June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

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jebmke
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June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by jebmke »

[Moved to Bogleheads Community, US Chapter subforum (remembrance honoring/otherwise significant to community members)
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Re: June 6 On my mind today

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From online:
What is D-Day?
It was the largest invasion ever assembled, before or since, landed 156,000 Allied troops by sea and air on five beachheads in Normandy, France.

D-Day was the start of Allied operations which would ultimately liberate Western Europe, defeat Nazi Germany and end the Second World War.
My Fil (DW's dad) was at Normandy and walked across Europe in WWII. All the way to Italy when it ended. Career military, veteran of Korea, Vietnam, and the Cold War, etc, he was buried at Arlington National a few years ago with full honors and a jet flyover.

Thanks for posting this.

Looking forward to Taylor Larimore's iconic yearly Christmas post on Bastogne.

While the forum focuses on finances, etc, it is still a shared humanity thanks to seniors and moderators.

Thanks again.
j :D
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by jebmke »

The top right is on the bluff overlooking Omaha Beach. The other three were at Arromanches. All taken in 2004.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Suntan1 »

Visited Bastogne a year before retiring from the Navy.
Thank you for the sacrifices of the men and women of the Greatest Generation!
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Silverado »

I was about two weeks from being commissioned as an Army 2LT out of ROTC. Just got off work from the overnight shift at my summer trucking company job and went to a local diner for breakfast before heading to my final couple days of summer school classes.

Older gentleman was next to me at the bar and we struck up a short conversation. This was in 93. Turned out he was a veteran who had made three combat jumps in Europe including on D-day. Every year I think back to that nice guy and wish I had spent more time or even remember more specifics about the conversation. Alas, I was just a dumb kid and didn’t recognize the treasure sitting there.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by DetroitRick »

Thanks for posting. All great pics, but that one on the lower right is especially awesome. I'm thinking today of all these great heroes that gave so much. Words fail me....
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Valuethinker »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AuKXAf ... A&index=12

(Canada. Heritage Minutes. Little vignettes from history - true stories. "D Day").

I knew a man whose job on D Day was with the Royal Engineers in the Canadian Army. Blowing up bunkers - with Germans in them. Fought his way across NW Europe, finished up in Holland.

The Canadian Army objective for the first day was Caen ("cah-n" in English Canadian) - about 15 miles behind the beaches. The would take it around D+40.

I remember him saying "Caen. Caen was bad".

Another Canadian on Juno Beach that day was James Doohan - who would lose 2 fingers in NW Europe. He would come to be one of the most famous characters in TV and film "Mr Scott here. Captain [Kirk]"
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Valuethinker »

DetroitRick wrote: Thu Jun 06, 2024 11:30 am Thanks for posting. All great pics, but that one on the lower right is especially awesome. I'm thinking today of all these great heroes that gave so much. Words fail me....
"Soldiers live. And wonder why"
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by jebmke »

Silverado wrote: Thu Jun 06, 2024 11:16 am I was about two weeks from being commissioned as an Army 2LT out of ROTC. Just got off work from the overnight shift at my summer trucking company job and went to a local diner for breakfast before heading to my final couple days of summer school classes.

Older gentleman was next to me at the bar and we struck up a short conversation. This was in 93. Turned out he was a veteran who had made three combat jumps in Europe including on D-day. Every year I think back to that nice guy and wish I had spent more time or even remember more specifics about the conversation. Alas, I was just a dumb kid and didn’t recognize the treasure sitting there.
My late father was 513PIR commanding a parachute unit. He was in the UK training for Operation Varsity in 1944 but his unit was flown to France in December and then rolled up overland to the Ardennes to push back the bulge. After that they returned to France to finish training and then he jumped into Germany -- in March 1945 when Varsity was launched.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Fat Tails »

My FIL was in the Army Reserves when WWII for the US started ramping up. Timing is everything. He went to North Africa, Sicily invasion, Salerno invasion, was otherwise occupied when Normandy occurred, but made the southern France invasion, then into Germany proper. As the US troops were beginning to be sent home from Germany, he was told to pack his bags, he was going to the Pacific theater for the invasion of Japan. He said Oh **** no. I have all my points. I’m going home. And he was right.

