat. Nothing else. No juice, no potatoes, no pasta, no sugar, no alcohol, no root veggies, no cookies or ice cream, no milk, no bread. I LOST 30 pounds without going to the gym. I felt 20 years younger, my joint pain stopped.

The bad thing that happened to me is within two weeks I started to have leg cramps while sleeping. Mostly the smaller muscles below my knees and on my feet. I could barely walk at night. I went to three doctors, no help. Months later, I learned carbohydrates are needed to move your muscles. As soon as I started to eat a bit of whole fruit, the cramps subsided.

Hundreds of hours of research later, I discovered Nutritionfacts.org. This is a website that reads the 100 scientific studies published every day and reports the good and bad of science nutrition and it's all free. I only eat a science diet of whole plant foods. I feel even better now and I'm 73. Diet so is simple now. Your taste buds adapt, so to me broccoli tastes mildly sweet. My mouth craves nutritional veggies and if I taste a buttered shrimp like I did at a 4 star chef's dinner, there is nothing to miss-it tasted like rubber. one thing I worried about was enough protein. The protein studies were done with rats who need many times what we need. As babies when we grow our fastest, mother's milk has about 3% protein. Vegans have higher T. Carl Lewis who dominated track and field for decades and won more gold metals than any other T&F person ate vegan!

[Comment deleted by mod oldcomputerguy]

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dm200
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by dm200 » Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:37 pm

greger wrote:
Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:30 pm
When I was bed ridden with a broken shoulder, I watched doctor after doctor on PBS TV say the Std. Am. Diet was horrible for your health. I was 68 y-o and decided to believe them even though I've never had a systemic problem besides the extra 30-35 pounds since college days. I chose to follow the Keto style doctor after checking the Dr. out. I only ate green veggies and meat. Nothing else. No juice, no potatoes, no pasta, no sugar, no alcohol, no root veggies, no cookies or ice cream, no milk, no bread. I LOST 30 pounds without going to the gym. I felt 20 years younger, my joint pain stopped.
The bad thing that happened to me is within two weeks I started to have leg cramps while sleeping. Mostly the smaller muscles below my knees and on my feet. I could barely walk at night. I went to three doctors, no help. Months later, I learned carbohydrates are needed to move your muscles. As soon as I started to eat a bit of whole fruit, the cramps subsided.
Hundreds of hours of research later, I discovered Nutritionfacts.org. This is a website that reads the 100 scientific studies published every day and reports the good and bad of science nutrition and it's all free. I only eat a science diet of whole plant foods. I feel even better now and I'm 73. Diet so is simple now. Your taste buds adapt, so to me broccoli tastes mildly sweet. My mouth craves nutritional veggies and if I taste a buttered shrimp like I did at a 4 star chef's dinner, there is nothing to miss-it tasted like rubber. one thing I worried about was enough protein. The protein studies were done with rats who need many times what we need. As babies when we grow our fastest, mother's milk has about 3% protein. Vegans have higher T. Carl Lewis who dominated track and field for decades and won more gold metals than any other T&F person ate vegan!
[Comment deleted by mod oldcomputerguy]
Yes - I love Dr Greger and nutritionfacts.org as well!!!

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by LilyFleur » Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:55 am

greger wrote:
Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:30 pm
When I was bed ridden with a broken shoulder, I watched doctor after doctor on PBS TV say the Std. Am. Diet was horrible for your health. I was 68 y-o and decided to believe them even though I've never had a systemic problem besides the extra 30-35 pounds since college days. I chose to follow the Keto style doctor after checking the Dr. out. I only ate green veggies and meat. Nothing else. No juice, no potatoes, no pasta, no sugar, no alcohol, no root veggies, no cookies or ice cream, no milk, no bread. I LOST 30 pounds without going to the gym. I felt 20 years younger, my joint pain stopped.

The bad thing that happened to me is within two weeks I started to have leg cramps while sleeping. Mostly the smaller muscles below my knees and on my feet. I could barely walk at night. I went to three doctors, no help. Months later, I learned carbohydrates are needed to move your muscles. As soon as I started to eat a bit of whole fruit, the cramps subsided.

