What Book Are YOU Currently Reading?

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cfs
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What Book Are YOU Currently Reading?

Post by cfs » Sat Apr 07, 2007 12:36 pm

[This thread had so many responses that it started to cause problems with the formatting on the homepage. So I closed it and started a Part II so the discussion can continue. - admin Alex]

I see a LOT of books quoted on the forum [that is good]. I wonder, what book are YOU currently reading?

I will start.

Currently reading:
a. Larry Swedroe's Only Guide To A Winning Investment Strategy
b. Larry Swedroe's Only Guide To A Winning Bond Strategy

And note that I have read the books, but I continue to read both as a good refresher.

Now it is your turn. Thanks.

cfs
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nick22
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Interesting

Post by nick22 » Sat Apr 07, 2007 12:50 pm

Because my answer is the same two books. I am now working on a textbook size tome, Behavioral Finance II edited by Thaler. I particulary wanted to go through a basic primer on bonds recently and Swedroe's book was my choice for bonds 101.
Nick22

Fclevz
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No Investment Books

Post by Fclevz » Sat Apr 07, 2007 12:51 pm

I read constantly, but I'm not currently reading any investment books.
After reading about 300 investment titles over the years, I've come to the conclusion that the secret to investing is that their isn't any secret. Just diversify into a few different asset classes via index funds ala Daniel Solin or Taylor's 4-Fund Portfolio and you're probably 90% of the way there. :wink:

I still read a few as they come along. I just read the new Bogle book, but mostly just for fun. Few investment books nowadays have anything in them that is actually new or different.

Cheers,
Fred

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orthros
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Post by orthros » Sat Apr 07, 2007 1:12 pm

I read, on average, about 2 books per week, usually whilst exercising.

Currently I'm reading Nolo Press' "Legal Guide to Starting and Running a Small Business" by Fred Steingold. It's very, very good. I'd definitely recommend reading it, especially if your library has it.

O

Sheltonian
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Post by Sheltonian » Sat Apr 07, 2007 1:12 pm

I've nearly finished "The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing" and will start on Richard Ferri's "All About Asset Allocation" soon.
"If money be not thy servant, it will be thy master." --Sir Francis Bacon

Sam I Am
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Just started..................

Post by Sam I Am » Sat Apr 07, 2007 1:59 pm

Michael Crichton's Next. I read a couple of books a week, usually mystery/whodunits. After reading, I resell them on Amazon, cutting my spending on books considerably. Sometimes I buy them used also.

The library would be lots cheaper, but UPS delivers six days a week.

I have copies of Larry's bond book and the Bogleheads' book, but haven't read them yet.

Sam I Am

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murfields
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Post by murfields » Sat Apr 07, 2007 2:07 pm

I am reading "Timing the Market" How to profit in the stock market using Yield Curve, Technical Analysis, and Cultural Indicators by Deborah Weir and my second book is "Ahead of the Curve" A commonsense guide to forecasting business and market cycles by Joseph H Ellis. Both books are on basic the same subject. I became interested in the Yield Curve and if it had any real predictive value after posting the question on this forum. Both are good reads.

Murfield
"Nobody wants to have in his cash holdings a definite number of pieces of money; he wants to keep a cash holdings of a definite amount of purchasing power"

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daryll40
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Post by daryll40 » Sat Apr 07, 2007 2:09 pm

THE IMPROVING STATE OF THE WORLD by Indur Goklany. I highly recommend this book. :lol:

While it's really a non-partisan, non-political work, it does help to put the current worries of oil shortages and prognostications of serious climate changes in perspective.

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JohnYaker
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My Turn

Post by JohnYaker » Sat Apr 07, 2007 2:17 pm

.
Not reading any financial book for the moment, though waiting for William Bengen's "Preserving Clients Portfolios During Retirement" through inter-library loan. Most recently read financial books were Bogle's new 'Little Book' and 'The Bogleheads' Guide'.

Just finished Path Between the Seas by David McCullough. Soon to start Over the Edge of the World: Magellan's Terrifying Circumnavigation of the Globe by Laurence Bergreen.

John

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anthau
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The Kings of New York

Post by anthau » Sat Apr 07, 2007 2:22 pm

The Kings of New York: A Year Among the Geeks, Oddballs, and Genuises Who Make Up America's Top High School Chess Team.

