Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Have a question about your personal investments? No matter how simple or complex, you can ask it here.
Post Reply
Topic Author
mzvarner
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jun 13, 2020 10:43 am

Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by mzvarner »

Saddly I have to report that my 15 year relationship with 9 years of marriage has run its course. The stressors of a child paired with the difficulties brought on by COVID have changed both of us. The decision to separate was made back in June, and we are in the final steps of settling assets with a mediator. She opted to buy me out of the house, and i am looking at a near 6 figure value.

33, Male. I am employeed as a nurse making ~$80k a year. This has fluctuated some because of OT incentives from COVID. There are contractual step increases based on years of service. I have been with this company for 6.5 years, and have no plans of leaving.

Emergency funds: I have 4 months worth of living expenses saved.

Debt: No debt. In previous posts I mentioned the vehicles. I sold the Porsche and replaced it with a very reliable, functional, and affordable Subaru Outback. I financed $3400 knowing it will be paid off when the lump sum comes. This was not an emergency so pulling from my small fund did not seem smart. If it makes a difference, I can go pay this off ASAP. I put expenses on my Fidelity rewards card, but it is paid off monthly.

State of Residence: WA

We had a brokerage account with Fidelity. I am keeping this account. It has roughly $10k in it.

I have a 403b through my employeer. I have this setup through Fidelity brokerage link and its allocations are reflective of the 3 fund portfolio. I dropped my contributions down so that I still get the full match, but taking home more money monthly was a priority.

I have an HSA with my employer. I am keeping my daughter on my insurance. I plan to keep the HSA and contribute the full family amount of $7200, investing as able.

I also have a ROTH open with Fidelity.

Taxes: We worked with an Ameriprise advisor early in our marriage. I opted to move my money and manage it on my own. He still manages her money, and has been willing to answer questions on occasion. He told me that this lump sum from the buyout will not be taxed as long as it is under $250,000.

Questions/ Plan:

1. Per the "Managing a windfall" wiki, I need to NOT DO ANYTHING QUICKLY. My sister recomended I open an account with Ally, as they have a pretty nice rate at the moment.

2. Do I really need to Keep 1 year of expenses in my savings account? I will increase my Emergency fund to at least 6 months.

3. My daughter and I want a home. Moving back into an apartment has been hard on us both. This market is wild. Rates and inflation continue to rise. Not sure what to set aside for a down payment, but that is a goal. I will talk to lenders this winter to see what I can afford. 20% down does away with PMI, but does that matter much? Advice here is appreciated.
- In a perfect world it would be nice to have money set aside for immediate repairs/ up grades (Paint, furnace/ AC/ Appliances, carpet, Etc). Would also be nice to have an "Emergency fund" for the house, but I am not sure if this is redunant with the established Emergency fund mentioned above.

4. Investing. This is a large life changing lump sum for me. It seems irresponsble to not invest a portion of it. I plan to max my ROTH for this year (maybe time it to fill next years as well?). What about my brokerage, everything is on "discount" right now so this is kind of the "silver lining" in my situation.

5. Planning for my daughters future. She is 3, started preschool this year. Her mom is keeping the 529 plan that she started for her. I dont really like the idea of 529s. My understanding is that they have limited uses, and outside of those they are taxed at a higher rate. I have read on this forum mixed reviews on how to proceed. Some open a brokerage for their kids and invest into that so they have more flexibility with that money later (I am leaning towards this).

6. What have I overlooked?

Thank you for your help. All advice is appreciated. There has been a lot to process in the last few months, but I am starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel.
User avatar
JoeRetire
Posts: 13860
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2018 2:44 pm

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by JoeRetire »

mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am Saddly I have to report that my 15 year relationship with 9 years of marriage has run its course.
Sorry to hear that.
She opted to buy me out of the house, and i am looking at a near 6 figure value.