Hundreds of hours of research later, I discovered Nutritionfacts.org. This is a website that reads the 100 scientific studies published every day and reports the good and bad of science nutrition and it's all free. I only eat a science diet of whole plant foods. I feel even better now and I'm 73. Diet so is simple now. Your taste buds adapt, so to me broccoli tastes mildly sweet. My mouth craves nutritional veggies and if I taste a buttered shrimp like I did at a 4 star chef's dinner, there is nothing to miss-it tasted like rubber. one thing I worried about was enough protein. The protein studies were done with rats who need many times what we need. As babies when we grow our fastest, mother's milk has about 3% protein. Vegans have higher T. Carl Lewis who dominated track and field for decades and won more gold metals than any other T&F person ate vegan!

[Comment deleted by mod oldcomputerguy]
Agree. The other day at lunch the roasted zucchini tasted sweet to me. I have almost completely cut out sugar and artificial sweeteners. I used to put stevia in my coffee with half and half. On a trip a few years ago, I forgot to bring my stevia. I just started drinking the coffee without any type of sweetener and found that I don't really miss it. Carrots taste sweet to me. No more diet Coke. I haven't exercised in 4 months and I am 120 pounds, 5/7".

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by mindboggling » Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:56 am

I am a believer in the low-fat vegan diet a la John McDougall for health reasons. However, eating habits, developed in childhood, are hard to change. I've only managed to change mine a little.

5'4'', 160 lb. I'm a little fat boy!
In broken mathematics, We estimate our prize, --Emily Dickinson

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by theplayer11 » Fri Sep 13, 2019 6:14 am

mindboggling wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:56 am
I am a believer in the low-fat vegan diet a la John McDougall for health reasons. However, eating habits, developed in childhood, are hard to change. I've only managed to change mine a little.

5'4'', 160 lb. I'm a little fat boy!
Everyone is different, but I find that quitting a bad food cold turkey isn't that hard. After about a week, I lose the craving and actually prefer the healthier option. When your long term health is at stake, substituting healthier choices shouldn't be that hard..and even if it is, you need to look at the long term benefits. I find changing diet and eating less so much easier than an increase in exercise.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by forgeblast » Fri Sep 13, 2019 6:37 am

I changed my diet, lost 20 lbs the first month ten the next and have kept it off for over a year. I saw pictures of me at the beach and was not happy...
I ate a pretty normal SAD diet (Standard American Diet) and it was catching up to me.
A buddy of mine show me his weight loss over a year with FOK (Forks over Knives (also netflix doc). Its whole food plant based very little oil (WFPB).
To make it easy no meat no dairy, very little oil.....Forks over knives has great cook books great recipes on pintrest too.
I still eat things like pizza, we use non dairy cheese which melts etc just like real cheese. there are a lot of replacement foods...just watch becoming a junk food vegan. whole food means you cook more instead of heating up food. I found the cost to be the same...we did not have to budget more.
I like WFPB because its not being a political vegan where you want to change everyone, or a religious vegan where you want to convert everyone, its you taking care of you. We still have fish occasionally, I like to go fishing anyway. I let people hunt my property and have hunted in the past. Its just right now for health reasons I eat this way.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by McGilicutty » Fri Sep 13, 2019 6:47 am

Well, I can tell you what not to do. Definitely do not eat an entire family-sized bag of potato chips for breakfast like I just did. Not a good idea.

Of course, I always plan to eat just a few chips or a few donuts or whatever, but how often does that happen? I hope you are not as undisciplined as me, because typically the only thing that stops me from eating is that I literally run out of food.

Probably the only hope for the undisciplined folks like myself is to hope that science invents a pill to cure hunger. Barring that, and without some type of rigorous exercise program which I'm to lazy to do, I think we are screwed.

As an aside, I've never seen a fat meth addict. But, I want to keep my teeth in my gums, so for now, I guess that option is out.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Mr. Rumples » Fri Sep 13, 2019 6:57 am

Dieting is tough. I'm a tall guy; I still lift weights 5 days a week and garden or do yard work almost daily, even in the winter unless my feet are really bad (peripheral neuropathy). I have a huge sweet tooth. If I take in over about 2,000 calories a day, I still gain weight. My solution is just to eat simply, no red meat, a bit of chicken, plain greek yogurt, tofu, lots of veggies and rice and oatmeal. I only have cheese and wheat products like pasta when I go out to eat. Now, I find that they tend to make me feel unwell the next day which isn't necessarily bad, I'll just have to go to salads with grilled chicken when I go out. But for my family and friends, dining out is a big deal, but this works for me. After all, I feel fortunate that they want to take the old man along, so many don't have that.

