People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
JakeyLee
Posts: 184
Joined: Sun Dec 31, 2017 11:34 am
Location: From sea to shining sea. But mostly the south west.

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by JakeyLee »

Op,
I can’t speak for most here, as my finances have been on auto-pilot for darn near 25 years. I retired less than two years ago. My days are filled with activities from sun-up to sun-down. I’m 52. I have time to hit the gym every day before noon, and then get to work on things I enjoy. I will say this.. while I employ the same basic index fund approach to my life; I still enjoy my cup of coffee every morning while I check the markets. Then I just sit here, and act on NONE of my feelings and emotions. It has served me well for close to 30 years.
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

Marseille07 wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:10 pm
Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 7:50 pm Yeah, that’s what I thought too

I’m not actually hitting the FIRE button intentionally

My initially blue ocean business take a dramatic downturn when the introduction of a new successful marketplace in my country cause my blue ocean market suddenly saturated, and it went downhill from there.

When the final nail hits the coffin, I realize: hey! I got enough to join the FIRE movement!

starting another successful business is not easy, so there I go into the FIRE lane

After FIRE-d and bored, I start another business which fills my time, but covid happens, and I’m back to FIRE and bored :oops:
Why not travel more? You said upthread you only travel 3 weeks out of a year for some reason. 3 weeks are a good amount for working folks but not FIREd folks.
Travel is expensive, especially nowadays, fight tickets are crazy. So international travel/luxury domestic travel totaled 3 weeks/year is what i can afford for now.

these 3 weeks also doesn’t count occasional visit to parents (another 3 weeks/year) and small trip to nearby towns.
I’m not sure if these trips are counted at trips or not by bogleheads standard.
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

JakeyLee wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:26 pm Op,
I can’t speak for most here, as my finances have been on auto-pilot for darn near 25 years. I retired less than two years ago. My days are filled with activities from sun-up to sun-down. I’m 52. I have time to hit the gym every day before noon, and then get to work on things I enjoy. I will say this.. while I employ the same basic index fund approach to my life; I still enjoy my cup of coffee every morning while I check the markets. Then I just sit here, and act on NONE of my feelings and emotions. It has served me well for close to 30 years.
JakeyLee,
interesting, can u share sample of your everyday schedule?

Actually my finance in the last 4 years has been passive bogleheads style, until the beginning of this year.

There’s this guru who is so smart and i admire, start posting weekly market update & options strategy.

Well turns out, July’s rally says that: even he, with extensive breakdown of macroeconomics, can’t consistently predict the direction of the market.
uglymcmuffin
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2022 12:27 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by uglymcmuffin »

Neus wrote: Mon Aug 01, 2022 9:36 pm

I have done house projects: I hate it, felt like I'm wasting my life on errands
Hiking is not viable in my country
Cooking, not really enjoy cooking because of how much time spend doing groceries and cook
There were a time when I like learning BBQ-ing, but after several bad cooks, I think it's a waste of meat
Not sure if it counts, but after 10 years of slinging code, I ‘retired’ to pursue house husbandry. DW still works for the medical insurance and for her personal career goals. But it took about a 6 months for me to adjust to the ‘retired’ lifestyle. Things that I used to consider to be chores and errands are now things i look forward to. I calculated that I still needed to cook 3 meals a day x 365 x 60yrs = 65000 more meals (x4 people is 260k meals) So it would be a good use of my time to improve my cooking abilities and find enjoyment in a process that I will be guaranteed to do multiple times a day for the rest of my life.

There was a learning curve of course, but now i really enjoy trying new recipes, going grocery shopping for seasonal ingredients, and inviting people over to cook new recipes for them. We go grocery shopping 2-3 times a week. When you are working, time is insanely valuable so spending it waiting in lines on the weekends grocery shopping just seemed like a waste. In retirement, time is less valuable, and you can shop in the middle of the week on a Thursday at 10a when there are no lines and all the food has been restocked for the weekend.

I find that other time sinking tasks with horrible efficiency are incredibly gratifying. Gardening and growing your own vegetables is hyper inefficient, but consumes a lot of my time and provides inexplicable gratification for a $0.50 tomato that probably cost $10 to grow by hand. Growing rare plants from seeds is also an inexpensive, slow, time consuming task.

I also picked up a lot of other hobbies that will require a lifetime to master. I’ve always wanted to draw and paint, and now I can spend 8 hours a day drawing without worrying about being a starving artist. I don’t have to take commissions or draw what i don’t want to. I enjoy taking art classes with old ladies painting watercolors.

We are about to have a kid, and I am excited to waste a lot of time playing with the kid and drawing pictures with them. When i was at work, i would look around at the people who were 50+ and i would always think - when i grow up, i don’t want be them. I don’t want the reason why i got up in the morning to be to go to work because i never found anything else I wanted to do. It’s pretty scary to look around yourself at work and realize that if you don’t get off the hamster wheel, in 20 years you will end up like everyone around you.
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

uglymcmuffin wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 2:10 am
Neus wrote: Mon Aug 01, 2022 9:36 pm

I have done house projects: I hate it, felt like I'm wasting my life on errands
Hiking is not viable in my country
Cooking, not really enjoy cooking because of how much time spend doing groceries and cook
There were a time when I like learning BBQ-ing, but after several bad cooks, I think it's a waste of meat
Not sure if it counts, but after 10 years of slinging code, I ‘retired’ to pursue house husbandry. DW still works for the medical insurance and for her personal career goals. But it took about a 6 months for me to adjust to the ‘retired’ lifestyle. Things that I used to consider to be chores and errands are now things i look forward to. I calculated that I still needed to cook 3 meals a day x 365 x 60yrs = 65000 more meals (x4 people is 260k meals) So it would be a good use of my time to improve my cooking abilities and find enjoyment in a process that I will be guaranteed to do multiple times a day for the rest of my life.

