What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

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Maverick3320
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Maverick3320 »

JD2775 wrote: Mon Mar 18, 2024 10:58 am Recently finished a re-read of "City of Thieves" (David Benioff). Great book

Also just finished "The Great Train Robbery" (Michael Crichton) - fun older book re-enacting a train robbery in London that happened in the 1800's

Just started "Liv and Let Die" (Alan Shipnuck). Behind the scenes story of the "war" between the PGA Tour and Liv Golf.
The same David Benioff that created the HBO Game of Thrones series, apparently!
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by JD2775 »

Maverick3320 wrote: Wed Mar 27, 2024 12:09 pm
JD2775 wrote: Mon Mar 18, 2024 10:58 am Recently finished a re-read of "City of Thieves" (David Benioff). Great book

Also just finished "The Great Train Robbery" (Michael Crichton) - fun older book re-enacting a train robbery in London that happened in the 1800's

Just started "Liv and Let Die" (Alan Shipnuck). Behind the scenes story of the "war" between the PGA Tour and Liv Golf.
The same David Benioff that created the HBO Game of Thrones series, apparently!
Yep, the same guy. Don't judge him based on his bad GoT ending....he can write!
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by JD2775 »

Just finished "Beyond the Wand" - Thomas Felton. A memoir from the actor who played Draco Malfoy in the Harry Potter movies. I don't usually read books like these, but my SO turned me onto it. Fun read, with a lot of interesting tidbits for fans of the series. Also includes his struggles later on in life.

Now I am trying to decide whether to re-read The Stand or go for a first read of Under the Dome (both Stephen King). I know the first one is excellent, and I've heard mixed reviews on the other.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by vnatale »

Count de Monet wrote: Tue Mar 26, 2024 8:38 pm Next: Elon Musk, by Walter Isaacson (2023)
Just finished: Leonardo da Vinci, by Walter Isaacson (2017)
Recent: Steve Jobs, by Walter Isaacson (2011)
December: Einstein, by Walter Isaacson (2007)
Few years ago: Benjamin Franklin, by Walter Isaacson (2003)
I am detecting a trend!

I endorse the Musk book.
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by vnatale »

Maverick3320 wrote: Wed Mar 27, 2024 9:20 am
vnatale wrote: Sun Sep 17, 2023 8:35 pm
JD2775 wrote: Fri Sep 15, 2023 7:35 pm
rockstar wrote: Fri Sep 15, 2023 3:00 pm
JD2775 wrote: Thu Sep 14, 2023 4:22 pm The Road - Cormac McCarthy

First McCarthy book I have read and I am about 70% of the way done. It took me a little while to get used to his unique way of writing (no quotation marks, no chapters, etc...). After I got the hang of it though I got used to it. Pretty good book so far.
No Country for Old Men is good. Read it again about a month ago. You get used to his writing style the more you read him.

I’m knocking out The Way We Live Now for Victober. Basically you read a Victorian novel for the month.

I’m trying to catch up to my significant other who reads 150+ books a year.
I cannot fathom reading 150+ books a year. That is incredible. Even if you are retired and aren't doing much else, that's still like ~3 books a week.

Does your SO read 150+ new books a year? Or are some of them re-reads? If always new, that's even more impressive.

Thanks for the tip about No County for Old Men. I'm gonna check that out. I remember really liking that movie.
I tried Blood Meridian a few months ago and gave up after about 15 mins, I just wasn't used to the style. Now I think I can give it another go.
I do have a friend who keeps me up to date on how many books he's read. As of yesterday he is up to 532 books. He reads little fiction. Mostly politics, history, atheism, baseball.

He is not retired, has a full-time job , watches a lot of TV. He obviously makes book reading a priority in his life. Looks like his all-time record is 807 books read in 2021.
I'm sorry, I find this hard to believe. Your friend works full-time but also reads 2.5 books per day?
He also watches a lot of TV.

He is full-time seasonally. From about now through October. Then more part-time from November through March.

But he really does read all those books. He reports on each one of them in Good Reads.
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fbone »

A Murder of Mages by Marshall Maresca. Murder mystery in pre-industrial city. Enjoyable.

