What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

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WhyNotKnow
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by WhyNotKnow » Tue Dec 17, 2019 9:08 am

The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning by Margareta Magnusson.

A charming, practical, and unsentimental approach to putting a home in order while reflecting on the tiny joys that make up a long life.

I haven’t yet tried the cheesecake recipe but it sounds interesting.

jdb
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jdb » Thu Dec 19, 2019 7:19 pm

Just finished two fascinating books, one a novel set in Paris and Iceland, The Sacrament by Olaf Olafsson, and the other a memoir set in the Welsh countryside, How To Catch A Mole, And Find Yourself in Nature by Marc Hamer. The protagonist of the novel is a young Frenchwoman who decides to become a Nun and joins a convent, she is adept at languages and learns Icelandic from a roommate at the Sorbonne. Years later she is asked by a Cardinal at the Vatican to quietly investigate a report of a priest in Iceland abusing young men at his school, she is chosen because of her language ability and to provide a cover for quiet investigation. The novel is beautifully written, almost lyrical, a well knit mystery story, enjoyed harsh location in Iceland, highly recommend. As to the memoir, my friends look at me askance when I tell them how much I enjoyed reading about a gardener and mole catcher in Wales. It is also almost lyrical, enjoyed the self deprecating nature loving author’s journey. At one point he says that “When I tell people at parties how I earn money they laugh. Not that I go to many parties”. None of my friends have taken me up on my offer to loan them the book to read but in my opinion it is their loss. Highly recommend even if you have never seen what a mole can do to a well tended lawn.

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MrBobcat
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by MrBobcat » Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:50 pm

Happy day, just found out Colleen McCullough's Masters of Rome series is FINALLY being released on Kindle 2/18/20. Pre-ordered them all and am so looking forward to re-reading them.

Currently rereading some old Raymond E Feist books (riftwar saga) on kindle.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by brokendirtdart » Wed Dec 25, 2019 5:38 pm

Blues wrote:
Tue Dec 17, 2019 8:33 am
"Sympathy for the Devil" by Kent Anderson. (A novel about the Vietnam War, the first of a three book series about one character.)
Woah!

I didn't know there were other books and the way Sympathy for the Devil ended, I can't imagine another book.

I first read this in the late 80s/early 90s before graduating high school. I was on a military book kick and Vietnam was the genre of the day. It was good enough I purchased another copy about 10 years ago.
Books like these were one of the reasons I fell for the "do you want to be airborne" question at MEPS when the guidance counselor asked me to volunteer for an airborne assignment. >20 years on jump status later and longer than that in the Army, I am looking forward to resting some tired bones and reading some more.

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Blues
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Blues » Wed Dec 25, 2019 6:29 pm

brokendirtdart wrote:
Wed Dec 25, 2019 5:38 pm
Blues wrote:
Tue Dec 17, 2019 8:33 am
"Sympathy for the Devil" by Kent Anderson. (A novel about the Vietnam War, the first of a three book series about one character.)
Woah!

I didn't know there were other books and the way Sympathy for the Devil ended, I can't imagine another book.

I first read this in the late 80s/early 90s before graduating high school. I was on a military book kick and Vietnam was the genre of the day. It was good enough I purchased another copy about 10 years ago.
Books like these were one of the reasons I fell for the "do you want to be airborne" question at MEPS when the guidance counselor asked me to volunteer for an airborne assignment. >20 years on jump status later and longer than that in the Army, I am looking forward to resting some tired bones and reading some more.
I figured out while reading "Sympathy for the Devil" that I'd read it sometime in years past. I'm now reading the second book in the three book series, (the last two deal with Hanson as a police officer), "Night Dogs". I'm between a third and a half way through and it's a good read. I'm retired from federal law enforcement so it's interesting to read about the period described which begins only a handful of years before I started my own career in L.E., but during a period I remember very well from my mid 20's.

