Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
ThankYouJack
Posts: 1983
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2014 7:27 pm

Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by ThankYouJack » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:08 pm

I've always lived within at least 2 1/2 hours from the beach. A couple times I've lived walking distance to some of the nicest beaches in the country and would go to the beach daily. One thing I noticed is that the after months of this, not surprisingly it would become routine and the beach wouldn't be as exciting.
So I'm wondering if staying 2 1/2 hours from the beach, but taking 6-10 short beach trips a year would actually be more exciting than living right at the beach.

Any thoughts or personal experiences?

livesoft
Posts: 60946
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by livesoft » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:16 pm

I lived on the shore for about 8 years. Saltwater at high tide was less than 50 feet from the patio. The view was great and the neighbors were some distance away. But wintertime was not as pleasant as the summer and summertime brought smells and trespassers. I would live there again.
Wiki This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

User avatar
Toons
Posts: 12746
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Hills of Tennessee

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Toons » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:18 pm

For the most part,,
Daily viewing becomes routine
Familiarity.The newness wears thin.
I see a lot of bodies of water in my travels,beaches,lakes etc.
I find myself wanting to discover something different on each journey though,,,,
so it doesn't become familiar and routine. :happy
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee

minimalistmarc
Posts: 229
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2015 4:38 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by minimalistmarc » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:22 pm

It's called hedonic adaptation.

"The hedonic treadmill, also known as hedonic adaptation, is the observed tendency of humans to quickly return to a relatively stable level of happiness despite major positive events or life changes".

If you can afford to and want to fly first class, better to alternate it with cattle class so you still appreciate it

User avatar
Sandtrap
Posts: 4610
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: 10/90 Allocation - Hawaii😀 Northern AZ.😳

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Sandtrap » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:25 pm

Lack of privacy due to beach goers and tourists and curious folks. Also those that "borrow" your patio faucet to wash their things or such. Also trash and random smells from foods, BBQ, etc, and noise. Everything rusts due to the salt in the air. . . door hinges. . computer circuit boards. . . cars, everything. Also, the salt air coats the windows, etc. But it is wonderful at sunrise and sunset and lounging in the patio or poolside in the evening if the climate is right. Personally, if one is a water or ocean person then none of this will matter because it will be heaven. But if one does not have a craving to "feel" the ocean or water 24/7 or have a boat with one's own dock. . . then perhaps it may not be as imagined before moving beachside. Of course this depends on where the house and beach is. Beachside Lanikai or Kailua is inundated with tourists and locals, some sections of Kahala and Black Point, not so much, but wonderful vs some coasts on the outer islands of Hawaii which are more secluded and private. Also depends whether the prevailing wind is toward the sea or toward the home. Besides the beach there's oceanside with a dock and a boat which is different than a beach but also nice.
My o2 from personal experience. Hopefully it will be helpful and provide actionable information to the OP and others. :D
Mahalo
Last edited by Sandtrap on Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
JoMoney
Posts: 5109
Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 5:31 am

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by JoMoney » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:27 pm

It did for me... I made more of an effort to 'visit the beach' (and I think appreciated it more) when I lived a 30 minute drive away then when I lived within walking distance. I currently live hundreds of miles away from the nearest beach, and have fond nostalgic memories of casual drives out for a walk at the beach or a pier, and some rather bitter memories about my time living at the beach - having a longer drive to get to everything else, and sometimes crazy traffic/tourists during certain times of day/seasons. I can remember rushing to leave my house before the traffic got heavy, and avoiding going home until certain times so I didn't have to deal with the traffic in/out of the major road through the beach town.
"To achieve satisfactory investment results is easier than most people realize; to achieve superior results is harder than it looks." - Benjamin Graham

Carefreeap
Posts: 2297
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: SF Bay Area

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Carefreeap » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:30 pm

We're about a mile back from the beach up on a hill with an ocean view. I never get tired of it. The sunsets are always different, watching storms come in is super cool. We can see some off shore islands and a lighthouse blinking. We also see the main shipping lane going into SF Bay. I've seen whale spouts, burning boats, and a stolen yacht run aground on our local beach. During crab season we see fishing boats at night which look like diamonds on velvet.