:beer To those 90 day wonders that went from the tractor to flying night bombing missions over Europe, and to those paratroopers doing night jumps. And to all the rest. The greatest generation indeed,

And to Taylor :beer :beer
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Parkinglotracer »

Salute to the greatest generation - my parents generation who stepped up to do what had to be done. Bad people tried to take over the world. My father graduated from Marine ROTC at Purdue when the atomic bombs were dropped in Japan and ended war. (Purdue accelerated their 4 year course of study to 3 years)

Yes Virginia there are bad people in the world and yes it is up to each of us to stop bullies.

Salute From an AF guy who flew 39 bombing missions in Desert Storm which was nothing compared to what those that served in WW2 did.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by FootballFan5548 »

My Grandfather was Fox Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne. Original Taccoa man from Band of Brothers fame, (Band of Brothers was Easy Company). Fox did everything with Easy Co. He jumped in Normandy on DDay, Holland for Operation Market Garden, and then trucked into Bastogne, where he was wounded outside of Foy on Jan. 4, 45. His war was over then.

Until the end of his life he would always say, he had been in a plane 18 times in his life, he never once landed in a plane... 18 parachute jumps.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by jerryk68 »

My father was a private in the 50th Infantry Battalion Company B serving with the 6th Armored Division under General George Patton. He landed at Utah Beach about mid July 1944 and mostly walked his way thru Europe until the war ended. Wounded twice with four bronze stars he returned home and for a period of time he had almost daily nightmares, seizures and what is now called PTSD. He never complained about anything and never spoke about his war experiences. He returned from the war working at a steelmill and along with my mother raised a family. A few years ago I took a trip to France/Belgium and went to several memorials and visited several cemeteries. It was very moving for me. Through records I found he was outside Bastogne in the forest during the Battle of the Bulge along with the 101st Airborne. Unknown at the time I walked into the forest and picked up a couple twigs off the ground and later learned thru battlefield records his company was in the same woods during that battle. He passed away some 30 years ago with me not knowing anything about his war experiences. Every time I open the drawer where twigs are located I think of my Dad and what he probably experienced. Yes, he was a member of the greatest generation.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

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jerryk68 wrote: Fri Jun 07, 2024 11:05 am My father was a private in the 50th Infantry Battalion Company B serving with the 6th Armored Division under General George Patton. He landed at Utah Beach about mid July 1944 and mostly walked his way thru Europe until the war ended. Wounded twice with four bronze stars he returned home and for a period of time he had almost daily nightmares, seizures and what is now called PTSD. He never complained about anything and never spoke about his war experiences. He returned from the war working at a steelmill and along with my mother raised a family. A few years ago I took a trip to France/Belgium and went to several memorials and visited several cemeteries. It was very moving for me. Through records I found he was outside Bastogne in the forest during the Battle of the Bulge along with the 101st Airborne. Unknown at the time I walked into the forest and picked up a couple twigs off the ground and later learned thru battlefield records his company was in the same woods during that battle. He passed away some 30 years ago with me not knowing anything about his war experiences. Every time I open the drawer where twigs are located I think of my Dad and what he probably experienced. Yes, he was a member of the greatest generation.
Thanks for sharing.

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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by BrooklynInvest »

Thanks so much for sharing OP.

My late father-in law took a few of the Stephen Ambrose tours and befriended the guys from Easy Company. It was one of his proudest moments just to be able to breathe the same air as these men. Everyone's gone now alas so keeping the stories alive is our collective responsibility. So...

My neighbor's dad was one of the Rangers that climbed the cliffs at Pointe du Hoc. Lived to a good age. My grandad wan't at D-Day but he was evacuated near Dunkirk a few days before the more famous/infamous evacuation. Survived by sheer luck. And the same story when he was torpedoed on the Arandora Star. He never spoke about either very much. My dad, different war, different outcome.

I'm glad they're being honored properly and decently.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by gamboolman »

ms gamboolgals father Mr. Beam was in the 101st: Sgt James L Beam 501 PIR, HQ 3, 3rd Battalion

Mr. Beam joined up at age 17 and was in the original Taccoa Group all the way thru the war.

