Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Zhuang
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by Zhuang »

OP,
We just bought a new car with $32,000 cash. GO FOR it! Don't over think. Life is too short! Enjoy it! :happy
Marseille07
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by Marseille07 »

3of10 wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 6:03 pm Timelord, I was in the same predicament as you. After I became FI, it turned into a mental situation. DW has been driving old used cars her entire life. When she needed to replace her car in 2019, the light bulb came on. I told her we have sacrificed enough, and that I was getting her a new car of her choice.
I don't think you need to hold back replacing an old car. That's just cost of living.

Budgeting is necessary when you're replacing a 5-year old car or getting a 3rd car. This is where need vs want comes into the picture.
Last edited by Marseille07 on Mon Apr 04, 2022 11:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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langelgjm
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by langelgjm »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 7:37 am I must say the most amazing posts to me in this thread are the one's that assume me (OP) needs charity therapy because implicit in these posts are two assumptions. First to upgrade the car one buys is an unnecessary material act, second that the person buying the car isn't currently making donations or sharing with others. These are awfully big assumptions when you don't know the price of the car or the upgrades, the amount of the assets the person has beyond being sufficient for the purchase and anything about the persons current or past charitable giving. The only thing I can figure out is that for some reason some of the folks here assume that if someone is having difficulty spend on themselves they have difficulty giving to charity and that by giving to charity it will teach them how to part with their money. It is a really curious line of reasoning to me.
Upgrading the car is clearly an unnecessary act, that's not assumption, it's a fact. No one needs an upgraded car. An upgrade in this context, practically by definition, means going above and beyond necessity.

Your second point may be correct, though. Reminds me of Bogle who gave away half his salary but still brought PB&J with him to work for lunch. It was enough for him.

Good luck.
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TheTimeLord
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by TheTimeLord »

langelgjm wrote: Mon Apr 04, 2022 3:19 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 7:37 am I must say the most amazing posts to me in this thread are the one's that assume me (OP) needs charity therapy because implicit in these posts are two assumptions. First to upgrade the car one buys is an unnecessary material act, second that the person buying the car isn't currently making donations or sharing with others. These are awfully big assumptions when you don't know the price of the car or the upgrades, the amount of the assets the person has beyond being sufficient for the purchase and anything about the persons current or past charitable giving. The only thing I can figure out is that for some reason some of the folks here assume that if someone is having difficulty spend on themselves they have difficulty giving to charity and that by giving to charity it will teach them how to part with their money. It is a really curious line of reasoning to me.
Upgrading the car is clearly an unnecessary act, that's not assumption, it's a fact. No one needs an upgraded car. An upgrade in this context, practically by definition, means going above and beyond necessity.

Your second point may be correct, though. Reminds me of Bogle who gave away half his salary but still brought PB&J with him to work for lunch. It was enough for him.

Good luck.
I am not sure if it was my brain or spellcheck but it should have said "unnecessarily material act" not "unnecessary" implying it was frivolous which is a judgement. If you get strict enough virtually nothing we do or purchase in life is necessary.
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Tamahome
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by Tamahome »

When people are trying to get out of debt, they have buckets. Use this bucket for your living expenses. Use that bucket for emergency fund. Use the other bucket for your debt.

You need a spending bucket. Budget an amount to spend. Put it in that account. Your penalty for not enjoying it is the ever decreasing value due to inflation. That way, however, you can be comfortable that this is the appropriate allocated amount to spend, and it is ok to spend it. When it builds up, you can get seat warmers, fancy sound systems, and a hat for your car if you want. Or go to dinner. Or buy a VR system as a cost effective (HA!) way to view some of the free VR museums.

Make a bucket.
I'm not a financial professional. Post is info only & not legal advice. No attorney-client relationship exists with reader. Scrutinize my ideas as if you spoke with a guy at a bar. I may be wrong.
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TheTimeLord
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by TheTimeLord »

Tamahome wrote: Tue Apr 05, 2022 11:56 am When people are trying to get out of debt, they have buckets. Use this bucket for your living expenses. Use that bucket for emergency fund. Use the other bucket for your debt.

You need a spending bucket. Budget an amount to spend. Put it in that account. Your penalty for not enjoying it is the ever decreasing value due to inflation. That way, however, you can be comfortable that this is the appropriate allocated amount to spend, and it is ok to spend it. When it builds up, you can get seat warmers, fancy sound systems, and a hat for your car if you want. Or go to dinner. Or buy a VR system as a cost effective (HA!) way to view some of the free VR museums.

