How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play?

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scrabbler1
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by scrabbler1 »

I remember when I was 5 years old already knowing how to read music but not really remembering how. I probably learned from my mom who played some Broadway show tunes because she attended many Broadway shows in Manhattan in the 1950s. My dad was also musical, having played the trombone and did some singing in barbershop choruses.

We had a piano in the house and she and I played a little game she played with her younger sister when she was a kid. One person would play a note on the piano while the other person turned away. The other person had 3 chances to play that note. But when my mom tried that with me, I simply announced the name of the note, to the shock of her. I had perfect pitch. To me, it was no big deal to do this, I thought everyone could simply name the note. But this was a big deal, to her and my dad when she told him later that day.

Despite this musical gift, I didn't suddenly have any big interest in music or playing an instrument, including in school. I did take some piano lessons soon after so I could learn more how to play the piano. Just some simple songs. About 3 years later, when I was 8, I took some more lessons from another teacher. This teacher, named Sylvia Gillery, taught from her mansion nearby which included a pair of baby grand pianos. She held small recitals there, at her Gillery Gallery, as it was called. Gillery also taught me some other skills I used often in the decades since. One was fingering guidelines when playing a string of continuous notes with one hand. Another, not related to the piano, was music theory. This became helpful years later when changing keys for songs I would later play on the guitar and ukulele. She also tested my perfect pitch, as she was fascinated by that and had only one other student who had PP.

Gillery also had this little dog who might have had PP, too. When Gillery played certain songs, the dog didn't react. But songs she played in certain keys elicited loud howling from the dog. Funny stuff.

A few years later, I took some guitar lessons. I already knew how to play the uke, as my dad also played it and taught me how to play it. The guitar lessons included chord formations and strumming styles. Dad had this little songbook of old songs for the uke and banks, another instrument I took up but only briefly.

When the movie "The Sting" came out in 1973, I was drawn to its Ragtime music and the revival of those Scott Joplin rags in the years which followed. We got a songbook with the sheet music from the movie and I began playing some of those songs, albeit on a simplified basis. By the time I went to college, I was playing several of them, still on a simplified basis. I was also playing some of my mom's favorite show tunes from her songbook collection.

In the 1980s, I would begin playing Billy Joel songs on the guitar and piano as well as some Simon and Garfunkel songs from their Greatest Hits cassette tape we had. I would eventually "un-"simplify some of the Joplin songs. After a long layoff, I resumed playing most of the Joplin songs about 6 years ago and still play them today.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

scrabbler1 wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 8:35 pm I remember when I was 5 years old already knowing how to read music but not really remembering how. I probably learned from my mom who played some Broadway show tunes because she attended many Broadway shows in Manhattan in the 1950s. My dad was also musical, having played the trombone and did some singing in barbershop choruses.

We had a piano in the house and she and I played a little game she played with her younger sister when she was a kid. One person would play a note on the piano while the other person turned away. The other person had 3 chances to play that note. But when my mom tried that with me, I simply announced the name of the note, to the shock of her. I had perfect pitch. To me, it was no big deal to do this, I thought everyone could simply name the note. But this was a big deal, to her and my dad when she told him later that day.

Despite this musical gift, I didn't suddenly have any big interest in music or playing an instrument, including in school. I did take some piano lessons soon after so I could learn more how to play the piano. Just some simple songs. About 3 years later, when I was 8, I took some more lessons from another teacher. This teacher, named Sylvia Gillery, taught from her mansion nearby which included a pair of baby grand pianos. She held small recitals there, at her Gillery Gallery, as it was called. Gillery also taught me some other skills I used often in the decades since. One was fingering guidelines when playing a string of continuous notes with one hand. Another, not related to the piano, was music theory. This became helpful years later when changing keys for songs I would later play on the guitar and ukulele. She also tested my perfect pitch, as she was fascinated by that and had only one other student who had PP.