At D-Day when they were over Normandy getting ready to jump, Mr. Beam said the sky was lit up bright from the gunfire. He said that all he wanted was to get out of the plane.

He was never wounded. He did say that he had a pencil shot out of his hand and all his web gear shot off him one time.

Respect and Thanks to all of the Veterans of all of the Wars.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today

Post by iceport »

Sandtrap wrote: Thu Jun 06, 2024 9:52 am Looking forward to Taylor Larimore's iconic yearly Christmas post on Bastogne.

While the forum focuses on finances, etc, it is still a shared humanity thanks to seniors and moderators.

Thanks again.
j :D
I've certainly been thinking of Taylor Larimore these past few days.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by rich126 »

I don't know if I'll ever get to do it but one of the few things I'd like to do would be to get some guided tour of Normandy and also in Belgium with Ardennes (I guess it extends into France) and Luxembourg to see various WW2 sites. We did visit Dachau a few years ago.

Probably close to 10 years ago I was sitting at a bar of an Italian Restaurant in MD and an older man was there and for some reason I mentioned doing the above and he said he would gladly volunteer to be the guide. I don't know the details but he was ex-military and was very familiar with the area. I don't think he was older enough to have been in WW2.

My grandfather served 4 years in WW1 (he was British) and I need to get back to trying to obtain he war records from the UK. I started down the path but due to the age of the records the email they sent me wanted me to visit the archives in person or do something else.

Certainly was an interesting and difficult time for many, many people.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Mel Lindauer »

When I was in France, I visited Normandy. For this Marine, it was a very moving experience that included being inside a German machine-gun bunker at the top of the hill overlooking the landing zone.

Several things stuck me as being really hard to imagine:
1. That the Rangers could possibly scale that vertical hill where the German bunkers were, and
2. That anyone could possibly survive in the landing zone with the machine-gun fire from the German bunkers raining down on them.

I also visited the American Cemetary which was very moving. It reminded me of Arlington. And I was totally surprised to see that Gen. Roosevelt, the president's son, was buried there, right along with his men.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Valuethinker »

Valuethinker wrote: Thu Jun 06, 2024 11:34 am https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AuKXAf ... A&index=12

(Canada. Heritage Minutes. Little vignettes from history - true stories. "D Day").

I knew a man whose job on D Day was with the Royal Engineers in the Canadian Army. Blowing up bunkers - with Germans in them. Fought his way across NW Europe, finished up in Holland.

The Canadian Army objective for the first day was Caen ("cah-n" in English Canadian) - about 15 miles behind the beaches. The would take it around D+40.

I remember him saying "Caen. Caen was bad".

Another Canadian on Juno Beach that day was James Doohan - who would lose 2 fingers in NW Europe. He would come to be one of the most famous characters in TV and film "Mr Scott here. Captain [Kirk]"
14k Canadians would land on Juno Beach that morning. Their main objective for D1 was Caen - 16 km behind the beaches. They would eventually capture it 6 weeks later.
"In 1939, a young man from Vancouver named James Doohan enlisted to fight...

A year later, he was a lieutenant in the army training in Britain...

James landed at Juno Beach in the Second Wave....

At 11.30pm he was crossing between 2 command posts. Suddenly 6 shots rang out.

Four bullets hit his leg, one blew off his right middle finger and the sixth bullet hit him in the chest. He would have been killed if not for the fact that a silver cigarette case, given to him by his brother, stopped the bullet from entering his chest.

As it turned out, the bullets didn't come from a German, but a nervous Canadian soldier.

He survived the war and went on to attend the Lorne Greene Academy of Radio Arts in Toronto.

He eventually made his way into television where his talent for accents provide very useful.

In the mid 1960s, he walked into an audition for a new TV show.

His character happened to be an engineer, and he felt the character would work best with a Scottish accent. He said later that all the best engineers were Scottish."
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Valuethinker »

Mel Lindauer wrote: Fri Jun 07, 2024 7:55 pm When I was in France, I visited Normandy. For this Marine, it was a very moving experience that included being inside a German machine-gun bunker at the top of the hill overlooking the landing zone.