Questions/ Plan:

1. Per the "Managing a windfall" wiki, I need to NOT DO ANYTHING QUICKLY. My sister recomended I open an account with Ally, as they have a pretty nice rate at the moment.
Ally would work. They are paying 2% now.
2. Do I really need to Keep 1 year of expenses in my savings account? I will increase my Emergency fund to at least 6 months.
If your job is very secure, you can probably get by with 6 months.
3. My daughter and I want a home. Moving back into an apartment has been hard on us both. This market is wild. Rates and inflation continue to rise. Not sure what to set aside for a down payment, but that is a goal. I will talk to lenders this winter to see what I can afford. 20% down does away with PMI, but does that matter much? Advice here is appreciated.
IMHO you should never pay PMI. If you can't afford 20% down, then you can't afford the house.
Oh, noooooo! I'm so sorry, it's the moops! The correct answer is 'the moops'.
User avatar
Jazztonight
Posts: 1238
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 12:21 am
Location: Lake Merritt

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by Jazztonight »

You will survive this experience. Stay strong! You are not alone.

Please try to be aware of making mistakes other than financial ones. You may be in a fragile or vulnerable state for the next couple of years. (Been there, done that.) I survived, you will too!

Good luck to you and your daughter.
"What does not destroy me, makes me stronger." Nietzsche
exodusNH
Posts: 5437
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2021 8:21 pm

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by exodusNH »

mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am He told me that this lump sum from the buyout will not be taxed as long as it is under $250,000
As long as your profit is less than $250,000. You need to subtract your half of what you paid for the house from whatever you get. Then you have $250k on top of that, free from federal taxes. Some states will tax it.
mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am 5. Planning for my daughters future. She is 3, started preschool this year. Her mom is keeping the 529 plan that she started for her. I dont really like the idea of 529s. My understanding is that they have limited uses, and outside of those they are taxed at a higher rate. I have read on this forum mixed reviews on how to proceed. Some open a brokerage for their kids and invest into that so they have more flexibility with that money later (I am leaning towards this).
529s can be useful if you're able to deduct the contributions, but if not, the taxable account is more flexible. Note that if you open a minor account, your daughter will get full control of it either at 18, 21, or 25 depending on state law. You could also just contribute to a brokerage account in your name, then gift her money when she's older.
mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am 20% down does away with PMI, but does that matter much? Advice here is appreciated.
There are special loans for doctors that offer lower amounts down. Not sure if that's also available for nurses.

Avoiding PMI is a good goal, but if you can't, you should understand whether the PMI will be dropped after you hit a certain loan-to-value ratio or if you would need to refinance out of it.

Not that, over the long term, renting vs owning is, to the average person, indistinguishable. Some people take a dim view of adults renting, but that's an unfortunate cultural bias instead of a truth. Depending on where you live, $80k salary may not get you much of a mortgage to play with, especially with interest rates in the 6s. Be wary of ARMs, especially shorter term ones.

If you can buy for less than renting, PMI might make sense, especially if you can shed it if property values rise.

And, to be pedantic, you want a home. Your 3 year old daughter probably doesn't care either way. (Of course, she may be taking cues from you.)

The real benefit of a 20% down payment is that it demonstrates that you're able to save, can probably afford the place (i.e. living below your means), and aren't likely to wind upside down on the property.
mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am In a perfect world it would be nice to have money set aside for immediate repairs/ up grades (Paint, furnace/ AC/ Appliances, carpet, Etc). Would also be nice to have an "Emergency fund" for the house, but I am not sure if this is redunant with the established Emergency fund mentioned above
I would say it depends on how big of an emergency fund you have. Certain things, like a roof, aren't really an emergency. They have a pretty standard life, and barring something like damage from a storm, shouldn't be a surprise when it fails. Depending on how old the roof is and what you have for an insurance policy, they may prorate damage replacement.

I think I once you have a home, especially with a child, you should go aim (over time) for a 12 month emergency fund.
mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am 4. Investing. This is a large life changing lump sum for me. It seems irresponsble to not invest a portion of it. I plan to max my ROTH for this year (maybe time it to fill next years as well?). What about my brokerage, everything is on "discount" right now so this is kind of the "silver lining" in my situation.
Investing responsibly is the key to building wealth, over the long term. Over shorter periods of time, it can be a kick in the gut.