Make a bucket.
I already have the money sitting in a Money Market fund with the express purpose of purchasing a new car.
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smitcat
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by smitcat »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 9:01 am
Joe_R95 wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 8:39 am I have a similar mindset, and a hard time spending money on things I want. It's caused me some regret over the years. I solve my issue by asking myself "Will I regret not getting this". If the answer is yes I buy it, if its no I don't.

I also like the Dave Ramsey quote "If burning the money in your backyard has no affect on your financial outcome don't worry about it". Or something like that.

For what it's worth I just went through this same situation while finding a replacement for my 13 year old truck as a daily driver. Spent a month or so weighing the options on the model I wanted, and ordered one that's about $20k over a base model. Third largest amount of money I've ever spent at one time, and the cost is a little more than I spend in a year normally. The sticker shock hurts, and hurt when I bought the truck but I deeply regretted not getting remote start, backup camera, and heated seats with the truck. I'll probably spend 10-20 years in my new ride. My butt and hands will be warm in the winter this go round, I'll be getting in to a warm car in a single trip, and I wont have to get out an look 5 times when hooking up a trailer. To me that's worth it.

So the question is does spending the extra money give you enough benefit that you will regret not getting it, or is it some bells and whistles you wouldn't use anyway?



Full Disclosure, I'm close if not at FI but still in my accumulation phase.
Along those lines, I have never owned a car anywhere near as long as I have owned my current car and the reason is I bought the exact car I wanted and I have enjoyed driving it everyday since without wishing I had got some feature I left off or even looking at new cars. So in many ways I have proven to myself getting what want is actually cheaper because I will keep it longer. Another funny part about this is the car I am looking at isn't a huge upgrade in level or cost to my current vehicle it but it was enough to roll the $10K digit one higher than what I was targeting/planning to spend. It is just such an odd and insignificant thing to get hung up on.
There is another person on this forum currently posting some thoughts, perhaps one of these would help out a bit....
"I have to admit some confusion on why people would save all their life with no intention to spend the fruits of their efforts."

"I am not talking about about people who indicate they are cutting it close. I am talking about the 50x, 100x and beyond cohort. Now maybe this is just a reflection of that fact I am making a concerted effort to start spending more on little luxuries while I can still enjoy them. If I hit FRA with roughly the same balance (inflation adjusted) I have today I hope I build my dream home in my dream location. My heirs will do fine when they liquidate it. But everyone is different."

"One of the reasons I have migrated to having Pre-SS, Post-SS and Unassigned accounts is to better understand what we can safely spend in our Go-Go years. Knowing I have a fully funded, Firecalc tested Post-SS account makes me more comfortable spending in my Pre-SS years."
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TheTimeLord
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by TheTimeLord »

smitcat wrote: Tue Apr 05, 2022 1:53 pm
TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 9:01 am
Joe_R95 wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 8:39 am I have a similar mindset, and a hard time spending money on things I want. It's caused me some regret over the years. I solve my issue by asking myself "Will I regret not getting this". If the answer is yes I buy it, if its no I don't.

I also like the Dave Ramsey quote "If burning the money in your backyard has no affect on your financial outcome don't worry about it". Or something like that.

For what it's worth I just went through this same situation while finding a replacement for my 13 year old truck as a daily driver. Spent a month or so weighing the options on the model I wanted, and ordered one that's about $20k over a base model. Third largest amount of money I've ever spent at one time, and the cost is a little more than I spend in a year normally. The sticker shock hurts, and hurt when I bought the truck but I deeply regretted not getting remote start, backup camera, and heated seats with the truck. I'll probably spend 10-20 years in my new ride. My butt and hands will be warm in the winter this go round, I'll be getting in to a warm car in a single trip, and I wont have to get out an look 5 times when hooking up a trailer. To me that's worth it.

So the question is does spending the extra money give you enough benefit that you will regret not getting it, or is it some bells and whistles you wouldn't use anyway?



Full Disclosure, I'm close if not at FI but still in my accumulation phase.
Along those lines, I have never owned a car anywhere near as long as I have owned my current car and the reason is I bought the exact car I wanted and I have enjoyed driving it everyday since without wishing I had got some feature I left off or even looking at new cars. So in many ways I have proven to myself getting what want is actually cheaper because I will keep it longer. Another funny part about this is the car I am looking at isn't a huge upgrade in level or cost to my current vehicle it but it was enough to roll the $10K digit one higher than what I was targeting/planning to spend. It is just such an odd and insignificant thing to get hung up on.
There is another person on this forum currently posting some thoughts, perhaps one of these would help out a bit....
"I have to admit some confusion on why people would save all their life with no intention to spend the fruits of their efforts."