Dieting is hard, after all, we have to eat daily. Managing money is a lot easier. If I really have a craving for something sweet, I'll down a can of unsweetened pineapple chunks. If I want salt, Fritos are about the best for me since its just corn and salt, but with that, my feet will swell :(.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by sid hartha » Fri Sep 13, 2019 7:27 am

It all comes down to calories in vs calories out. There is no magic or mystery behind it. To lose weight you have to cut down the calories you intake and or increase calories burned to the point that you are using more calories than you take in. For instance, I did that on a hiking trip where I was burning more calories hiking than I was consuming and lost 5 lbs. The easiest way to lose weight is to restrict the calories you intake (it's rather hard to increase the calories burned significantly to lose substantial weight) so that it's less than your body uses. For example, 30 min of running is easily undone by eating a cookie. I think 1 pound is roughly 3000 calories. That requires the very thing you lack though, discipline. And lots of it. You have to be able to go through the uncomfortable feeling of being hungry. You have to have the discipline to not succumb to biological urges realizing that you are not going to starve to death if you cut calories and go hungry. You have to watch while everyone else pigs out on dessert and you don't. Eventually you get used to it and your body and mind will adjust. You've been conditioned to consume food a certain way and it's hard to change that conditioning.





Good luck.

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HomerJ
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by HomerJ » Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:57 am

theplayer11 wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 6:14 am
mindboggling wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:56 am
I am a believer in the low-fat vegan diet a la John McDougall for health reasons. However, eating habits, developed in childhood, are hard to change. I've only managed to change mine a little.
Everyone is different, but I find that quitting a bad food cold turkey isn't that hard. After about a week, I lose the craving and actually prefer the healthier option. When your long term health is at stake, substituting healthier choices shouldn't be that hard..and even if it is, you need to look at the long term benefits. I find changing diet and eating less so much easier than an increase in exercise.
Everyone is indeed different.

It's good that changing your diet is easy for you.

I agree with mindboggling. Eating habits, for most people, are extremely hard to change.

Changing my diet is incredibly hard. I like what I like. I'm not going to eat steamed broccoli instead of a hamburger. I CAN eat one hamburger instead of two hamburgers. I CAN eat chicken instead of a hamburger. I discovered eating less was easier if I ate real slowly. That I can do.

There are changes people can make. Everyone has to find what works for them. What works for me may not work for others.

But advice like "Oh give up a food you've enjoyed for the past 30-50 years and switch to these vegetables instead. It's easy!" just isn't that useful.

It's not that easy for most of us.

:(
The J stands for Jay

unstartable
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by unstartable » Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:19 am

Lifting heavy weights changed my life.

Some sort of program that uses barbells to do compound lifts and focuses on increasing the amount of weight lifted is both effective and motivating.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by dm200 » Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:19 am

One aspect of this that has worked for me (much of the time) is to try to fill myself up (or 80% - see below) with the good things - and then I will not be as likely to want more of the bad things.

The elders of Okinawa (longest lived population in the world) have a saying: "Eat until you are 80% full"

See the book "The Okinawa Program"

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Caduceus » Fri Sep 13, 2019 12:11 pm

Maybe I'm in the minority as someone who can't seem to gain weight no matter what I eat, but the responses here are fascinating. Dieting simply requires that you don't do something, so why is that so hard? Gaining weight, on the other hand, requires that you actually do something - I can never seem to eat enough to gain weight. It's a constant chore to be remembering to snack/eat. If I'm pre-occupied with work, I can easily miss a meal.

Here's an out of the box idea. Try fasting. Get familiar with what it's like to feel hungry for a while. It's actually something you forget after a while. I've fasted easily without trying to on particularly busy days. I wake up, don't have time for breakfast, and by the time I know it, it is 5 p.m. and dinner is my first meal of the day.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by theplayer11 » Fri Sep 13, 2019 12:39 pm

HomerJ wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:57 am
theplayer11 wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 6:14 am
mindboggling wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:56 am
I am a believer in the low-fat vegan diet a la John McDougall for health reasons. However, eating habits, developed in childhood, are hard to change. I've only managed to change mine a little.
Everyone is different, but I find that quitting a bad food cold turkey isn't that hard. After about a week, I lose the craving and actually prefer the healthier option. When your long term health is at stake, substituting healthier choices shouldn't be that hard..and even if it is, you need to look at the long term benefits. I find changing diet and eating less so much easier than an increase in exercise.
Everyone is indeed different.