The Marshall Chess Club was my middle school baby sitter, so the subject is near and dear to me. The book is more about the intersection of adolescence and talent, though, so I think anyone would enjoy it, and the author does a good job of making chess accessible to those who don't know how to play without condescending nor dumbing it down.
Best, | | Anth

George
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Books

Post by George » Sat Apr 07, 2007 3:54 pm

I'm reading Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean, by Charles Freeman, mainly because I enjoyed his later The Closing of the Western Mind.

Both books are a nice addendum to Donald Kagan's four volume set on the Peloponnesian War, which I re-read once a year or so.

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DaleMaley
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Post by DaleMaley » Sat Apr 07, 2007 4:03 pm

Most investors, both institutional and individual, will find that the best way to own common stocks is through an index fund that charges minimal fees. – Warren Buffett

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bob90245
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Post by bob90245 » Sat Apr 07, 2007 4:07 pm

My local library has a wonderful collection of books-on-tape. I've discovered I really enjoy listening to books on history and biographies. I've been listening to the Will Durant series. Currently on the The Renaissance.

A few months ago, I picked up Walter Updegrave's How to Retire Rich in a Totally Changed World from my local library. I didn't finish it before I had to return it. But I decided that it contained a lot of good information. So I ordered it from Amazon. Am just getting around to reading it again.

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Judsen
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reading

Post by Judsen » Sat Apr 07, 2007 4:30 pm

I just read "The Birth Of Plenty... "by Bill Bernstein and enjoyed it very much.! A great must read book! I am now reading "Straight talk..." by Jack Brennan. I especially enjoyed the books by messers Swedroe, Ferri, and Bogle. Amoung the first investment books I read were "Bullseye Investing" by John Mauldin and one whose title I don't recall at the senior moment by John Neff the former mgr of Windsor fund. Even though I don't recall the title it was a great book too. That said, the "Bogleheads Guide..." is the one I gave to my children! Jud

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TnGuy
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Post by TnGuy » Sat Apr 07, 2007 4:48 pm

"Money will not make you happy. And happy will not make you money." - Groucho Marx

norm
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Post by norm » Sat Apr 07, 2007 4:51 pm

I read about two books a week. I'm waiting for the library to get me a copy of Bogle's new book from another town. I'm reading Always Say Goodbye by Stuart M. Kaminsky, a mystery novel.

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Colin
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What I'm Reading Today

Post by Colin » Sat Apr 07, 2007 5:23 pm

I'm reading Against the Gods. It is an analysis of the study of risk and the management of risk in all facets of life. The author is Peter L. Bernstein. Its scope ranges from gaming theory in the first few centuries A.D. to investment theory in the present day.
Colin

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mickeyd
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Post by mickeyd » Sat Apr 07, 2007 5:39 pm

The Age of Uncertainty by JK Galbraith. Though a 1977 copyright, it is very enlightening.

My favorite quote, so far (refering to money P. 161): "...either it has been abundant and very unreliable, or reliable and very scarce."
Part-Owner of Texas | | “The CMH-the Cost Matters Hypothesis -is all that is needed to explain why indexing must and will work… Yes, it is that simple.” John C. Bogle

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DRiP Guy
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Post by DRiP Guy » Sat Apr 07, 2007 5:52 pm

Rereading "For Whom the Bell Tolls." Just put "Four Pillars" back on the shelf.
I typically have one non-fiction and one fiction at a time going, although my pace of finishing them is not quite as fast as when I was younger. I particularly enjoy reading non-fiction associated with accident investigation, human factors, engineering errors, etc.

I tend to not buy a lot of new material, but instead go back and read my old stuff. I guess some of the 'newer' (all relative!) books I have really enjoyed were from William Langewiesche ("Inside the Sky", "The Outlaw Sea", "Cutting for Sign") & Susan Orleans ("Orchid Thief", "The Bullfighter Checks Her Makeup"). When I find an author I enjoy, I tend to look for more of their works, even if the genre takes me out of my usual interest areas. Even my fiction sometimes tends to run towards the non-fiction themes, i.e. Crichton's "Airframe"...

asset_chaos
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Post by asset_chaos » Sat Apr 07, 2007 5:54 pm

Recently finished Bogle's last little book and am currently on The Echo Maker by Richard Powers.
Regards, | | Guy

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mickeyd
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Post by mickeyd » Sat Apr 07, 2007 5:57 pm

Recently finished Bogle's last little book
That's my next book. How did you like it?
Part-Owner of Texas | | “The CMH-the Cost Matters Hypothesis -is all that is needed to explain why indexing must and will work… Yes, it is that simple.” John C. Bogle

donocash
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Post by donocash » Sat Apr 07, 2007 6:05 pm

Just finished "In Spite of the Gods: The Strange Rise of Modern India", by Edward Luce.