You don't need to rush into it though, and certainly don't want to tie up money you can reasonably expect to need within 2 years, e.g. a down payment. A reasonable goal would be to put the down payment money into a Treasury and then invest the rest according to your need and ability to take risk.
User avatar
SquawkIdent
Posts: 777
Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2008 7:14 pm
Location: Planet Earth

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by SquawkIdent »

Jazztonight wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 11:07 am You will survive this experience. Stay strong! You are not alone.

Please try to be aware of making mistakes other than financial ones. You may be in a fragile or vulnerable state for the next couple of years. (Been there, done that.) I survived, you will too!

Good luck to you and your daughter.
+1
aristotelian
Posts: 10613
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:05 pm

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by aristotelian »

Following #1, I would move very, very slowly on buying a house. Owning a home is perhaps the biggest financial decision you can make and you are going through a major life transition and probably experiencing a lot of emotion. This is not a time to make a big financial decision. The odds of doing something you will regret later are very high. I would want to wait at least a year to see how the finances of the divorce and your new living situation shake out. Will your cash flow be comfortable with a mortgage payment, plus higher utility and maintenance costs? Do you have enough saved up to replace a roof or HVAC system? Are you sure you will have time to maintain the house by yourself while working and parenting?
If you want more space than the apartment, you can rent a small house. Your daughter won't care whether it is rented or owned.

Regarding PMI, you should understand why institutions charge extra for low down payments. That is because the investment is much riskier when there is less equity backing it up. Just my two cents, but housing went up a lot when interest rates cratered, and there are a lot of red flags that a bubble is about to burst. That is always a risk, but the market seems especially ripe for a correction right now. Setting aside PMI, the bigger risk IMO is getting yourself in an under-water situation where you are forced to sell (e.g. due to job loss) when the market is down. Say you buy a $300k house with $20k down, the market drops 40% to $180k but you have lost your job and can't afford the payment. Due to current high rates you've only accumulated another $10k of equity. If you sell, you owe the bank $270k to close out the mortgage, so that is going to cost you $90k cash to sell the house. Do you really want to be in that situation? The fact that you are considering PMI tells me you would be stretching to buy.

Regarding the 403b, contributing above the match can still be beneficial depending on your tax bracket. That depends in part on your filing status. Will your daughter be spending more time with your or your spouse? Only one of you can claim Head of Household. If you are HH, you would have $73,000 of income in the 12% bracket. I would want to contribute at least $7k in that case. If you are Single, you would have $53,025 in the 12% bracket. In that case, I would try to max out the 403b if possible, even if you have to dip into your nest egg. For every $1,000 earned, I'd rather be saving $1,000 in my 403b instead of receiving $780 in your paycheck (less state taxes) and paying $220 to the government!
GreenLawn
Posts: 175
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2020 10:58 am

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by GreenLawn »

Apartments aren't pleasant for a lot of people, you could try renting a house. Doesn't have to be fancy as you're planning to buy in the not too distant future, but renting a house will relieve the pressure of sharing walls with strangers and give you time to consider the home purchase decision.

My PMI is 54 bucks a month. Pocket change to me and it allowed me to keep the money I would have used for a down payment in the market. So the PMI decision depends in part on how much it will be.

Great time to buy VTI, in fact I bought some today at 190 and have an automatic buy setup to purchase more when or if it hits 185. Waiting is not a bad idea either while you consider your options, but you'll feel better if you buy at least a little VTI while it's on sale. I purchase using limits so I was driving today when my purchase went through at 190. Love that ding on my phone when Vanguard texts me a notification that I've purchased yet more VTI at a bargain:)
ClaycordJCA
Posts: 452
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2015 11:19 pm
Location: SF Bay Area

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by ClaycordJCA »

With respect to investing some of your proceeds from the house sale, the question is how soon do you envision spending the money? If long-term (such as for your daughter’s education in 15 or so years), investing now in VTI should be fine. But if you anticipate needing the money for other purposes (such as a house down payment) in the short to mid-term, you really are gambling that the market will go up quickly. It could drop another 25% or more and take some years to recover. Is that a risk you are prepared to take?