Gillery also had this little dog who might have had PP, too. When Gillery played certain songs, the dog didn't react. But songs she played in certain keys elicited loud howling from the dog. Funny stuff.

A few years later, I took some guitar lessons. I already knew how to play the uke, as my dad also played it and taught me how to play it. The guitar lessons included chord formations and strumming styles. Dad had this little songbook of old songs for the uke and banks, another instrument I took up but only briefly.

When the movie "The Sting" came out in 1973, I was drawn to its Ragtime music and the revival of those Scott Joplin rags in the years which followed. We got a songbook with the sheet music from the movie and I began playing some of those songs, albeit on a simplified basis. By the time I went to college, I was playing several of them, still on a simplified basis. I was also playing some of my mom's favorite show tunes from her songbook collection.

In the 1980s, I would begin playing Billy Joel songs on the guitar and piano as well as some Simon and Garfunkel songs from their Greatest Hits cassette tape we had. I would eventually "un-"simplify some of the Joplin songs. After a long layoff, I resumed playing most of the Joplin songs about 6 years ago and still play them today.
wow
what a great musical journey, and . . . natural talent. . . !
I remember that, Simon and Garfunkel "Greatest Hits" on cassette tapes. Used to have boxes of those for the car and home. DW as well.

There used to be "music stores", yes, way back when, where half of the store was filled with sheet music and one could spend all day there.

Do you sing as well?
j
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scrabbler1
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by scrabbler1 »

Sandtrap wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 9:12 pm
scrabbler1 wrote: Tue Jul 09, 2024 8:35 pm I remember when I was 5 years old already knowing how to read music but not really remembering how. I probably learned from my mom who played some Broadway show tunes because she attended many Broadway shows in Manhattan in the 1950s. My dad was also musical, having played the trombone and did some singing in barbershop choruses.

We had a piano in the house and she and I played a little game she played with her younger sister when she was a kid. One person would play a note on the piano while the other person turned away. The other person had 3 chances to play that note. But when my mom tried that with me, I simply announced the name of the note, to the shock of her. I had perfect pitch. To me, it was no big deal to do this, I thought everyone could simply name the note. But this was a big deal, to her and my dad when she told him later that day.

Despite this musical gift, I didn't suddenly have any big interest in music or playing an instrument, including in school. I did take some piano lessons soon after so I could learn more how to play the piano. Just some simple songs. About 3 years later, when I was 8, I took some more lessons from another teacher. This teacher, named Sylvia Gillery, taught from her mansion nearby which included a pair of baby grand pianos. She held small recitals there, at her Gillery Gallery, as it was called. Gillery also taught me some other skills I used often in the decades since. One was fingering guidelines when playing a string of continuous notes with one hand. Another, not related to the piano, was music theory. This became helpful years later when changing keys for songs I would later play on the guitar and ukulele. She also tested my perfect pitch, as she was fascinated by that and had only one other student who had PP.

Gillery also had this little dog who might have had PP, too. When Gillery played certain songs, the dog didn't react. But songs she played in certain keys elicited loud howling from the dog. Funny stuff.

A few years later, I took some guitar lessons. I already knew how to play the uke, as my dad also played it and taught me how to play it. The guitar lessons included chord formations and strumming styles. Dad had this little songbook of old songs for the uke and banks, another instrument I took up but only briefly.

When the movie "The Sting" came out in 1973, I was drawn to its Ragtime music and the revival of those Scott Joplin rags in the years which followed. We got a songbook with the sheet music from the movie and I began playing some of those songs, albeit on a simplified basis. By the time I went to college, I was playing several of them, still on a simplified basis. I was also playing some of my mom's favorite show tunes from her songbook collection.