In many ways I'm very happy that we are not "on the beach". Maintenance is a real problem. I also would not like to deal with trespassers or crowds. And in my town beach erosion is a huge issue. Over the last 50 years there's been about 150' of Cliffside erosion. During our tenure we've seen 10 houses removed (they were on 200' lots!) and three apartment buildings. There is no insurance for erosion loss.

User avatar
snackdog
Posts: 266
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2014 4:57 am

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by snackdog » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:48 pm

We were beach front at Ipanema for several years. It wears off pretty quickly. Nice to always have a lovely view, sunrise, sunset, of course. But along with that we see a lot of chaos- traffic, people, etc. The sea air quickly ate our bikes, electronics, AC units, binoculars, etc. even though we never opened the windows (due to heat and humidity). Would I do it again? Perhaps. I am just as happy with a keyhole view from a bit farther away - enough to see weather conditions but not front row. In this sense, it's like a concert - do you want to be in the front row? All the time? I kinda prefer a private balcony.

It is good to get this out of your system before building or buying your dream house.

User avatar
Youngblood
Posts: 471
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 7:18 am

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Youngblood » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:57 pm

Hoping the OP won't mind me generalizing a bit.

I don't have any direct experience with living on the beach because except for an occasional visit neither my wife or I enjoyed the beach all that much. Instead, we seem to be attracted to living on lake shoreline. So, when we retired, we managed to purchase a condo that is surrounded by a very wide river/lake. The river part we live on is about 1.5 miles from a dam. Therefore, this part of the river is considered a lake too. Looking out our windows or patio doors you actually think you are on a boat because you can't see the shore unless you go directly to a window. The sunsets can be spectacular and are always different and we still are amazed we actually live here with this view. Barges pass by and on the weekends recreational sailboats, pontoons, fishing boats all contribute to the changing view we enjoy. Likewise with herons, hawks, vultures, beavers, turtles etc.

That being said, I can still remember looking out when we first moved here and simply being amazed buy just about everything. Watching the storms come in from the west and whitecaps on the lake, trees across the lake and changing seasons.

All still amazing and not taken for granted but not the same as the first year or so.

I would not want to buy a second home and only come back here in order to experience a unique newness.

YB
"I made my money by selling too soon." | Bernard M. Baruch

edge
Posts: 3300
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:44 pm
Location: Great Falls VA

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by edge » Sun Mar 26, 2017 4:21 pm

For many people, probably.

But there are probably situations where you integrate the beach into your life. My father lives at a near-beach community that has a premium community beach house that has a restaurant and saltwater pool from which you can see the beach and ocean. He goes there a lot and walks his dog on the private beach as well.

I think if you were into fishing/boating or any other water sport/activity then you would be set. If you like the beach because you just lay there then that is going to get old.

TravelforFun
Posts: 1293
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2012 11:05 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by TravelforFun » Sun Mar 26, 2017 5:51 pm

Would it be pleasurable to eat lobster every day? Life needs variety.

otinkyad
Posts: 160
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2016 5:35 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by otinkyad » Sun Mar 26, 2017 5:58 pm

ThankYouJack wrote:So I'm wondering if staying 2 1/2 hours from the beach, but taking 6-10 short beach trips a year would actually be more exciting than living right at the beach.
More comfortable maybe, but I can't see how you could get as far as more exciting (each trip, sure, but not overall).

Why the bifurcation? Are there no houses (or jobs) between beachside and 2-1/2 hours away? I live 10 miles from the ocean: no summer crowds, salt air maintenance issues, etc., but I have a 15 minute drive instead of 2-1/2 hours if I want to go to the beach. I've also worked a block from the ocean for 10 years, and I still love it.