I highly, highly recommend it, especially if you have ever wanted to more about India, or ever gave a passing thought to investing in India.

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Chas
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Re: What Book Are YOU Currently Reading?

Post by Chas » Sat Apr 07, 2007 6:25 pm

cfs wrote:I see a LOT of books quoted on the forum [that is good]. I wonder, what book are YOU currently reading?


I have just finished Bogle's "Common Sense on Mutual Funds", and it is beyond doubt, a classic. I am now reading Bogle's "Little Book on Investing", but it looks like a repeat/summary of "Common Sense". Also, I have just finished Ferri's, "All about Asset Allocation". Getting around to fiction, I have just re-read Steven King's "It", one of his best efforts, if not, "the best".
Chas | | The course of true love never did run smooth. Shakespeare

Grt2bOutdoors
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Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Sat Apr 07, 2007 6:52 pm

DripGuy - For Whom the Bell Tolls - that's a great book, a classic!

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Chas
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Re: My Turn

Post by Chas » Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:00 pm

JohnYaker wrote:.
Not reading any financial book for the moment, though waiting for William Bengen's "Preserving Clients Portfolios During Retirement".
John, I am looking for a source that provides a useful method for administering an annuity pay-out so as to achieve a good balance of maximum initial payments and total return, verses "safety", i.e., achieving coverage over a specified period with a high probability of success. I have a paper published in the FPA Journal, "Decision Rules and Maximum Initial Withdrawal Rates" (for variable annuities) by Guyton and Klinger. This looks like a good method, but I need a way to model it, or something similar, so that a trustee may easily follow the rules in administering an annuity. Guyton and Klinger used a computer simulation to analyze various options and came up with some good looking recommendations. The problem is, how to write down, or otherwise provide, directions that are clear and simple enough for a trustee with general accounting skills to comprehend and follow without needing specific annuity administration skills or computer software.

For example, an ideal method would administer an annuity payout that begins with the highest safe disbursal rate (say that “safe” means a 99% probability of lasting out the period), increases the disbursal each year by the inflation rate, and never disperses less than the amount of the preceding year. However, this ideal results in a very conservative rate. The trick is to introduce compromises that achieve the goal with seriously infringing on the said objective. Guyton and Klinger claim to do just that with new rules that they propose. The problem is how to set forth those rules, or any other set of rules, in such a way that the average accountant, acting as trustee, could follow them. Of course, a professional annuity administrator would have a model and the necessary computer software to do this, but I am looking for a way to “do it myself”; any pointers anyone?
Chas | | The course of true love never did run smooth. Shakespeare

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DRiP Guy
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Post by DRiP Guy » Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:08 pm

GRT2BOUTDOORS wrote:DripGuy - For Whom the Bell Tolls - that's a great book, a classic!
Hemingway is amazing to me. You read the prose and first are likely to say "Boy that is so simple it is childish. And, it feels stiff, and clunky...heck it can be almost embarrassingly self-conscious at times..." and yet... you then get drawn into the story and the characters, but most of all, the great truths he is really writing about, so that at the end of the book you wonder how any human could have sewn that all together so seemingly effortlessly[where did the clunkiness disappear to?]... I guess by way of a painting analogy, he would be a pointillist... if you look at the individual bits, you will likely not be impressed at all... but stand back and let the picture and the mind of the artist be revealed...
Last edited by DRiP Guy on Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

rreck
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Post by rreck » Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:14 pm

I'm in the middle of James Grant's John Adams: Party of One. Grant has a financial writer's perspective on the days when our as yet un-united states were printing money as fast as they could get ink and paper, and JA was trying to get the Dutch (who thought of our debt as junk bonds, and expected a hefty interest) to finance us. The more I read about Adams, the more I appreciate him. [I'd recommend reading Page Smith's JA biography first, though!] Lou

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WiseNLucky
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Post by WiseNLucky » Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:26 pm

mickeyd wrote:
Recently finished Bogle's last little book
That's my next book. How did you like it?
I agree with Chas that it is mostly a rehash of Common Sense, which I felt was the better book. The little book is limited by size, I think.
WiseNLucky

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zhiwiller
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Post by zhiwiller » Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:28 pm

No investment books for me currently - I get all the information I need in the M* forum and here.