Several things stuck me as being really hard to imagine:
1. That the Rangers could possibly scale that vertical hill where the German bunkers were, and
2. That anyone could possibly survive in the landing zone with the machine-gun fire from the German bunkers raining down on them.

I also visited the American Cemetary which was very moving. It reminded me of Arlington. And I was totally surprised to see that Gen. Roosevelt, the president's son, was buried there, right along with his men.
The Americans landed on 2 beaches: designated Utah and Omaha. The Canadians on Juno Beach, the British on Gold and Sword Beaches. The 82nd and 101st Parachute divisions were dropped behind the American beaches, and the 1st Parachute Division ("the Red Devils") behind the British beaches.

The former, Utah Beach, the landing went very well, better than could have been expected. The beach was only lightly defended because the difficult access from the land made it an apparently unattractive invasion site. The fire plan involved an attack by B25 Mitchell and B26 Marauder medium bombers, flying at low altitudes. They scored a number of direct hits on German bunkers, knocking them out of action at least temporarily. They fell quickly to the landing forces. Although access to Utah Beach was via causeways through salt marshes, the combination of scattered paratroopers and American beach landing forces were able to link up and secure beach exits, whilst German reinforcements were critically delayed.

Omaha Beach was always difficult - one plan had involved no landing there, but it was felt that would leave too large a gap between the British-Canadian and American landing forces.

The beach was dominated by cliffs. The only feasible ways off the beach for vehicles were via 2 draws (gullies)-- heavily fortified. The 1st Infantry Division, one of the most battle-hardened divisions in the US Army, from North Africa, Sicily and Italy, was given one. The 29th Infantry Division, a Maryland National Guard division activated to the regulars, was given the other. It was famous for its commander's barked catchphrase "29th let's go!" (The military historian and wargame designer Joe Balkoski has written a series of books detailing the 29th in WW2, from Normandy to Germany - each phase, the division would be decimated by combat, and rebuilt with new replacements).

Unlike many other locations on the Normandy Beaches, Omaha Beach was garrisoned by a battalion of regular German infantry, with combat experience on the Eastern Front (?). (Other beaches had forces such as ex Russian Prisoners of War). Facing what must have seemed like impossible odds, and the terror of the largest amphibious invasion in human history, they dug in, and fought back - hard. We talk about the bravery of Allied soldiers, but there were some very brave German ones, too, that day.

Almost everything that might have gone wrong, did go wrong on Omaha Beach, negating the superb preparatory measures the Allies had taken:

- due to the timing of the tides, the American beaches were given far less time for naval gunfire preparation than the British beaches. The Americans went in at dawn, the British & Canadians not until hours later

- American troops would have to scramble over hundreds of feet of obstacle strewn beach, to reach solid land above the high tide line. And there was no cover on Omaha Beach.

- the strategic bomber forces, B17 Flying Fortress and B24 Liberator bombers, were tasked with the bombardment of the other 4 beaches (ie not Utah). To avoid hitting any of the First Waves, waiting in their landing craft, with bombs dropped short, the bombers bombed parallel to the beaches, not orthogonal (right angles) to them. Bombing was done from quite a high altitude (from memory over 12000 feet) and visual conditions impeded accuracy. In a last minute change the bomb aiming point was moved further back from the water line. This is still a point of considerable discussion among military historians.

Thus the bombing was almost totally ineffective. An awful lot of French farmers' fields got chewed up. Very little damage or suppression was made to German positions on D Day itself (the pre D Day bombing had been highly successful in disrupting the German transportation system and in deceiving the Germans as to the actual intended landing spots).

To avoid chewing up the beach with craters, and thus impeding the buildup post landing, the beach was not shelled - there were not craters to take cover in, from the withering German fire.

- the amphibious "Duplex Drive" Sherman tanks were released into the heavy swell. Most of the ones in the first waves were swamped. American forces had refused to use "Hobart's Funnies" the range of specially adapted engineering tanks the British had invented -- carrying mine sweepers, obstacle bridging, heavy anti-fortification mortars etc.

