What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
User avatar
augryphon
Posts: 238
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2016 11:35 am

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by augryphon »

Delete
Last edited by augryphon on Sun Nov 20, 2022 7:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
augryphon
Posts: 238
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2016 11:35 am

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by augryphon »

The Washington War by James Lacey

This one’s been in my queue for a while. It’s a study of the political leadership of WWII, particularly the political play of Roosevelt with his cabinet, Congress, military leaders, Churchill, Stalin. It’s fascinating. I’ve always thought everyone just grabbed their rifle and went after the Axis. The author does a great job detailing the interactions. Particularly interesting is Roosevelt, the master manipulator, who before he died in the fight, lost his top counselors to death, one by one, until only Eleanor remained. Churchill is always amazing, George Marshall is particularly interesting.

It’s hard for us to truly understand the difficulties because we know how the story ends. But at the time, every detail was a political fight before it succeeded in battle. An example, Churchill had to visit Stalin and communicate that invading France would be delayed a year, all while Russian soldiers were dying at the rate of 10,000 a week! Try selling that idea to your toughest customer!

I highly recommend!


https://www.amazon.com/Washington-War-I ... C96&sr=1-1
User avatar
Nicolas
Posts: 3844
Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2012 7:41 am
Location: 2120 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago, IL

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Nicolas »

augryphon wrote: Sun Nov 20, 2022 7:28 pm The Washington War by James Lacey

This one’s been in my queue for a while. It’s a study of the political leadership of WWII, particularly the political play of Roosevelt with his cabinet, Congress, military leaders, Churchill, Stalin. It’s fascinating. I’ve always thought everyone just grabbed their rifle and went after the Axis. The author does a great job detailing the interactions. Particularly interesting is Roosevelt, the master manipulator, who before he died in the fight, lost his top counselors to death, one by one, until only Eleanor remained. Churchill is always amazing, George Marshall is particularly interesting.

It’s hard for us to truly understand the difficulties because we know how the story ends. But at the time, every detail was a political fight before it succeeded in battle. An example, Churchill had to visit Stalin and communicate that invading France would be delayed a year, all while Russian soldiers were dying at the rate of 10,000 a week! Try selling that idea to your toughest customer!

I highly recommend!


https://www.amazon.com/Washington-War-I ... C96&sr=1-1
It probably didn’t bother Stalin too much. That murderer was busy killing off his officer elite just before the war. And he starved millions in Ukraine in the 30s. You should read Churchill’s excellent history of the war: The Second World War (Six Volumes).
User avatar
augryphon
Posts: 238
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2016 11:35 am

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by augryphon »

Nicolas wrote: Mon Nov 21, 2022 6:31 am
augryphon wrote: Sun Nov 20, 2022 7:28 pm The Washington War by James Lacey

This one’s been in my queue for a while. It’s a study of the political leadership of WWII, particularly the political play of Roosevelt with his cabinet, Congress, military leaders, Churchill, Stalin. It’s fascinating. I’ve always thought everyone just grabbed their rifle and went after the Axis. The author does a great job detailing the interactions. Particularly interesting is Roosevelt, the master manipulator, who before he died in the fight, lost his top counselors to death, one by one, until only Eleanor remained. Churchill is always amazing, George Marshall is particularly interesting.

It’s hard for us to truly understand the difficulties because we know how the story ends. But at the time, every detail was a political fight before it succeeded in battle. An example, Churchill had to visit Stalin and communicate that invading France would be delayed a year, all while Russian soldiers were dying at the rate of 10,000 a week! Try selling that idea to your toughest customer!

I highly recommend!


https://www.amazon.com/Washington-War-I ... C96&sr=1-1
It probably didn’t bother Stalin too much. That murderer was busy killing off his officer elite just before the war. And he starved millions in Ukraine in the 30s. You should read Churchill’s excellent history of the war: The Second World War (Six Volumes).
I have!
Fallible
Posts: 8328
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2009 4:44 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fallible »

LilyFleur wrote: Thu Nov 17, 2022 4:45 pm
FreeAtLast wrote: Tue Nov 08, 2022 9:01 pm "How Fast Did T. Rex Run?", by David Hone (Princeton University Press 2022)