Get some rest, brother. I'm sure you've earned it.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Compound » Wed Dec 25, 2019 8:06 pm

mak1277 wrote:
Mon Dec 16, 2019 8:42 am
Compound wrote:
Sat Dec 14, 2019 6:34 pm
Barbarian Days by William Finnegan.

Finished this book recently and loved it. I previously dabbled in surfing and this really brought me back. Finnegan’s writing style also resonated with me.
I'm trying to get through this currently. I've started and stopped (and finished three novels in the meantime) and just can't get into the book. I keep wondering why I should care about the author's story.
Have you surfed before? I wonder how the book would read to someone who has no personal interest in surfing.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by brokendirtdart » Thu Dec 26, 2019 5:18 pm

Thanks Blues. Having just read a synopsis of Night Dogs, I'll add it to my long list of "want to reads".

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Thu Dec 26, 2019 5:51 pm

Six Frigates, by Ian Toll.

This is a very interesting history of the foundation of the U.S. Navy through 1815, including the quasi war with France, the Barbary Wars, and the War of 1812.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Freefun » Thu Dec 26, 2019 6:02 pm

The hard thing about hard things, by Ben Horowitz.
Remember when you wanted what you currently have?

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by HoosierJim » Fri Dec 27, 2019 10:24 am

The Last Days of the Romanovs by Helen Rappaport from our local library ebook service.

Lots of details of an unsuitable, inept leader that would have rather been a farmer and the tragedy of his family.

Dave55
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Dave55 » Fri Dec 27, 2019 10:53 am

"Strip Jack" by Ian Rankin, the 4th book in the Detective Rebus series.

Dave

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FreeAtLast
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast » Sun Dec 29, 2019 8:03 pm

"Manstein: Hitler's Greatest General", by Mungo Melvin (Thomas Dunne Books 2010).

A reasonable argument can be put forth that if General Erich von Manstein had not fundamentally changed the "schwerpunkt" (initial assault point) for the Wehrmacht's offensive against France on May 10th 1940, the entire history of the Second World War would have been quite different and maybe not in Germany's favor. Instead of throwing the majority of the Panzer divisions into the old WWI route through northern Belgium, he had them all funneled through the Ardennnes Forest to cross the Meuse river near Sedan where they quickly broke through the defenses of the confused and demoralized French Army. The Allies were split and flanked, the British were very lucky to retrieve most of their manpower from Dunkirk, and the final surrender of France came during the third week in June. Manstein went on to carry out multiple successful operations against the Russians, the most famous of them being the taking of the fortified port of Sevastopol, after which Hitler made him a Field Marshal. The Russians naturally hated him, but respected his operational abilities and eventually became better and wiser fighters by learning from his methods. Major military academies across the world teach these same methods today.

BUT - like several other extremely competent German generals in WW2 - Kesselring and Model come to mind - our admiration for their military expertise is much lessened when we discover their acquiescence to the war crimes instigated by the directives of Hitler. At the very least, Manstein allowed by omission the operation of the murdering Einsatzgruppen in his area of responsibility, as well as turning a blind eye to the shootings of Russian POW's and the summary execution of suspected "partisan" civilians without trials. Unlike Manstein, other German generals such as Blaskowitz, von Senger, and Rommel either refused to carry out the illegal orders or protested them directly to the Fuehrer. Unfortunately, most of the German General Staff made a literal deal with the Devil because of their arrogance and ambition, and millions of innocents paid for their transgressions with their lives. In the final analysis, this book is for military history geeks, who will be rewarded for their patience by learning a lot of detail about the Wehrmacht's engagements from the invasion of Poland to the destruction of Army Group Center.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by planetmike » Fri Jan 03, 2020 8:47 am

"Norco '80: The True Story of the Most Spectacular Bank Robbery in American History" by Peter Houlahan.

A bank robbery gone wrong in Southern California in 1980. I keep imagining this as a movie.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Dave55 » Sun Jan 05, 2020 4:44 pm

I just finished "Fractured" by Karin Slaughter, the 2nd book in the Will Trent series. Homicide mystery. Totally enjoyable, crisp writing, great plot, & page turner.