In the 1980s, I would begin playing Billy Joel songs on the guitar and piano as well as some Simon and Garfunkel songs from their Greatest Hits cassette tape we had. I would eventually "un-"simplify some of the Joplin songs. After a long layoff, I resumed playing most of the Joplin songs about 6 years ago and still play them today.
wow
what a great musical journey, and . . . natural talent. . . !
I remember that, Simon and Garfunkel "Greatest Hits" on cassette tapes. Used to have boxes of those for the car and home. DW as well.

There used to be "music stores", yes, way back when, where half of the store was filled with sheet music and one could spend all day there.

Do you sing as well?
j
I can sing along with the Billy Joel songs I plan on the guitar (and, to a lesser degree, the piano). I should add that with my perfect pitch and a tuning wrench, I can tune my piano, too, after closely watching a piano tuner tune it up just after I moved to my current apartment (which already had a piano) 35 years ago.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

I have played and sang traditional and "Waikiki/tourist/"hapa-haole" music all my life in jams ("kanakapila") public, stage, and in trios, duos, and solo.
Over time, I found I was better at entertaining and singing, than playing instruments as good as others. While a lot of "real expert musicians" focused on playing.

This is a wonderful video and beautiful music from a local Hawaiian group filmed at the Royal Room in Waikiki.
Enjoy:
Youtube: video and music clip.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hr3YHX7KryU
ps: I do not sing falsetto which is very characteristic to Hawaiian music.

Here's Weldon Kekauoha doing "Queenʻs Jubilee" with a hula dancer. This is a deeply Hawaiian cultural song.
The movements of the hula dancer mirror the song's words and meaning.
Weldon's voice and style is legendary. This looks like it was filmed on the beach terrace at the Kahala Hilton on Oahu, Hawaii.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AbqkjkkcE7M

Enjoy a Hawaiian Island Tradition and culture.
j
Many Hawaii Island families send their children to hula school "halau" taught by a "kumu hula" and they continue as they get older, even as adults. From the "kumu", they learn dance, Hawaiian language, and Hawaiian cultural traditions, etc.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Harmonica:

When I heard the Beatles doing "Love Me Do" with that harmonica intro. I was hooked.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbt8oH5Lxto
When I heard John Mayall doing "Room to Move" on his harmonica. I was hooked.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANfqJk2rdNo
Others:
Piano Man: Elton John
Heart of Gold: Neil Young (of course I used a neck brace and played acoustic. That was the thing at that time.
Long Train Running: Doobie Brothers

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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by A440 »

Sandtrap wrote: Thu Jul 11, 2024 12:28 pm
Others:
Piano Man: Elton John
Although Elton John is a piano guy, I believe Billy Joel wrote "Piano Man". :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

A440 wrote: Fri Jul 12, 2024 6:17 am
Sandtrap wrote: Thu Jul 11, 2024 12:28 pm
Others:
Piano Man: Elton John
Although Elton John is a piano guy, I believe Billy Joel wrote "Piano Man". :D
outstanding.

What instrument do you play?
What kind of music?
How did you learn?

Thanks.
j
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Elsebet »

yankees60 wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 4:44 pm From your name I am assuming that you are a female?

If so were there any other females in those 2 rock bands you were in at the same time?
Yes I am female. In band A, I was the only female the entire time. In band B, we briefly had a female singer join our group. She was very talented, but she started dating one of our guitarists and when they began fighting/split up it went downhill from there! It was too bad, I liked her but their relationship caused a lot of drama. No one is interested in bass players, so there was no drama from me. :)
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Elsebet »

Sandtrap wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 7:47 pm They seem so opposite, electric bass and violin. The concepts and roles are so different. Why did you pick bass?
What do you play? Fender bass? Short scale semi hollowbody Epiphone bass?
I don't exactly recall how I got into bass, it may have been to try and divert myself away from spending all my free time on video games. In my late 20's and 30's I tried playing the acoustic guitar several times and it just felt too awkward. I also didn't care for playing chords. In comparison the electric bass felt much better in my hands right away and I liked sitting in the back of the band locking in with the drummer instead of being out front.