Good luck.
Topic Author
mzvarner
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jun 13, 2020 10:43 am

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by mzvarner »

Jazztonight wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 11:07 am You will survive this experience. Stay strong! You are not alone.

Please try to be aware of making mistakes other than financial ones. You may be in a fragile or vulnerable state for the next couple of years. (Been there, done that.) I survived, you will too!

Good luck to you and your daughter.
Thank you! I am out of the "Crisis" phase. I have been thinking about making this post for a while, but did not want to count my eggs. This is an opportunity at a fresh start, and I want to set myself and my daughter up for future success.
User avatar
Duckie
Posts: 8937
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 2:55 pm

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by Duckie »

mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am 3. My daughter and I want a home. Moving back into an apartment has been hard on us both.
Your home is where you live, whether rented or owned, whether a single family home, townhouse, or apartment. Do you need a yard? Do you have pets? A three-year-old will adjust to almost anything if you're okay with it.
6. What have I overlooked?
It reads like you have primary custody. Who takes care of your daughter when you're at work? Child care is expensive.
cerequio
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2015 1:03 pm

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by cerequio »

mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am Saddly I have to report that my 15 year relationship with 9 years of marriage has run its course. The stressors of a child paired with the difficulties brought on by COVID have changed both of us. The decision to separate was made back in June, and we are in the final steps of settling assets with a mediator. She opted to buy me out of the house, and i am looking at a near 6 figure value.

33, Male. I am employeed as a nurse making ~$80k a year. This has fluctuated some because of OT incentives from COVID. There are contractual step increases based on years of service. I have been with this company for 6.5 years, and have no plans of leaving.

Emergency funds: I have 4 months worth of living expenses saved.

Debt: No debt. In previous posts I mentioned the vehicles. I sold the Porsche and replaced it with a very reliable, functional, and affordable Subaru Outback. I financed $3400 knowing it will be paid off when the lump sum comes. This was not an emergency so pulling from my small fund did not seem smart. If it makes a difference, I can go pay this off ASAP. I put expenses on my Fidelity rewards card, but it is paid off monthly.

State of Residence: WA

We had a brokerage account with Fidelity. I am keeping this account. It has roughly $10k in it.

I have a 403b through my employeer. I have this setup through Fidelity brokerage link and its allocations are reflective of the 3 fund portfolio. I dropped my contributions down so that I still get the full match, but taking home more money monthly was a priority.

I have an HSA with my employer. I am keeping my daughter on my insurance. I plan to keep the HSA and contribute the full family amount of $7200, investing as able.

I also have a ROTH open with Fidelity.

Taxes: We worked with an Ameriprise advisor early in our marriage. I opted to move my money and manage it on my own. He still manages her money, and has been willing to answer questions on occasion. He told me that this lump sum from the buyout will not be taxed as long as it is under $250,000.

Questions/ Plan:

1. Per the "Managing a windfall" wiki, I need to NOT DO ANYTHING QUICKLY. My sister recomended I open an account with Ally, as they have a pretty nice rate at the moment.

2. Do I really need to Keep 1 year of expenses in my savings account? I will increase my Emergency fund to at least 6 months.

3. My daughter and I want a home. Moving back into an apartment has been hard on us both. This market is wild. Rates and inflation continue to rise. Not sure what to set aside for a down payment, but that is a goal. I will talk to lenders this winter to see what I can afford. 20% down does away with PMI, but does that matter much? Advice here is appreciated.
- In a perfect world it would be nice to have money set aside for immediate repairs/ up grades (Paint, furnace/ AC/ Appliances, carpet, Etc). Would also be nice to have an "Emergency fund" for the house, but I am not sure if this is redunant with the established Emergency fund mentioned above.

4. Investing. This is a large life changing lump sum for me. It seems irresponsble to not invest a portion of it. I plan to max my ROTH for this year (maybe time it to fill next years as well?). What about my brokerage, everything is on "discount" right now so this is kind of the "silver lining" in my situation.