Dave

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Jim21713 » Fri Jan 10, 2020 3:59 pm

I just came across "Homewreckers" in my local public library. Its by Aaron Glantz a pulitzer prize finalist and from its intro..."How a Gang of Wall Street Kingpins, Hedge Fund Magnates, Crooked Banks, and Vulture Capitalists suckered millions out of their homes and demolished the American dream". I have followed real estate for some time and was aware that hedge funds had purchased large numbers of homes, many of which were foreclosures from the 2008 home loan crash and recession. I had no ideal of the actual process that was involved nor of the enormous wealth obtained by very few people, much of which was paid from government funds.

The book very detailed and fairly long (over 300 pages) and comes together in the final two or three chapters. If you have the inclination for this sort of topic I heartily recommend you read it. I found it very enlightening and a little scary.

Small Law Survivor
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Small Law Survivor » Fri Jan 10, 2020 4:32 pm

The Glory and the Dream, by William Manchester (1973)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NM ... tkin_p1_i7

I saw this book mentioned somewhere, and downloaded the (lengthy) sample on my Kindle. I will purchase the book when I get to the end of the sample.

The description of American life during the Great Depression is amazing and terrifying. I had never before read in detail how the Depression affected the millions of people who were put out of work for years, and the terrible hardships they endured. No wonder that generation was so deeply scarred. I understand my father (born 1920, lost his father 1929) much better after reading this. He never talked about his experiences in any detail, either because he'd repressed those memories or he didn't feel he could inflict them on his children.

The portrayal of Hoover and his/the Republican incompetent response to this catastrophe is also well worth reading.

The book opens with a detailed account of McArthur's attack on the "Bonus Army" (WWI vets demonstrating in D.C.) which is enough to make your blood run cold.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonus_Army
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Small Law Survivor » Sat Jan 11, 2020 8:53 am

Also reading (or finished over last year):

Guns of August, Barbara Tuchman - this is a reread of this history of the events leading up to the commencement of WWI in August 1914

Testimony, Robbie Robertson - rock bio by one of founders of The Band. Quite good!

Texas Flood, the Inside Story of Stevie Ray Vaughn - having a bit of a struggle with this biography. Moderate recommendation

Ball Four, Jim Bouton - wonderful. Highly recommend. "A ballplayer spends a good piece of his life gripping a baseball, and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time."

Life After Life, by Kate Atkinson - highly recommend. One of the best works of fiction I've read

The Border trilogy by Don Winslow - deeply disturbing series of books about Mexican drug cartels. The writing and characterizations are mediocre, but the history of the cartels, as reflected in these books, is terrifying
68 yrs, semi-retired lawyer, 50/40/10 s/b/c, 70/30 dom/int'l. Plan: 4% WR until age 70, 3% after social security kicks in. Boglehead since day 1 (and M* Diehard before that) under various other names

birnhamwood
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood » Sat Jan 11, 2020 11:36 am

Infantry Attacks by Erwin Rommel (with preface by his son Manfred}

"In this classic study of the art of war, Rommel analyzes the tactics that lay behind his success. First published in 1937, it quickly became a highly regarded military textbook and also brought its author to the attention of Adolph Hitler. Rommel was to subsequently advance through the ranks to the high command in World War II. Though most people immediately connect Rommel with the African campaigns of World War II, he made his initial legendary giant steps during the First World War. In this 1935 title, he recalls his greatest battles, outlines how he won them, and provides his strategies on the use of armor in the field lessons ultimately used by Patton and other Allied tank commanders to defeat him." Library Journal

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by abuss368 » Sat Jan 11, 2020 11:42 am

Reading Jack Bogle last book “Stay the Course”. Really good.
John C. Bogle - Two Fund Portfolio: Total Stock & Total Bond. "Simplicity is the master key to financial success."

