Screwdriver and wrenches

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Mr. Rumples
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Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Mr. Rumples »

I will be moving into a small apt. at a continuing care retirement community. Alas, with the limited storage I want to consolidate decades of tools; other than drill a pilot hole into drywall, or screw perhaps some furniture that needs assembly, I don't see the need for most of it. I am thinking of two things and suggestions as to make/model would be helpful since I am overwhelmed by the choices:

1) screwdriver (cordless or corded - since I will always be close to an outlet) that can handle small drilling jobs
2) an all in one wrench. I can't find one that has both needle nose and flat nose pliers
"History is the memory of time, the life of the dead and the happiness of the living." Captain John Smith 1580-1631
PeninsulaPerson
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by PeninsulaPerson »

Mr. Rumples wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 5:25 am
1) screwdriver (cordless or corded - since I will always be close to an outlet) that can handle small drilling jobs
2) an all in one wrench. I can't find one that has both needle nose and flat nose pliers

Have you inquired at the CCRC? Because they may have tools to borrow or a group of folks who that's their thing - say woodworking - who love to help others.

Before you buy something new that you can always buy later.

Do you have a treasured old tool or two that you're keeping ... :)?
B4Xt3r
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by B4Xt3r »

Perhaps you'de find utility in a Leatherman of some kind?
Kensai
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Kensai »

Your question is very limited/specific so I'll answer your direct question on brand and toss out a few suggestions as well- I am a fan of crafstman for homeowners because their quality has always been decent, and cost is mid range, sub for whatever similar price/brand.

If I were limited - I'm not sure I'd go for two items, but if I had to get rid of everything I own as a equipment technician/mechanic background and still do all my work on my own vehicles: Here's what I would keep.

Leatherman (Skeletool is my favorite!)
Multibit screw driver - Craftsman or whatever other cheap brand
Small Pliers (always handy) - Knipex
Small(er) adjustable wrench. Craftsman or whatever brand.
Set of Allen Wrenches - Eklind
1/4" Ratchet/Socket - Craftsman
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lthenderson
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Location: Iowa

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by lthenderson »

Getting an all in one wrench is just going to be an exercise in frustration as none of them work well long term. If it were me, I would just purchase one of those 100 (or so) piece sets that come in a small plastic box and have an array of socket, wrench and screwdriver sizes that will meet your every need and take up very little space. As suggested above Craftsman makes a number of them geared toward the basic homeowner.
Vinny_in_NJ
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Vinny_in_NJ »

Just my opinion - stay away from battery operated anything as they require frequent use/charging for the battery to stay good. I agree with a multi-bit screwdriver except there are times that the shaft is too large if you need to go deep into a hole to screw something in, I have a Klein multi-bit at work that works well most of the time. If the multi-bit screwdriver is not something you're interested in a #1 and #2 Philips and a small and medium flat blade works for most of the things. Lowes with Craftsman and Home Depot with Husky would be good tools for home assuming you are not using them a lot but both brands are guaranteed for life so probably a good way to go. Small ratchet set could be nice to have, again Craftsman and Husky would be good, I had a stubby set that had worked well and didn't take up a lot of room. Wrench or pliers, there is a difference. I think separate needle nose and standard pliers would work the best, I like slip joint pliers vs electrician's or linesman's pliers unless you're planning on cutting wire. If you need a wrench then get an adjustable medium size or maybe a plumbers slip joint pliers. These can fit into a small toolbox (except the ratchet set) and fit anywhere.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Sandtrap »

Mr. Rumples wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 5:25 am I will be moving into a small apt. at a continuing care retirement community. Alas, with the limited storage I want to consolidate decades of tools; other than drill a pilot hole into drywall, or screw perhaps some furniture that needs assembly, I don't see the need for most of it. I am thinking of two things and suggestions as to make/model would be helpful since I am overwhelmed by the choices:

1) screwdriver (cordless or corded - since I will always be close to an outlet) that can handle small drilling jobs
2) an all in one wrench. I can't find one that has both needle nose and flat nose pliers
I have used these regularly and they have been reliable and of good quality. I have a full size "shop" building but have these sets in my home for convenience.
I shopped "name brand" and "no name" and nowadays, "name brand" or "familiar name" is just marketing and no assurance of quality, only higher price often.
All on Amazon.com. Free 30 day returns and refund.

