Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

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avenger
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by avenger »

True!

We have an autocover so we have negligible water loss.
cheers ... -Mark | "Our life is frittered away with detail. Simplify. Simplify." -Henry David Thoreau | [VTI, VXUS, VWITX, SV fund]
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Will do good
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by Will do good »

No. We have gone on many, many month long trips.
homebuyer6426
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by homebuyer6426 »

I think that draining an old water heater can sometimes be what breaks it. That's why I wouldn't want to shut off the house supply.
criticalmass
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by criticalmass »

bertilak wrote: Mon Sep 19, 2022 10:48 am
neilpilot wrote: Mon Sep 19, 2022 9:45 am
bertilak wrote: Mon Sep 19, 2022 9:37 am
Nowizard wrote: Fri Jul 29, 2022 8:32 am No, but we do turn off water to the washer where it connects.
Tim
That's twice I have seen this in this thread. I don't understand what it accomplishes. Does the washer somehow turn on by itself when nobody is home?
No, one of the two supply hoses fails. Some actually leave valves closed routinely when not washing a load.
I still don't understand. How is the washer different from other things (like water heater or dishwasher or shower for example) in a way that make it more likely to fail?

EDIT:
OK, let me guess -- those other things will drain.
State Farm has said that their number one homeowners insurance claim expense (aside from major disasters) is ruptured washing machine hoses. Rubber hoses are prevalent and especially susceptible. The water hammer on the hoses from the quick action solenoids closing causes the hoses to weaken over time as well. If rubber hoses are used, they need replacement after 5 years. I use braided stainless steel hoses and turn off the water when not in use. It takes 3 seconds.
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bertilak
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by bertilak »

criticalmass wrote: Tue Sep 20, 2022 4:08 pm
bertilak wrote: Mon Sep 19, 2022 10:48 am
OK, let me guess -- those other things will drain.
State Farm has said that their number one homeowners insurance claim expense (aside from major disasters) is ruptured washing machine hoses. Rubber hoses are prevalent and especially susceptible. The water hammer on the hoses from the quick action solenoids closing causes the hoses to weaken over time as well. If rubber hoses are used, they need replacement after 5 years. I use braided stainless steel hoses and turn off the water when not in use. It takes 3 seconds.
So there goes my theory! If one of my hoses failed, that would happen outside the washer and not have anything to do with the washer's internal drain.

In my case I have braided hoses that are not likely to fail. Also, the washer is set in a depression in the floor with its own drain. Any leaking water will go down that drain.

I will not bother turning off the water as I think such repeated use would make a failure of the valve more likely than that of the hose and any damage would be well contained anyway.
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard. -- Squire Omar Barker (aka S.O.B.), the Cowboy Poet
TightButAggressive
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by TightButAggressive »

We are on municipal water. We turn it off for anything overnight. Takes 30 seconds. The likelihood is small, but the consequence is high for a failure. It's worth 30 seconds. I can speak from experience. I've had a braided hose burst twice, 2 outside hose lines sprink a leak inside the house not during the winter (yes, we have properly drained them in winter religiously) and a running toilet combined with a rubber gasket failure. The damage was enough of a PITA for those and we were home for all of them. If we weren't home, a couple of those would have been $100k+ and months in repairs. It's a slightly more complicated equation if you are on well water but generally...

It's worth 30 seconds to shut it off.
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snackdog
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by snackdog »

criticalmass wrote: Tue Sep 20, 2022 4:08 pm ...The water hammer on the hoses from the quick action solenoids closing causes the hoses to weaken over time as well. If rubber hoses are used, they need replacement after 5 years. I use braided stainless steel hoses and turn off the water when not in use. It takes 3 seconds.
Best practice is to install water hammer arrestors on the washing machine water inlet - saves wear and tear on all your plumbing.
tesuzuki2002
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by tesuzuki2002 »

It takes me about 1 minute to shut off the main water supply... so yes I do it when I'm gone for a week or so...
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burgrat
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by burgrat »