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Mactheriverrat » Sun Jan 12, 2020 2:44 pm

I have the kindle version of The Bogleheads' Guide to the Three-Fund Portfolio
but
I have now have the hard cover books from Amazon

The Bogleheads' Guide to the Three-Fund Portfolio and The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing .

Just call me old timer as I rather have a hard copy of books.
Everything evolves. | May Every Sunrise Bring You Hope. May Every Sunset Bring you Peace.

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wabbott
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by wabbott » Sun Jan 12, 2020 3:19 pm

Gunpowder: Alchemy, Bombards, And Pyrotechnics: The History Of The Explosive That Changed The World
by Jack Kelley

crystalbank
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by crystalbank » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:16 pm

Ishmael by Daniel Quinn. Philosophical fiction sounds strange, but this book is riveting. I quite didn't know what to expect and was really enthralled when I finished this book. Highly recommended.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by puc_ytpme » Sun Jan 12, 2020 6:14 pm

Why Buddhism is true: The science & philosophy of meditation & enlightenment by Robert Wright, author of the Moral Animal
"I am the wisest man alive, for I know one thing, and that is that I know nothing" -Plato

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fallible » Sun Jan 12, 2020 6:39 pm

Jim21713 wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 3:59 pm
I just came across "Homewreckers" in my local public library. Its by Aaron Glantz a pulitzer prize finalist and from its intro..."How a Gang of Wall Street Kingpins, Hedge Fund Magnates, Crooked Banks, and Vulture Capitalists suckered millions out of their homes and demolished the American dream". I have followed real estate for some time and was aware that hedge funds had purchased large numbers of homes, many of which were foreclosures from the 2008 home loan crash and recession. I had no ideal of the actual process that was involved nor of the enormous wealth obtained by very few people, much of which was paid from government funds.

The book very detailed and fairly long (over 300 pages) and comes together in the final two or three chapters. If you have the inclination for this sort of topic I heartily recommend you read it. I found it very enlightening and a little scary.
The book is on my list to read, but I'm not looking forward to the frustration I expect to feel from reading more about those who benefited from and, in many cases, helped cause the financial crisis and GOT AWAY WITH IT. But the enlightenment you mention from reading this book, and all the other good books about the crisis, is important to achieve.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by North Texas Cajun » Sun Jan 12, 2020 7:00 pm

Vacationed in Miami Beach last week and read two Wall Street books about boom and then bust years for telecoms:

Wall Street Meat by Andy Kessler
Confessions of a Walk Street Analyst by Dan Reingold

Both accounts make good cases against Salomon Smith Barney and Jack Grubman. I enjoyed Kessler’s book as much as cI liked Michael Lewis’s Liar’s Poker and The Big Short.

Just started an old book by Cecil Jackson, “Business Fairy Tales”. It has chapters on Sunbeam, Enron, Worldcom and others. The value for me is the signals he shows that were not so hidden in financials of the companies. Although I’m a passive investor, I still enjoy using some of the analysis skills I learned in B-School and later in my career.

I probably could have worked on Wall Street. Many of my classmates did. I often wonder if I would have made some of the mistakes I read about.

quantAndHold
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by quantAndHold » Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:54 pm

Small Law Survivor wrote:
Sat Jan 11, 2020 8:53 am
Life After Life, by Kate Atkinson - highly recommend. One of the best works of fiction I've read
Indeed, excellent book.

I’m finishing the Elena Ferrante quartet. The story of the relationship between two friends, from their childhood in Naples just after WWII, through the changes in Italian society during the last half of the last century, until one disappears without a trace in her 60’s. Highly recommended.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood » Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:24 pm

Agree that Life after Life is a good read.

But I'll never eat balogna sausage again :^)

(Wearing hip boots, workers walk around in the mush as the balogna cooks in huge vats).

quantAndHold
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by quantAndHold » Mon Jan 13, 2020 10:58 pm

birnhamwood wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:24 pm
Agree that Life after Life is a good read.