User avatar
F150HD
Posts: 1484
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2015 7:49 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by F150HD » Sun Mar 26, 2017 6:32 pm

Good question. I always wondered about retiring in Florida and if the beach thing would get old and routine? (in midwest now)

rralex1
Posts: 117
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 4:21 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by rralex1 » Sun Mar 26, 2017 6:46 pm

For us, no, it does not. It remains one of those thing that we talk about and say "do you believe that we actually live here?" Perhaps our regular pausing to appreciate that we are grateful, helps us appreciate where we are as well as other things.

That, and particularly realizing and appreciating that for us the greatest blessings are our children, grand children, and family are what is most important. We will likely end up living closer to them and they are not on the coast.
Last edited by rralex1 on Sun Mar 26, 2017 6:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

simmias
Posts: 219
Joined: Sun May 17, 2015 4:18 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by simmias » Sun Mar 26, 2017 6:54 pm

I lived two blocks from the beach in Ocean Beach, San Diego for a year. Never got tired of it. I did hate going to work while my buddies went surfing, though.

One thing I did get used to was the perfect weather, even though I moved there from Chicago. I'd only really appreciate it when I had visitors in town from places like Chicago or New York who couldn't shut up about it.

User avatar
blueblock
Posts: 861
Joined: Sun Oct 19, 2014 6:06 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by blueblock » Sun Mar 26, 2017 6:56 pm

ThankYouJack wrote:So I'm wondering if staying 2 1/2 hours from the beach, but taking 6-10 short beach trips a year would actually be more exciting than living right at the beach.

Any thoughts or personal experiences?
When I was a little kid living in LA, our one-hour family trips to my grandparents' beach house were very exciting, though the glorious fun of the beach itself was wrapped up in seeing the grands, and the concomitant "special treats," like rotisserie chicken from the supermarket and Fudgecicles in front of the TV before bed.

Now, I live on a lake. I don't much care anymore for "fun stuff to do," but there isn't a day goes by that I don't appreciate the view or get excited by a wildlife sighting. There's a narrative that unfolds with year-round lake living: the arrival of water fowl in the Spring, followed by parades of ducklings and swan cygnets, the "just hanging out" great herons perched in the trees overlooking their feeding spots, the shy muskrats you can only spot at dawn, the birds visiting the yard that vary according to the season, the lake freezing over, the rabbit taking up Winter residence in our yard despite the intense interest of our dogs.

So, to answer your question, I imagine that year-round beachfront living would bring a new and quite different appreciation that you don't get as a visitor.

happyhiker
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2016 9:41 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by happyhiker » Sun Mar 26, 2017 7:26 pm

Not for me. In fact it has increased the appeal. A few years ago we moved from a house 30 miles from the ocean to one a block from the ocean. I am not into laying on the beach but I love walking, running and biking along ocean paths every day. I have seen whales breaching on my morning walks. More recently I have discovered the tide pools and nearby coastal areas to explore. The ocean is constantly changing and almost as gorgeous in bad weather as in sunshine.

I don't have a view from my house but can see the water about thirty seconds from my front door. Because we are a block off the water our house and yard are quiet. We do get occasional trash in our front yard during the summer but nothing too disgusting. Traffic is usually manageable.

It has been four years and it hasn't gotten any less thrilling.

island
Posts: 1721
Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 1:45 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by island » Sun Mar 26, 2017 9:24 pm

Any of you who replied care to tell us where you're located?

gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by gkaplan » Sun Mar 26, 2017 9:29 pm

island wrote:Any of you who replied care to tell us where you're located?
I moved to Portland three years ago when I retired. Before that, I lived three blocks from the beach in Ventura for almost twenty-five years. Not at the beach, as I would have liked, but close enough. It never lost its appeal.
Gordon

ThankYouJack
Posts: 1983
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2014 7:27 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by ThankYouJack » Sun Mar 26, 2017 10:25 pm

TravelforFun wrote:Would it be pleasurable to eat lobster every day? Life needs variety.
Oh man, you got me really craving lobster! :oops:

Variety is the spice of life.
otinkyad wrote:
ThankYouJack wrote:So I'm wondering if staying 2 1/2 hours from the beach, but taking 6-10 short beach trips a year would actually be more exciting than living right at the beach.
More comfortable maybe, but I can't see how you could get as far as more exciting (each trip, sure, but not overall).