It's good that changing your diet is easy for you.

I agree with mindboggling. Eating habits, for most people, are extremely hard to change.

Changing my diet is incredibly hard. I like what I like. I'm not going to eat steamed broccoli instead of a hamburger. I CAN eat one hamburger instead of two hamburgers. I CAN eat chicken instead of a hamburger. I discovered eating less was easier if I ate real slowly. That I can do.

There are changes people can make. Everyone has to find what works for them. What works for me may not work for others.

But advice like "Oh give up a food you've enjoyed for the past 30-50 years and switch to these vegetables instead. It's easy!" just isn't that useful.

It's not that easy for most of us.

:(
I guess, but it's tough to agree because I'm not special and had a really horrible diet. If I can do it, it's hard not for me not to say anyone can. I hate most vegetables and have a sweet tooth. For example, a gave up drinking coke 5 years ago. If I take a sip now, I think it's nasty because it's so sweet.
I think the key is to obviously not have bad foods around...don't buy them. If they are not in the house, you can't eat them. I think the older you get the easier it is to see how your diet effects you and most people should realize that you must eat healthy if you want to live a long life without diet related health problems.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Lextalionis » Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:23 pm

As mentioned below, Keogenic is what I did and am down 25lbs.
A few things to add for me anyway:
  • If you are working out, increase your protein and keep you calories high because your body will rebel if you cut down into the 700-800 range over a period of time and hold on to its fat reserves. Protein can metabolize through gluconeogenesis raising your glucose, but if you are working out, you can sacrifice some muscle if you don't keep the recommended .8 grams per pound of protein. I do lunch-lunch fasts on off days.
  • If you break ketosis, pare back your fats until you are back in.
  • Figure out your plateaus until the fat/carb/protein macros work for you.
  • Find a good food tracker app with barcode scanner like LoseIt that connects to smart devices. Makes tracking as easy as a scan.
  • Find a simple workout plan for beginners like the old school power 90 or the new online p90 and stick with it the best you can.



telsaar wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 5:21 pm
I would do a low carb diet (moderate protein/high fat). Especially a Ketogenic diet. You will need a blood sugar level tester and a supply of ketostix. Measure your blood sugar first thing in the morning before you eat. Through out the day eat less than 20 grams of carbs. Excercise for 1 hr per day weights, aerobic, etc. After two days, start measuring ketones. If your fasting blood sugar is running high (above 110) Fast and fast until the Blood Sugar gets to 80 or so. By the third day Ketones should be showing up in your urine. Keep your carbs in low carb vegetables and lower carb nuts (peanuts, pecans, but watch out for pistachios). Try to keep your blood sugar below 100 range, but don't let it drop below 70. Once your in ketosis, your hunger will be very manageable. Ketones are your feed back to show that your are indeed staying on your low carb diet. If your blood sugar gets high, fast. I fasted for two days and my morning blood sugar dropped from 110 to mid 70's. It also accelerated my weight loss. Always end your fast with low carbs menus. Good Luck.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by dm200 » Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:35 pm