But I'll never eat balogna sausage again :^)

(Wearing hip boots, workers walk around in the mush as the balogna cooks in huge vats).
I stopped eating sausage after I read The Jungle in high school.

mak1277
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by mak1277 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:36 am

quantAndHold wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 10:58 pm
birnhamwood wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:24 pm
Agree that Life after Life is a good read.

But I'll never eat balogna sausage again :^)

(Wearing hip boots, workers walk around in the mush as the balogna cooks in huge vats).
I stopped eating sausage after I read The Jungle in high school.
I'll stop eating sausage when pigs stop tasting good.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jubby288 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:50 am

Highly recommend The Company, a Novel of the CIA by Robert Littell

It's a historical fiction spy novel that follows a cast of characters through a few decades

It's long but a real page turner, kept my interest which is no easy task!

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood » Tue Jan 14, 2020 12:28 pm

I am thoroughly enjoying Erwin Rommel's INFANTRY ATTACKS, his accounts of his experiences as as 2nd Lt.infantry platoon leader in WWI. I cannot help but see his genius at age 21. I came along as a PEACE time infantry platoon leader some 60 years later and can only marvel at the things he knew and at his leadership skills at that young age. I never had the slightest clue at that age.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by black jack » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:43 pm

jubby288 wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:50 am
Highly recommend The Company, a Novel of the CIA by Robert Littell

It's a historical fiction spy novel that follows a cast of characters through a few decades

It's long but a real page turner, kept my interest which is no easy task!
I read The Company (or listened to the audiobook) last spring, and second the recommendation: it's a gripping and well-told tale.

Some of the central characters are reportedly based on real people. "Harvey Torriti" is a particularly memorable character (based on William King Harvey, "America's James Bond," I learned from reading about the book after reading it).
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast » Wed Jan 15, 2020 12:50 am

"Edison", by Edmund Morris (Random House NY 2019)

A superb biography of an extraordinary American individual. Your schoolboy/girl education concerning Edison was absolutely inadequate to appreciate all of what he accomplished in his lifetime and how he achieved those accomplishments. Furthermore, he came close to inventing the radio, the telephone, and the field of electronics. His inventions were not created by just luck and "99% perspiration"; he was an intuitive mechanical genius who read widely and deeply in chemistry, physics, engineering, and botany. A must read.

The book does one absurd thing. It deliberately arranges its chapters ("Parts") starting with the end of Edison's life and proceeding in reverse to his birth. My advice is to ignore this nonsensical chronology and begin by reading Part Eight, then Part Seven.....all the way to Part One, then the Prologue and finally the Epilogue. Worked fine for me. :D
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jubby288 » Wed Jan 15, 2020 6:42 am

black jack wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:43 pm
jubby288 wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:50 am
Highly recommend The Company, a Novel of the CIA by Robert Littell

It's a historical fiction spy novel that follows a cast of characters through a few decades

It's long but a real page turner, kept my interest which is no easy task!
I read The Company (or listened to the audiobook) last spring, and second the recommendation: it's a gripping and well-told tale.

Some of the central characters are reportedly based on real people. "Harvey Torriti" is a particularly memorable character (based on William King Harvey, "America's James Bond," I learned from reading about the book after reading it).
Yes, that makes it all the more interesting!

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius » Wed Jan 15, 2020 6:58 am

American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America, by Colin Woodard. Fascinating. It's one of those books that ties in things I knew with a vast number of closely related things I didn't know and hadn't understood. The central claim is that eleven regional cultures--including two that cross borders, one with Mexico and one with Canada--have identifiable characteristics, that trace back to their earliest days, and behave somewhat as cultural and political units. The parts I can judge seem accurate, and the parts I didn't know are amazing.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:44 am

nisiprius wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 6:58 am
American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America, by Colin Woodard. Fascinating. It's one of those books that ties in things I knew with a vast number of closely related things I didn't know and hadn't understood. The central claim is that eleven regional cultures--including two that cross borders, one with Mexico and one with Canada--have identifiable characteristics, that trace back to their earliest days, and behave somewhat as cultural and political units. The parts I can judge seem accurate, and the parts I didn't know are amazing.
Another book, even better, that deals with the same subject is Albion's Seed, by David Hacket Fischer. Amazon link.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by theicecreamman » Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:44 am