I have a Fender 5 string jazz bass and an Epiphone Thunderbird 4 string bass. I haven't touched them in years, honestly I should sell them.

I first became interested in the violin when I attended an Erie Philharmonic concert where they had an "Instrument Petting Zoo" with cellos and violins. I thought it was just for children but I asked and they said adults were welcome, so I tried both. I didn't really like the cello but was able to squeak out "Mary had a little lamb" on the violin pretty quickly. A few weeks later I saw a violin for sale on Craigslist so I bought it and a year later am still playing and taking lessons. My teacher just invited me to play with her amateur community orchestra, which should be fun.

The violin and electric bass are very different. What I like about the violin is that it's extremely portable and I can take it and play it anywhere even with no power, similar to an acoustic guitar. As an example during the eclipse earlier this year, I did my practicing outside while waiting for totality. It's also a good instrument solo, duo, or with a group of any size. The bass I really enjoyed only when playing with a full band and it required an amp, cables, and electricity. I did try an upright bass but I could not imagine lugging that thing around.
Sandtrap wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 7:47 pm What kind of music do you play on bass, on violin?
On violin mostly classical pieces, although I do try to figure out popular themes like Game of Thrones, Zelda, Mario, etc.

On bass, almost entirely rock/pop covers, whatever my garage band(s) wanted to play. My favorite song to play on bass was "Fire" by Jimi Hendrix if you had a really good drummer who could pull it off.
"...the man who adapts himself to his slender means and makes himself wealthy on a little sum, is the truly rich man..." ~Seneca
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Elsebet wrote: Fri Jul 12, 2024 4:56 pm
Sandtrap wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 7:47 pm They seem so opposite, electric bass and violin. The concepts and roles are so different. Why did you pick bass?
What do you play? Fender bass? Short scale semi hollowbody Epiphone bass?
I don't exactly recall how I got into bass, it may have been to try and divert myself away from spending all my free time on video games. In my late 20's and 30's I tried playing the acoustic guitar several times and it just felt too awkward. I also didn't care for playing chords. In comparison the electric bass felt much better in my hands right away and I liked sitting in the back of the band locking in with the drummer instead of being out front.

I have a Fender 5 string jazz bass and an Epiphone Thunderbird 4 string bass. I haven't touched them in years, honestly I should sell them.

I first became interested in the violin when I attended an Erie Philharmonic concert where they had an "Instrument Petting Zoo" with cellos and violins. I thought it was just for children but I asked and they said adults were welcome, so I tried both. I didn't really like the cello but was able to squeak out "Mary had a little lamb" on the violin pretty quickly. A few weeks later I saw a violin for sale on Craigslist so I bought it and a year later am still playing and taking lessons. My teacher just invited me to play with her amateur community orchestra, which should be fun.

The violin and electric bass are very different. What I like about the violin is that it's extremely portable and I can take it and play it anywhere even with no power, similar to an acoustic guitar. As an example during the eclipse earlier this year, I did my practicing outside while waiting for totality. It's also a good instrument solo, duo, or with a group of any size. The bass I really enjoyed only when playing with a full band and it required an amp, cables, and electricity. I did try an upright bass but I could not imagine lugging that thing around.
Sandtrap wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 7:47 pm What kind of music do you play on bass, on violin?
On violin mostly classical pieces, although I do try to figure out popular themes like Game of Thrones, Zelda, Mario, etc.

On bass, almost entirely rock/pop covers, whatever my garage band(s) wanted to play. My favorite song to play on bass was "Fire" by Jimi Hendrix if you had a really good drummer who could pull it off.
That's really nice that you are keeping up lessons and practice. It adds up over many years, and the continued challenge keeps it interesting.

thanks for sharing.
j
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Michael Patrick »

Speaking of practice... One of the reasons I want to take lessons again is so that I have something to work on. I play every day now, but I'm not sure it rises to "practicing." I'm hoping that working with a teacher and having set things to work on will help to provide focus.