There was a learning curve of course, but now i really enjoy trying new recipes, going grocery shopping for seasonal ingredients, and inviting people over to cook new recipes for them. We go grocery shopping 2-3 times a week. When you are working, time is insanely valuable so spending it waiting in lines on the weekends grocery shopping just seemed like a waste. In retirement, time is less valuable, and you can shop in the middle of the week on a Thursday at 10a when there are no lines and all the food has been restocked for the weekend.

I find that other time sinking tasks with horrible efficiency are incredibly gratifying. Gardening and growing your own vegetables is hyper inefficient, but consumes a lot of my time and provides inexplicable gratification for a $0.50 tomato that probably cost $10 to grow by hand. Growing rare plants from seeds is also an inexpensive, slow, time consuming task.

I also picked up a lot of other hobbies that will require a lifetime to master. I’ve always wanted to draw and paint, and now I can spend 8 hours a day drawing without worrying about being a starving artist. I don’t have to take commissions or draw what i don’t want to. I enjoy taking art classes with old ladies painting watercolors.

We are about to have a kid, and I am excited to waste a lot of time playing with the kid and drawing pictures with them. When i was at work, i would look around at the people who were 50+ and i would always think - when i grow up, i don’t want be them. I don’t want the reason why i got up in the morning to be to go to work because i never found anything else I wanted to do. It’s pretty scary to look around yourself at work and realize that if you don’t get off the hamster wheel, in 20 years you will end up like everyone around you.
Interesting that you mention growing plants are time-consuming, and it's more expensive than buying, but still do it anyway.

I felt cooking is inefficient, and I hate inefficiencies, that's why I can't stand cooking, at least one by one (I do cook a simple meal in batch)

What kind of drawing do you do? And what's your learning method (youtube?)

I used to love drawing anime, but I have no talent for drawing or have not been pointed to the right learning method.

My high school art teacher actually suggested I find another hobby, which in hindsight is actually good advice.

Yeah working for money is horrible, until recently, I didn't realize how people get used to living a horrible life that they do not realize anymore how bad is it to be constantly under pressure from your non-caring boss, whose interest is only to squeeze the last drop of energy from his underling.
uglymcmuffin
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2022 12:27 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by uglymcmuffin »

Neus wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 2:56 am
Interesting that you mention growing plants are time-consuming, and it's more expensive than buying, but still do it anyway.

I felt cooking is inefficient, and I hate inefficiencies, that's why I can't stand cooking, at least one by one (I do cook a simple meal in batch)

What kind of drawing do you do? And what's your learning method (youtube?)

I used to love drawing anime, but I have no talent for drawing or have not been pointed to the right learning method.

My high school art teacher actually suggested I find another hobby, which in hindsight is actually good advice.

Yeah working for money is horrible, until recently, I didn't realize how people get used to living a horrible life that they do not realize anymore how bad is it to be constantly under pressure from your non-caring boss, whose interest is only to squeeze the last drop of energy from his underling.
Sometimes I feel like the whole point of being retired is to enjoy inefficiencies. But cooking, music, drawing and other skill / performance based tasks require lots of practice and iteration. I love trying and failing and adjusting to slowly increase quality. Part of why cooking is fun is because if you mess it up, you can try again in like 5 hrs when you eat your next meal. Also scaling up your meal plan from 1 person to 2 to 4 to 8 people is quite the challenge. I’d say cooking is probably my favorite ‘retired’ activity because of how much value it brings to myself and others and how much you skill you can develop researching foods and going to restaurants for ideas.

For drawing, I learned by copying pictures that I think look cool. I have no formal training. I have no talent other than persistence. I also like drawing cartoons and anime. It’s a long road to mastery. I probably spend 8hrs a day drawing and painting. There is no value in what I create. I just do it because I like developing the skill. Sometimes I take community classes to learn a new technique or style. You can check out some local figure drawing classes those are a lot of fun. You draw nude models for 3hrs straight. There are some similar YouTube videos like croquiscafe that do shorter 20 minute sessions.

It’s funny because all the stuff I used to do as a kid, I now do as a retired guy. Cooking, drawing, running, gardening were all my favorite childhood activities, but somewhere along the way I got side tracked into writing soul sucking code and working.

Think of all your childhood activities that you loved and always wanted to do. Now you have the time to do them. People always point out kids who are savants and have natural talent, but a lot of it is hard work. 15hrs a day of focused effort mastering a skill in the 15yrs they have walked the earth. I figure if I spent the next 50yrs of my life to achieve what they did in 15years that would be pretty cool, and maybe I’ll have some time left over to try something else.

Also, your high school teacher was kind of right. Be glad you didn’t try to earn your millions for FIRE with anime drawings. But now you can draw anime or whatever you want because you have FU money.
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

uglymcmuffin wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 3:43 am
Neus wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 2:56 am
Interesting that you mention growing plants are time-consuming, and it's more expensive than buying, but still do it anyway.

I felt cooking is inefficient, and I hate inefficiencies, that's why I can't stand cooking, at least one by one (I do cook a simple meal in batch)

What kind of drawing do you do? And what's your learning method (youtube?)

I used to love drawing anime, but I have no talent for drawing or have not been pointed to the right learning method.

My high school art teacher actually suggested I find another hobby, which in hindsight is actually good advice.

Yeah working for money is horrible, until recently, I didn't realize how people get used to living a horrible life that they do not realize anymore how bad is it to be constantly under pressure from your non-caring boss, whose interest is only to squeeze the last drop of energy from his underling.
Sometimes I feel like the whole point of being retired is to enjoy inefficiencies. But cooking, music, drawing and other skill / performance based tasks require lots of practice and iteration. I love trying and failing and adjusting to slowly increase quality. Part of why cooking is fun is because if you mess it up, you can try again in like 5 hrs when you eat your next meal. Also scaling up your meal plan from 1 person to 2 to 4 to 8 people is quite the challenge. I’d say cooking is probably my favorite ‘retired’ activity because of how much value it brings to myself and others and how much you skill you can develop researching foods and going to restaurants for ideas.

