Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

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coachd50
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by coachd50 »

secondopinion wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 1:26 pm
dertere wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 1:24 pm When I played the stock market game as a student, the "winning" top 10% consisted entirely of the folks who realized that the online platform we were using had a delay versus real time which you could front run. Taught me the very valuable lesson on the value of insider information, and the futility in trying to actively trade against someone with that knowledge.
My class was required to give a write up on every action done to the portfolio (which was graded); any students who would have tried that would certainly fail because they had no good reason.
I think it is quite evident that your college course was conducted quite differently than this game for 15 year old HS kids.
What is somewhat ironic is that in the world of academia,you were assessed on the rationale for stock selection when academia has reported time after time that making such selections is a losing proposition compared to simply accepting market returns.
billaster
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by billaster »

secondopinion wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 5:58 pm My class required a written rationale for each stock (and a written reason for any updates we wanted to do) and we were required to pick at least 5 stocks. The grade was on the rationale, not performance. I got 100% plus extra credit for outperformance (during Fall 2008). An "A" was not getting first place; it was thinking like a real investor.
Will Rogers:
Don't gamble; take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don't go up, don't buy it.
I don't think you can say it better than that.
secondopinion
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by secondopinion »

billaster wrote: Sat Jan 21, 2023 10:02 pm
secondopinion wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 5:58 pm My class required a written rationale for each stock (and a written reason for any updates we wanted to do) and we were required to pick at least 5 stocks. The grade was on the rationale, not performance. I got 100% plus extra credit for outperformance (during Fall 2008). An "A" was not getting first place; it was thinking like a real investor.
Will Rogers:
Don't gamble; take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don't go up, don't buy it.
I don't think you can say it better than that.
If that is what I am trying to say — but it is not. We were graded on our written reasoning only. Extra credit was awarded to students who did well on the written reasoning and outperforming.

I apologize if it was not clear.
Passive investing: not about making big bucks but making profits. Active investing: not about beating the market but meeting goals. Speculation: not about timing the market but taking profitable risks.
Fallible
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by Fallible »

secondopinion wrote: Sun Jan 22, 2023 12:55 am
billaster wrote: Sat Jan 21, 2023 10:02 pm
secondopinion wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 5:58 pm My class required a written rationale for each stock (and a written reason for any updates we wanted to do) and we were required to pick at least 5 stocks. The grade was on the rationale, not performance. I got 100% plus extra credit for outperformance (during Fall 2008). An "A" was not getting first place; it was thinking like a real investor.
Will Rogers:
Don't gamble; take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don't go up, don't buy it.
I don't think you can say it better than that.
If that is what I am trying to say — but it is not. We were graded on our written reasoning only. Extra credit was awarded to students who did well on the written reasoning and outperforming. ...
It seems good that rationale is being graded. But If rationale refers to stock analysis (usually fundamentals for the long term and statistical, i.e., price fluctuations for the short term), how are fundamentals for the long term graded for outperformance?
"Yes, investing is simple. But it is not easy, for it requires discipline, patience, steadfastness, and that most uncommon of all gifts, common sense." ~Jack Bogle
moneyflowin
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by moneyflowin »

If you outperform the market, you should get a passing grade for that project. If you underperform, you should get a D. If you lose money, you get an F.

That simulates real life. Otherwise it just encourages reckless gambling. I hate these classroom stock market games where you have nothing to lose. Real life isn't that way, so why should a school lesson be?
criticalmass
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by criticalmass »

Kookaburra wrote: Wed Jan 18, 2023 8:20 pm I wish high school wouldn’t do this sort of game. It’s at best not educational, and at worst hazardous.

Two outcomes:

1. Your stock pick goes up significantly in the 2 months. “Look, I have skill!” Sets them on the wrong path (individual stock picking) with the wrong mindset.