5. Planning for my daughters future. She is 3, started preschool this year. Her mom is keeping the 529 plan that she started for her. I dont really like the idea of 529s. My understanding is that they have limited uses, and outside of those they are taxed at a higher rate. I have read on this forum mixed reviews on how to proceed. Some open a brokerage for their kids and invest into that so they have more flexibility with that money later (I am leaning towards this).

6. What have I overlooked?

Thank you for your help. All advice is appreciated. There has been a lot to process in the last few months, but I am starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel.
I don't have much advice to offer but I am curious what the concern is with contributing to 529s? I just front loaded the 6 yr annual gift amount for our youngest because I like that we can withdraw any contributions anytime. Am I missing something?
Zipster
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2022 5:49 pm

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by Zipster »

I don't have much advice to offer but I am curious what the concern is with contributing to 529s? I just front loaded the 6 yr annual gift amount for our youngest because I like that we can withdraw any contributions anytime. Am I missing something?
You cannot selectively withdraw JUST your contributions— whatever you withdraw will be a mix of contributions (basis) and gains. If the withdrawal is for non-qualified expenses, you are penalized (and taxed) on the gains part of the withdrawal.
HomeStretch
Posts: 8460
Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2018 3:06 pm

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by HomeStretch »

+1 to renting a house rather than buying right away. In addition to the reasons given, above, you may find it beneficial to buy a house in a year or two located within walking distance to your child’s elementary school. Move in early enough before school starts for you both to meet neighboring families. If you work from home, you can walk to do a playground pickup where kids play/make friends and parents get to meet one another/arrange play dates. You both will likely build a circle of friends in the elementary school community that will follow your child through high school. A lot of towns assign kids to scouting packs, sports leagues, etc. by school so you and your child may see a lot of the same faces there plus living nearby/short-no work commute will give you a chance to coach, etc.
random_walker_77
Posts: 1979
Joined: Tue May 21, 2013 8:49 pm

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by random_walker_77 »

Houses can be rented too, not just apartments. How do home rental rates compare to ownership (PITI)? This might be a time to avoid major financial decisions. As your child gets older, you may also find that your preferred school district tastes change.

Are your hours regular, and how's the childcare situation (since that can get very expensive very quickly)?

No hurry on investing decisions, you don't want to lock yourself into anything. Keep it in cash for a while until plans, living situations etc are all stable. The ally savings account rate is pretty reasonable, and I think that's a fine place to keep it while you figure things out.
Topic Author
mzvarner
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jun 13, 2020 10:43 am

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by mzvarner »

exodusNH wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 11:12 am
529s can be useful if you're able to deduct the contributions, but if not, the taxable account is more flexible. Note that if you open a minor account, your daughter will get full control of it either at 18, 21, or 25 depending on state law. You could also just contribute to a brokerage account in your name, then gift her money when she's older.

There are no tax incentives for a 529 in washington state.
mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am 4. Investing. This is a large life changing lump sum for me. It seems irresponsble to not invest a portion of it. I plan to max my ROTH for this year (maybe time it to fill next years as well?). What about my brokerage, everything is on "discount" right now so this is kind of the "silver lining" in my situation.
Investing responsibly is the key to building wealth, over the long term. Over shorter periods of time, it can be a kick in the gut.

You don't need to rush into it though, and certainly don't want to tie up money you can reasonably expect to need within 2 years, e.g. a down payment. A reasonable goal would be to put the down payment money into a Treasury and then invest the rest according to your need and ability to take risk.
[/quote]

I am not opposed to renting. I really would like something bigger with a yard because this apartment sure filled up fast. I will talk to some lenders to see what I would qualify for. i do not plan on investing any of the money I would use towards a home. I will keep that liquid. I am not sure if I am spreading myself too thin with all of my goals?
Topic Author
mzvarner
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jun 13, 2020 10:43 am

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by mzvarner »

aristotelian wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 12:01 pm Following #1, I would move very, very slowly on buying a house. Owning a home is perhaps the biggest financial decision you can make and you are going through a major life transition and probably experiencing a lot of emotion. This is not a time to make a big financial decision. The odds of doing something you will regret later are very high. I would want to wait at least a year to see how the finances of the divorce and your new living situation shake out. Will your cash flow be comfortable with a mortgage payment, plus higher utility and maintenance costs? Do you have enough saved up to replace a roof or HVAC system? Are you sure you will have time to maintain the house by yourself while working and parenting?
If you want more space than the apartment, you can rent a small house. Your daughter won't care whether it is rented or owned.