In the past, when I was in a band (or bands plural...) there was always something to work on, and a lot of it was geared towards playing live. Making sure I was stepping on the fuzz at exactly the right moment, making sure I was coming out of a solo on the correct beat, etc. Sometime when I was working on an original project, it would be coming up with guitar parts for songs written by band mates, or writing songs myself and having to think about what I wanted the others to play.

Sometimes the practice would be on things not directly related to playing. One project I was involved in was a tribute act. The guitar player I was emulating had long hair. Even when I had hair, I didn't have hair like that. Which meant I had to wear a wig. I discovered at our first dress rehearsal that changing guitars and pulling the strap over my head sent the wig flying. That wasn't going to fly (heh!), so I had to come up with a solution. I put strap locks on the guitars I would be using, and I would unhook the guitar from the strap, leaving the strap in place over my shoulder. I spent a few hours practicing unhooking one guitar, setting it in the stand, picking up the next guitar, hooking it up to the strap at both ends, and then plugging it in. I wanted to do it as quickly as possible so as to not unduly interrupt the flow of the show.
Last edited by Michael Patrick on Sun Jul 14, 2024 7:39 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Sandtrap »

Michael Patrick wrote: Sat Jul 13, 2024 7:32 am Speaking of practice... One of the reason I want to take lessons again is so that I have something to work on. I play every day now, but I'm not sure it rises to "practicing." I'm hoping that working with a teacher and having set things to work on will help to provide focus.

In the past, when I was in a band (or bands plural...) there was always something to work on, and a lot of it was geared towards playing live. Making sure I was stepping on the fuzz at exactly the right moment, making sure I was coming out of a solo on the correct beat, etc. Sometime when I was working on an original project, it would be coming up with guitar parts for songs written by band mates, or writing songs myself and having to think about what I wanted the others to play.

Sometimes the practice would be on things not directly related to playing. One project I was involved in was a tribute act. The guitar player I was emulating had long hair. Even when I had hair, I didn't have hair like that. Which meant I had to wear a wig. I discovered at our first dress rehearsal that changing guitars and pulling the strap over my head sent the wig flying. That wasn't going to fly (heh!), so I had to come up with a solution. I put strap locks on the guitars I would be using, and I would unhook the guitar from the strap, leaving the strap in place over my shoulder. I spent a few hours practicing unhooking one guitar, setting it in the stand, picking up the next guitar, hooking it up to the strap at both ends, and then plugging it in. I wanted to do it as quickly as possible so as to not unduly interrupt the flow of the show.
Yes.
Practicing for playing on stage or live in public is demanding in a different way than "practicing for personal improvement", in some ways.
And, especially if playing with a group, band, trio, etc, in public. Everyone has to "lock in".
There is also a huge difference if one is a singer/player/"entertainer" that introduces songs, tells stories, entertains, etc, while playing.

The "flow of the show" is critical. Even if besides playing as a trio or duo, one is playing live in public as solo.
There's "set practice" and there's "music practice" and there's "song practice.

What kinds of lessons are you going to take?
What kind of music do you play and on what?
Do you still play in public?
Solo or group only?

Thanks for sharing.
Fun stuff!
j :D
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by Michael Patrick »

Sandtrap wrote: Sat Jul 13, 2024 7:57 am
Michael Patrick wrote: Sat Jul 13, 2024 7:32 am Speaking of practice... One of the reason I want to take lessons again is so that I have something to work on. I play every day now, but I'm not sure it rises to "practicing." I'm hoping that working with a teacher and having set things to work on will help to provide focus.

In the past, when I was in a band (or bands plural...) there was always something to work on, and a lot of it was geared towards playing live. Making sure I was stepping on the fuzz at exactly the right moment, making sure I was coming out of a solo on the correct beat, etc. Sometime when I was working on an original project, it would be coming up with guitar parts for songs written by band mates, or writing songs myself and having to think about what I wanted the others to play.