Possible stupid question: To shut off the main water to the house, are we talking the water main (from the muni water supply, in-ground) that requires a long shutoff key? Is there sometimes a main shutoff valve in the house or garage that does this? Forgive my lack of knowledge but I don't know. I've turned off a water main (located in ground, on the front lawn between the road and the house) to change out a toilet and valves, but it sounds like a lot of people simply turn a valve somewhere in the house. Just curious. Thanks!
criticalmass
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by criticalmass »

snackdog wrote: Tue Sep 20, 2022 5:20 pm
criticalmass wrote: Tue Sep 20, 2022 4:08 pm ...The water hammer on the hoses from the quick action solenoids closing causes the hoses to weaken over time as well. If rubber hoses are used, they need replacement after 5 years. I use braided stainless steel hoses and turn off the water when not in use. It takes 3 seconds.
Best practice is to install water hammer arrestors on the washing machine water inlet - saves wear and tear on all your plumbing.
I have done that. I also turn off the water when not in use.
criticalmass
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by criticalmass »

bertilak wrote: Tue Sep 20, 2022 4:31 pm
criticalmass wrote: Tue Sep 20, 2022 4:08 pm
bertilak wrote: Mon Sep 19, 2022 10:48 am
OK, let me guess -- those other things will drain.
State Farm has said that their number one homeowners insurance claim expense (aside from major disasters) is ruptured washing machine hoses. Rubber hoses are prevalent and especially susceptible. The water hammer on the hoses from the quick action solenoids closing causes the hoses to weaken over time as well. If rubber hoses are used, they need replacement after 5 years. I use braided stainless steel hoses and turn off the water when not in use. It takes 3 seconds.
So there goes my theory! If one of my hoses failed, that would happen outside the washer and not have anything to do with the washer's internal drain.

In my case I have braided hoses that are not likely to fail. Also, the washer is set in a depression in the floor with its own drain. Any leaking water will go down that drain.

I will not bother turning off the water as I think such repeated use would make a failure of the valve more likely than that of the hose and any damage would be well contained anyway.
Turning the valve once a week on to was laundry and again off would take many lifetimes to fail the valve. Use a ball valve if concerned, just don’t turn off the ball valve quickly when water is flowing through it.
mancich
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by mancich »

Yes. Not much downside in my opinion and only takes a second with the main shutoff valve in the basement.
OpenMinded1
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by OpenMinded1 »

burgrat wrote: Tue Sep 20, 2022 10:46 pm Possible stupid question: To shut off the main water to the house, are we talking the water main (from the muni water supply, in-ground) that requires a long shutoff key? Is there sometimes a main shutoff valve in the house or garage that does this? Forgive my lack of knowledge but I don't know. I've turned off a water main (located in ground, on the front lawn between the road and the house) to change out a toilet and valves, but it sounds like a lot of people simply turn a valve somewhere in the house. Just curious. Thanks!
Probably best to close the in-ground, main water-supply valve. I think people sometimes call it a curb stop. It's the one that often requires a long shutoff key to easily close. If you close the curb stop and drain the pipes in your house, water from the municipal water supply shouldn't be able to get close to your house.

Some houses have a shutoff valve where the water comes into the house. Some don't. I recently installed one in my house. I turn both the curb stop and the one in my house off because on one occasion the valve at the curb wouldn't completely shut off. Water was getting past it even though the position of the knob on the valve indicated that it was closed.

Also a good idea to turn the power off to you water heater before draining your pipes.
punkinhead
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by punkinhead »

bertilak wrote: Tue Sep 20, 2022 4:31 pm
I will not bother turning off the water as I think such repeated use would make a failure of the valve more likely than that of the hose and any damage would be well contained anyway.
Valves don't fail from overuse. They fail from lack of use. Minerals in the water stick them in place when they aren't regularly turned.
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bertilak
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by bertilak »

punkinhead wrote: Thu Sep 22, 2022 6:51 am
bertilak wrote: Tue Sep 20, 2022 4:31 pm
I will not bother turning off the water as I think such repeated use would make a failure of the valve more likely than that of the hose and any damage would be well contained anyway.
Valves don't fail from overuse. They fail from lack of use. Minerals in the water stick them in place when they aren't regularly turned.
Good point.

I actually do test the valves occasionally to see that they turn freely but I probably don't do that often enough. I have a water softener so that probably helps avoid mineral buildup.
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard. -- Squire Omar Barker (aka S.O.B.), the Cowboy Poet
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thriftynick
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Re: Leaving for a week: shut off main water supply?

Post by thriftynick »

I have a few Kangaroo water sensors that I put in the laundry room, under the kitchen sink, and in the bathroom. I'll get an alert on my phone if water is detected, and then I can have my in-laws check on things. Luckily, I haven't had anything happen yet, but it's peace of mind when on vacation knowing that water is NOT on the floor. :happy

Also, the bathroom one goes off frequently when my teenage daughter takes a shower, so I know they work...
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