For drawing, I learned by copying pictures that I think look cool. I have no formal training. I have no talent other than persistence. I also like drawing cartoons and anime. It’s a long road to mastery. I probably spend 8hrs a day drawing and painting. There is no value in what I create. I just do it because I like developing the skill. Sometimes I take community classes to learn a new technique or style. You can check out some local figure drawing classes those are a lot of fun. You draw nude models for 3hrs straight. There are some similar YouTube videos like croquiscafe that do shorter 20 minute sessions.

It’s funny because all the stuff I used to do as a kid, I now do as a retired guy. Cooking, drawing, running, gardening were all my favorite childhood activities, but somewhere along the way I got side tracked into writing soul sucking code and working.

Think of all your childhood activities that you loved and always wanted to do. Now you have the time to do them. People always point out kids who are savants and have natural talent, but a lot of it is hard work. 15hrs a day of focused effort mastering a skill in the 15yrs they have walked the earth. I figure if I spent the next 50yrs of my life to achieve what they did in 15years that would be pretty cool, and maybe I’ll have some time left over to try something else.

Also, your high school teacher was kind of right. Be glad you didn’t try to earn your millions for FIRE with anime drawings. But now you can draw anime or whatever you want because you have FU money.
Lol. Indeed, i earn my money using the ugliest website ever.

Interesting that you mention childhood activities. My favorite childhood activies are playing video games, sport, science experiment, checking my treasure box & counting my little money.

The problem with counting money (which i still do everyday,) is it’s not recommended by bogleheads as it give the itch to optimize.
sureshoe
Posts: 1664
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:26 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by sureshoe »

Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 7:03 pm
sureshoe wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 1:50 pm
Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:24 am So not much money to be made as bogleheads style advisor?
So it’s better to be financial planner that peddle non bogleheads? (ie active fund)

I don’t mind sales, and passing CFP exam should be a piece of cake
Most flat fee advisors charge between 0.5% and 2% of total account value. I haven't looked in a while, but I generally assume a 1% fee except for very large or very small acounts.

If you can get 10 accounts, each at $1M of value, that's a $100k income - not bad. That's why you see brokers/planners/insurance agents scramble at the beginning of their career. But, later in life they're on the golf course pulling down a $300k+ mostly passive income, because over the years they amassed a large client base who pays their bills. Think about it, if in your first 5 years, you can get to 30 clients with a value of $100k each, over the next 15 years, you should easily have $30M under managements. At which point, it's easy street. But, getting there is hard work in sales.

The other dirty secret of the planning industry is that most of them are more boglehead than you'd believe. They typically have spreadsheets and systems that they plug your numbers in and it spits out a mix of funds. Very few are active stock pickers (outside of brokers). They might slightly overweight or underweight sectors, but ultimately the get to something not terribly different than holding VTI. BUT! of course if you show clients you only have 3 funds, they're natural reaction is "this guy doesn't do crap". When in reality - most advisors in this segment don't do crap on selection, they're using predefined formulas.

If a guy has $150k with you, and you're only leaching $15k/year - you can't spend more than 5-10 hours a quarter on him or you won't have time to do the most important work: sell. Most only do a brief quarterly check-in with the clients alongside the occasional panicked "market is dying" phone call. It's all sales and life coach.

I haven't tried it, but I have heard the CFP is very difficult. Also, like I wrote - you can't just take it and call yourself a CFP. It's like a real estate broker I believe, you have to demonstrate X hours in the field. About 15 years ago, I answered an ad for CFP training. I showed up in shorts, and they thought I was there to be an interview candidate for a slug sales job. LOL, I told them I just wanted a license to do my own thing. Dismissed.
0.5-2% annually for planning??
Damnnnn
That’s a fingerlicious fees

So about do your own thing, to be financial planner, we don’t need to work for a company, right?
I'm not sure if you're being facetious or not. Sarcasm doesn't work in text well. Are you a CFP now? Will answer once more if you're actually serious.

There's more to it than just "buy these 2-3 funds", collect 1%. There is infrastructure and overhead. There are "stock pickers" who offer advice and do very little - the internet is littered with them. But being an actual fiduciary and handling the money/etc. does have overhead.

Do you have to work for a company? As I posted multiple times (which makes me wonder if you're trying to bait me), you can't just go take the CFP and start fleecing marks. And even if you did, you'd need some infrastructure. This is where most people in the financial industry start out with a company, sign non-competes, etc. At some point they make enough there or break out on their own. Sometimes clean, sometimes it's a messy divorce, I haven't been super deep at that level. However, I've seen it in other "cartel" style businesses - like Insurance and Real Estate.
User avatar
JoeRetire
Posts: 13315
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2018 2:44 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by JoeRetire »

Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:28 am
JoeRetire wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 5:39 am
Neus wrote: Mon Aug 01, 2022 9:00 pm I always felt that being relatively young, and doing errands is a waste of time.
I can't help but feel I'm wasting my talent and my life doing a small task
What is your talent?
You can always pay people to do all of your errands and small tasks for you.
my talent is to solve problem, prevent it to occur ever again..
thanks to this, soon enough i will be out of things to do :mrgreen:
It doesn't sound like you are very motivated to solve this problem.
If you want to avoid boredom, you can. But you keep coming up with excuses.

Good luck.
This is gonna be my time. Time to taste the fruits and let the juices drip down my chin. I proclaim this: The Summer of George!
michaeljc70
Posts: 8759
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2015 3:53 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by michaeljc70 »

Since I wasn't spending all day trading while working the amount of time managing my portfolio is not really any different in retirement. The bigger thing is filling the 40 or more hours to fill you spent working. One hard thing is if you retire early a lot of your friends and/or spouse might still be working and unavailable.