Lextalionis wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:23 pm
As mentioned below, Keogenic is what I did and am down 25lbs.
A few things to add for me anyway:
  • If you are working out, increase your protein and keep you calories high because your body will rebel if you cut down into the 700-800 range over a period of time and hold on to its fat reserves. Protein can metabolize through gluconeogenesis raising your glucose, but if you are working out, you can sacrifice some muscle if you don't keep the recommended .8 grams per pound of protein. I do lunch-lunch fasts on off days.
  • If you break ketosis, pare back your fats until you are back in.
  • Figure out your plateaus until the fat/carb/protein macros work for you.
  • Find a good food tracker app with barcode scanner like LoseIt that connects to smart devices. Makes tracking as easy as a scan.
  • Find a simple workout plan for beginners like the old school power 90 or the new online p90 and stick with it the best you can.
telsaar wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 5:21 pm
I would do a low carb diet (moderate protein/high fat). Especially a Ketogenic diet. You will need a blood sugar level tester and a supply of ketostix. Measure your blood sugar first thing in the morning before you eat. Through out the day eat less than 20 grams of carbs. Excercise for 1 hr per day weights, aerobic, etc. After two days, start measuring ketones. If your fasting blood sugar is running high (above 110) Fast and fast until the Blood Sugar gets to 80 or so. By the third day Ketones should be showing up in your urine. Keep your carbs in low carb vegetables and lower carb nuts (peanuts, pecans, but watch out for pistachios). Try to keep your blood sugar below 100 range, but don't let it drop below 70. Once your in ketosis, your hunger will be very manageable. Ketones are your feed back to show that your are indeed staying on your low carb diet. If your blood sugar gets high, fast. I fasted for two days and my morning blood sugar dropped from 110 to mid 70's. It also accelerated my weight loss. Always end your fast with low carbs menus. Good Luck.
Dr Greger has done a number of recent videos on Ketogenic diets - according to "what the science says" - with many refereces.

www.nutritionfacts.org

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Dottie57 » Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:12 pm

I am thinking I need a Food Management Policy Statement.

I love to eat but want a healthier life all around. Since health is so important and food choices are part of it, a written statement may help me a bit.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by randomguy » Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:15 pm

theplayer11 wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 12:39 pm

I guess, but it's tough to agree because I'm not special and had a really horrible diet. If I can do it, it's hard not for me not to say anyone can. I hate most vegetables and have a sweet tooth. For example, a gave up drinking coke 5 years ago. If I take a sip now, I think it's nasty because it's so sweet.
I think the key is to obviously not have bad foods around...don't buy them. If they are not in the house, you can't eat them. I think the older you get the easier it is to see how your diet effects you and most people should realize that you must eat healthy if you want to live a long life without diet related health problems.
How do you know your not special? It is easy to think that anything we can do others could also if they just tried. Reality can be a lot different.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by Sandtrap » Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:25 pm

X = Daily Calric intake to maintain current weight.

Some rules of thumb: X = 10 times body weight +_ 10

Less than X = weight loss

More than X = Weight gains

J🏝
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greger
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by greger » Fri Sep 13, 2019 11:39 pm

CyclingDuo wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:27 pm
Trism wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:20 pm
Agree wholeheartedly. People spend billions annually on diet and exercise nonsense, when all they have to do is math. Math was the basis for my successful weight loss plan (posted above), and I ate mostly garbage.
Yup. Simple math. Tons of forum posts at MyFitnessPal.com that proves eating dirty vs. eating clean doesn't matter when it comes to losing weight. You can lose weight eating garbage as long as you can quantify that you ate fewer calories than you burned that day. :mrgreen:

Booze, donuts, nachos, chips and cookies will do it as well as broccoli, spinach, turkey, apple slices and water as long as the math is correct. One gets pretty good at counting calories with a measuring cup, a scale, reading packages, looking things up online and opening one's eyes to how many calories things do or do not have.
Before the 2000's many doctor's with little to no nutritional training believed this simple math equation explanation of biology. Turns out biological science says otherwise as explained by Dr. Lustig of UCSF medical school.

One example in 2016-17, the UCSF medical "Sugar Team" headed by Dr. Lustig proved that all calories are Not the same. Sugar is as addictive as heroin or other opiates. Sugar increases your brain dopamine to make you feel the same as when you are "in love". Sugar is digested through a pathway that does not send the satiation singling molecule to you brain so we keep eating it trying to reach satiation.

This year 2019, they proved Sugar is the cause of diabetes ll, heart attacks, Parkinson's, and ED. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zx-QrilOoSM

All refined foods are stripped of nutrients your body needs and turn to sugar before they get to your stomach . Bread, pasta, chips...