2. Your stock pick goes down in the 2 months. “Stocks are risky and I don’t want to lose money”. So then they avoid the stock market altogether.
I think you overthinking this. I played this game in elementary school (fifth grade). Back then, it was done with scanned sheets for your entry (#2 pencil) and we'd get a report each week, fresh off a dot matrix printer, in near letter quality. :happy
The point was to learn the mechanics of investing, what shorting stock is, commissions, what the stock market is (in general), you can invest in individual companies, etc. We didn't have ETFs to worry about. I don't think I did particularly well, just picked several stocks and let it ride through inertia. I remember we had to pay fake brokerage commissions with our fake money, reducing our buying power somewhat. It was fun, but I didn't have any conclusion that I was good or bad at picking stocks....it just opened our eyes to what was going on and that we (as adults) would be able to do this someday...investing takes great care but is not just limited to special people in Manhattan.
criticalmass
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by criticalmass »

moneyflowin wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 1:53 am If you outperform the market, you should get a passing grade for that project. If you underperform, you should get a D. If you lose money, you get an F.

That simulates real life. Otherwise it just encourages reckless gambling. I hate these classroom stock market games where you have nothing to lose. Real life isn't that way, so why should a school lesson be?
Geeze, for real life--I wouldn't want you teaching early parenting in high school health class!! We used empty egg shells to simulate instead of giving everyone a real infant.
Kookaburra
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by Kookaburra »

criticalmass wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 2:14 am
Kookaburra wrote: Wed Jan 18, 2023 8:20 pm I wish high school wouldn’t do this sort of game. It’s at best not educational, and at worst hazardous.

Two outcomes:

1. Your stock pick goes up significantly in the 2 months. “Look, I have skill!” Sets them on the wrong path (individual stock picking) with the wrong mindset.

2. Your stock pick goes down in the 2 months. “Stocks are risky and I don’t want to lose money”. So then they avoid the stock market altogether.
I think you overthinking this. I played this game in elementary school (fifth grade). Back then, it was done with scanned sheets for your entry (#2 pencil) and we'd get a report each week, fresh off a dot matrix printer, in near letter quality. :happy
The point was to learn the mechanics of investing, what shorting stock is, commissions, what the stock market is (in general), you can invest in individual companies, etc. We didn't have ETFs to worry about. I don't think I did particularly well, just picked several stocks and let it ride through inertia. I remember we had to pay fake brokerage commissions with our fake money, reducing our buying power somewhat. It was fun, but I didn't have any conclusion that I was good or bad at picking stocks....it just opened our eyes to what was going on and that we (as adults) would be able to do this someday...investing takes great care but is not just limited to special people in Manhattan.
That’s impressive that in elementary school you learned about shorting, brokerages, and commissions. We didn’t even learn about these when our 12th grade economics class did this exercise.
Wannaretireearly
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by Wannaretireearly »

Finridge wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 3:25 am Fidelity now has a new "Youth Account" option for teens aged 13 to 17, with no account fees or minimum balance requirements. We just opened one. I think this is a great way to get kids started with investing with real money, even if it's just a few bucks.

And I agree that playing stock picking games is dangerous and counterproductive. Have them use the account to get started in Boglehead-style investing where they buy and hold a three fund portfolio.

https://www.fidelity.com/go/youth-account/overview
Thanks. This may work for my kids
Death and taxes. Only one is under your control!
Wannaretireearly
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by Wannaretireearly »

criticalmass wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 2:14 am
Kookaburra wrote: Wed Jan 18, 2023 8:20 pm I wish high school wouldn’t do this sort of game. It’s at best not educational, and at worst hazardous.

Two outcomes:

1. Your stock pick goes up significantly in the 2 months. “Look, I have skill!” Sets them on the wrong path (individual stock picking) with the wrong mindset.