One thing I read somewhere is that in retirement you just do everything longer/slower. Read more. More trips to the grocery store. More time cooking. Things like that. I've found that to be true. I don't worry about getting groceries for a week anymore. I can go back. Of course it is great if you can take up new hobbies. If I was interested in a hobby though I took it up before I retired. YMMV
KneeReplacementTutor
Posts: 370
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2020 11:52 am

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by KneeReplacementTutor »

I FIRE'd six years ago at age 49 and have stayed the course with my investments. What has kept me from becoming bored is helping out in the fabrication of a traveling national monument to America's servicemen and women, and starting a niche business out of my former area of expertise to help improve the lives of a defined group of people. These things help me utilize my time and talents in ways that keep my life meaningful so that I don't get bored. :happy
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

sureshoe wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 7:11 am
Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 7:03 pm
sureshoe wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 1:50 pm
Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:24 am So not much money to be made as bogleheads style advisor?
So it’s better to be financial planner that peddle non bogleheads? (ie active fund)

I don’t mind sales, and passing CFP exam should be a piece of cake
Most flat fee advisors charge between 0.5% and 2% of total account value. I haven't looked in a while, but I generally assume a 1% fee except for very large or very small acounts.

If you can get 10 accounts, each at $1M of value, that's a $100k income - not bad. That's why you see brokers/planners/insurance agents scramble at the beginning of their career. But, later in life they're on the golf course pulling down a $300k+ mostly passive income, because over the years they amassed a large client base who pays their bills. Think about it, if in your first 5 years, you can get to 30 clients with a value of $100k each, over the next 15 years, you should easily have $30M under managements. At which point, it's easy street. But, getting there is hard work in sales.

The other dirty secret of the planning industry is that most of them are more boglehead than you'd believe. They typically have spreadsheets and systems that they plug your numbers in and it spits out a mix of funds. Very few are active stock pickers (outside of brokers). They might slightly overweight or underweight sectors, but ultimately the get to something not terribly different than holding VTI. BUT! of course if you show clients you only have 3 funds, they're natural reaction is "this guy doesn't do crap". When in reality - most advisors in this segment don't do crap on selection, they're using predefined formulas.

If a guy has $150k with you, and you're only leaching $15k/year - you can't spend more than 5-10 hours a quarter on him or you won't have time to do the most important work: sell. Most only do a brief quarterly check-in with the clients alongside the occasional panicked "market is dying" phone call. It's all sales and life coach.

I haven't tried it, but I have heard the CFP is very difficult. Also, like I wrote - you can't just take it and call yourself a CFP. It's like a real estate broker I believe, you have to demonstrate X hours in the field. About 15 years ago, I answered an ad for CFP training. I showed up in shorts, and they thought I was there to be an interview candidate for a slug sales job. LOL, I told them I just wanted a license to do my own thing. Dismissed.
0.5-2% annually for planning??
Damnnnn
That’s a fingerlicious fees

So about do your own thing, to be financial planner, we don’t need to work for a company, right?
I'm not sure if you're being facetious or not. Sarcasm doesn't work in text well. Are you a CFP now? Will answer once more if you're actually serious.

There's more to it than just "buy these 2-3 funds", collect 1%. There is infrastructure and overhead. There are "stock pickers" who offer advice and do very little - the internet is littered with them. But being an actual fiduciary and handling the money/etc. does have overhead.

Do you have to work for a company? As I posted multiple times (which makes me wonder if you're trying to bait me), you can't just go take the CFP and start fleecing marks. And even if you did, you'd need some infrastructure. This is where most people in the financial industry start out with a company, sign non-competes, etc. At some point they make enough there or break out on their own. Sometimes clean, sometimes it's a messy divorce, I haven't been super deep at that level. However, I've seen it in other "cartel" style businesses - like Insurance and Real Estate.
I’m seriously considering financial planner/private wealth management as a way to fill my time, and make extra money.

I’m just not sure if the hours are flexible, and whether or not i can start independent practise without first join a large corporate division
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

KneeReplacementTutor wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:18 am I FIRE'd six years ago at age 49 and have stayed the course with my investments. What has kept me from becoming bored is helping out in the fabrication of a traveling national monument to America's servicemen and women, and starting a niche business out of my former area of expertise to help improve the lives of a defined group of people. These things help me utilize my time and talents in ways that keep my life meaningful so that I don't get bored. :happy
Nice. so if i may conclude: volunteer & niche business.
BalancedJCB19
Posts: 352
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:30 am

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by BalancedJCB19 »

Neus wrote: Mon Aug 01, 2022 3:14 am To those who have FIRE and Stay the course (no tampering/no active trading, so no use of following the market as it may create an urge to deviate from the course)

What do you do specifically to not get bored with this proven but boring stay-the-course method?
You've won the game. Time to find another hobby. I'm not fire, but reduced my hours and now work 100% from home.
Warning, don't do what I did and get into a hobby that costs money. I got heavily into watches and although really loving the hobby, I kind of spent too much money. lol.
KneeReplacementTutor
Posts: 370
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2020 11:52 am

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by KneeReplacementTutor »

Neus wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:22 am
KneeReplacementTutor wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:18 am I FIRE'd six years ago at age 49 and have stayed the course with my investments. What has kept me from becoming bored is helping out in the fabrication of a traveling national monument to America's servicemen and women, and starting a niche business out of my former area of expertise to help improve the lives of a defined group of people. These things help me utilize my time and talents in ways that keep my life meaningful so that I don't get bored. :happy
Nice. so if i may conclude: volunteer & niche business.
Yes.
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

michaeljc70 wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:09 am Since I wasn't spending all day trading while working the amount of time managing my portfolio is not really any different in retirement. The bigger thing is filling the 40 or more hours to fill you spent working. One hard thing is if you retire early a lot of your friends and/or spouse might still be working and unavailable.