Where are the Customers' Yachts? by Fred Schwed, Jr. Even better than I thought it would be.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood » Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:51 pm

The two reviews of THE COMPANY reminded me of the similarly titled non-fiction book, INSIDE THE COMPANY, which I enjoyed reading very much. Here's a snippet from Wikipedia's entry on its author, Phillip Agee.

Because of legal problems in the United States, Inside the Company was first published in 1975 in Britain, while Agee was living in London.[14] In an issue of Playboy magazine after the book's publication, Agee was interviewed: "Millions of people all over the world had been killed or at least had their lives destroyed by the CIA ... I couldn't just sit by and do nothing."[17]

Agee acknowledged that "Representatives of the Communist Party of Cuba also gave important encouragement at a time when I doubted that I would be able to find the additional information I needed."[8]

The London Evening News called Inside the Company: CIA Diary "a frightening picture of corruption, pressure, assassination and conspiracy". The Economist called the book "inescapable reading". Miles Copeland, Jr., a former CIA station chief in Cairo, said the book was "as complete an account of spy work as is likely to be published anywhere"[18] and it is "an authentic account of how an ordinary American or British 'case officer' operates ... All of it ... is presented with deadly accuracy."[19]

The book was delayed for six months before being published in the United States; it became an immediate best seller.[14]

Inside the Company identified 250 alleged CIA officers and agents.[3] The list of officers and agents, all personally known to Agee, appears in an appendix to the book.[20] While written as a diary, the book actually reconstructs events based on Agee's memory and his subsequent research.[21]

Agee describes his first overseas assignment in 1960 to Ecuador, where his primary mission had the aim of forcing a diplomatic break between Ecuador and Cuba. He writes that the technique he used included bribery, intimidation, bugging, and forgery. Agee spent four years in Ecuador penetrating Ecuadorian politics. He states that his actions subverted and destroyed the political fabric of Ecuador.[4]

Agee helped bug the United Arab Republic code-room in Montevideo, Uruguay, with two contact microphones placed on the ceiling of the room below.[4]

On December 12, 1965 Agee visited senior Uruguayan military and police officers at a Montevideo police headquarters. He realized that the screaming he heard from a nearby cell was the torturing of a Uruguayan, whose name he had given to the police as someone to watch. The Uruguayan senior officers simply turned up a radio report of a soccer game to drown out the screams.[4]

Agee also ran CIA operations within the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games and he witnessed the events of the Tlatelolco massacre.[citation needed]

Agee identified President José Figueres Ferrer of Costa Rica, President Luis Echeverría Álvarez (1970–1976) of Mexico and President Alfonso López Michelsen (1974–1978) of Colombia as CIA collaborators or agents.[22]

Following this he details how he resigned from the CIA and began writing the book, conducting research in Cuba, London and Paris. During this time he alleged that the CIA spied on him.[4][22][23] The cover of the book actually featured an image of the bugged typewriter given to Agee by a CIA agent as part of their surveillance and attempts to stop publication of the book.[13]

In 1982, the United States Congress passed the Intelligence Identities Protection Act (IIPA), legislation that seemed directly aimed at Agee's works. The law would later figure in the 2003 Valerie Plame affair.[7]

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by North Texas Cajun » Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:58 pm

theicecreamman wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:44 am
Where are the Customers' Yachts? by Fred Schwed, Jr. Even better than I thought it would be.
I’ve got that in my library, and had planned to read it this year. Thanks for the recommendation.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ScoobyDoo » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:07 pm

crystalbank wrote:
Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:16 pm
Ishmael by Daniel Quinn. Philosophical fiction sounds strange, but this book is riveting. I quite didn't know what to expect and was really enthralled when I finished this book. Highly recommended.
Love this book! I first read it because a friend recommended it. I knew nothing going in, needless to say, the first few pages took me through some stuff!!!! Wow!