Screwdriver ratchet set.
The screwdriver handles are very practical. Not all are.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09HJ ... =UTF8&th=1

Rechargeable drill/driver. Cheap. Works. *(charge it up when you need it).
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07F2 ... =UTF8&th=1

Hex drive drill bit set.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0CFQ ... UTF8&psc=1

Hex drive hex bit set.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0859 ... =UTF8&th=1

Rechargeable screwdriver.
This is a strange tool that I've grown into and found very useful.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07C4 ... =UTF8&th=1

Screwdriver set. Inexpensive and works fine for medium/ight use.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0BJ3 ... =UTF8&th=1

Generic set of pliers for $20
We have a set of these in the hallway closet. They've worked well for many years. I just replaced a shower head and ball swivel with the channellock.
I rarely have to get a "professional quality/price" tool from my shop if it is just around the house use.
https://www.amazon.com/WORKPRO-7-piece- ... hdGY&psc=1

Any 16 oz hammer will do. But, you have to have a hammer. Make sure the bag is long enough to fit it.
https://www.amazon.com/YIYITOOLS-Claw-H ... r=8-9&th=1

Stanley Utility Knife with quick change and storage.
Used on construction sites everywhere, a reliable and durable standard.
https://www.amazon.com/Stanleyamp-Quick ... 64&sr=8-15

Tool bag
Any Inexpensive tool bag. You don't need the outer pockets, everything goes inside. Fits all of the above.
https://www.amazon.com/Performance-Tool ... N_H57OyotR

This small bag of "real" tools is better in the long run for your small dwelling. (not a leatherman or one size does all type of tools).

have fun.
j :D
Last edited by Sandtrap on Sun May 12, 2024 8:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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hunoraut
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by hunoraut »

Modern lithium ion battery tools are sooooo good, theres absolutely no reason for corded for occasional home hobby use.

Get a reputable branded 12V cordless driver, for more compact size and lighter weight.

For 2 wrenches, a needle nose and a cobra style “pliers-wrench” (from knipex) will do 99% of what you need.
chemocean
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by chemocean »

If there is a tool library in your area, considering donating your present inventory of tools to them.
linuxizer
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by linuxizer »

Milwaukee M12 driver (not drill if you can only have one)
- A set of metric hex bits for putting together IKEA type furniture
- A good (Makita or Milwaukee) set of basic bits. Phillips, torx, and square.

A Knipex pliers wrench

A basic hex bit screwdriver

Should run you maybe $150 and handle a remarkable amount of things and last forever without stripping screws and bolts.
lazydavid
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by lazydavid »

This tiny ratchet set has quickly become my most-used tool, so much so that I actually leave it out on the kitchen counter:

Image

The pictures make it look bigger than it is. the whole case is 2" x 5", and less than 1.5" thick. Add a set of metric and SAE nut setters ($5-13 per set, depending on which line you choose), and you've got a pretty comprehensive little kit for light work, and all the bits will also work in whatever driver you decide on.

This Milwaukee cordless screwdriver is awesome. I managed to score it on sale for $60, but it's a good value even at $99.
Last edited by lazydavid on Sun May 12, 2024 8:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
PeninsulaPerson
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Location: Metro Boston

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by PeninsulaPerson »

linuxizer wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 8:05 am
Should run you maybe $150 and handle a remarkable amount of things and last forever without stripping screws and bolts.
Mr. Rumples wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 5:25 am
I will be moving into a small apt. at a continuing care retirement community.


Since the OP is moving to a "small apt." in a CCRC, why buy any of this stuff that he will probably never use and that may be easily available elsewhere - one example, our library has a "library of things" where simple/common tools can be borrowed.

Also, surely the CCRC has a handyman - at the senior living place where my MIL spent her last days, the handyman was wonderful. She never had to lift a finger.

The OP should check his options in this new situation before spending $$$. There may even be rules about what he can do!
PeninsulaPerson
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by PeninsulaPerson »

chemocean wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 8:04 am
If there is a tool library in your area, considering donating your present inventory of tools to them.