Next is Doors of Sleep by Tim Pratt
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

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Just finished Machine Vendetta by Alastair Reynolds the third and final installment in the prefect subseries of his revelation space universe as the three way battle between emergent distributed machine intelligences and the police force called panoply comes to a head.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by sschullo »

stoptothink wrote: Thu Jan 04, 2024 9:53 am
TomatoTomahto wrote: Thu Jan 04, 2024 9:18 am
FoolStreet wrote: Wed Jan 03, 2024 6:28 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun Dec 31, 2023 7:43 am
TomatoTomahto wrote: Fri Dec 29, 2023 6:46 am Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover. I just began Part Three. To quote The New Yorker,
Just finished it in time to make it my Best Book of 2023.
Really? Can you share why? It was required reading for my kid in HS and got good reviews. Seemed to echo some family upbringing on my spouse's side.
I know some people regard this as more a work of fiction than a memoir. I trusted the author in that she took pains to verify the history as best she could, and when discrepancies arose, she discussed them. In my personal experience (not immediate family, but family adjacent), I find that the dangerous parties are more likely to defend and justify than the victims; most everyone wants to regard relatives, especially siblings and parents, as decent and healthy human beings.

It’s worth a read to determine whether you agree; it’s not a long or ponderous book
Haven't read the book, but I am familiar with the story simply because it occurred not that far from where we Iive. In cases like this I always assume that the truth falls somewhere in the middle, and someone writing a book absolutely has an incentive to stretch a bit. I am also familiar with LDS fundamentalists; some crazy banana hammock stuff goes on in that "culture" - I don't need to read a book about it.
I read it a couple of years ago. I liked it. I read a lot of memoirs, and most memoirs have to invent dialogue because very few people remember exact conversations as they are presented in most memoirs. Here is my immature review: https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-revi ... B072BLVM83
Never in the history of market day-traders’ has the obsession with so much massive, sophisticated, & powerful statistical machinery used by the brightest people on earth with such useless results.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius »

Semicolon: The Past, Present, and Future of a Misunderstood Mark by Cecelia Watson.

Yes, it's a book about the semicolon.

I give it a mixed review.

Absolutely worth... uh... borrowing if you're interested in... uh... punctuation. And the history of the English language. There are some interesting comments on the "register" of punctuation, the elitism (or not) and pretentiousness (or not) of the usage of the semicolon. And meaning of the fact that Martin Luther King chose--needed to use--"American Written English," the language of the power structure, to express his protests against that power structure.

Nowhere near as good as Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation, Symbols, and Other Typographical Marks by Keith Huston.

The historic parts, showing how the semicolon historically was used and regarded, and the fascinating trends and fashions in its use, were very good. Her analysis of various examples from famous writers was interesting, but the intensity of her analysis and the claims for the magisterial use, and how the semicolon contributes to the meaning and feeling of specific passages, seemed exaggerated and overwrought.

The odd thing is that neither she nor anybody else seems to grasp what I thought was obvious: the comma, semicolon, colon, and period simply form a hierarchical grouping structure, allowing the expression of four-deep nested hierarchies in a linear notation. Whether it's good or bad depends on whether such a nested hierarchy is appropriate to the subject matter.

"Scorn not the semicolon, critic..."
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Nicolas
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Nicolas »

Be Useful: Seven Tools For Life by Arnold Schwarzenegger (2023)
In this inspirational self-help book Arnold inspires the reader to be a success. He relates that his father taught him that in life he should make it his goal to “be useful”. Taking pages from his own life, he instructs the reader to set high goals, ignore the naysayers, and put in the hard work necessary to achieve their dreams. I don’t read self-help books so this is a departure for me. Some may criticize this book as being too simplistic and low-brow but I’ve always liked Arnold and so far I’m enjoying the book.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ekid »

"The odd thing is that neither she nor anybody else seems to grasp what I thought was obvious: the comma, semicolon, colon, and period simply form a hierarchical grouping structure, allowing the expression of four-deep nested hierarchies in a linear notation. Whether it's good or bad depends on whether such a nested hierarchy is appropriate to the subject matter.

"Scorn not the semicolon, critic..."