What I am currently reading:
-McSweeney's Quarterly Concern Issue #22 (A very eclectic literary quarterly. They tend to do some wacky things with their presentation. One issue came in a cigar box, one came with a comb, this one is magnetic.) I have been a subscriber since the early teens.
-The Great Libertarian Offer by Harry Browne. This book shaped my entire political ideology back in 2000. I lent it to a friend in college and never got it back and recently found it cheap used online, so I ordered it and am going through it again. I don't always completely agree with him, but the fundamentals are presneted in a very compelling fasion.
-Dialogue by Gloria Kempton
-I also subscribe to some magazines - GameDeveloper, Games, Fantasy and Science Fiction, The New Yorker

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DRiP Guy
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Post by DRiP Guy » Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:37 pm

zhiwiller wrote:
They tend to do some wacky things with their presentation. One issue came in a cigar box, one came with a comb, this one is magnetic.)

I'm a sucker for that. I got a multi CD collection of car-themed songs, came with fuzzy dice, moonie stickers (remember those?)

It was pretty cool. Rare commercials from the fifties, other ephemera...

Came in a plastic-model box sized container, sent me right down memory lane...

Image

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lucky7
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Post by lucky7 » Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:46 pm

Re-reading Ed Slott's, Retirement Savings Time Bomb, and how to defuse it. Critical read for tax issues with retirement accounts, RMDs and the "stretch" IRAs.

Bob

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orthros
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Post by orthros » Sat Apr 07, 2007 8:47 pm

Nice. I just finished a book a while back on the Cure D'Ars, a simple man who was simply amazing.

gkaplan
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Books

Post by gkaplan » Sat Apr 07, 2007 9:01 pm

I'm currently reading Lou Cannon's Ronnie and Jesse.

(Has anyone read George Eliot's Romola?)
Gordon

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shadowrings
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Post by shadowrings » Sat Apr 07, 2007 9:54 pm

Wide range of reading. Normally read 2-3 titles a week but now down to maybe 1 every 2 weeks as time permits... work, pre-move sort and disposal of years of accumulation (as well as associated get ready to put on market tasks), and winding down some estates haven't left me much of my own.

Currently working on Michael Pollan's "The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals"
so far an excellent book but has been sort of sidelined while I skim through Menopause for Dummies.... blah

stay warm out there folks
vickie
Knowing your own darkness is the best method for dealing with the darknesses of other people. | --- Carl G. Jung

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Rick
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Black Book on Personal Finance

Post by Rick » Sat Apr 07, 2007 9:59 pm

Just read "The Black Book on Personal Finance", glad I borrowed and didn't pay for it...

Rick

LocalHero
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books lately

Post by LocalHero » Sat Apr 07, 2007 10:48 pm

Greetings Bogleheads,

Recently finished "A Random Walk Down Wall Street: The Time-Tested Strategy for Successful Investing," 9th ed., Jack's "The Little Book of Common Sense Investing," Carl Hiaasen's "Skin Tight," and Randy Wayne White's "The Heat Islands."
Am currently reading Hiaasen's "Native Tongue" and Ayaan Hirsi Ali's "Infidel."
Rick Ferri's "All About Index Funds'" 2nd ed. and the "Ubuntu Linux Bible" are in queue along with several other Hiaasen and White books.
Peter L. Bernstein's "Capital Ideas Evolving" and Nassim Nicholas Taleb's "The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable" are on pre-order from Amazon. "Index Funds: The 12-Step Program for Active Investors" is on back order.
Also awaiting the final Harry Potter book.

Best wishes,
JB
Remember, I'm pulling for you. We're all in this together. -- Red Green

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oneleaf
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Post by oneleaf » Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:12 pm

The Undiscovered Chekhov: Thirty-Eight New Stories by Anton Chekhov. Found this gem at the library recently.

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stratton
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Post by stratton » Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:24 pm

I picked up a used copy of Fabozzi's The Handbook of Fixed Income Securities for almost nothing. I could still take it back, but it seems like it would be the perfect compantion for Larry Swedroes bond book. :-)

Paul

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rob
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Post by rob » Sun Apr 08, 2007 1:01 am

On the immediate list....

Light:Science & Magic [Photography]
Image

The God Delusion [Religion Maybe? :D]
Image

The World is Flat [Economics]
Image

Mechanics Tale [Formula 1 Racing]
Image
| Rob | Its a dangerous business going out your front door. - J.R.R.Tolkien

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DRiP Guy
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Post by DRiP Guy » Sun Apr 08, 2007 8:52 am

[quote="rob"]On the immediate list....