+1
linuxizer
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by linuxizer »

Penninsulaperson makes sense. May not need any tools.

Lazydavid that looks like the most useful compact array of bits I’ve ever seen.
MrNarwhal
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by MrNarwhal »

I don't have experience using an electric screwdriver instead of a drill. It seems that is the main space savings you hope to accomplish. I personally worry about stripping cheap screws with an electric driver but it could be good labor / grip strength saving.

Multibit screwdrivers are great when you need to carry a tool in your pocket. For a small apartment, you can select the right screwdriver and a slimmed-down regular set would work fine.

If you don't already have one, get something like this. To avoid getting down on your hands and knees searching for dropped screws.
https://www.harborfreight.com/15-lb-cap ... 64656.html
Outer Marker
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Outer Marker »

Mr. Rumples wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 5:25 am I will be moving into a small apt. at a continuing care retirement community. Alas, with the limited storage I want to consolidate decades of tools; other than drill a pilot hole into drywall, or screw perhaps some furniture that needs assembly, I don't see the need for most of it.
My useful tools occupy a small fraction of the space of "stuff" I've accumulated over the years. If you've already got them, I wouldn't throw them out to go buy new multifunction things that don't do tasks as well as the purpose built tools. If you haven't used a tool in the last 10 years, you probably don't need it, and can get rid of stuff that falls in that category. You can also probably give away larger power tools like skill saws, mitre box, etc.
iamlucky13
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by iamlucky13 »

For clarification, an electric screw driver is almost always a low power tool specifically for turning screws that are easy to turn. It does not have an adjustable chuck to hold different size drill bits. You could get quick change drill bits with a hex shank that will fit in an electric screw driver, but the low speed means it will take a while to drill a hole in anything but very soft materials. I've never tried drilling into drywall with one. It might work, I suppose.

I'd probably default to having a manual screwdriver with interchangeable bits, and a drill. I'm actually about to grab a Milwaukee interchangeable bit screwdriver from Home Depot at my wife's request for her car.

A drill (aka drill/driver) runs faster and usually has more power, but as long as it has a variable speed trigger, which most do these days, it also is useful for driving screws.

For apartment use, a 12V drill should be plenty. The Milwaukee and Bosch 12V models are very compact, and actually pretty high performance, but pricey. Makita and Dewalt also have good quality models with a more traditional battery layout that makes them slightly bigger. Harbor Freight has their "Hercules" brand 12V drill that should be a solid budget option. Harbor Freight also have a a budget "Warrior" brand that is poor quality, but very cheap, and does seem to work for low demand tasks (I do not own one, but have handled it). If you don't want to shop at Harbor Freight, there is a Black and Decker model that should be an ok budget option. Ryobi has an 18V model where the motor and chuck is roughly as compact as 12V models, but the overall drill is not quite as small due to the bigger battery.
Vinny_in_NJ wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 7:14 am Just my opinion - stay away from battery operated anything as they require frequent use/charging for the battery to stay good.
They do not require frequent use, or frequent charging. I do recommend leaving the battery about half charged to minimize the rate it ages, but even if you store it fully charged, at room temperature, it will probably last about 5 years. I have a couple batteries that are about 10 years old and still work ok, but do seem to have lost some power.

They do need to be prevented from completely discharging, so I would advise, if you aren't going to use it often, try to find a model with some sort of battery meter (4 indicator lights is most common), and make sure its above 1/4 charged.
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illumination
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by illumination »

I highly recommend getting one of these impact drivers (there's several versions) I find myself reaching for it constantly. Even with a bare bones tool collection. It does a good job holding a charge, I can go months and pick it up and works perfectly.

Image
hunoraut
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by hunoraut »

illumination wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 11:28 am I highly recommend getting one of these impact drivers (there's several versions) I find myself reaching for it constantly. Even with a bare bones tool collection. It does a good job holding a charge, I can go months and pick it up and works perfectly.