"I am not talking about about people who indicate they are cutting it close. I am talking about the 50x, 100x and beyond cohort. Now maybe this is just a reflection of that fact I am making a concerted effort to start spending more on little luxuries while I can still enjoy them. If I hit FRA with roughly the same balance (inflation adjusted) I have today I hope I build my dream home in my dream location. My heirs will do fine when they liquidate it. But everyone is different."

"One of the reasons I have migrated to having Pre-SS, Post-SS and Unassigned accounts is to better understand what we can safely spend in our Go-Go years. Knowing I have a fully funded, Firecalc tested Post-SS account makes me more comfortable spending in my Pre-SS years."
Exactly why this is so frustrating, it goes against everything I have been working towards for years. Nothing to do with finances or the cost of the car, nothing to with me feeling it is okay to spend, it is basically like having the yips in golf. As I mentioned in a previous post, I am beginning to believe it has something to do with social dynamics and feeling like you fit in. You know, like a second grader would experience.
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AnnetteLouisan
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by AnnetteLouisan »

TheTimeLord wrote: Tue Apr 05, 2022 3:30 pm
smitcat wrote: Tue Apr 05, 2022 1:53 pm
TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 9:01 am
Joe_R95 wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 8:39 am I have a similar mindset, and a hard time spending money on things I want. It's caused me some regret over the years. I solve my issue by asking myself "Will I regret not getting this". If the answer is yes I buy it, if its no I don't.

I also like the Dave Ramsey quote "If burning the money in your backyard has no affect on your financial outcome don't worry about it". Or something like that.

For what it's worth I just went through this same situation while finding a replacement for my 13 year old truck as a daily driver. Spent a month or so weighing the options on the model I wanted, and ordered one that's about $20k over a base model. Third largest amount of money I've ever spent at one time, and the cost is a little more than I spend in a year normally. The sticker shock hurts, and hurt when I bought the truck but I deeply regretted not getting remote start, backup camera, and heated seats with the truck. I'll probably spend 10-20 years in my new ride. My butt and hands will be warm in the winter this go round, I'll be getting in to a warm car in a single trip, and I wont have to get out an look 5 times when hooking up a trailer. To me that's worth it.

So the question is does spending the extra money give you enough benefit that you will regret not getting it, or is it some bells and whistles you wouldn't use anyway?



Full Disclosure, I'm close if not at FI but still in my accumulation phase.
Along those lines, I have never owned a car anywhere near as long as I have owned my current car and the reason is I bought the exact car I wanted and I have enjoyed driving it everyday since without wishing I had got some feature I left off or even looking at new cars. So in many ways I have proven to myself getting what want is actually cheaper because I will keep it longer. Another funny part about this is the car I am looking at isn't a huge upgrade in level or cost to my current vehicle it but it was enough to roll the $10K digit one higher than what I was targeting/planning to spend. It is just such an odd and insignificant thing to get hung up on.
There is another person on this forum currently posting some thoughts, perhaps one of these would help out a bit....
"I have to admit some confusion on why people would save all their life with no intention to spend the fruits of their efforts."

"I am not talking about about people who indicate they are cutting it close. I am talking about the 50x, 100x and beyond cohort. Now maybe this is just a reflection of that fact I am making a concerted effort to start spending more on little luxuries while I can still enjoy them. If I hit FRA with roughly the same balance (inflation adjusted) I have today I hope I build my dream home in my dream location. My heirs will do fine when they liquidate it. But everyone is different."

"One of the reasons I have migrated to having Pre-SS, Post-SS and Unassigned accounts is to better understand what we can safely spend in our Go-Go years. Knowing I have a fully funded, Firecalc tested Post-SS account makes me more comfortable spending in my Pre-SS years."
Exactly why this is so frustrating, it goes against everything I have been working towards for years. Nothing to do with finances or the cost of the car, nothing to with me feeling it is okay to spend, it is basically like having the yips in golf. As I mentioned in a previous post, I am beginning to believe it has something to do with social dynamics and feeling like you fit in. You know, like a second grader would experience.
There was an article in the Washington Post a few months ago profiling billionaire Leon Cooperman. he’s frugal, he gives millions to charity, he goes and speaks to poor school kids, and he still looks to see what’s on sale at the grocery store when deciding what he and his wife will have for dinner, he says in the article. It was a very nice and humane portrayal - he knows who he is, he grew up poor and doesn’t feel pressured to spend. He lives near people who spend a lot and he likes them but thinks their spending is silly. The article specifically mentions that he doesn’t spend extra on his car.

Maybe someone can link the article. OP, you may find you’re in very good company.