One thing I read somewhere is that in retirement you just do everything longer/slower. Read more. More trips to the grocery store. More time cooking. Things like that. I've found that to be true. I don't worry about getting groceries for a week anymore. I can go back. Of course it is great if you can take up new hobbies. If I was interested in a hobby though I took it up before I retired. YMMV
I agree about friends and even spouse availability is indeed an issue, there are times when i’m meeting a friend at work hours, and he can’t stop taking phone calls, and it’s pissing me off.

how do you deal with this issue?
michaeljc70
Posts: 8759
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2015 3:53 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by michaeljc70 »

Neus wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:31 am
michaeljc70 wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:09 am Since I wasn't spending all day trading while working the amount of time managing my portfolio is not really any different in retirement. The bigger thing is filling the 40 or more hours to fill you spent working. One hard thing is if you retire early a lot of your friends and/or spouse might still be working and unavailable.

One thing I read somewhere is that in retirement you just do everything longer/slower. Read more. More trips to the grocery store. More time cooking. Things like that. I've found that to be true. I don't worry about getting groceries for a week anymore. I can go back. Of course it is great if you can take up new hobbies. If I was interested in a hobby though I took it up before I retired. YMMV
I agree about friends and even spouse availability is indeed an issue, there are times when i’m meeting a friend at work hours, and he can’t stop taking phone calls, and it’s pissing me off.

how do you deal with this issue?
I try to limit meeting working friends during the workday unless it is for lunch. Of course, even for an hour some people can't disconnect.
H-Town
Posts: 4689
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2017 2:08 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by H-Town »

Neus wrote: Mon Aug 01, 2022 9:41 pm
H-Town wrote: Mon Aug 01, 2022 10:33 am
Neus wrote: Mon Aug 01, 2022 3:14 am To those who have FIRE and Stay the course (no tampering/no active trading, so no use of following the market as it may create an urge to deviate from the course)

What do you do specifically to not get bored with this proven but boring stay-the-course method?
We do a lot of traveling. At least 8 weeks a year.

I also enjoy weight lifting and outdoor activities (hiking, kayaking, etc.)

We either get busing living or get busy dying.
I see.
But even with 8 weeks of traveling, there are still 44 weeks in a year, what do you do on those 44 regular weeks?
I stay busy living :) there are many things to do: reading, researching, working out, outdoor activities, visiting state park, national parks, etc. Time is the ultimate currency. It's a luxury to be able to do what I want, when I want.
Time is the ultimate currency.
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

BalancedJCB19 wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:23 am
Neus wrote: Mon Aug 01, 2022 3:14 am To those who have FIRE and Stay the course (no tampering/no active trading, so no use of following the market as it may create an urge to deviate from the course)

What do you do specifically to not get bored with this proven but boring stay-the-course method?
You've won the game. Time to find another hobby. I'm not fire, but reduced my hours and now work 100% from home.
Warning, don't do what I did and get into a hobby that costs money. I got heavily into watches and although really loving the hobby, I kind of spent too much money. lol.
Sounds like a great setup!
warning: don’t fire, it can be boring :D

I see, yes indeed watches can be crazy expensive, especially recently. luckily i can stay away from it, although it’s actually quite profitable alt inv.
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

michaeljc70 wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:34 am
Neus wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:31 am
michaeljc70 wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:09 am Since I wasn't spending all day trading while working the amount of time managing my portfolio is not really any different in retirement. The bigger thing is filling the 40 or more hours to fill you spent working. One hard thing is if you retire early a lot of your friends and/or spouse might still be working and unavailable.

One thing I read somewhere is that in retirement you just do everything longer/slower. Read more. More trips to the grocery store. More time cooking. Things like that. I've found that to be true. I don't worry about getting groceries for a week anymore. I can go back. Of course it is great if you can take up new hobbies. If I was interested in a hobby though I took it up before I retired. YMMV
I agree about friends and even spouse availability is indeed an issue, there are times when i’m meeting a friend at work hours, and he can’t stop taking phone calls, and it’s pissing me off.

how do you deal with this issue?
I try to limit meeting working friends during the workday unless it is for lunch. Of course, even for an hour some people can't disconnect.
Ah, true, good thinking.

I just expect that since my friend agree to meet at work hours, he can disconnect during that time.
hnd
Posts: 885
Joined: Mon Jun 22, 2020 11:43 am

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by hnd »

for me, while I enjoy the aspects of the journey, it doesn't consume me. (i'm not FIRE or even close to it but I know people who are) Who ARE you? do people know you as the FIRE guy? probably not. you likely have passions outside of the investing side of things. Its a means to an end. and if you are at the end, its time to shift your focus to new things and adventures that the old one funds.

I always feel like the end of action movies are always awkward. the great battle has taken place, the good side has won. now what. sail off into the sunset. driving off into the distance of a deserted highway as the credits start to roll. But then there is often a sequel! a new adventure.
JakeyLee
Posts: 184
Joined: Sun Dec 31, 2017 11:34 am
Location: From sea to shining sea. But mostly the south west.

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by JakeyLee »

Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:54 pm
JakeyLee wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:26 pm Op,
I can’t speak for most here, as my finances have been on auto-pilot for darn near 25 years. I retired less than two years ago. My days are filled with activities from sun-up to sun-down. I’m 52. I have time to hit the gym every day before noon, and then get to work on things I enjoy. I will say this.. while I employ the same basic index fund approach to my life; I still enjoy my cup of coffee every morning while I check the markets. Then I just sit here, and act on NONE of my feelings and emotions. It has served me well for close to 30 years.
JakeyLee,
interesting, can u share sample of your everyday schedule?