Image
impact is overkill for doing basic screw-driving and minor drilling duties. the drill-driver will have a clutch setting to limit torque and make it more appropriate for driving screws.
Vinny_in_NJ wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 7:14 am Just my opinion - stay away from battery operated anything as they require frequent use/charging for the battery to stay good. I agree with a multi-bit screwdriver except there are times that the shaft is too large if you need to go deep into a hole to screw something in, I have a Klein multi-bit at work that works well most of the time.... Wrench or pliers, there is a difference.
modern li-ion batteries are terrific. i have a pair of 4ah 18v batteries and for doing small jobs around the house, i basically never have to think about charging. manual driving? why do that when you dont have to. for the miniscule space a 12v set takes (1 unit, 1 battery, 1 charger, and 1 bit box), its infinitely more pleasant to use.

the "pliers-wrench" with cobra does both function and is a bit of a magic tool. expandable to different size. great grip. does almost everything, except reach in tight spot, which is why you also want a pair of needle nose.
adamthesmythe
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by adamthesmythe »

If I had to move into a smaller place I would just curate my present tool collection. Not buy more and different.

I have an entire drawer full of screwdrivers alone...I suspect they mate and reproduce.

AND repair tasks around the house typically involve at least two trips to the hardware store, sometimes to buy more tools. Tools are way cheaper than handyman services.
RudyS
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by RudyS »

PeninsulaPerson wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 8:35 am
linuxizer wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 8:05 am
Should run you maybe $150 and handle a remarkable amount of things and last forever without stripping screws and bolts.
Mr. Rumples wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 5:25 am
I will be moving into a small apt. at a continuing care retirement community.


Since the OP is moving to a "small apt." in a CCRC, why buy any of this stuff that he will probably never use and that may be easily available elsewhere - one example, our library has a "library of things" where simple/common tools can be borrowed.

Also, surely the CCRC has a handyman - at the senior living place where my MIL spent her last days, the handyman was wonderful. She never had to lift a finger.

The OP should check his options in this new situation before spending $$$. There may even be rules about what he can do!
Moved to a CCRC 5 years ago. I agree with the above. Our maintenance folks are available for most any task. I did bring a selection of tools I already own, and never found a need for more. If you have a knife sharpening stone, bring that to sharpen kitchen knives. Tiny screwdrivers to remove the screws on battery compartments will be useful.
twh
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by twh »

I have a cheap plastic low profile toolbox that would easily slide under most close to the ground furniture or beds. Might be a good thing to just keep your limited tools and screws, hangers, etc. As I recall it was advertised for under the seat of a pickup truck.
Topic Author
Mr. Rumples
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Mr. Rumples »

Yes, there are restrictions; they don't want folks doing much of anything since if there is an accident, they have to care for the person; hence about all I might have to do / want to do is hang a picture or assemble furniture. Upon moving in, I have several hours of their time to hang stuff. My ratchet screwdriver has served me well for decades, but it's worn now and won't hold the bits well and my fingers go cattywampus when using it (or opening a can).

Have some screwdrivers for micro things like eyeglasses; I'll bring my sharpening stone.

Thanks for all the suggestions.
"History is the memory of time, the life of the dead and the happiness of the living." Captain John Smith 1580-1631
Vinny_in_NJ
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Vinny_in_NJ »

iamlucky13 wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 11:05 am For clarification, an electric screw driver is almost always a low power tool specifically for turning screws that are easy to turn. It does not have an adjustable chuck to hold different size drill bits. You could get quick change drill bits with a hex shank that will fit in an electric screw driver, but the low speed means it will take a while to drill a hole in anything but very soft materials. I've never tried drilling into drywall with one. It might work, I suppose.

I'd probably default to having a manual screwdriver with interchangeable bits, and a drill. I'm actually about to grab a Milwaukee interchangeable bit screwdriver from Home Depot at my wife's request for her car.

A drill (aka drill/driver) runs faster and usually has more power, but as long as it has a variable speed trigger, which most do these days, it also is useful for driving screws.