I was in my twenties and reread it in my 30s thinking it was just a quirky book i fantasized as being good....Loved it again! Quinn won an award i believe for this book and a movie was “loosely based on the premise” which was quite disappointing!
ScoobyDoo!

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by black jack » Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:33 pm

birnhamwood wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:51 pm
The two reviews of THE COMPANY reminded me of the similarly titled non-fiction book, INSIDE THE COMPANY, which I enjoyed reading very much. Here's a snippet from Wikipedia's entry on its author, Phillip Agee.

Because of legal problems in the United States, Inside the Company was first published in 1975 in Britain, while Agee was living in London.[14] In an issue of Playboy magazine after the book's publication, Agee was interviewed: "Millions of people all over the world had been killed or at least had their lives destroyed by the CIA ... I couldn't just sit by and do nothing."[17]

Agee acknowledged that "Representatives of the Communist Party of Cuba also gave important encouragement at a time when I doubted that I would be able to find the additional information I needed."[8]

The London Evening News called Inside the Company: CIA Diary "a frightening picture of corruption, pressure, assassination and conspiracy". The Economist called the book "inescapable reading". Miles Copeland, Jr., a former CIA station chief in Cairo, said the book was "as complete an account of spy work as is likely to be published anywhere"[18] and it is "an authentic account of how an ordinary American or British 'case officer' operates ... All of it ... is presented with deadly accuracy."[19]

The book was delayed for six months before being published in the United States; it became an immediate best seller.[14]

Inside the Company identified 250 alleged CIA officers and agents.[3] The list of officers and agents, all personally known to Agee, appears in an appendix to the book.[20] While written as a diary, the book actually reconstructs events based on Agee's memory and his subsequent research.[21]

Agee describes his first overseas assignment in 1960 to Ecuador, where his primary mission had the aim of forcing a diplomatic break between Ecuador and Cuba. He writes that the technique he used included bribery, intimidation, bugging, and forgery. Agee spent four years in Ecuador penetrating Ecuadorian politics. He states that his actions subverted and destroyed the political fabric of Ecuador.[4]

Agee helped bug the United Arab Republic code-room in Montevideo, Uruguay, with two contact microphones placed on the ceiling of the room below.[4]

On December 12, 1965 Agee visited senior Uruguayan military and police officers at a Montevideo police headquarters. He realized that the screaming he heard from a nearby cell was the torturing of a Uruguayan, whose name he had given to the police as someone to watch. The Uruguayan senior officers simply turned up a radio report of a soccer game to drown out the screams.[4]

Agee also ran CIA operations within the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games and he witnessed the events of the Tlatelolco massacre.[citation needed]

Agee identified President José Figueres Ferrer of Costa Rica, President Luis Echeverría Álvarez (1970–1976) of Mexico and President Alfonso López Michelsen (1974–1978) of Colombia as CIA collaborators or agents.[22]

Following this he details how he resigned from the CIA and began writing the book, conducting research in Cuba, London and Paris. During this time he alleged that the CIA spied on him.[4][22][23] The cover of the book actually featured an image of the bugged typewriter given to Agee by a CIA agent as part of their surveillance and attempts to stop publication of the book.[13]

In 1982, the United States Congress passed the Intelligence Identities Protection Act (IIPA), legislation that seemed directly aimed at Agee's works. The law would later figure in the 2003 Valerie Plame affair.[7]
I'd heard of Agee and his book; have never read it.

After reading your post, I looked for it in the online catalog of two large public library systems. Neither had a listing for Agee or this book. That seems...very odd.