Actually my finance in the last 4 years has been passive bogleheads style, until the beginning of this year.

There’s this guru who is so smart and i admire, start posting weekly market update & options strategy.

Well turns out, July’s rally says that: even he, with extensive breakdown of macroeconomics, can’t consistently predict the direction of the market.
Neus,
Like many folks, I recognized that my career had become my identity. I was a problem solver, and managed a team of folks that dealt with high risk criminal investigations… all while actively managing a large budget, grants, contracts, etc.. I truly felt like everyone depended on me, and I couldn’t possibly let others down. My epiphany came when I realized (going into retirement) that I might have a lot of confidence, but I had very little self worth. How could I when I tied my entire identity to my profession? So to answer your question, here’s what I did:

I identified hobbies, projects, and building/improving relationships. I had to be purposeful with this, because I was also identifying who I was going to be the next 30 some odd years (God willing). I now plan meals and activities with friends and families (I have lots of calendar space). I’ve learned that I have a passion for cooking and planning meals, BBQ’s, etc.. I plan short day trips where I discover new things and places. I’ve discovered I actually enjoy long walks and hikes. A few years ago forum member, Joe Retire, mentioned pickle ball. Now I play pickle ball at least twice a month. And while doing so, I’ve become friends with a couple of my new neighbors. I never have a problem filling my day or calendar. But the difference is, I’m now in control of said calendar.

I’ve heard it said that “boring people are bored in retirement”. I’m not entirely sure that’s a fair depiction of some of us. Quite frankly I had become institutionalized during the 3 decades of my career. I had to make specific and actionable changes to my life upon entering retirement. But once I let go of the work mindset, it was like a dam bursting of activity, projects , and dare I say.. self discovery.

By the way, retirement may not be for you. Not right now, anyway. That’s okay. But the best piece of advice I received (right on this forum) is start figuring out the life you want to live before you pull the plug, and start building that now. It’s much easier transition to the life you have, than transitioning to a life of the unknown.

I can’t offer much in advice to your investment question. This might be the wrong place for advice on experts who time the market. I will reiterate that a simple two fund portfolio has served me well for now 30 years. I have no doubt that it will continue to do so.
JakeyLee
Posts: 184
Joined: Sun Dec 31, 2017 11:34 am
Location: From sea to shining sea. But mostly the south west.

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by JakeyLee »

JakeyLee wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 1:11 pm
Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:54 pm
JakeyLee wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:26 pm Op,
I can’t speak for most here, as my finances have been on auto-pilot for darn near 25 years. I retired less than two years ago. My days are filled with activities from sun-up to sun-down. I’m 52. I have time to hit the gym every day before noon, and then get to work on things I enjoy. I will say this.. while I employ the same basic index fund approach to my life; I still enjoy my cup of coffee every morning while I check the markets. Then I just sit here, and act on NONE of my feelings and emotions. It has served me well for close to 30 years.
JakeyLee,
interesting, can u share sample of your everyday schedule?

Actually my finance in the last 4 years has been passive bogleheads style, until the beginning of this year.

There’s this guru who is so smart and i admire, start posting weekly market update & options strategy.

Well turns out, July’s rally says that: even he, with extensive breakdown of macroeconomics, can’t consistently predict the direction of the market.
Neus,
Like many folks, I recognized that my career had become my identity. I was a problem solver, and managed a team of folks that dealt with high risk criminal investigations… all while actively managing a large budget, grants, contracts, etc.. I truly felt like everyone depended on me, and I couldn’t possibly let others down. My epiphany came when I realized (going into retirement) that I might have a lot of confidence, but I had very little self worth. How could I when I tied my entire identity to my profession? So to answer your question, here’s what I did:

I identified hobbies, projects, and building/improving relationships. I had to be purposeful with this, because I was also identifying who I was going to be the next 30 some odd years (God willing). I now plan meals and activities with friends and families (I have lots of calendar space). I’ve learned that I have a passion for cooking and planning meals, BBQ’s, etc.. I plan short day trips where I discover new things and places. I’ve discovered I actually enjoy long walks and hikes.

A few years ago forum member, Joe Retire, mentioned pickle ball. Now I play pickle ball at least twice a month. And while doing so, I’ve become friends with a couple of my new neighbors. I never have a problem filling my day or calendar. But the difference is, I’m now in control of said calendar.

I’ve heard it said that “boring people are bored in retirement”. I’m not entirely sure that’s a fair depiction of some of us. Quite frankly I had become institutionalized during the 3 decades of my career. I had to make specific and actionable changes to my life upon entering retirement. But once I let go of the work mindset, it was like a dam bursting of activity, projects , and dare I say.. self discovery.

By the way, retirement may not be for you. Not right now, anyway. That’s okay. But the best piece of advice I received (right on this forum) is start figuring out the life you want to live before you pull the plug, and start building that now. It’s much easier transition to the life you have, than transitioning to a life of the unknown.

I can’t offer much in advice to your investment question. This might be the wrong place for advice on experts who time the market. I will reiterate that a simple two fund portfolio has served me well for now 30 years. I have no doubt that it will continue to do so.
sureshoe
Posts: 1664
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:26 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by sureshoe »

Neus wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:20 am I’m seriously considering financial planner/private wealth management as a way to fill my time, and make extra money.

I’m just not sure if the hours are flexible, and whether or not i can start independent practise without first join a large corporate division
I'd rely on a real CFP and not some message board goof (like me). I don't think you need to go work for American Express Financial Planning, but getting a start without being associated with a real CFP is hard (if not totally impossible/illegal).

The hours are absolutely flexible, but in the beginning, you're probably scrambling to find initial clients. No CFP is going to hand you a fat portfolio and say "manage this", because he/she would have already done all the hard work and now they're just milking the cow.