For apartment use, a 12V drill should be plenty. The Milwaukee and Bosch 12V models are very compact, and actually pretty high performance, but pricey. Makita and Dewalt also have good quality models with a more traditional battery layout that makes them slightly bigger. Harbor Freight has their "Hercules" brand 12V drill that should be a solid budget option. Harbor Freight also have a a budget "Warrior" brand that is poor quality, but very cheap, and does seem to work for low demand tasks (I do not own one, but have handled it). If you don't want to shop at Harbor Freight, there is a Black and Decker model that should be an ok budget option. Ryobi has an 18V model where the motor and chuck is roughly as compact as 12V models, but the overall drill is not quite as small due to the bigger battery.
Vinny_in_NJ wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 7:14 am Just my opinion - stay away from battery operated anything as they require frequent use/charging for the battery to stay good.
They do not require frequent use, or frequent charging. I do recommend leaving the battery about half charged to minimize the rate it ages, but even if you store it fully charged, at room temperature, it will probably last about 5 years. I have a couple batteries that are about 10 years old and still work ok, but do seem to have lost some power.

They do need to be prevented from completely discharging, so I would advise, if you aren't going to use it often, try to find a model with some sort of battery meter (4 indicator lights is most common), and make sure its above 1/4 charged.
My experiences with battery powered equipment differs from yours, I have had plenty batteries die from infrequent use. Newer batteries may be better than older batteries but my son had a 4 YO Milwaukee 5 AH battery die on him even with light to medium use, which I suspect may still be the case with most batteries. Charge a battery and let it sit for a few months and it may or may not work at least that's been my experience. I am having good luck on a Ryobi 40 volt battery for my string trimmer which kind of surprises me. Some homeowners use their power tools very infrequently and if their battery dies and can't be recharged then it's useless. Your experience may differ from mine
Yooper
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Yooper »

I was about to mention one of my favorite tools - a ratcheting screwdriver that I absolutely love (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004V ... UTF8&psc=1) but you mentioned your wrists don't like twisting motions.
heisenberg.
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by heisenberg. »

I have lived in small apartments for most lf my life and have done everything i ever needed (furniture assembly, hanging pictures/shelves) with a battery drill and a drill bit set and a small hammer.

I had to charge the battery maybe once a year, no problems on performance whatsoever.

Don’t overthink it, something like a Bosch drill above will do.

I would be more stressed about what to do with the old beloved tools….
lazydavid
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by lazydavid »

iamlucky13 wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 11:05 am For clarification, an electric screw driver is almost always a low power tool specifically for turning screws that are easy to turn. It does not have an adjustable chuck to hold different size drill bits. You could get quick change drill bits with a hex shank that will fit in an electric screw driver, but the low speed means it will take a while to drill a hole in anything but very soft materials. I've never tried drilling into drywall with one. It might work, I suppose.
The one I linked above tops out at 500rpm, about a third as fast as an equivalent drill. Absolutely less effective at drilling tasks, but will get them done when you need. The tradeoff is it is dramatically easier to use for driving fasteners, which it sounds like is the far more likely use case.
hunoraut wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 12:11 pm impact is overkill for doing basic screw-driving and minor drilling duties. the drill-driver will have a clutch setting to limit torque and make it more appropriate for driving screws.
Impact drivers are far better than drills for fasteners, not because they have more power but because they require much less pressure on the head to avoid stripping it. However, they are close to useless for drilling. You can use very light pressure with very small bits in relatively soft surfaces, but any more than that and you trigger the hammering function and accomplish nothing. This is why they are often bundled with a drill/driver--best of both worlds.

Which is why my single-tool solution for very light stuff around the house would actually be a capable electric screwdriver. Best option by far for smaller and lower-torque screws that will account for the lion's share of work, passable for the much less frequent drilling and higher-torque work.
PeninsulaPerson
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by PeninsulaPerson »

Mr. Rumples wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 2:25 pm
My ratchet screwdriver has served me well for decades, but it's worn now and won't hold the bits well and my fingers go cattywampus when using it (or opening a can).


Hope you love the CCRC - everyone we know who has moved to one has loved it (except for one person who wouldn't be happy anyplace).

You may find yours has a club of people who love to help others fix things or tools on site that you can use if needed.

Plenty of time to buy what you realize you need after you move in.

Lucky you - getting picture hanging help!
iamlucky13
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Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by iamlucky13 »

Vinny_in_NJ wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 7:03 pm
iamlucky13 wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 11:05 am
Vinny_in_NJ wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 7:14 am Just my opinion - stay away from battery operated anything as they require frequent use/charging for the battery to stay good.
They do not require frequent use, or frequent charging. I do recommend leaving the battery about half charged to minimize the rate it ages, but even if you store it fully charged, at room temperature, it will probably last about 5 years. I have a couple batteries that are about 10 years old and still work ok, but do seem to have lost some power.