What about their reproductive behavior, eg, how were dinosaurs able to mate? It's one thing to brush easily over a romantic interlude between two small Velociraptors that were the size of turkeys. However, when you are referring to infatuated monsters like 5-7 ton Rexes or, even more daunting, 40-50 ton sauropods like Apatosaurus or Diplodocus, embarrassing questions must be asked. Since Bogleheads is a family forum, I must demur in describing the pertinent anatomical issues. Just don't assume that the physical structure of dinosaurs below the waistline is identical to that of Homo Sapiens.
Thank you.
Thank you so much.
I am an artist with a vivid imagination and I really did not want that in my mind's eye. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
FWIW, the various anatomical locations of animals leave nothing to the imagination in a wonderful book I recently read by science writer Ed Yong, An Immense World, about how animals sense their world. Just thought I should mention this (somewhat humorously) in case either of you reads this book.
"Yes, investing is simple. But it is not easy, for it requires discipline, patience, steadfastness, and that most uncommon of all gifts, common sense." ~Jack Bogle
User avatar
LilyFleur
Posts: 2817
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:36 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by LilyFleur »

Fallible wrote: Tue Nov 22, 2022 2:30 pm
LilyFleur wrote: Thu Nov 17, 2022 4:45 pm
FreeAtLast wrote: Tue Nov 08, 2022 9:01 pm "How Fast Did T. Rex Run?", by David Hone (Princeton University Press 2022)

What about their reproductive behavior, eg, how were dinosaurs able to mate? It's one thing to brush easily over a romantic interlude between two small Velociraptors that were the size of turkeys. However, when you are referring to infatuated monsters like 5-7 ton Rexes or, even more daunting, 40-50 ton sauropods like Apatosaurus or Diplodocus, embarrassing questions must be asked. Since Bogleheads is a family forum, I must demur in describing the pertinent anatomical issues. Just don't assume that the physical structure of dinosaurs below the waistline is identical to that of Homo Sapiens.
Thank you.
Thank you so much.
I am an artist with a vivid imagination and I really did not want that in my mind's eye. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
FWIW, the various anatomical locations of animals leave nothing to the imagination in a wonderful book I recently read by science writer Ed Yong, An Immense World, about how animals sense their world. Just thought I should mention this (somewhat humorously) in case either of you reads this book.
Hahahaha, I won't be reading the book!
User avatar
heartwood
Posts: 2247
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:40 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by heartwood »

Fallible wrote: Tue Nov 22, 2022 2:30 pm
LilyFleur wrote: Thu Nov 17, 2022 4:45 pm
FreeAtLast wrote: Tue Nov 08, 2022 9:01 pm "How Fast Did T. Rex Run?", by David Hone (Princeton University Press 2022)

What about their reproductive behavior, eg, how were dinosaurs able to mate? It's one thing to brush easily over a romantic interlude between two small Velociraptors that were the size of turkeys. However, when you are referring to infatuated monsters like 5-7 ton Rexes or, even more daunting, 40-50 ton sauropods like Apatosaurus or Diplodocus, embarrassing questions must be asked. Since Bogleheads is a family forum, I must demur in describing the pertinent anatomical issues. Just don't assume that the physical structure of dinosaurs below the waistline is identical to that of Homo Sapiens.
Thank you.
Thank you so much.
I am an artist with a vivid imagination and I really did not want that in my mind's eye. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
FWIW, the various anatomical locations of animals leave nothing to the imagination in a wonderful book I recently read by science writer Ed Yong, An Immense World, about how animals sense their world. Just thought I should mention this (somewhat humorously) in case either of you reads this book.
A very popular and well reviewed book, rated 4.7/5 on Amazon. I have access to several libraries. I use the Library Extension in my browser at Amazon. It shows me availability of hard cover, audio and ebooks at all my libraries, and lets me place holds. Many multiple copies at each library, but no availability for more than 3-6 months in any format.
Fallible
Posts: 8328
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2009 4:44 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fallible »

LilyFleur wrote: Wed Nov 23, 2022 1:02 pm
Fallible wrote: Tue Nov 22, 2022 2:30 pm
LilyFleur wrote: Thu Nov 17, 2022 4:45 pm
FreeAtLast wrote: Tue Nov 08, 2022 9:01 pm "How Fast Did T. Rex Run?", by David Hone (Princeton University Press 2022)

What about their reproductive behavior, eg, how were dinosaurs able to mate? It's one thing to brush easily over a romantic interlude between two small Velociraptors that were the size of turkeys. However, when you are referring to infatuated monsters like 5-7 ton Rexes or, even more daunting, 40-50 ton sauropods like Apatosaurus or Diplodocus, embarrassing questions must be asked. Since Bogleheads is a family forum, I must demur in describing the pertinent anatomical issues. Just don't assume that the physical structure of dinosaurs below the waistline is identical to that of Homo Sapiens.
Thank you.
Thank you so much.
I am an artist with a vivid imagination and I really did not want that in my mind's eye. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
FWIW, the various anatomical locations of animals leave nothing to the imagination in a wonderful book I recently read by science writer Ed Yong, An Immense World, about how animals sense their world. Just thought I should mention this (somewhat humorously) in case either of you reads this book.
Hahahaha, I won't be reading the book!
I understand, although to be fair to the book and its noted author, I should also say that only one anatomical location still occasionally pops into my thoughts, the one that initially caused me to wonder "What are they doing there?" :shock: Overall, the book says much about limited human senses.
"Yes, investing is simple. But it is not easy, for it requires discipline, patience, steadfastness, and that most uncommon of all gifts, common sense." ~Jack Bogle
roamingzebra
Posts: 495
Joined: Thu Apr 22, 2021 3:29 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by roamingzebra »