Why the bifurcation? Are there no houses (or jobs) between beachside and 2-1/2 hours away?
We really love where we are now, have a great setup with great jobs and would be sacrificing a lot to move to the beach.

texasdiver
Posts: 2456
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 12:50 am
Location: Vancouver WA

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by texasdiver » Sun Mar 26, 2017 11:50 pm

I've lived in a couple of beach towns over the years.

I don't get tired of the beach.

What I do get tired of is living in a tourist town. The endless stream of clueless short-term visitors who seem to think it is a theme park for their enjoyment and not an actual community where people live. Something about being on vacation brings out the worst behavior in a lot of otherwise normal people. And it also seems to bring out the worst in the service industry folks who have to deal with it.

It's worse in warm sunny locations.

Valuethinker
Posts: 34871
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Mar 27, 2017 3:04 am

texasdiver wrote:I've lived in a couple of beach towns over the years.

I don't get tired of the beach.

What I do get tired of is living in a tourist town. The endless stream of clueless short-term visitors who seem to think it is a theme park for their enjoyment and not an actual community where people live. Something about being on vacation brings out the worst behavior in a lot of otherwise normal people. And it also seems to bring out the worst in the service industry folks who have to deal with it.

It's worse in warm sunny locations.
Lord yes to all of the above. And not only seaside towns, but lakeside ones too, if you live in the wrong place-- Lake Erie, Huron and Georgian Bay can be bad. Cottage country, generally.

Long weekends where the students arrive and just drink beer, litter, cause havoc. And not only the students. Just the crowds-- Brighton, UK in summer (south coast). And the traffic. Gawd the traffic.

Most seaside places are better in winter in my experience-- you get the vistas of the seas, the walks on uncrowded beaches (past the occasional mad surfer or windsurfer in their drysuit ;-)).

Note that the Hamptons, where mansions are built for $20m+, have serious issues with poverty, need food banks, and even homelessness. When the collective wealth of the people who only go there on weekends and in the summer could easily resolve many of those issues. But NIMBY for example prevents construction of affordable housing. At least under feudalism (believe it or not, some of my cousins still have tenant farmers, in rural England) the Lord had to provide housing for his serfs, as well as access to Common Land for grazing, foraging for wood, etc.

dbphd
Posts: 129
Joined: Wed Mar 07, 2007 1:07 pm
Location: Montecito, CA

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by dbphd » Mon Mar 27, 2017 3:25 am

We live a short block from the beach in Montecito, a small unincorporated town adjacent to Santa Barbara. For me, the answer is no.

User avatar
oldcomputerguy
Posts: 2917
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2015 6:50 am
Location: In the middle of five acres of woods

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by oldcomputerguy » Mon Mar 27, 2017 5:27 am

I've never lived near the beach. However, I do live less than an hour's drive from Gatlinburg TN. We moved to this area over thirty years ago from my hometown. When my friends heard I was moving here, the comment I frequently got was "Oh, you'll be able to go to Gatlinburg anytime you want!" And it's true, I can. But while Gatlinburg is nice to visit, I personally get enough of it going maybe once a year. Point is, the newness and shininess wore off quickly. I would imagine it would be the same with the beach.