Lynn Truss wrote entertainingly on punctuation. Another writer has a good profane book on good usage, english.
Not ALL profane.

https://www.amazon.com/Between-You-Me-C ... _author_dp

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast »

"Math Makers", by Alfred Posamentier and Christian Spreitzer (Prometheus Books 2020)

I own a number of books that describe the lives and works of the great mathematicians. The most comprehensive of these are:

A Short Account of the History of Mathematics, by W.W.R. Ball (original copyright 1912)
Men of Mathematics, by E.T. Bell (original copyright 1937)
A History of Mathematics, by Carl B. Boyer (original copyright 1968)

These tomes are all excellent works, but, golly gee, they are all a little bit long in the tooth, aren't they? So when I saw "Math Makers" at my library, I eagerly scooped it up. The cover sheet states that it reviews "The Lives and Works of 50 Famous Mathematicians".

Now that I have finished the text, I view the book as a mixed success. The short section on the Indian mathematician Brahmagupta (598-668) made me somewhat ashamed for holding a Eurocentric prejudice; he was absolutely brilliant and far ahead of his time. The explanations of Archimedes' impressive theorems were admirably clear. The section on the "amateur" Fermat was superb and provides many biographical details that I had never known about him before. I never get tired of learning more about the "Battling Bernoulli's" and their section does not disappoint. The sections on Charles Babbage and George Boole were admirably concise and educational. The best part of this book may be that the female mathematicians receive a full and just recounting: Maria Agnesi, Sophie Germain, Ada Lovelace, Sofia Kovalevskaya, Emmy Noether, and Maryam Mirzakhani.

Concerns? Some of the accounts were a little too abbreviated for my tastes, although I understand the authors' dilemma. When you begin to describe the lives and works of Euler, Gauss, Abel, Galois, Newton, Leibniz, and Laplace, just to name some of the most renowned, how deep do you want to go and where do you stop? Their biggest error was allotting 20 pages with multiple diagrams to explain Lorenzo Mascheroni's proof that one can create all geometric constructions with two compasses alone, e.g., no straightedge is necessary. Fifteen of those pages could have been assigned to other notables.

Any college mathematics department should have this book assigned to its undergraduate majors. I finally note that if E.T. Bell were miraculously re-incarnated today, his first task would be to change that name of his book to "People of Mathematics".
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Nicolas
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Nicolas »

FreeAtLast wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 5:37 pm "Math Makers", by Alfred Posamentier and Christian Spreitzer (Prometheus Books 2020)

I own a number of books that describe the lives and works of the great mathematicians. The most comprehensive of these are:

A Short Account of the History of Mathematics, by W.W.R. Ball (original copyright 1912)
Men of Mathematics, by E.T. Bell (original copyright 1937)
A History of Mathematics, by Carl B. Boyer (original copyright 1968)

These tomes are all excellent works, but, golly gee, they are all a little bit long in the tooth, aren't they? So when I saw "Math Makers" at my library, I eagerly scooped it up. The cover sheet states that it reviews "The Lives and Works of 50 Famous Mathematicians".

Now that I have finished the text, I view the book as a mixed success. The short section on the Indian mathematician Brahmagupta (598-668) made me somewhat ashamed for holding a Eurocentric prejudice; he was absolutely brilliant and far ahead of his time. The explanations of Archimedes' impressive theorems were admirably clear. The section on the "amateur" Fermat was superb and provides many biographical details that I had never known about him before. I never get tired of learning more about the "Battling Bernoulli's" and their section does not disappoint. The sections on Charles Babbage and George Boole were admirably concise and educational. The best part of this book may be that the female mathematicians receive a full and just recounting: Maria Agnesi, Sophie Germain, Ada Lovelace, Sofia Kovalevskaya, Emmy Noether, and Maryam Mirzakhani.

Concerns? Some of the accounts were a little too abbreviated for my tastes, although I understand the authors' dilemma. When you begin to describe the lives and works of Euler, Gauss, Abel, Galois, Newton, Leibniz, and Laplace, just to name some of the most renowned, how deep do you want to go and where do you stop? Their biggest error was allotting 20 pages with multiple diagrams to explain Lorenzo Mascheroni's proof that one can create all geometric constructions with two compasses alone, e.g., no straightedge is necessary. Fifteen of those pages could have been assigned to other notables.