They do need to be prevented from completely discharging, so I would advise, if you aren't going to use it often, try to find a model with some sort of battery meter (4 indicator lights is most common), and make sure its above 1/4 charged.
My experiences with battery powered equipment differs from yours, I have had plenty batteries die from infrequent use. Newer batteries may be better than older batteries but my son had a 4 YO Milwaukee 5 AH battery die on him even with light to medium use, which I suspect may still be the case with most batteries. Charge a battery and let it sit for a few months and it may or may not work at least that's been my experience. I am having good luck on a Ryobi 40 volt battery for my string trimmer which kind of surprises me. Some homeowners use their power tools very infrequently and if their battery dies and can't be recharged then it's useless. Your experience may differ from mine
This is coming from a mix of experience and from reviewing various published test data, including academic research on lithium ion batteries. I'd like to help others understand how to best manage lithium ion batteries:

They don't need to be cycled. If a lithium ion battery is dying after several months of non-use, it is due to a defect, or perhaps being stored on a device that has some standby drain. Most power tools I've looked at do not have standby drain, although some chargers may, so batteries should not be left stored on a charger that is not plugged in. I don't recommend storing them on a plugged-in charger, either because keeping them topped up also is not ideal, although not as bad as letting them completely discharge. However, keeping a yard tool battery on a plugged-in charger during the lawn care season for convenience is merely sub-optimal, not a serious concern.

One possible defect a battery can have is a tendency to self-discharge, which may drain the battery below the minimum level. If an 18V battery gets much below 12.5V* (I think the problem level is actually about 10V, but rated minimum discharge levels are conservative), it will start to experience chemical reactions that can cause internal short circuits to develop. Nearly all power tool batteries have a battery management system built in to prevent this - they will automatically stop delivering power to the tool at around 15V. But if an internal defect exists, it can self-discharge just sitting on the shelf.

Furthermore, the internal short circuits that an overdischarged lithium ion battery develops can actually make it a fire risk if it is charged again, so chargers refuse to charge a battery that is below a certain level.

This is why I specifically recommended batteries with a built-in gauge if they are going to be infrequently used, so that it is easy to check that whether it should be charged. Using a multimeter to check voltage also works, but I assume most people don't have a multimeter.

* Equivalent minimum levels: rated (true minimum)
- "4V" battery (actually 3.6V): 2.5V (2.0V)
- "12V" battery (actually 10.8V): 7.5V (6.0V)
- "20V" battery (actually 18V): 12.5V (10.0V)
- "40V" battery (actually 36V): 25V (20.0V)
- "56V" battery (actually 50.4V): 35V (28.0V)

Quotation marks are used above because power tool manufacturers have started...let's call it "branding"... their batteries with a different voltage than than the actual voltage rating according to the established convention within the battery industry. For example, in Australia, Ryobi markets their yard tool batteries as 36V, because Australian law is more strict about battery labeling than in the US, where they are labeled "40V."
deikel
Posts: 1625
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2014 6:13 pm

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by deikel »

serious suggestion: The Ikea Fixa kit - all you need in an apartment. Actually just saw that they changed the name to Trixig...pity

https://www.ikea.com/us/en/p/trixig-15- ... -80556689/
Everything you read in this post is my personal opinion. If you disagree with this disclaimer, please un-read the text immediately and destroy any copy or remembrance of it.
PeninsulaPerson
Posts: 1573
Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2022 9:35 am
Location: Metro Boston

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by PeninsulaPerson »

deikel wrote: Mon May 13, 2024 3:29 pm
serious suggestion: The Ikea Fixa kit - all you need in an apartment. Actually just saw that they changed the name to Trixig...pity

https://www.ikea.com/us/en/p/trixig-15- ... -80556689/

Kits like this are great - I got one at the hardware store a few years ago and use it all the time.
tesuzuki2002
Posts: 1461
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2015 11:40 am

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by tesuzuki2002 »

I only buy good quality tools. I use them very often. I have no plans to sell any tools. I might pack and store some away as I've done now since I moved to a small ish condo with a very small garage.