The result is the first waves onto Omaha Beach landed to a slaughter. No cover, right under the German machine guns, field anti-tank weapons etc. Most of the Sherman tanks (in 1 of the 2 sectors?) were destroyed or swamped. By mid morning, there were thousands of American soldiers, many wounded or dead, huddled against the edge of the beach. Allied commanders gave serious consideration to halting future waves and ordering a retreat.

It looked like the landing at Omaha Beach had failed.

What saved it were a couple of factors:

- some landing craft commanders, carrying Sherman DDs, saw what was happening and ran their boats far closer to the actual shoreline - and the Shermans were able to debark without swamping, and served as rallying points for troops already on the beach, and able to direct their fire onto German fortified positions

- acting at the limits of their authority and their orders not to put their ships at undue risk, destroyer captains sailed their ships to a few thousand yards of the beaches, risking grounding in shallow water or destruction from Germany artillery fire. They concentrated their fire on the draws, suppressing the German strongpoints, and allowing American troops to begin to force their way forward.

(a grass fire on the cliffs, blew smoke over the American troops, which obscured the German aim, saving many lives)

- small groups of American soldiers, in ad hoc units of survivors, made their way up from the beach, up the cliffs at Omaha and through the German minefields, to enter the villages *behind* the draws, thus encircling the defenders. It was a demonstration of courage and initiative on the part of ordinary GIs as memorable as any.

Slowly, the German fire on the beaches began to slacken. The combination of the paratrooper attack, German confusion and Allied preparatory fire meant that reserves were slow in coming up (or not available).

By late afternoon, Omaha Beach had been secured. The Normandy Campaign would be brutal, hard fought. What had been intended to be achieved within a few days was not achieved for nearly 2 1/2 months. Divisions would suffer attrition down to ineffectiveness, and have their soldiers replaced - many times. The cost to infantry divisions in particular was awful, resembling the battles on the Western Front in World War One.

But the armies: British, Canadian, American (plus Poles, Free French) were ashore, in strength. Crack German panzer armoured divisions - the best Hitler had - were en route to counterattack against the landing force.

The preliminary was over, and the main event could begin. The destruction of the German Wehrmacht and the road to Berlin. To quote Churchill (about the Battle of El Alamein, in 1942) "This is not the end. Nor even the beginning of the end. But we may say it is the end of the beginning".
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Sprucebark »

After high school I tracked down some relatives via marriage who lived in that region and went over to visit. I hadn’t met them before the trip and haven’t talked to them since. They took me to the beaches and gave me a tour of all the landing zones. I had a handheld digital camera and took some pictures.

Couple months later we were visiting some cousins and I had a great uncle of some kind (also via marriage) and this guy had Alzheimer’s. He was so lost and lived in a bowl of fog and couldn’t remember anything that happened yesterday. He was at the end and kind of just waiting to die. I showed him pictures of my trip to Europe and it was pretty meaningless to him until I got to the Normandy pictures. Then his face changed and his eyes changed and he started talking. He was extremely lucid (you would have no idea he had Alzheimer’s) and he could remember every detail of the battle and the landing. From my pictures he knew exactly where it was and what beach it was. It took him right back. He was 19 again and it brought everything back with force. I didn’t know he had taken part in the landings!

The part that really stuck with me from the conversation was after the beachhead was established and they started punching inland he said he got shot through the hand and was taken back to a medical area to recover. He said supply trucks would leave for the front with gear, and come back to the rear loaded up with dead soldiers. He said the arms would be sticking out the sides of the trucks and the arms would be flopping around as the trucks went over bumps and potholes. He said it was a tough thing for him to see.

He didn’t talk about the war otherwise and he passed away a couple months after our conversation.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Valuethinker »

Sprucebark wrote: Sat Jun 08, 2024 12:50 pm After high school I tracked down some relatives via marriage who lived in that region and went over to visit. I hadn’t met them before the trip and haven’t talked to them since. They took me to the beaches and gave me a tour of all the landing zones. I had a handheld digital camera and took some pictures.