2. Your stock pick goes down in the 2 months. “Stocks are risky and I don’t want to lose money”. So then they avoid the stock market altogether.
I think you overthinking this. I played this game in elementary school (fifth grade). Back then, it was done with scanned sheets for your entry (#2 pencil) and we'd get a report each week, fresh off a dot matrix printer, in near letter quality. :happy
The point was to learn the mechanics of investing, what shorting stock is, commissions, what the stock market is (in general), you can invest in individual companies, etc. We didn't have ETFs to worry about. I don't think I did particularly well, just picked several stocks and let it ride through inertia. I remember we had to pay fake brokerage commissions with our fake money, reducing our buying power somewhat. It was fun, but I didn't have any conclusion that I was good or bad at picking stocks....it just opened our eyes to what was going on and that we (as adults) would be able to do this someday...investing takes great care but is not just limited to special people in Manhattan.
Sorry if I missed this upstream. What is the game called and is it available to play online?
Death and taxes. Only one is under your control!
secondopinion
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by secondopinion »

Fallible wrote: Sun Jan 22, 2023 3:17 pm
secondopinion wrote: Sun Jan 22, 2023 12:55 am
billaster wrote: Sat Jan 21, 2023 10:02 pm
secondopinion wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 5:58 pm My class required a written rationale for each stock (and a written reason for any updates we wanted to do) and we were required to pick at least 5 stocks. The grade was on the rationale, not performance. I got 100% plus extra credit for outperformance (during Fall 2008). An "A" was not getting first place; it was thinking like a real investor.
Will Rogers:
Don't gamble; take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don't go up, don't buy it.
I don't think you can say it better than that.
If that is what I am trying to say — but it is not. We were graded on our written reasoning only. Extra credit was awarded to students who did well on the written reasoning and outperforming. ...
It seems good that rationale is being graded. But If rationale refers to stock analysis (usually fundamentals for the long term and statistical, i.e., price fluctuations for the short term), how are fundamentals for the long term graded for outperformance?
You are entirely right; I picked stocks according to their fundamentals and long-term performance would have been the only accurate grade. With Johnson & Johnson, Walmart, and other similar companies as my picks, I do not think I was stupid in 2008; definitely not your speculative choices to get rich quick.
Passive investing: not about making big bucks but making profits. Active investing: not about beating the market but meeting goals. Speculation: not about timing the market but taking profitable risks.
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seajay
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by seajay »

:) Is that a history class? Above and beyond a modern day personal finance class that covers peer to peer, crowdfunding, venture capital, cryptocurrency etc.? :)

My recollections of kids that age was you needn't bother teaching them, as they know everything already. :)
Fallible
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by Fallible »

criticalmass wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 2:14 am
Kookaburra wrote: Wed Jan 18, 2023 8:20 pm I wish high school wouldn’t do this sort of game. It’s at best not educational, and at worst hazardous.

Two outcomes:

1. Your stock pick goes up significantly in the 2 months. “Look, I have skill!” Sets them on the wrong path (individual stock picking) with the wrong mindset.

2. Your stock pick goes down in the 2 months. “Stocks are risky and I don’t want to lose money”. So then they avoid the stock market altogether.
I think you overthinking this. I played this game in elementary school (fifth grade). Back then, it was done with scanned sheets for your entry (#2 pencil) and we'd get a report each week, fresh off a dot matrix printer, in near letter quality. :happy
The point was to learn the mechanics of investing, what shorting stock is, commissions, what the stock market is (in general), you can invest in individual companies, etc. We didn't have ETFs to worry about. I don't think I did particularly well, just picked several stocks and let it ride through inertia. I remember we had to pay fake brokerage commissions with our fake money, reducing our buying power somewhat. It was fun, but I didn't have any conclusion that I was good or bad at picking stocks....it just opened our eyes to what was going on and that we (as adults) would be able to do this someday...investing takes great care but is not just limited to special people in Manhattan.
I think both these posts show, in different ways, the basic problem with the stock games - their main focus is stocks, just stocks, just picking individual stocks. But what about the rest of investing that includes personal finance, beginning with saving, having a plan, understanding risk in general and personal risk tolerance, behavioral pitfalls, etc.? These are the areas that, for example, Bill Bernstein writes about so well in his book, The Four Pillars of Investing (theory, history, psychology, business), but they are largely ignored while kids study stocks and the only real winner is Wall Street.
"Yes, investing is simple. But it is not easy, for it requires discipline, patience, steadfastness, and that most uncommon of all gifts, common sense." ~Jack Bogle
criticalmass
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by criticalmass »

Fallible wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 1:36 pm
criticalmass wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 2:14 am
Kookaburra wrote: Wed Jan 18, 2023 8:20 pm I wish high school wouldn’t do this sort of game. It’s at best not educational, and at worst hazardous.