wabbott wrote: Mon Nov 07, 2022 4:42 am
Blues wrote: Sun Nov 06, 2022 9:35 pm
Calli114 wrote: Sun Nov 06, 2022 9:07 pm Mila 18 by Leon Uris, set in Poland during the Warsaw ghetto uprising in WWII.
One of my favorite books from my youth.
I read Exodus as a young man in my 20's iirc, back in the mid 70s. A very good book. I had seen the movie when it first came out in 1960.
Don Draper -- of the "Mad Men" TV series which takes place in the 60s -- was shown reading "Exodus" as research for an ad campaign for Israeli tourism. :)
lazydavid
Posts: 4366
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:37 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by lazydavid »

CBL wrote: Fri Oct 28, 2022 6:32 am I agree. Fairy Tale’s first half was great then was a struggle to finish. Highly recommend 11/22/63.
I haven't gotten to Fairy Tale, and based on the feedback here I might not. :p

But I'll agree with everyone that 11/22/63 was wonderful. Almost doubly unexpected because there are very few horror elements to it.

Spoiler tags don't seem to be working, so Extremely mild spoiler below, having nothing to do with the plot:


I knew before I got to the afterward that his son Joe Hill had written the final chapter. The ending was so bittersweet and beautiful there was no way King penned it himself. As much as I love King's work--and I've read nearly all of it--closing out a long novel is definitely not his strong suit. Joe is MUCH better than his father in that regard.

Speaking of, if you haven't checked out Joe Hill's work, go do so immediately. In particular, N0S4A2 is a masterpiece, all the more impressive that it was just his third novel.
tenkuky
Posts: 2299
Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2014 4:28 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by tenkuky »

FreeAtLast wrote: Thu Nov 03, 2022 10:03 pm "The Writing Of The Gods", by Edward Dolnick (Scribner 2021)

This book is an account of the deciphering of the Rosetta Stone. The two principal investigators were Thomas Young and Jean-Francois Champollion. The former was a solemn British polymath who, among other scientific achievements, confirmed the wave theory of light. The latter was an emotional Frenchman who was a genius in linguistics. The Stone was discovered in rubble by French soldiers in Egypt in 1799 as they were rebuilding a broken down fort on the orders of Napoleon I . Its surface contained three different types of writing on it. After two decades of intensive study by both men, especially Champollion, the Stone was revealed to be an ancient Egyptian to Greek dictionary.

The best part of this book is that Dolnick slowly and carefully takes you through the false leads and successful breakthroughs that Young and Champollion experienced as they struggled with the translation. Along the way, you learn a lot about the ancient Egyptians, their society, and their extraordinary use of hieroglyphs ("hieroglyphics" is an adjective, not a noun). Champollion made the final translation because he had taught himself another almost dead language known as Coptic. What a wonderful story this is!
Thank you for this.
Borrowed from public library and read it over last couple of weeks.
Wonderful read! :beer
User avatar
FreeAtLast
Posts: 784
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2014 9:08 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast »

tenkuky wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 8:34 pm
FreeAtLast wrote: Thu Nov 03, 2022 10:03 pm "The Writing Of The Gods", by Edward Dolnick (Scribner 2021)

This book is an account of the deciphering of the Rosetta Stone. The two principal investigators were Thomas Young and Jean-Francois Champollion. The former was a solemn British polymath who, among other scientific achievements, confirmed the wave theory of light. The latter was an emotional Frenchman who was a genius in linguistics. The Stone was discovered in rubble by French soldiers in Egypt in 1799 as they were rebuilding a broken down fort on the orders of Napoleon I . Its surface contained three different types of writing on it. After two decades of intensive study by both men, especially Champollion, the Stone was revealed to be an ancient Egyptian to Greek dictionary.