Any college mathematics department should have this book assigned to its undergraduate majors. I finally note that if E.T. Bell were miraculously re-incarnated today, his first task would be to change that name of his book to "People of Mathematics".
Thanks, I want to read this book. I’m fascinated with mathematical geniuses, past and present. I took a minor in mathematics at university and later regretted it wasn’t my major. I wonder if the book covers the Indian genius Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887-1920).
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast »

"Elvis And The Colonel", by Greg McDonald and Marshall Terrill (St. Martin's Press 2023)

Colonel Tom Parker has received a nasty reputation as the Svengali who drove Elvis to work himself to death and who stole most of Elvis's hard-earned money. Greg McDonald, who worked with both men for decades, begs to differ with what he knows is a very unfair description. He supports his position with pages and pages of inside business details and anecdotes.

Both Parker and Elvis loved to earn money. Both were obsessively hard workers, as demonstrated by Elvis through his endless performing and Parker through his ceaseless managing of contracts and venues. Parker was loud, rudely blunt, tough as nails, and took no prisoners when it came to negotiating new business for his charge. Elvis was well aware of Parker's methods, knew how much Parker was earning off of his unbelievable fame, and had no problem with any of it. Together, these two men created a celebrity money-making machine for two decades that is astounding to recount even when viewed through our 21st century perspective.

The cracks in this successful partnership began fairly early on with Elvis. He always spent his share of the extraordinary earnings as if he were an entire battleship of drunken sailors. Therefore, he was obligated to work at an unsustainable level that eventually exhausted him and led to his abuse of prescription drugs. Elvis was repeatedly cautioned by his close friends and Parker about his destructive behavior, but refused to listen to them with the stubborn arrogance of an addict. Unfortunately, the multitude of celebrity rehabilitation clinics that exist today were not available then. We all know the sad result.

Read the book and make up your own mind about the "malign" influence of Parker on Elvis. The biographical section on Parker is very detailed and absolutely fascinating. What a life he led even before he met Elvis!
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast »

Nicolas wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 6:04 pm
FreeAtLast wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 5:37 pm "Math Makers", by Alfred Posamentier and Christian Spreitzer (Prometheus Books 2020)

I own a number of books that describe the lives and works of the great mathematicians. The most comprehensive of these are:

A Short Account of the History of Mathematics, by W.W.R. Ball (original copyright 1912)
Men of Mathematics, by E.T. Bell (original copyright 1937)
A History of Mathematics, by Carl B. Boyer (original copyright 1968)

These tomes are all excellent works, but, golly gee, they are all a little bit long in the tooth, aren't they? So when I saw "Math Makers" at my library, I eagerly scooped it up. The cover sheet states that it reviews "The Lives and Works of 50 Famous Mathematicians".

Now that I have finished the text, I view the book as a mixed success. The short section on the Indian mathematician Brahmagupta (598-668) made me somewhat ashamed for holding a Eurocentric prejudice; he was absolutely brilliant and far ahead of his time. The explanations of Archimedes' impressive theorems were admirably clear. The section on the "amateur" Fermat was superb and provides many biographical details that I had never known about him before. I never get tired of learning more about the "Battling Bernoulli's" and their section does not disappoint. The sections on Charles Babbage and George Boole were admirably concise and educational. The best part of this book may be that the female mathematicians receive a full and just recounting: Maria Agnesi, Sophie Germain, Ada Lovelace, Sofia Kovalevskaya, Emmy Noether, and Maryam Mirzakhani.

Concerns? Some of the accounts were a little too abbreviated for my tastes, although I understand the authors' dilemma. When you begin to describe the lives and works of Euler, Gauss, Abel, Galois, Newton, Leibniz, and Laplace, just to name some of the most renowned, how deep do you want to go and where do you stop? Their biggest error was allotting 20 pages with multiple diagrams to explain Lorenzo Mascheroni's proof that one can create all geometric constructions with two compasses alone, e.g., no straightedge is necessary. Fifteen of those pages could have been assigned to other notables.