Two outcomes:

1. Your stock pick goes up significantly in the 2 months. “Look, I have skill!” Sets them on the wrong path (individual stock picking) with the wrong mindset.

2. Your stock pick goes down in the 2 months. “Stocks are risky and I don’t want to lose money”. So then they avoid the stock market altogether.
I think you overthinking this. I played this game in elementary school (fifth grade). Back then, it was done with scanned sheets for your entry (#2 pencil) and we'd get a report each week, fresh off a dot matrix printer, in near letter quality. :happy
The point was to learn the mechanics of investing, what shorting stock is, commissions, what the stock market is (in general), you can invest in individual companies, etc. We didn't have ETFs to worry about. I don't think I did particularly well, just picked several stocks and let it ride through inertia. I remember we had to pay fake brokerage commissions with our fake money, reducing our buying power somewhat. It was fun, but I didn't have any conclusion that I was good or bad at picking stocks....it just opened our eyes to what was going on and that we (as adults) would be able to do this someday...investing takes great care but is not just limited to special people in Manhattan.
I think both these posts show, in different ways, the basic problem with the stock games - their main focus is stocks, just stocks, just picking individual stocks. But what about the rest of investing that includes personal finance, beginning with saving, having a plan, understanding risk in general and personal risk tolerance, behavioral pitfalls, etc.? These are the areas that, for example, Bill Bernstein writes about so well in his book, The Four Pillars of Investing (theory, history, psychology, business), but they are largely ignored while kids study stocks and the only real winner is Wall Street.
That's like saying the problem with spelling bee games is that they only teach spelling, and not math or music. You can only do so much with one lesson, even it is disguised as a "game." Of course other ideas are worthy, but not mutually exclusive.
criticalmass
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by criticalmass »

Wannaretireearly wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 11:59 am
criticalmass wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 2:14 am
Kookaburra wrote: Wed Jan 18, 2023 8:20 pm I wish high school wouldn’t do this sort of game. It’s at best not educational, and at worst hazardous.

Two outcomes:

1. Your stock pick goes up significantly in the 2 months. “Look, I have skill!” Sets them on the wrong path (individual stock picking) with the wrong mindset.

2. Your stock pick goes down in the 2 months. “Stocks are risky and I don’t want to lose money”. So then they avoid the stock market altogether.
I think you overthinking this. I played this game in elementary school (fifth grade). Back then, it was done with scanned sheets for your entry (#2 pencil) and we'd get a report each week, fresh off a dot matrix printer, in near letter quality. :happy
The point was to learn the mechanics of investing, what shorting stock is, commissions, what the stock market is (in general), you can invest in individual companies, etc. We didn't have ETFs to worry about. I don't think I did particularly well, just picked several stocks and let it ride through inertia. I remember we had to pay fake brokerage commissions with our fake money, reducing our buying power somewhat. It was fun, but I didn't have any conclusion that I was good or bad at picking stocks....it just opened our eyes to what was going on and that we (as adults) would be able to do this someday...investing takes great care but is not just limited to special people in Manhattan.
Sorry if I missed this upstream. What is the game called and is it available to play online?
The information is earlier in the thread / thread title.
criticalmass
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by criticalmass »

Kookaburra wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 11:53 am
criticalmass wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 2:14 am
Kookaburra wrote: Wed Jan 18, 2023 8:20 pm I wish high school wouldn’t do this sort of game. It’s at best not educational, and at worst hazardous.

Two outcomes:

1. Your stock pick goes up significantly in the 2 months. “Look, I have skill!” Sets them on the wrong path (individual stock picking) with the wrong mindset.