The best part of this book is that Dolnick slowly and carefully takes you through the false leads and successful breakthroughs that Young and Champollion experienced as they struggled with the translation. Along the way, you learn a lot about the ancient Egyptians, their society, and their extraordinary use of hieroglyphs ("hieroglyphics" is an adjective, not a noun). Champollion made the final translation because he had taught himself another almost dead language known as Coptic. What a wonderful story this is!
Thank you for this.
Borrowed from public library and read it over last couple of weeks.
Wonderful read! :beer
tenkuky -

My pleasure! "Gods" is certainly an amazing historical account.

Free
Illegitimi non carborundum.
Barkingsparrow
Posts: 508
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:09 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Barkingsparrow »

The Code Breaker - Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race - Walter Isaascson

The bigger picture of this book is about the evolution of the CRISPR technology, with the primary context being Jennifer's Doudna's biography and work in this evolution. She and Emmanuelle Charpentier won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the paper describing the CSISPR/Cas9 gene editing "tools". CSISPR itself basically is rooted in how bacteria developed protective genetic sequences as a result of their billion years war with invading viruses. I think that same technique is how bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics.

This book is a fascinating read and runs the gamut from Watson/Crick and their "discovery" of the DNA double helix, including their infamous "steal" of the work done by Rosamund Franklin, through the ferocious competition to develop patentable CSISPR technologies, and as to how the CRISPR/Cas9 discovery played a key role in developing the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. And last but not least, the moral/ethical fears about the unauthorized/misuse of CSISPR gene editing given how easy it is to do with literally off-the-shelf tools.

My understanding is that there are two types of gene editing. First is somatic - where the editing is targeted at a specific disease such as Sickle Cell Anemia or Huntington's Disease, where the edit is not inheritable. The second is germline editing, where the editing is inheritable. Imagine for example, some billionaire wanting embryos to be edited to make his/her's offspring smarter, taller, etc; and maybe pass those traits on down to future descendants. I have no doubt germline editing will happen. To an extent it already has happened in China
jebmke
Posts: 18554
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 2:44 pm
Location: Delmarva Peninsula

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jebmke »

Barkingsparrow wrote: Sat Nov 26, 2022 12:25 pm The Code Breaker - Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race - Walter Isaascson

The bigger picture of this book is about the evolution of the CRISPR technology, with the primary context being Jennifer's Doudna's biography and work in this evolution. She and Emmanuelle Charpentier won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the paper describing the CSISPR/Cas9 gene editing "tools". CSISPR itself basically is rooted in how bacteria developed protective genetic sequences as a result of their billion years war with invading viruses. I think that same technique is how bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics.

This book is a fascinating read and runs the gamut from Watson/Crick and their "discovery" of the DNA double helix, including their infamous "steal" of the work done by Rosamund Franklin, through the ferocious competition to develop patentable CSISPR technologies, and as to how the CRISPR/Cas9 discovery played a key role in developing the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. And last but not least, the moral/ethical fears about the unauthorized/misuse of CSISPR gene editing given how easy it is to do with literally off-the-shelf tools.

My understanding is that there are two types of gene editing. First is somatic - where the editing is targeted at a specific disease such as Sickle Cell Anemia or Huntington's Disease, where the edit is not inheritable. The second is germline editing, where the editing is inheritable. Imagine for example, some billionaire wanting embryos to be edited to make his/her's offspring smarter, taller, etc; and maybe pass those traits on down to future descendants. I have no doubt germline editing will happen. To an extent it already has happened in China
I read this last year. I also recommend "Gene" by Muckerjee and especially "The Tangled Tree" by David Quamman.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.
User avatar
wabbott
Posts: 276
Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2017 5:55 pm
Location: Ruston, LA

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by wabbott »

Captiva - Randy Wayne White.

Fourth in the "Doc" Ford series, written in the mid-90s and set against the highly controversial Florida gill net ban that put many commercial net fishermen out of business. One of the local "netters" at Dinkin's Bay, Sanibel is killed when his boat explodes, and Ford sets about solving the mystery.

https://www.floridatoday.com/story/news ... /29532739/

The character of Hannah Smith is introduced, a descendant of one of Florida's legendary female pioneers. Hannah's niece, also named Hannah, is featured in her own series of books by White.

One of the best of the series, imo. Locales are vividly described, with a compact, believable story.
cs412a
Posts: 243
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2017 1:37 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by cs412a »

Blue Lightning: Wilder's Mounted Infantry Brigade in the Battle of Chickamauga by Richard Baumgartner.

A history of the Union Army's Lightning Brigade, highly mobile mounted infantry armed with technologically advanced repeating Spencer rifles. A major strength of the book is the extent to which it incorporates first person accounts as well as portraits of individuals who served in the brigade to provide a vivid account of events from the formation of the brigade to its justly celebrated role in the Battle of Chickamauga.
Post Reply