Any college mathematics department should have this book assigned to its undergraduate majors. I finally note that if E.T. Bell were miraculously re-incarnated today, his first task would be to change that name of his book to "People of Mathematics".
Thanks, I want to read this book. I’m fascinated with mathematical geniuses, past and present. I took a minor in mathematics at university and later regretted it wasn’t my major. I wonder if the book covers the Indian genius Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887-1920).
The book has an excellent short section on Ramanujan. However, I must immediately refer you to Robert Kanigel's biography, "The Man Who Knew Infinity". You will enjoy it tremendously.
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Nicolas
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Nicolas »

FreeAtLast wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 6:45 pm The book has an excellent short section on Ramanujan. However, I must immediately refer you to Robert Kanigel's biography, "The Man Who Knew Infinity". You will enjoy it tremendously.
I’ll pick up a copy, thanks!
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by sandburg »

“The River of Doubt, Theodore Roosevelt’s Darkest Journey” by Candice Millard.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ekid »

FreeAtLast wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 6:45 pm
Nicolas wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 6:04 pm
FreeAtLast wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 5:37 pm "Math Makers", by Alfred Posamentier and Christian Spreitzer (Prometheus Books 2020)

I own a number of books that describe the lives and works of the great mathematicians. The most comprehensive of these are:

A Short Account of the History of Mathematics, by W.W.R. Ball (original copyright 1912)
Men of Mathematics, by E.T. Bell (original copyright 1937)
A History of Mathematics, by Carl B. Boyer (original copyright 1968)

These tomes are all excellent works, but, golly gee, they are all a little bit long in the tooth, aren't they? So when I saw "Math Makers" at my library, I eagerly scooped it up. The cover sheet states that it reviews "The Lives and Works of 50 Famous Mathematicians".

Now that I have finished the text, I view the book as a mixed success. The short section on the Indian mathematician Brahmagupta (598-668) made me somewhat ashamed for holding a Eurocentric prejudice; he was absolutely brilliant and far ahead of his time. The explanations of Archimedes' impressive theorems were admirably clear. The section on the "amateur" Fermat was superb and provides many biographical details that I had never known about him before. I never get tired of learning more about the "Battling Bernoulli's" and their section does not disappoint. The sections on Charles Babbage and George Boole were admirably concise and educational. The best part of this book may be that the female mathematicians receive a full and just recounting: Maria Agnesi, Sophie Germain, Ada Lovelace, Sofia Kovalevskaya, Emmy Noether, and Maryam Mirzakhani.

Concerns? Some of the accounts were a little too abbreviated for my tastes, although I understand the authors' dilemma. When you begin to describe the lives and works of Euler, Gauss, Abel, Galois, Newton, Leibniz, and Laplace, just to name some of the most renowned, how deep do you want to go and where do you stop? Their biggest error was allotting 20 pages with multiple diagrams to explain Lorenzo Mascheroni's proof that one can create all geometric constructions with two compasses alone, e.g., no straightedge is necessary. Fifteen of those pages could have been assigned to other notables.

Any college mathematics department should have this book assigned to its undergraduate majors. I finally note that if E.T. Bell were miraculously re-incarnated today, his first task would be to change that name of his book to "People of Mathematics".
Thanks, I want to read this book. I’m fascinated with mathematical geniuses, past and present. I took a minor in mathematics at university and later regretted it wasn’t my major. I wonder if the book covers the Indian genius Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887-1920).
The book has an excellent short section on Ramanujan. However, I must immediately refer you to Robert Kanigel's biography, "The Man Who Knew Infinity". You will enjoy it tremendously.
Excellent review.
I used to read Isaac Asimov' nonfiction math books. They were fascinating.

But I fear "Mathmakers" will be in few public libraries!
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by rockstar »

Reading the Foundation trilogy. First book is pretty good so far. Reading Spells for Forgiving for book club. It’s not good. I wouldn’t recommend. And slowly making my way through Pillars of Earth. It’s a long book. I’m enjoying it so far.

I also knocked out the Dubliners last month. Nice short story collection that’s in public domain. You’ll need to Google some of the slang. But I found it enjoyable. I’d recommend.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by vnatale »

ekid wrote: Tue Apr 02, 2024 10:53 am

Excellent review.
I used to read Isaac Asimov' nonfiction math books. They were fascinating.

I read that Asimov typed finished book output at the rate of 80 words per minute!