Light:Science & Magic [Photography]
Image

If you like that one, you might also like "Perception & Imaging". Easy read, full of graphics and examples tying together human psychology with imaging [including photography] techniques that evoke certain responses.
Image

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cfs
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All good inputs

Post by cfs » Sun Apr 08, 2007 1:03 pm

Thanks for all the good inputs.
Chas wrote:I have just finished Bogle's "Common Sense on Mutual Funds", and it is beyond doubt, a classic. I am now reading Bogle's "Little Book on Investing", but it looks like a repeat/summary of "Common Sense".
Yes, Jack Bogle's Common Sense on Mutual Funds was my very first investment book [gave my old copy to a good shipmate during my last deployment].

At my favorite public library, I read Barron's, WSJ, and a few money magazine, all just for the fun of it [no I do not follow any of those HOT tips].

Again, thanks for the good inputs.

cfs
~ Member of the Active Retired Force since 2014 ~

MattBrennan
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Post by MattBrennan » Sun Apr 08, 2007 1:05 pm

Just finished "The Third Option" by Vince Flynn. Now I'm reading Rick Ferri's "All About Asset Allocation".

Matt

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CyberBob
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Nothing Financial

Post by CyberBob » Sun Apr 08, 2007 3:25 pm

I'm not reading anything financial anymore. After reading about 300 investment-related books over the years, I'm kind of burnt out. That, and the fact that their seems to only rarely be somthing in the finance section that actually contains new information.

I just finished a book by Erik Larson entitled The Devil in the White City. The White City being the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, and the devil being a serial killer that was active around that time. The timeline of the two happens simultaneously and the book melds them together like a suspense novel, even though it's all true. All history should be this interesting.
Image

Since Larson's other book was so entertaining, I'm now finishing one of his others, entitled Thunderstruck, which melds together the two timelines of Marconi inventing the wireless telegraph, and a hen-pecked doctor killing his wife. Again, all true, but it reads like a suspense novel.
Image

Bob

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Norbert Schlenker
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Post by Norbert Schlenker » Sun Apr 08, 2007 4:55 pm

Special Topics in Calamity Physics

Recommended by my daughter and pretty darn good so far.

gazoline
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Post by gazoline » Sun Apr 08, 2007 5:31 pm

You may have heard of them:
- A Random Walk Down Wall Street
- The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing
- The Successful Investor Today
- All About Asset Allocation

I think I am off financial books for a while. Any book recommendations for suspenseful short stories?

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spangineer
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Post by spangineer » Sun Apr 08, 2007 7:20 pm

As for me, I'm reading:
  • John Bogle's Common Sense on Mutual Funds -- good, but having read a number of Bogle's speeches online and books by Berstein and Ferri, there isn't alot of new material here.
    Gary Kleck's Point Blank: Guns and Violence in America -- so far pretty interesting; from what I gather it's an in-depth study on how guns are used in the U.S. Dismantles the logical fallicies of both the pro-gun and anti-gun sides, and analyzes a wide assortment of data.
Haven't read much classic fiction lately, so will probably be reading Alice's Adventures in Wonderland next.

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shadowrings
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Post by shadowrings » Mon Apr 09, 2007 9:30 am

Kim Harrison's "For a Few Demons More" link It's the author's fifth book in an arcane toned spaghetti-western style set in a future Cincinnati suburb called The Hollows. Excellent characters, good tangled plot very reminenscent of the Eastwood spaghetti-western's that she makes puns of for the book titles.

vickie
Knowing your own darkness is the best method for dealing with the darknesses of other people. | --- Carl G. Jung

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Black Knights
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Post by Black Knights » Mon Apr 09, 2007 12:06 pm

More Than You Know: Finding Financial Wisdom in Unconventional Places by Michael J. Mauboussin.

Read it as a mental diversifier and thought provoker, not as a prescriptive investing resource. Applies to much more than finance.
Jed

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shadowrings
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Post by shadowrings » Mon Apr 09, 2007 12:44 pm

Neighbor just passed me a copy of Annette Thau's The Bond Book
Knowing your own darkness is the best method for dealing with the darknesses of other people. | --- Carl G. Jung

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Vegomatic
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The Catcher Was a Spy: The Mysterious Life of Moe Berg

Post by Vegomatic » Mon Apr 09, 2007 1:48 pm

The Catcher Was a Spy: The Mysterious Life of Moe Berg
by Nicholas Dawidoff


"The only Major League ballplayer whose baseball card is on display at the headquarters of the CIA, Moe Berg has the singular distinction of having both a 15-year career as a catcher for such teams as the New York Robins and the Chicago White Sox and that of a spy for the OSS during World War II."

Locked