Fast forward a few years.. I'll likely be back in a house with a 2 car garage and workshop area..

Multi-tools might be the way to go for the time you have your tools stored away.
PoorPlumber
Posts: 45
Joined: Mon May 13, 2024 5:22 pm

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by PoorPlumber »

Some great suggestions in this thread. I'd seriously need more information to really give a custom answer though.

As for myself, I've owned or used almost all of the different company's tools over the years. Still own and use from time to time:
Makita
Milwaukee
Ridgid
Bosch (Not really using these anymore though...)
Crafsman
Ryobi
Black and Decker
Dewalt
Blah, blah, blah....

It does seem from your original post that you are looking to not do too much and not need much power. So for a drill and impact driver a homeowner isn't going to be working too hard, I'd say get a small battery Milwaukee, Bosch (shown above), Ridgid impact driver/drill set. Typically 12V.
Just look for the best deal and any of them should serve you well.


Impact driver bits that drill are readily available as well as driver bits if you only want one tool and forego a traditional drill.

I might would maybe recommend Ryobi because it is often found cheaper. But I just looked and they don't seem to offer the small format and lower voltage of the others. The smaller format is much more pleasurable to use with fit and weight on the tasks I'm guessing you would be doing.
Don't let the lower voltage fool you either. The small ones can handle most things.

By the way, did you know that power tools by Milwaukee, Ridgid, Ryobi are all under the TTI Group? (China) I know....sad.

I have the Milwaukee 12V Drill and Impact driver combination that you can find online or at Home Depot. Been very pleased with both of them.

And for the record I HATE what I would call premature battery failure on ANYTHING. But these have held up reasonably.
I'm not recommending corded though because cords in finished houses/apartments stripe walls, dirty carpet, and are trip hazards.

Now on to the wrenches! :D

As stated, there will never, ever be a "universal" wrench to handle most applications. Just not going to happen.

With that said, one of my favorite wrenches that does many things is a small (8 inch?) DUCK BILLED adjustable wrench. Mine is a Ridgid made by Western Forge. But I think they went out of business. Still comparable ones out there though. The duck bull does make a difference and is why I have capitalized it. Once you have one, you'll see.

I have a Leatherman but more often than not I find it so inferior to the "actual" tool it is supposed to replace that I just don't carry it. I guess maybe it would be good for a homeowner that would only take it out of the drawer once a year? I like the fact they are made in USA but most of the good ones are pretty expensive.

You could get a pretty nice set at Harbor Freight or put together a customized set for the cost of one $100.00+- Leatherman. And have better tools to complete the job. Just one smallish bag would hold all of this stuck in the back of a closet. Drill and impact driver too.

Hope this helps.
mariezzz
Posts: 1134
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2017 11:02 pm

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by mariezzz »

Vice grips come in handy quite often! I'd add that to your list.
FellsGuy
Posts: 504
Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2021 12:30 pm

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by FellsGuy »

lazydavid wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 8:34 am This tiny ratchet set has quickly become my most-used tool, so much so that I actually leave it out on the kitchen counter:

Image

The pictures make it look bigger than it is. the whole case is 2" x 5", and less than 1.5" thick. Add a set of metric and SAE nut setters ($5-13 per set, depending on which line you choose), and you've got a pretty comprehensive little kit for light work, and all the bits will also work in whatever driver you decide on.

This Milwaukee cordless screwdriver is awesome. I managed to score it on sale for $60, but it's a good value even at $99.

That tiny ratchet set is fantastic I’m amazed how often I use it and it is top quality start with that cordless screwdriver I use the HOTO it’s good looking and works very well another item I’m surprised I use as much as I do.
“Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six , result happiness. | Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery”
Vinny_in_NJ
Posts: 230
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2024 5:01 pm

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Vinny_in_NJ »

iamlucky13 wrote: Mon May 13, 2024 11:13 am
Vinny_in_NJ wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 7:03 pm
iamlucky13 wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 11:05 am
Vinny_in_NJ wrote: Sun May 12, 2024 7:14 am Just my opinion - stay away from battery operated anything as they require frequent use/charging for the battery to stay good.
They do not require frequent use, or frequent charging. I do recommend leaving the battery about half charged to minimize the rate it ages, but even if you store it fully charged, at room temperature, it will probably last about 5 years. I have a couple batteries that are about 10 years old and still work ok, but do seem to have lost some power.