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HomerJ
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by HomerJ » Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:03 am

greger wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 11:39 pm
All refined foods are stripped of nutrients your body needs and turn to sugar before they get to your stomach . Bread, pasta, chips...
Don't exaggerate. They're not completely stripped of "nutrients your body needs". They may not be the best food for you, but you're not going to die eating bread and pasta.
The J stands for Jay

greger
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by greger » Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:03 am

randomguy wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:15 pm
theplayer11 wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 12:39 pm

I guess, but it's tough to agree because I'm not special and had a really horrible diet. If I can do it, it's hard not for me not to say anyone can. I hate most vegetables and have a sweet tooth. For example, a gave up drinking coke 5 years ago. If I take a sip now, I think it's nasty because it's so sweet.
I think the key is to obviously not have bad foods around...don't buy them. If they are not in the house, you can't eat them. I think the older you get the easier it is to see how your diet effects you and most people should realize that you must eat healthy if you want to live a long life without diet related health problems.
How do you know your not special? It is easy to think that anything we can do others could also if they just tried. Reality can be a lot different.
I agree. Biology of diet effects is very complicated to real doctors and researchers. Reality of what people can and cannot do is so complicated the fields of Physiology, Psychology and Endocrinology struggle with it all. Consider yourself lucky in ways you don't really know and maybe don't assume for others.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by surfstar » Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:06 am

38 y/o
I like "junk" food a bit - pizza, sweets, limited fruits/veggies, etc. Fast food is very limited now (1/month?), though, vs younger/single days.

I've never been overweight, always active/athletic, but have been on an intermittent fast diet for ~ 1 year now. I lost ~15 lbs easily and have kept it off. I still eat the things I enjoy, except 2 or 3 days a week, I skip breakfast and have a small lunch, later in the day - getting an 18 hour fast in.
It's kinda a combo of a 5:2 diet and 18:6 diet. I don't do the 18:6 (time restricted eating) daily like some people do, but when I do it, I eat less calories on those days. I feel that IF (Intermittent Fasting) is just starting to be studied in people and may be the best "new" approach. Seems to have many benefits beyond weight-loss, although the studies in humans is forthcoming.

Combined with a 4 min / Tabata workout (started in last 6 months), my wife and I are back to High School weight and are rock climbing harder than ever, without doing any real crazy training or diet program. It is easy to follow and stick to. The first couple times you fast, you're hungry; but your body quickly adapts. Black coffee and tea are okay while fasting. I still get to drink my beer and eat whatever I normally want on most days. Best diet ever for people who don't want to have drastic changes (cutting out meat/carbs only plants, etc).

I call it the:
"I'd rather not eat than eat healthy, diet." :P
Last edited by surfstar on Sat Sep 14, 2019 9:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

greger
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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by greger » Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:26 am

HomerJ wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:03 am
greger wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 11:39 pm
All refined foods are stripped of nutrients your body needs and turn to sugar before they get to your stomach . Bread, pasta, chips...
Don't exaggerate. They're not completely stripped of "nutrients your body needs". They may not be the best food for you, but you're not going to die eating bread and pasta.
You exaggerate in your complaint. I never said "completely stripped".

I should have said white bread and white pasta. You need sugar/carbs to make your muscles work but if you eat the whole plant, you get all those other molecules your body evolved to thrive on. You will not die immediately eating processed foods, you will just lose years of good life than if not, so say the scientists.

Remember the "Super Size Me" guy? He was eating foods stripped of most nutrients. He did get his sugar, and his doctors stopped him from continuing. There are many scientific papers, books, web sites and videos about this very subject.

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Re: Disciplined with finances, but not so with diet

Post by theplayer11 » Sat Sep 14, 2019 6:56 am

greger wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:03 am
randomguy wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:15 pm
theplayer11 wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 12:39 pm

I guess, but it's tough to agree because I'm not special and had a really horrible diet. If I can do it, it's hard not for me not to say anyone can. I hate most vegetables and have a sweet tooth. For example, a gave up drinking coke 5 years ago. If I take a sip now, I think it's nasty because it's so sweet.
I think the key is to obviously not have bad foods around...don't buy them. If they are not in the house, you can't eat them. I think the older you get the easier it is to see how your diet effects you and most people should realize that you must eat healthy if you want to live a long life without diet related health problems.
How do you know your not special? It is easy to think that anything we can do others could also if they just tried. Reality can be a lot different.
I agree. Biology of diet effects is very complicated to real doctors and researchers. Reality of what people can and cannot do is so complicated the fields of Physiology, Psychology and Endocrinology struggle with it all. Consider yourself lucky in ways you don't really know and maybe don't assume for others.
maybe you are right, but not buying bad food seems to be a simple first step. If unhealthy food is not in the house, you are forced to eat the healthy options. If someone can't resist buying junk food, have someone else shop for you.

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