Sometimes the practice would be on things not directly related to playing. One project I was involved in was a tribute act. The guitar player I was emulating had long hair. Even when I had hair, I didn't have hair like that. Which meant I had to wear a wig. I discovered at our first dress rehearsal that changing guitars and pulling the strap over my head sent the wig flying. That wasn't going to fly (heh!), so I had to come up with a solution. I put strap locks on the guitars I would be using, and I would unhook the guitar from the strap, leaving the strap in place over my shoulder. I spent a few hours practicing unhooking one guitar, setting it in the stand, picking up the next guitar, hooking it up to the strap at both ends, and then plugging it in. I wanted to do it as quickly as possible so as to not unduly interrupt the flow of the show.
Yes.
Practicing for playing on stage or live in public is demanding in a different way than "practicing for personal improvement", in some ways.
And, especially if playing with a group, band, trio, etc, in public. Everyone has to "lock in".
There is also a huge difference if one is a singer/player/"entertainer" that introduces songs, tells stories, entertains, etc, while playing.

The "flow of the show" is critical. Even if besides playing as a trio or duo, one is playing live in public as solo.
There's "set practice" and there's "music practice" and there's "song practice.

What kinds of lessons are you going to take?
What kind of music do you play and on what?
Do you still play in public?
Solo or group only?

Thanks for sharing.
Fun stuff!
j :D
I mentioned some of the stuff I want to work on up thread - finger picking, jazz theory, Eric Johnson's long legato lines.

I want to go with a teacher because I'm hoping it will provide greater motivation than just watching a bunch of YouTube videos. I wouldn't want to show up for a lesson not having worked on whatever I was supposed to. There wouldn't be the same level of shame with random videos.
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Re: How did you learn and play music, and what resources and teachers/coaching did you use; ukulele, guitar, piano, etc.

Post by yankees60 »

Elsebet wrote: Fri Jul 12, 2024 4:02 pm
yankees60 wrote: Mon Jul 08, 2024 4:44 pm From your name I am assuming that you are a female?

If so were there any other females in those 2 rock bands you were in at the same time?
Yes I am female. In band A, I was the only female the entire time. In band B, we briefly had a female singer join our group. She was very talented, but she It's not dating one of our guitarists and when they began fighting/split up it went downhill from there! It was too bad, I liked her but their relationship caused a lot of drama. No one is interested in bass players, so there was no drama from me. :)
I always ask this question of female musicians. Why do you think Female musicians are under represented in Rock music? It's not a strength issue. There have been plenty of female musicians over the last 40 years since the 80s. What the percentage overall is still quite low.
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Flamenco guitar players?

Post by Sandtrap »

*** Please keep this thread "on topic" (musicians, those who learn and play music, instruments you own) to help others and share. Thanks. :D

This is my custom flamenco spanish classical guitar that I have had for a number of years. It is very light. The fingerboard is a tad narrower for that style of playing. The sound is exquisite. It is a far higher level of quality guitar than my skill levels but very rewarding to play. The touch is excellent for a nylon string guitar. Cheaper classicals tend to always have high actions and limited adjustments.

I've not been very successful with "flamenco" and latin music, struggling with timing. Playing so many years with 4/4 classical so the changes are difficult.

Any flamenco guitar players out there?

The high gloss finish has a lot of reflections in this picture.
Image

Herencia Latina by Paco Pena is the only latin/rumba piece that I play, something like this one at this pace.
The arrangement was given to me by a university music guitar teacher over 40 years ago.
YouTube: "Herencia Latina".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-zsbjo5p8E

thanks so much.
j :D

Love "Gypsy Kings", here's "Un Amour".
https://www.google.com/search?q=youtube ... EXw0g,st:0

Herencia Latina PDF printable music arrangement file for guitar for you:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1HCoaah ... sp=sharing
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Sandtrap
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Re:Guitar "Tab" VS music notation

Post by Sandtrap »

Guitar "tab" (bottom lines shown below) shows where to put your fingers and can be efficient, simple, and very easy to learn.