On the other hand, the thought of retiring to Jamaica has been on my mind lately.... :D
It’s taken me a lot of years, but I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people. And if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you.

wolf359
Posts: 1242
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2015 8:47 am

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by wolf359 » Mon Mar 27, 2017 6:56 am

TravelforFun wrote:Would it be pleasurable to eat lobster every day? Life needs variety.
No, it wouldn't. http://www.gma.org/lobsters/allaboutlob ... story.html
Long ago, lobsters were so plentiful that Native Americans used them to fertilize their fields and to bait their hooks for fishing. In colonial times, lobsters were considered "poverty food." They were harvested from tidal pools and served to children, to prisoners, and to indentured servants, who exchanged their passage to America for seven years of service to their sponsors. In Massachusetts, some of the servants finally rebelled. They had it put into their contracts that they would not be forced to eat lobster more than three times a week.

User avatar
midareff
Posts: 5563
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 10:43 am
Location: Biscayne Bay, South Florida

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by midareff » Mon Mar 27, 2017 7:30 am

I lived on the beach for about 7 years and used to exercise walk the beach a few times weekly. The last 13 years I live on a small island about 30 feet from the Bay and maybe a twenty minute walk to the beach. Don't miss the sand at all.

TravelforFun
Posts: 1293
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2012 11:05 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by TravelforFun » Mon Mar 27, 2017 2:52 pm

wolf359 wrote:
TravelforFun wrote:Would it be pleasurable to eat lobster every day? Life needs variety.
No, it wouldn't. http://www.gma.org/lobsters/allaboutlob ... story.html
Long ago, lobsters were so plentiful that Native Americans used them to fertilize their fields and to bait their hooks for fishing. In colonial times, lobsters were considered "poverty food." They were harvested from tidal pools and served to children, to prisoners, and to indentured servants, who exchanged their passage to America for seven years of service to their sponsors. In Massachusetts, some of the servants finally rebelled. They had it put into their contracts that they would not be forced to eat lobster more than three times a week.
This sounds like crawfish in Louisiana back in the day.

abner kravitz
Posts: 299
Joined: Tue May 05, 2015 7:42 am
Location: Beaufort County, SC

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by abner kravitz » Mon Mar 27, 2017 3:23 pm

I retired to the beach (or as close as my net worth would allow). To me, living at the beach increases its appeal - the hassle of packing, getting there, going home are eliminated. The thrill is certainly not as great, but the enjoyment is.

havehad
Posts: 29
Joined: Thu Nov 20, 2014 2:43 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by havehad » Mon Mar 27, 2017 3:38 pm

Not for me. Once you figure out the rice in the salt shaker routine, and remember to save those 10 sugar packets they always throw in when you order coffee some places, life is wonderful.

I live a three block walk in a seasonal town. Fortunately, their are enough of us around in
the off season to socialize and check in on each other. The houses in my immediate block
are all full time or family-owned homes so no mysterious rentals to disrupt routine.

Full season really is 4th of July to end of August. Early school and college start times
mean the season slows down a little even before Labor day. September is my favorite month. But really, all year is great for me, the dog and the visiting kids. I think if I lived in
land my company would not be as frequent. But we maintain that you are only company
for a few hours at the house. Once you know where things are you are on your own.

People like the collective meal prep and the city folk even enjoy helping out with tending
the cottage garden and other small tasks. In winter, we may even go out to dinner once
and a while. Like anything, life at the beach becomes familiar but in my case in breeds
contentment.

sarahjane
Posts: 190
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 5:18 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by sarahjane » Mon Mar 27, 2017 3:42 pm

I've lived in Ocean City, NJ for 25 years. Never a "beach person" but I love the ocean and to walk on the beach. I was an ardent windsurfer until recently and a sometimes birder. OCNJ is a dry town--no bars or booze stores which helps keep the tourists in check. I am self described anti-social so I love winter when you can look both ways and not see another person.