This is something I will be watching and reevaluating this winter and spring. I am not ready to just jump into the housing market yet.


Regarding PMI, you should understand why institutions charge extra for low down payments. That is because the investment is much riskier when there is less equity backing it up. Just my two cents, but housing went up a lot when interest rates cratered, and there are a lot of red flags that a bubble is about to burst. That is always a risk, but the market seems especially ripe for a correction right now. Setting aside PMI, the bigger risk IMO is getting yourself in an under-water situation where you are forced to sell (e.g. due to job loss) when the market is down. Say you buy a $300k house with $20k down, the market drops 40% to $180k but you have lost your job and can't afford the payment. Due to current high rates you've only accumulated another $10k of equity. If you sell, you owe the bank $270k to close out the mortgage, so that is going to cost you $90k cash to sell the house. Do you really want to be in that situation? The fact that you are considering PMI tells me you would be stretching to buy.

My job is very safe. It would take some very strange circumstance to loose my jon. I vaguely understand PMI. The 2 homes we bought together, neither had 20% down, so we always had PMI. I will be in a very real spot to put 20% down, but was wondering if using a lower down payment and taking PMI would be beneficial so I can best optimize my goals listed in the OP.


Regarding the 403b, contributing above the match can still be beneficial depending on your tax bracket. That depends in part on your filing status. Will your daughter be spending more time with your or your spouse? Only one of you can claim Head of Household. If you are HH, you would have $73,000 of income in the 12% bracket. I would want to contribute at least $7k in that case. If you are Single, you would have $53,025 in the 12% bracket. In that case, I would try to max out the 403b if possible, even if you have to dip into your nest egg. For every $1,000 earned, I'd rather be saving $1,000 in my 403b instead of receiving $780 in your paycheck (less state taxes) and paying $220 to the government!


I will not be HH. I plan to increase my contribution, but until I secured an emergency fund, and knew how things were looking, I wanted to bring home as much as possible.
Topic Author
mzvarner
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jun 13, 2020 10:43 am

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by mzvarner »

GreenLawn wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 1:02 pm Apartments aren't pleasant for a lot of people, you could try renting a house. Doesn't have to be fancy as you're planning to buy in the not too distant future, but renting a house will relieve the pressure of sharing walls with strangers and give you time to consider the home purchase decision.

My PMI is 54 bucks a month. Pocket change to me and it allowed me to keep the money I would have used for a down payment in the market. So the PMI decision depends in part on how much it will be.
This is the mindset I was thinking!I do not recall PMI being very expensive, so do I take PMI so I can better use the funds available to me for savings AND investing.
Topic Author
mzvarner
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jun 13, 2020 10:43 am

Re: Managing a "windfall" after divorce

Post by mzvarner »

Duckie wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 5:29 pm
mzvarner wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 10:20 am 3. My daughter and I want a home. Moving back into an apartment has been hard on us both.
Your home is where you live, whether rented or owned, whether a single family home, townhouse, or apartment. Do you need a yard? Do you have pets? A three-year-old will adjust to almost anything if you're okay with it.
6. What have I overlooked?
It reads like you have primary custody. Who takes care of your daughter when you're at work? Child care is expensive.

We do not have pets, but we both miss our yard. I also have a number of hobbies where garage space was nice.

She spends most of the time with here mom (60-40 split kind of). She is in preschool 5 days a week 8-12. We do not have childcare, if something comes up we have family and grandparents in town to help.
Post Reply