2. Your stock pick goes down in the 2 months. “Stocks are risky and I don’t want to lose money”. So then they avoid the stock market altogether.
I think you overthinking this. I played this game in elementary school (fifth grade). Back then, it was done with scanned sheets for your entry (#2 pencil) and we'd get a report each week, fresh off a dot matrix printer, in near letter quality. :happy
The point was to learn the mechanics of investing, what shorting stock is, commissions, what the stock market is (in general), you can invest in individual companies, etc. We didn't have ETFs to worry about. I don't think I did particularly well, just picked several stocks and let it ride through inertia. I remember we had to pay fake brokerage commissions with our fake money, reducing our buying power somewhat. It was fun, but I didn't have any conclusion that I was good or bad at picking stocks....it just opened our eyes to what was going on and that we (as adults) would be able to do this someday...investing takes great care but is not just limited to special people in Manhattan.
That’s impressive that in elementary school you learned about shorting, brokerages, and commissions. We didn’t even learn about these when our 12th grade economics class did this exercise.
To be fair, it was an experimental "academic talent" class a few hours a week that you had to test to be part of. It was a pretty fun class actually, and we got exposed to a bunch of things (besides the stock market game, which was only a month or two on the side) that we would never have seen in the regular classes. Not sure if it even still exists...I remember Odyssey of the Mind was part of it too.
thousandaire
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by thousandaire »

Kookaburra wrote: Wed Jan 18, 2023 8:20 pm I wish high school wouldn’t do this sort of game. It’s at best not educational, and at worst hazardous.

Two outcomes:

1. Your stock pick goes up significantly in the 2 months. “Look, I have skill!” Sets them on the wrong path (individual stock picking) with the wrong mindset.

2. Your stock pick goes down in the 2 months. “Stocks are risky and I don’t want to lose money”. So then they avoid the stock market altogether.
3. Some stocks go up, some go down. "Man, picking stocks isn't as easy as I thought, even if I do tons of research."

That's the conclusion I came to in 7th grade, as a high-achieving student (see: "know-it-all") who expected to win.

My dad and I played together, doing research on all the stocks and checking the tickers in the Washington Post's business section. Every week, I'd develop a new "strategy" that was sure to propel me forward, only to find that the stocks moved almost completely randomly--and that I was losing badly to kids who I didn't think were as smart as me.

I walked away having had a lot of fun, ended up spending lots of quality time with my dad, but also with a general thought of "man, that seems like a crapshoot." When the time came many years later to start investing for real, the Boglehead philosophy made instant sense for me.

This game was actually pretty impactful in a positive way for me--a safe place to make mistakes, learn lessons, and have some fun (without losing all your money!)
SpaghettiLegs
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by SpaghettiLegs »

My son played the game in 8th grade in 2013. Pick one stock and ride it for a semester. He picked Apple right before a big drop in value, so did not do well in comparison to others in the class. Around the same time though, I spent a fair amount of time with him learning to read a balance sheet, learning value stocks, buy and hold strategies. Apple is about 8x now compared to that point in 2013.

The loss didn’t scare him off as he majored in economics and accounting in college and now works as an investment analyst and is studying for his CFA certification.
Glockenspiel
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by Glockenspiel »

If her only goal is to win the game, and it's a short-term game, her best bet is to probably pick a smaller company that is very volatile and has had a recent drop in share price.

If she picks VTSAX or VTI, she'll probably be in the middle of the pack.
Fallible
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by Fallible »

criticalmass wrote: Tue Jan 24, 2023 12:18 am
Fallible wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 1:36 pm
criticalmass wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 2:14 am
Kookaburra wrote: Wed Jan 18, 2023 8:20 pm I wish high school wouldn’t do this sort of game. It’s at best not educational, and at worst hazardous.

Two outcomes:

1. Your stock pick goes up significantly in the 2 months. “Look, I have skill!” Sets them on the wrong path (individual stock picking) with the wrong mindset.