But, it does not tell you "how" to play the notes/line and what it sounds like, as with "standard music notation". (top line shown below)
For example: the place where it says, "tempo gusto" even has the finger notation and where the emphasis is, also timing, much like piano.

Though I no longer read music notation quickly or easily, it still helps to see both that and "guitar tab" at the same time when playing from sheet music, whether note for note or just reminders as you play from memory.

Have fun!
j :D

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minimalistmarc
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Re: How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play

Post by minimalistmarc »

I like the Simply Piano app for casual players. I learned in high school but forgot everything including how to read sheet music. A few weeks of simply piano and I was able to play many popular songs. I’m thinking about learning guitar casually as well.
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Sandtrap
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Re: How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play

Post by Sandtrap »

minimalistmarc wrote: Tue Jul 16, 2024 7:36 am I like the Simply Piano app for casual players. I learned in high school but forgot everything including how to read sheet music. A few weeks of simply piano and I was able to play many popular songs. I’m thinking about learning guitar casually as well.
I have a Yamaha digital grand piano that's been untouched for years, waiting for me to play it, but long forgotten note reading and skills make it discouraging.

This is an interesting app and I can see how it might work well with a large iPad on the piano.
"Simple Piano App".
Here's a review:
https://www.pianodreamers.com/simply-piano-review/

Thanks for the suggestion.
j :D
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MikeWillRetire
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Re: How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play

Post by MikeWillRetire »

Sandtrap wrote: Tue Jul 02, 2024 8:25 am
How did you learn to play music?
A couple of friends of mine had a basement band, but they didn't have a bass player. So when I graduated from college, I bought a bass guitar and a "How to Play Bass Guitar" book. I only got about 1/4th of the way through the book. And then I joined my friends in the basement. I became good enough to play with them, but I never was able to develop the "ear" for music. We played for about 6 years, and then I stopped playing.

Did you have teachers, what do you play?
No, I was self taught and was a terrible teacher.

What instruments do you own and play?
In 1985, I bought an electric bass guitar from the Sears catalog! Several years later I destroyed the Sears guitar and bought a fretless Yamaha electric bass and a fretless Washburn acoustic/electric bass. They have been hanging on my basement wall for 30 years.

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Sandtrap
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Re: How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play

Post by Sandtrap »

MikeWillRetire wrote: Tue Jul 16, 2024 10:16 am
Sandtrap wrote: Tue Jul 02, 2024 8:25 am
How did you learn to play music?
A couple of friends of mine had a basement band, but they didn't have a bass player. So when I graduated from college, I bought a bass guitar and a "How to Play Bass Guitar" book. I only got about 1/4th of the way through the book. And then I joined my friends in the basement. I became good enough to play with them, but I never was able to develop the "ear" for music. We played for about 6 years, and then I stopped playing.

Did you have teachers, what do you play?
No, I was self taught and was a terrible teacher.

What instruments do you own and play?
In 1985, I bought an electric bass guitar from the Sears catalog! Several years later I destroyed the Sears guitar and bought a fretless Yamaha electric bass and a fretless Washburn acoustic/electric bass. They have been hanging on my basement wall for 30 years.

You must have a level of natural skill and pitch.
Fretless bass, or for that matter, any string instrument without frets, is very difficult to play.

consider taking up guitar, now?

thanks for sharing.
j
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gtrplayer
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Re: How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play

Post by gtrplayer »

Was in band in school, then took private lessons on guitar. The private lessons were the most important thing. I studied music in college, too, but I still think I learned more useful information studying privately.
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Sandtrap
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Re: How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play

Post by Sandtrap »

gtrplayer wrote: Tue Jul 16, 2024 2:28 pm Was in band in school, then took private lessons on guitar. The private lessons were the most important thing. I studied music in college, too, but I still think I learned more useful information studying privately.
Very true.