But Hurricane Sandy changed my attitude about living here. Fortunately our house was ok, but worrying about floods and where to keep vehicles safe has become a hassle, and that's not likely to change.

niners9088
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2014 9:50 am

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by niners9088 » Mon Mar 27, 2017 3:52 pm

Two years ago I moved from the snowy northeast to a medium sized coastal city in the south east. I definitely don't take it for granted but it does lose some of the appeal during the winter. I live about a 10 minute drive from the beach and try to get there often for morning runs, evening walks, or just plain enjoying it on the weekends. Another side benefit is great seafood. Will definitely miss it if I ever leave.

User avatar
lthenderson
Posts: 3141
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by lthenderson » Mon Mar 27, 2017 4:41 pm

I've never lived on an ocean beach but have spent lots of time in rentals along it. Like others said above, I'm more for living on fresh water than salt water. When I was on the beach there was always the hassle of sand in everything, salt degrading everything, crowds, etc. But what really did it in for me was being on an ocean beach during a red tide event when you either became a prisoner of your own house or stumbled around nearly blind and hacking when outside for weeks on end.

chrisam314
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2016 9:22 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by chrisam314 » Mon Mar 27, 2017 8:24 pm

I lived on the beach for 3 years (panhandle of Florida). Had it not been for career aspirations/ grad school/ local job opportunities I would have stayed. Living on the beach itself never got old to me. The views, sunsets, running on the beach, dolphins swimming up the shoreline in the winter when the beach was empty, amazing thunderstorms rolling in. I took up kitesurfing. The lifestyle never got old to me. It probably would to some. :beer

dave_k
Posts: 218
Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2015 8:25 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by dave_k » Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:42 am

My wife and I have lived on a lake for several years, and it hasn't gotten old. The initial "paradise" feeling faded some after a few months, but we still love it and go boating regularly when the weather is good, and enjoy the view. Here in the Midwest I think having long cold winters makes us appreciate summer lake activities more every year.

We also bought a beach house in south Florida on the gulf coast a few years ago, which we visit for a few weeks a year and rent out the rest of the time. We plan to retire there in 5 years or so. I expect the novelty will wear off somewhat, but I love running on the beach, swimming, etc., and I doubt I'll ever get tired of the view, especially sunsets over the water. We are planning in retirement to move seasonally between that house and another waterfront home in the northeast, and do some other travelling, so that should break up the experience and keep it more interesting.

When I lived in Southern California years ago, about 45 minutes from the beach, I used to go often at first, but then got tired of bothering with the drive, parking, etc. Living on the beach/water makes it so convenient, it's a different story. On the lake, having the boat on a lift right there ready to go any time is vastly more convenient than having to take it in and out. I think we use the boat more every year than the guy we bought it from (who didn't live on the lake) did in the several years he had it total. And there's no substitute for the view right on the water. There's a reason waterfront lots are often twice as much or more as the ones just behind them. It needs to be something you really want in order to make it worth the expense, but we're happy with it. If we ever tire of it, moving to a less expensive house inland will be easy financially.

fasteddie911
Posts: 99
Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 3:13 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by fasteddie911 » Sat Apr 01, 2017 9:35 am

I've experienced the same thing. I've had the opportunity to live in some great places. Upon moving there I'd visit the popular/exciting areas and be amazed and appreciative of it, only to have the excitement wear off (though it would still be nice) and have it become routine and even ignored the more I did or saw it. I visited a family member's beachfront house once, which was amazing at first, but I soon started thinking about the potential issues with the property. My spouse grew up in a home with an amazing view, and it was only after she moved out that she became appreciative of that view.

ddurrett896
Posts: 775
Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2014 3:23 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by ddurrett896 » Sat Apr 01, 2017 10:03 am

Yes. I live 15 minutes from a nice beach and never go.

I do drive 1.5 hours regularly to a farm on a river my buddy owns and play there.