I've read of other authors who consider it a good day if their entire day's output was 500 words!
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Chv396 »

“The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People”, by Stephen Covey
“Stay the Course” - My Portfolio (BND, VT, VXUS), Spouse’s Portfolio (VEA, VGSH, VOO, VOT)
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fallible »

ekid wrote: Mon Apr 01, 2024 12:44 pm ...
Lynn Truss wrote entertainingly on punctuation. Another writer has a good profane book on good usage, english.
Not ALL profane.

https://www.amazon.com/Between-You-Me-C ... _author_dp

Mary Norris
I've read some of Norris and loved Truss's clever book, Eats, Shoots & Leaves. Still, after one has reasonably read up on the semicolon and other proper punctuation (i.e., the almighty RULES applied to proper interpretation of what's written), for me it always comes back most simply to one book, Elements of Style, by Will Strunk and E.B. White, 4th ed., "Elementary Rules of Usage," No. 5, "Do not join independent clauses with a comma," including exceptions (often the fun part :happy) to the rule?
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius »

sandburg wrote: Tue Apr 02, 2024 10:00 am “The River of Doubt, Theodore Roosevelt’s Darkest Journey” by Candice Millard.
I read that several years ago and it's fading, but I remember it as being very interesting, very well written, and very worth reading.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Barkingsparrow »

"The German Generals Talk" - B.H. Liddell Hart.

Series of interviews with some of the surviving German Generals after WW2, including von Runstedt, von Kleist, and Manteuffel. This was a frustrating experience, as I came to find while reading the book, that Hart was essentially a contributor to the "Clean Wehrmacht" myth, where the regular German armed forces were not involved with committing war crimes, and that the crimes were committed solely by the SS. A myth that has been thoroughly disabused.

Armed with this knowledge you can see how Hart is attempting to shape the interviews in service of the myth. While there is some interesting information here, ultimately I found this book distasteful, allowing the Generals to provide self-serving answers with no challenges.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by heartwood »

I just finished The Women by Kristin Hannah.

Set in Vietnam and the US in the mid-60s and early 70s, it follows Frankie, a young Southern California nurse who joins the Army Nurse Corps.

I've not read anything by Hannah before. I picked it up from DW's book club selection after discarding other current best sellers. Very readable, perhaps because I experienced the times. Very graphic at times.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FootballFan5548 »

K72 wrote: Tue Mar 26, 2024 11:45 am Lightning Down by Tom Clavin

Gripping true story about a P38 pilot who ended up in a concentration camp (not POW camp) with 167 other allied flyers.
I recently read this as well. Picked it up in an airport bookstore and couldn't put it down.

The new WWII miniseries on Apple TV, Masters of the Air goes into some detail in a few episodes about downed pilots and at one of the camps that the p38 pilot was in. They also do the same forced march at the end of the book to different camps.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fbone »

Fbone wrote: Sat Mar 30, 2024 1:17 am
Next is Doors of Sleep by Tim Pratt
Creative ideas. Fun and fast-paced. C+ grade

Next is Discount Armageddon by Seanan McGuire
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Chv396
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Chv396 »

“The Investor’s Manifesto” (2009), Dr. William J. Berstein
“Stay the Course” - My Portfolio (BND, VT, VXUS), Spouse’s Portfolio (VEA, VGSH, VOO, VOT)
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Scassi »

I've been re-reading a lot of my library now that I am retired and have the time to do it right (with notebook to look up words, historical figures & events, locales, and to translate as necessary), and am having a great time :happy .

Last 5 books in order read:

1. All the Pretty Horses, Cormac McCarthy
2. The Crying of Lot 49, Thomas Pynchon
3. The Crossing, CM
4. Vineland, TP
5. Cities of the Plain, CM (in the process presently)

Re the McCarthy I am re-reading the Border trilogy in sequence essentially back to back something I could not do the first time around (he is a tough read emotionally, esp The Crossing, so breaking them up works best for me). Pychon's weird wit and wackiness, esp those two novels, is a great interlude that also stand in their own right/on their on ground given the deep undertones of meaning in each.

The question is after CofTP do I re-read V or Against the Day or Mason & Dixon next... Decisions :wink:
All I ask is the chance to prove that money can't make me happy - Spike Milligan
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