Guess I'll have to buy a copy to read it.
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by protagonist » Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:26 pm

I just finished Patti Smith's "Just Kids" (yes, the rock star Patti Smith)....an autobiographical recount of her relationship with Robert Mapplethorpe. She promised Mapplethorpe she would write it on his death bed in 1989 and she finally finished it in 2010.

I don't often read books of this genre but I loved it. I'm not generally drawn to love stories- I find most of them too melodramatic for my taste- but this was one of the most touching and interesting love stories I have ever read.

Plus, having been a part of the New York scene in the late 60s, early 70s (though not nearly to the extent or with the same passion or depth of experience as the author), I related to many of her recounts of her experiences (people, places, etc).

Agee's book sounds interesting. I will look for it.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:49 pm

Adventures of a Mountain Man, by Zenas Leonard.

This is the first person narrative of five years (1831-1835) spent trapping furs in the mountain west, including participation in the Joseph Walker expedition which established a route to California and discovered the Yosemite Valley.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by mighty72 » Thu Jan 16, 2020 8:33 pm

"The Great Depression: A Diary" based on dairy of Benjamin Roth & written by Daniel Roth and James Ledbetter. It is quite an interesting read.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by mak1277 » Fri Jan 17, 2020 8:52 am

ruralavalon wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:49 pm
Adventures of a Mountain Man, by Zenas Leonard.

This is the first person narrative of five years (1831-1835) spent trapping furs in the mountain west, including participation in the Joseph Walker expedition which established a route to California and discovered the Yosemite Valley.
Recommend?

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Nowizard » Fri Jan 17, 2020 9:02 am

Tales from a Free-Range Childhood by Donald Davis. It is a group of short chapters primarily written for and about his and his children's history. Parents, particularly fathers, would relate to many of the stories. Nice to read something non-controversial in these days of polarization in numerous areas.
OOPS! No intent to underline everything!

Tim

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by mancich » Fri Jan 17, 2020 10:42 am

mighty72 wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 8:33 pm
"The Great Depression: A Diary" based on dairy of Benjamin Roth & written by Daniel Roth and James Ledbetter. It is quite an interesting read.
+1 I read it last year and also found it very interesting. It really puts things into perspective.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Fri Jan 17, 2020 10:49 am

mak1277 wrote:
Fri Jan 17, 2020 8:52 am
ruralavalon wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:49 pm
Adventures of a Mountain Man, by Zenas Leonard.

This is the first person narrative of five years (1831-1835) spent trapping furs in the mountain west, including participation in the Joseph Walker expedition which established a route to California and discovered the Yosemite Valley.
Recommend?
Yes, I recommend this book.

I like first person narratives, accounts by someone who was there and based on personal experience and observation, rather than academic histories based on study in a library.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by bertilak » Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:09 pm

theicecreamman wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:44 am
Where are the Customers' Yachts? by Fred Schwed, Jr. Even better than I thought it would be.
So I read it too, based on this and other favorable reviews. It is also better than I thought it would be.

From the introduction, when discussing to what depth the workings of the investment markets will be described:
  • The reader will not get much of [that] in this book. ... My method of dealing with those subjects which I have never been able to understand will be to omit them.
What the reader WILL get is an intuitive feel for how much credence to give to those who want you to hand over your money to them to invest. As a not insignificant side benefit, the reader will ALSO get highly entertained.

I guess that's why this book has been around since 1940. 80 years!
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard. -- Squire Omar Barker (aka S.O.B.), the Cowboy Poet

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Workable Goblin » Fri Jan 17, 2020 5:43 pm

mighty72 wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 8:33 pm
"The Great Depression: A Diary" based on dairy of Benjamin Roth & written by Daniel Roth and James Ledbetter. It is quite an interesting read.
By coincidence, I also just finished that last night. I have to say that I was somewhat disappointed since it had more of a finance bent and a lot more ranting about inflation and the national debt than I was looking for. Still, I found a number of other interesting-looking books in the back which I will probably read later.

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