User avatar
gunn_show
Posts: 1406
Joined: Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:02 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by gunn_show » Sat Apr 01, 2017 1:23 pm

rralex1 wrote:For us, no, it does not. It remains one of those thing that we talk about and say "do you believe that we actually live here?" Perhaps our regular pausing to appreciate that we are grateful, helps us appreciate where we are as well as other things.
We don't live on the beach, but near the bay, and have a splendid bay view of the coast of Socal. After 3 yrs, it still doesn't get old looking at it daily. I love working from home and eating my lunch on the deck getting a tan and staring at the gorgeous view. We spend most of our weekends working out, working in the yard, and then relaxing in the afternoons on the sun deck looking at the bay and beach. Never gets old. Appreciative every day.
"I love competition. And I want to win." R. Murdoch

RoadHouseFan
Posts: 279
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2016 6:55 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by RoadHouseFan » Sat Apr 01, 2017 1:44 pm

It's not very appealing.

smitcat
Posts: 1349
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:51 am

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by smitcat » Sat Apr 01, 2017 4:11 pm

It never gets old for us....

Mr.BB
Posts: 454
Joined: Sun May 08, 2016 10:10 am

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Mr.BB » Sat Apr 01, 2017 4:19 pm

We travel to Maui almost every year, it is our favorite place, we love going there. We joked about being able to retire there; but we realized that what makes it so special is that we are not there all the time. If we are lucky in retirement we will be able to stay there for a few weeks every year, instead of 5-8 days. I guess absence does make the heart grow fonder.
"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit."

User avatar
Pajamas
Posts: 5363
Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:32 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Pajamas » Sat Apr 01, 2017 4:37 pm

It depends on your personality. Do you get tired of eating your favorite food twice a week or can you eat something you like for lunch and then have the leftovers for dinner and again for lunch the next day? Do you tend to wear your favorite clothing constantly and ignore everything else in your closet or do you enjoy choosing something different to wear every day? When your car needs replacing do you get the same model or do you look for a different model or a different manufacturer or even a different type of vehicle?

I go to the beach often during the summer. It's about an hour on the subway each way and that's no fun at all, especially coming home after a long day in the sun. I enjoy being at the beach a lot and even look at apartments at the beach I go to online, but prefer to live where I do now. Same thing when I go to the beach or elsewhere on vacation. It's fun to think about living somewhere else, but I always decide to stay put.

However, as I have gotten older, I have been considering buying a small apartment at the beach, probably in Florida, and becoming a semi-snowbird.

Beensabu
Posts: 146
Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2016 3:22 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Beensabu » Sat Apr 01, 2017 5:50 pm

Infrequent beach time is exciting. Regular beach time is relaxing. The happiest periods of my life are the ones where I made it to the beach every day. It's easy to take for granted when caught up in the daily grind. Thanks for the reminder.
"The only thing that makes life possible is permanent, intolerable uncertainty; not knowing what comes next."

Valuethinker
Posts: 34871
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Apr 02, 2017 6:50 am

I shall predict that beach front living, in North America, particularly on the East Coast (and South coast) is going to have less appeal in the future. And that it will actually become a problem for housing resale (when is not clear and I do not believe there is a definitive view).

I would also say that I understand that the US Navy is beginning to make plans around that. Whilst renting works fine, I would be careful about committing large amounts of capital to a beachfront property.

For what I understand are geological reasons, this is less the case on most of the West Coast.

I don't wish to be mysterious, and it's quite possible to totally disagree with me, nonetheless besides Forum rules 2 anonymous people on the internet are not going to persuade each other, nor anyone else ;-). So it would be pointless to argue here ;-).

Happy to send someone some references if they wish to learn more -- PM me.

User avatar
Smorgasbord
Posts: 329
Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2016 8:12 pm

Re: Does living at the beach reduce it's appeal?

Post by Smorgasbord » Sun Apr 02, 2017 8:25 am

I'm about 8 months into living a few hundred feet from a beach on Lake Michigan. So far, the appeal hasn't worn off although I would imagine just sitting on the beach watching the waves would get boring pretty quick. The town does a pretty good job of making it difficult for non-residents to get to the beach which helps a lot in regards to tourists, but dealing with rowdy party goers weekend after weekend would get tiring quite quickly.

Post Reply