2. Your stock pick goes down in the 2 months. “Stocks are risky and I don’t want to lose money”. So then they avoid the stock market altogether.
I think you overthinking this. I played this game in elementary school (fifth grade). Back then, it was done with scanned sheets for your entry (#2 pencil) and we'd get a report each week, fresh off a dot matrix printer, in near letter quality. :happy
The point was to learn the mechanics of investing, what shorting stock is, commissions, what the stock market is (in general), you can invest in individual companies, etc. We didn't have ETFs to worry about. I don't think I did particularly well, just picked several stocks and let it ride through inertia. I remember we had to pay fake brokerage commissions with our fake money, reducing our buying power somewhat. It was fun, but I didn't have any conclusion that I was good or bad at picking stocks....it just opened our eyes to what was going on and that we (as adults) would be able to do this someday...investing takes great care but is not just limited to special people in Manhattan.
I think both these posts show, in different ways, the basic problem with the stock games - their main focus is stocks, just stocks, just picking individual stocks. But what about the rest of investing that includes personal finance, beginning with saving, having a plan, understanding risk in general and personal risk tolerance, behavioral pitfalls, etc.? These are the areas that, for example, Bill Bernstein writes about so well in his book, The Four Pillars of Investing (theory, history, psychology, business), but they are largely ignored while kids study stocks and the only real winner is Wall Street.
That's like saying the problem with spelling bee games is that they only teach spelling, and not math or music. You can only do so much with one lesson, even it is disguised as a "game." Of course other ideas are worthy, but not mutually exclusive.
My point was that picking stocks is just one part of investing, which includes the many other parts I mentioned (I boldfaced above).
"Yes, investing is simple. But it is not easy, for it requires discipline, patience, steadfastness, and that most uncommon of all gifts, common sense." ~Jack Bogle
Living Free
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by Living Free »

secondopinion wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 1:26 pm
dertere wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 1:24 pm When I played the stock market game as a student, the "winning" top 10% consisted entirely of the folks who realized that the online platform we were using had a delay versus real time which you could front run. Taught me the very valuable lesson on the value of insider information, and the futility in trying to actively trade against someone with that knowledge.
My class was required to give a write up on every action done to the portfolio (which was graded); any students who would have tried that would certainly fail because they had no good reason.
Isn't that a good reason though?

Also, based upon what I understand of picking individual stocks vs index funds, why not just pick index funds and then support that decision with the numerous studies that show index funds beating an active strategy? Wouldn't that be the best strategy for this class in which one's grade is based upon his write up of the rationale for his decisions?
secondopinion
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by secondopinion »

Living Free wrote: Tue Jan 24, 2023 1:12 pm
secondopinion wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 1:26 pm
dertere wrote: Thu Jan 19, 2023 1:24 pm When I played the stock market game as a student, the "winning" top 10% consisted entirely of the folks who realized that the online platform we were using had a delay versus real time which you could front run. Taught me the very valuable lesson on the value of insider information, and the futility in trying to actively trade against someone with that knowledge.
My class was required to give a write up on every action done to the portfolio (which was graded); any students who would have tried that would certainly fail because they had no good reason.
Isn't that a good reason though?

Also, based upon what I understand of picking individual stocks vs index funds, why not just pick index funds and then support that decision with the numerous studies that show index funds beating an active strategy? Wouldn't that be the best strategy for this class in which one's grade is based upon his write up of the rationale for his decisions?
Technically, I could increase the odds of beating the market for that period by writing a covered call option on the index as well, write the rationale up (including the general index fund research), and very likely walk out with an "A" and extra credit.

But it was only stocks, no funds/ETFs, no options, no shorting, no left over cash.
Passive investing: not about making big bucks but making profits. Active investing: not about beating the market but meeting goals. Speculation: not about timing the market but taking profitable risks.
criticalmass
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by criticalmass »

Fallible wrote: Tue Jan 24, 2023 11:51 am
criticalmass wrote: Tue Jan 24, 2023 12:18 am
Fallible wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 1:36 pm
That's like saying the problem with spelling bee games is that they only teach spelling, and not math or music. You can only do so much with one lesson, even it is disguised as a "game." Of course other ideas are worthy, but not mutually exclusive.
My point was that picking stocks is just one part of investing, which includes the many other parts I mentioned (I boldfaced above).
It is called the stock market game. :)
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zhiwiller
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Re: Stock Market Game with my HS daughter

Post by zhiwiller »

At least she isn't my age and doing this exact same game in 1999. I learned some bad lessons about CSCO.
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