If you go this way, post your journey - I think it would be interesting.
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

JakeyLee wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 1:11 pm
JakeyLee wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 1:11 pm
Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:54 pm
JakeyLee wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:26 pm Op,
I can’t speak for most here, as my finances have been on auto-pilot for darn near 25 years. I retired less than two years ago. My days are filled with activities from sun-up to sun-down. I’m 52. I have time to hit the gym every day before noon, and then get to work on things I enjoy. I will say this.. while I employ the same basic index fund approach to my life; I still enjoy my cup of coffee every morning while I check the markets. Then I just sit here, and act on NONE of my feelings and emotions. It has served me well for close to 30 years.
JakeyLee,
interesting, can u share sample of your everyday schedule?

Actually my finance in the last 4 years has been passive bogleheads style, until the beginning of this year.

There’s this guru who is so smart and i admire, start posting weekly market update & options strategy.

Well turns out, July’s rally says that: even he, with extensive breakdown of macroeconomics, can’t consistently predict the direction of the market.
Neus,
Like many folks, I recognized that my career had become my identity. I was a problem solver, and managed a team of folks that dealt with high risk criminal investigations… all while actively managing a large budget, grants, contracts, etc.. I truly felt like everyone depended on me, and I couldn’t possibly let others down. My epiphany came when I realized (going into retirement) that I might have a lot of confidence, but I had very little self worth. How could I when I tied my entire identity to my profession? So to answer your question, here’s what I did:

I identified hobbies, projects, and building/improving relationships. I had to be purposeful with this, because I was also identifying who I was going to be the next 30 some odd years (God willing). I now plan meals and activities with friends and families (I have lots of calendar space). I’ve learned that I have a passion for cooking and planning meals, BBQ’s, etc.. I plan short day trips where I discover new things and places. I’ve discovered I actually enjoy long walks and hikes.

A few years ago forum member, Joe Retire, mentioned pickle ball. Now I play pickle ball at least twice a month. And while doing so, I’ve become friends with a couple of my new neighbors. I never have a problem filling my day or calendar. But the difference is, I’m now in control of said calendar.

I’ve heard it said that “boring people are bored in retirement”. I’m not entirely sure that’s a fair depiction of some of us. Quite frankly I had become institutionalized during the 3 decades of my career. I had to make specific and actionable changes to my life upon entering retirement. But once I let go of the work mindset, it was like a dam bursting of activity, projects , and dare I say.. self discovery.

By the way, retirement may not be for you. Not right now, anyway. That’s okay. But the best piece of advice I received (right on this forum) is start figuring out the life you want to live before you pull the plug, and start building that now. It’s much easier transition to the life you have, than transitioning to a life of the unknown.

I can’t offer much in advice to your investment question. This might be the wrong place for advice on experts who time the market. I will reiterate that a simple two fund portfolio has served me well for now 30 years. I have no doubt that it will continue to do so.
JakeyLee,
Thank you for sharing your experience
Thanks for mentioning projects and improving relationship
i can do projects, and improving relationship is a reminder than relationship doesn’t improve itself and can always be improved.

your quote is beautiful.
I do have a plan of the life i want to live (a grandoise one), but sometimes reality says that human can only plan, especially if the plan involves other people’s approval :(

It’s a recent realization, so i’m currently building another plan of the life i want next, one that doesn’t require some people’s approval
Last edited by Neus on Wed Aug 03, 2022 7:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

sureshoe wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 2:13 pm
Neus wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 9:20 am I’m seriously considering financial planner/private wealth management as a way to fill my time, and make extra money.

I’m just not sure if the hours are flexible, and whether or not i can start independent practise without first join a large corporate division
I'd rely on a real CFP and not some message board goof (like me). I don't think you need to go work for American Express Financial Planning, but getting a start without being associated with a real CFP is hard (if not totally impossible/illegal).

The hours are absolutely flexible, but in the beginning, you're probably scrambling to find initial clients. No CFP is going to hand you a fat portfolio and say "manage this", because he/she would have already done all the hard work and now they're just milking the cow.

If you go this way, post your journey - I think it would be interesting.
Sureshoe,
Got it, will check more into this
What matters the most for me is the flexible hours (I currently have 3 extra hours/day that i don’t know what to do, but felt guilty if used on gaming), so it seems viable so far.
Thanks!
User avatar
22twain
Posts: 3327
Joined: Thu May 10, 2012 5:42 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by 22twain »

Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:48 pm Travel is expensive, especially nowadays, fight tickets are crazy. So international travel/luxury domestic travel totaled 3 weeks/year is what i can afford for now.

these 3 weeks also doesn’t count occasional visit to parents (another 3 weeks/year) and small trip to nearby towns.
I’m not sure if these trips are counted at trips or not by bogleheads standard.
Some people equate travel with luxury resorts and/or other expensive destinations, and with flying. Most of my travel is by car, ranging from day-trips to nearby cities and events to 2-3 week road trips to other parts of the US. I usually organize these trips around hobby conventions or other similar events, with lots of sightseeing along the way.

The last time I flew for one of these trips was six years ago, to the west coast of the US. At the beginning of 2020 I was seriously considering a hobby-related group tour in Europe, anchored on a trade show in Berlin in fall 2020. Then Covid happened, and everything was canceled.
It's "IRMAA" (Income Related Monthly Adjustment Amount), not "IIRMA" or "IRRMA" or "IRMMA".
Topic Author
Neus
Posts: 426
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:12 am
Location: a Developing country in Asia with Low Cost of Living and Tax Treaty with USA

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Neus »

22twain wrote: Thu Aug 04, 2022 12:23 am
Neus wrote: Tue Aug 02, 2022 11:48 pm Travel is expensive, especially nowadays, fight tickets are crazy. So international travel/luxury domestic travel totaled 3 weeks/year is what i can afford for now.

these 3 weeks also doesn’t count occasional visit to parents (another 3 weeks/year) and small trip to nearby towns.
I’m not sure if these trips are counted at trips or not by bogleheads standard.
Some people equate travel with luxury resorts and/or other expensive destinations, and with flying. Most of my travel is by car, ranging from day-trips to nearby cities and events to 2-3 week road trips to other parts of the US. I usually organize these trips around hobby conventions or other similar events, with lots of sightseeing along the way.