What guitars do you have now?
What music do you play?

j
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CuriousGeorgeTx
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Re: How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play

Post by CuriousGeorgeTx »

1
How did you learn to play music?
a) my mean old mother made me take piano lessons starting at about age 6. I continued to take lessons until I was 17. (I'm very grateful for my mother's instance)
b) in jr high, I started singing in the choir. I loved it. Sang in HS choir and madrigal group. Was part of a Barbershop Quartet for while.
c) at age 16, I took group guitar lessons through the county recreation system
d) at age 22, I took organ lessons for one semester in college.
2
What kind of music do you play?
I am now a church organist. I play hymns for congregational singing. For prelude and postlude, I play a mix of hymn arrangements and classical pieces (mostly Bach)
3
What instruments do you play?
Piano, guitar & organ
4
What resources did you and now use?
5
I attend an organ workshop almost every year.
Did you have teachers, what do you play?
6 (see above)
What instruments do you own and play?
7
Piano and guitar. I play the organ at our church.
What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?

If you want to get better you need to practice. A teacher can be invaluable in making the practice more productive. Regardless, even without a teach now, my playing has greatly improved because in retirement I have time to practice almost daily.
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Re: How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play

Post by Sandtrap »

CuriousGeorgeTx wrote: Tue Jul 16, 2024 11:11 pm 1
How did you learn to play music?
a) my mean old mother made me take piano lessons starting at about age 6. I continued to take lessons until I was 17. (I'm very grateful for my mother's instance)
b) in jr high, I started singing in the choir. I loved it. Sang in HS choir and madrigal group. Was part of a Barbershop Quartet for while.
c) at age 16, I took group guitar lessons through the county recreation system
d) at age 22, I took organ lessons for one semester in college.
2
What kind of music do you play?
I am now a church organist. I play hymns for congregational singing. For prelude and postlude, I play a mix of hymn arrangements and classical pieces (mostly Bach)
3
What instruments do you play?
Piano, guitar & organ
4
What resources did you and now use?
5
I attend an organ workshop almost every year.
Did you have teachers, what do you play?
6 (see above)
What instruments do you own and play?
7
Piano and guitar. I play the organ at our church.
What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?

If you want to get better you need to practice. A teacher can be invaluable in making the practice more productive. Regardless, even without a teach now, my playing has greatly improved because in retirement I have time to practice almost daily.
So true.
I think there was an old saying, "How do you get to Carnegie Hall?" "Practice, practice, practice".
Another one was, "If I don't practice for a day, I notice, If I don't practice for ...???... others notice". Something like that.

It's great that you continue to enjoy playing and can do that in retirement, and also are able to share that in public.

Do you still sing?

Do you play acoustic guitar, classical, now in retirement?

Thanks for sharing your musical journey.
j :D
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protagonist
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Re: How did you learn to play music? What resources and teachers/coaching did you use? What instruments do you own/play

Post by protagonist »

1
How did you learn to play music?
combination of lessons, workshops, playing with better musicians than myself, putting myself out at jam sessions, and mostly hard work. I started in my mid-50s.
2
What kind of music do you play?
Jazz
3
What instruments do you play?
saxophone
4
What resources did you and now use?
mostly online resources and phone apps. I have bought several music books but usually lose patience with them.
5
Did you have teachers,
Yes
6
What instruments do you own and play?
Tenor sax
Soprano sax
7
What suggestions do you have for others that are getting started or want to improve?
1. Do it!
2. Get a good instrument that will not leave you frustrated and wanting to buy another.
3. Find a good teacher and stick with it. Force yourself to practice daily.
4. Play with others as often as possible....it is much more fun than playing alone and a much better learning experience.
5. Have fun.
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