They do need to be prevented from completely discharging, so I would advise, if you aren't going to use it often, try to find a model with some sort of battery meter (4 indicator lights is most common), and make sure its above 1/4 charged.
My experiences with battery powered equipment differs from yours, I have had plenty batteries die from infrequent use. Newer batteries may be better than older batteries but my son had a 4 YO Milwaukee 5 AH battery die on him even with light to medium use, which I suspect may still be the case with most batteries. Charge a battery and let it sit for a few months and it may or may not work at least that's been my experience. I am having good luck on a Ryobi 40 volt battery for my string trimmer which kind of surprises me. Some homeowners use their power tools very infrequently and if their battery dies and can't be recharged then it's useless. Your experience may differ from mine
This is coming from a mix of experience and from reviewing various published test data, including academic research on lithium ion batteries. I'd like to help others understand how to best manage lithium ion batteries:

They don't need to be cycled. If a lithium ion battery is dying after several months of non-use, it is due to a defect, or perhaps being stored on a device that has some standby drain. Most power tools I've looked at do not have standby drain, although some chargers may, so batteries should not be left stored on a charger that is not plugged in. I don't recommend storing them on a plugged-in charger, either because keeping them topped up also is not ideal, although not as bad as letting them completely discharge. However, keeping a yard tool battery on a plugged-in charger during the lawn care season for convenience is merely sub-optimal, not a serious concern.

One possible defect a battery can have is a tendency to self-discharge, which may drain the battery below the minimum level. If an 18V battery gets much below 12.5V* (I think the problem level is actually about 10V, but rated minimum discharge levels are conservative), it will start to experience chemical reactions that can cause internal short circuits to develop. Nearly all power tool batteries have a battery management system built in to prevent this - they will automatically stop delivering power to the tool at around 15V. But if an internal defect exists, it can self-discharge just sitting on the shelf.

Furthermore, the internal short circuits that an overdischarged lithium ion battery develops can actually make it a fire risk if it is charged again, so chargers refuse to charge a battery that is below a certain level.

This is why I specifically recommended batteries with a built-in gauge if they are going to be infrequently used, so that it is easy to check that whether it should be charged. Using a multimeter to check voltage also works, but I assume most people don't have a multimeter.

* Equivalent minimum levels: rated (true minimum)
- "4V" battery (actually 3.6V): 2.5V (2.0V)
- "12V" battery (actually 10.8V): 7.5V (6.0V)
- "20V" battery (actually 18V): 12.5V (10.0V)
- "40V" battery (actually 36V): 25V (20.0V)
- "56V" battery (actually 50.4V): 35V (28.0V)

Quotation marks are used above because power tool manufacturers have started...let's call it "branding"... their batteries with a different voltage than than the actual voltage rating according to the established convention within the battery industry. For example, in Australia, Ryobi markets their yard tool batteries as 36V, because Australian law is more strict about battery labeling than in the US, where they are labeled "40V."
Thanks for the detailed info!
Luke Duke
Posts: 1360
Joined: Tue Jun 18, 2013 11:44 am
Location: Texas

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Luke Duke »

Just get a tool kit from the nearest big box store

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-73-Piec ... 5001961063
Topic Author
Mr. Rumples
Posts: 3096
Joined: Sun Aug 25, 2019 7:16 am

Re: Screwdriver and wrenches

Post by Mr. Rumples »

Thank y'all. As space is the premium, I'll use my tool box and take what I can get in it, somewhat similar to the kit shown above in the end. It's a process of looking at each item and questioning when was the last time I used it. I will take one drill and leave it in the storage unit they give (4'x4'). The other painful thing is giving up all the assorted washers, nuts and and so forth accumulated over the years. Though I refuse to part with my antique forged nails.
"History is the memory of time, the life of the dead and the happiness of the living." Captain John Smith 1580-1631
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