Couple months later we were visiting some cousins and I had a great uncle of some kind (also via marriage) and this guy had Alzheimer’s. He was so lost and lived in a bowl of fog and couldn’t remember anything that happened yesterday. He was at the end and kind of just waiting to die. I showed him pictures of my trip to Europe and it was pretty meaningless to him until I got to the Normandy pictures. Then his face changed and his eyes changed and he started talking. He was extremely lucid (you would have no idea he had Alzheimer’s) and he could remember every detail of the battle and the landing. From my pictures he knew exactly where it was and what beach it was. It took him right back. He was 19 again and it brought everything back with force. I didn’t know he had taken part in the landings!

The part that really stuck with me from the conversation was after the beachhead was established and they started punching inland he said he got shot through the hand and was taken back to a medical area to recover. He said supply trucks would leave for the front with gear, and come back to the rear loaded up with dead soldiers. He said the arms would be sticking out the sides of the trucks and the arms would be flopping around as the trucks went over bumps and potholes. He said it was a tough thing for him to see.

He didn’t talk about the war otherwise and he passed away a couple months after our conversation.
Depending on the nature of the dementia, old memories remain accessible even as newer ones are lost.

Battle for Hue City, Tet Offensive 1968.

USMC and South Vietnamese retook the traditional historic capital of Vietnam from the North Vietnamese Army in intense house-to-house fighting. As bad as WW2.

It's in Michael Herr's book "Dispatches" but also, I think, in the TV documentary "10,000 Day War" and possibly "Vietnam: a television history". It might be in Mark Bowden's book as well (not sure).

They have a small utility vehicle, Marine shot in the head among the wounded passengers. The thing gets stuck under enemy fire. The driver turns to the wounded men, including the guy shot in the head, and they get out and push the vehicle across the obstacle. It was that, or just sit there, under enemy fire.

I don't think anyone who has not fought in combat, can really understand what it is like. Also, human memory fades and distorts - that's one of the reason why the vast majority of veterans stay sane. I have direct family experience of trauma, and yes, forgetting is an important survival feature.

But as someone grows old and their memory fades, perhaps the original memories, burned into the brain, come back to the fore.
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Re: June 6 On my mind today [D-Day]

Post by Valuethinker »

Sprucebark wrote: Sat Jun 08, 2024 12:50 pm After high school I tracked down some relatives via marriage who lived in that region and went over to visit. I hadn’t met them before the trip and haven’t talked to them since. They took me to the beaches and gave me a tour of all the landing zones. I had a handheld digital camera and took some pictures.

Couple months later we were visiting some cousins and I had a great uncle of some kind (also via marriage) and this guy had Alzheimer’s. He was so lost and lived in a bowl of fog and couldn’t remember anything that happened yesterday. He was at the end and kind of just waiting to die. I showed him pictures of my trip to Europe and it was pretty meaningless to him until I got to the Normandy pictures. Then his face changed and his eyes changed and he started talking. He was extremely lucid (you would have no idea he had Alzheimer’s) and he could remember every detail of the battle and the landing. From my pictures he knew exactly where it was and what beach it was. It took him right back. He was 19 again and it brought everything back with force. I didn’t know he had taken part in the landings!

The part that really stuck with me from the conversation was after the beachhead was established and they started punching inland he said he got shot through the hand and was taken back to a medical area to recover. He said supply trucks would leave for the front with gear, and come back to the rear loaded up with dead soldiers. He said the arms would be sticking out the sides of the trucks and the arms would be flopping around as the trucks went over bumps and potholes. He said it was a tough thing for him to see.

He didn’t talk about the war otherwise and he passed away a couple months after our conversation.
Photos bring back memories.

I had a cousin who was highly decorated in North Africa, Italy and Greece (a Guards Regiment of the British Army).

His son visited Tunisia, where they broke the Mareth Line - a French pre war fortification that the Germans had refortified to protect their retreat from Libya when the Allies landed behind them in Algeria and Morocco. His son served in the same regiment in the 1970s and 1980s.

At the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery were soldiers of Britain and its Allies who died in the Mareth Line battle.

His son took some slide photos of the cemetery. He was showing the slides to family and some friends back home in England.

Suddenly the woman in the audience started.

"That's my brother". Her brother had been shot and killed, next to my cousin, that day in late 1942. This was the first time she had seen his grave.
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