The last time I flew for one of these trips was six years ago, to the west coast of the US. At the beginning of 2020 I was seriously considering a hobby-related group tour in Europe, anchored on a trade show in Berlin in fall 2020. Then Covid happened, and everything was canceled.
Ah. if so, i normally travel 5-6 weeks/year then, travel less in covid too
lillycat
Posts: 163
Joined: Mon Aug 10, 2020 11:26 am

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by lillycat »

Oh my. I can relate to OPs post. And as an extrovert, I think it’s worse for us.

In a nutshell, my financial plan was to create passive income via owner financed real estate.
I buy the asset, and sell on owner finance terms for up to 30 years of payments.
I’ve been doing that for almost 15? years It is working! Good ROIs. Occasional blips, but that is to be expected.
I still do deals now and then but my professional endeavors have slowed down a lot.
And COVID also shut down some networking options that have since gone away for good.

I think many of the activities posters have mentioned are more solo activities.
As an extrovert, I feel lost and isolated without human contact on a regular basis. Sigh.
Yes, I am married, but DH comes home mentally worn out from work, (He loves his job overall btw)
We have mostly quiet evenings at home eating simple meals.
So I too get bored siting in our beautiful home, surrounded by our fur babies.
I am now listening to the ROOMBA vacuum the floor.
Please don’t hate me, but I also believe in sharing abundance.
We have a weekly housekeeper and this job helps to support her and her family.
Yes, it’s a first world problem, I know.

I do competitive dog sports, therapy dog visits, go to the gym, and lunch with my busy working friends when they have time, etc.
But some days, like today, I still feel a bit stir crazy and isolated!
Looks like my passive income plan may have worked too well?
lws
Posts: 501
Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2017 6:12 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by lws »

Live life to the fullest and cherish every moment as it comes.
Hobbies, entertainment, volunteering, community involvement, and more.
User avatar
JoeRetire
Posts: 13315
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2018 2:44 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by JoeRetire »

lillycat wrote: Fri Aug 05, 2022 8:43 am So I too get bored siting in our beautiful home, surrounded by our fur babies.
I am now listening to the ROOMBA vacuum the floor.

I do competitive dog sports, therapy dog visits, go to the gym, and lunch with my busy working friends when they have time, etc.
But some days, like today, I still feel a bit stir crazy and isolated!
So do something else!
This is gonna be my time. Time to taste the fruits and let the juices drip down my chin. I proclaim this: The Summer of George!
lillycat
Posts: 163
Joined: Mon Aug 10, 2020 11:26 am

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by lillycat »

JoeRetire wrote: Sat Aug 06, 2022 5:58 pm
lillycat wrote: Fri Aug 05, 2022 8:43 am So I too get bored siting in our beautiful home, surrounded by our fur babies.
I am now listening to the ROOMBA vacuum the floor.

I do competitive dog sports, therapy dog visits, go to the gym, and lunch with my busy working friends when they have time, etc.
But some days, like today, I still feel a bit stir crazy and isolated!
So do something else!
DONE! That’s why you read my post. ;-)
TXWill
Posts: 41
Joined: Wed Apr 09, 2014 1:08 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by TXWill »

I travel. :D
Pyramid44
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2021 8:27 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by Pyramid44 »

Sounds like you need a “job”.

My spouse and I were offered the chance to “retire” at the end of 2020 due to downturn in business for our employers. (Take retirement by the end of the year with X weeks of additional pay or get laid off with nothing). We took the hint and retired.

We are both musicians who hadn’t done anything serious with our own playing in decades. We switched from being woodwind players to piano (me) and drums (spouse). We signed up with EDX for music classes at Berkelee in Boston. Music theory was lots of fun.

We became more active in a local 501c(3) that supports music education an now run their jazz club that has live audience and does live streaming. (There is a core group of 8 that make it work). At lot of the local musicians who teach on the side have seen an increase in adults taking up music for the first time. Pick an instrument you think is fun and dive in. There are plenty of gently used instruments floating around.

We are also providing care for our remaining parent and closing out the estate of another parent. I would like a year off from dealing with various government agencies, insurance companies, medical institutions, and financial institutions that require reams of repetitive paperwork done their way. The whole process made even more stretched out due to closed offices during covid. (Yes, this was even with a trust and beneficiary set up; no probate).

We take 2-3 day mini trips (mostly trailer camping) midweek to various placed we never had time to visit while working and maintaining an on-call schedule with our employers. This gets us to places during more quiet times than the jammed up weekends.

Take a class. On line systems like EDX, Coursera (sp) etc provide free to cheap ways to learn something new without becoming committed to finishing a structured program. Our local parks and rec district has just gone back to starting in person classes for various hobbies.

I have also been able to finish all kinds of projects around our house instead of doing “just enough” to keep things going.

We have reached out to long time friends that we haven’t connected with in a while. Plenty of fellow travelers in the encouraged retirement programs.

Try anything new to you. If you enjoy it, keep on going. If you don’t like it, try yet another thing new to you.
Choose happiness.
quantAndHold
Posts: 7597
Joined: Thu Sep 17, 2015 10:39 pm

Re: People who has FIRE + Stay the course, how to deal with boredom?

Post by quantAndHold »

The first year or so I was retired, I did a lot of reading and spreadsheets to figure out how best to manage my financial life. Since then, though, my financial life has been on autopilot.

I play a lot of sports and volunteer. I can’t say boredom is an issue.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.
Post Reply