Or maybe you ARE Leon …..
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swengineer
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by swengineer »

It's sometimes difficult to value the future perceived benefits/satisfaction/joy so you can compare it to the dollars you are contemplating spending now. I seem to be hardwired/conditioned to need to do that comparison when I spend.

One thing to consider that I haven't seen mentioned is to look at the total cost of ownership for the two trim levels. Does the higher trim level have additional safety systems that will have a lower insurance cost? Does it have a higher MPG rating? The cost difference over the long haul might not be as much as you especially if you keep vehicles for a long time.
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TheTimeLord
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by TheTimeLord »

AnnetteLouisan wrote: Tue Apr 05, 2022 8:31 pm
TheTimeLord wrote: Tue Apr 05, 2022 3:30 pm
smitcat wrote: Tue Apr 05, 2022 1:53 pm
TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 9:01 am
Joe_R95 wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 8:39 am I have a similar mindset, and a hard time spending money on things I want. It's caused me some regret over the years. I solve my issue by asking myself "Will I regret not getting this". If the answer is yes I buy it, if its no I don't.

I also like the Dave Ramsey quote "If burning the money in your backyard has no affect on your financial outcome don't worry about it". Or something like that.

For what it's worth I just went through this same situation while finding a replacement for my 13 year old truck as a daily driver. Spent a month or so weighing the options on the model I wanted, and ordered one that's about $20k over a base model. Third largest amount of money I've ever spent at one time, and the cost is a little more than I spend in a year normally. The sticker shock hurts, and hurt when I bought the truck but I deeply regretted not getting remote start, backup camera, and heated seats with the truck. I'll probably spend 10-20 years in my new ride. My butt and hands will be warm in the winter this go round, I'll be getting in to a warm car in a single trip, and I wont have to get out an look 5 times when hooking up a trailer. To me that's worth it.

So the question is does spending the extra money give you enough benefit that you will regret not getting it, or is it some bells and whistles you wouldn't use anyway?



Full Disclosure, I'm close if not at FI but still in my accumulation phase.
Along those lines, I have never owned a car anywhere near as long as I have owned my current car and the reason is I bought the exact car I wanted and I have enjoyed driving it everyday since without wishing I had got some feature I left off or even looking at new cars. So in many ways I have proven to myself getting what want is actually cheaper because I will keep it longer. Another funny part about this is the car I am looking at isn't a huge upgrade in level or cost to my current vehicle it but it was enough to roll the $10K digit one higher than what I was targeting/planning to spend. It is just such an odd and insignificant thing to get hung up on.
There is another person on this forum currently posting some thoughts, perhaps one of these would help out a bit....
"I have to admit some confusion on why people would save all their life with no intention to spend the fruits of their efforts."

"I am not talking about about people who indicate they are cutting it close. I am talking about the 50x, 100x and beyond cohort. Now maybe this is just a reflection of that fact I am making a concerted effort to start spending more on little luxuries while I can still enjoy them. If I hit FRA with roughly the same balance (inflation adjusted) I have today I hope I build my dream home in my dream location. My heirs will do fine when they liquidate it. But everyone is different."

"One of the reasons I have migrated to having Pre-SS, Post-SS and Unassigned accounts is to better understand what we can safely spend in our Go-Go years. Knowing I have a fully funded, Firecalc tested Post-SS account makes me more comfortable spending in my Pre-SS years."
Exactly why this is so frustrating, it goes against everything I have been working towards for years. Nothing to do with finances or the cost of the car, nothing to with me feeling it is okay to spend, it is basically like having the yips in golf. As I mentioned in a previous post, I am beginning to believe it has something to do with social dynamics and feeling like you fit in. You know, like a second grader would experience.
There was an article in the Washington Post a few months ago profiling billionaire Leon Cooperman. he’s frugal, he gives millions to charity, he goes and speaks to poor school kids, and he still looks to see what’s on sale at the grocery store when deciding what he and his wife will have for dinner, he says in the article. It was a very nice and humane portrayal - he knows who he is, he grew up poor and doesn’t feel pressured to spend. He lives near people who spend a lot and he likes them but thinks their spending is silly. Maybe someone can link the article. OP, you may find you’re in very good company.

Or maybe you ARE Leon …..
I am definitely no Leon Cooperman, I have seen him on TV several times. I am not worried about not fitting in because I am frugal we already have folks who fit that bill and they are fine. It doesn't seem my issue resonates in this community which is fine. We are all individuals with our own little quirks.
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TheTimeLord
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by TheTimeLord »

swengineer wrote: Tue Apr 05, 2022 8:51 pm It's sometimes difficult to value the future perceived benefits/satisfaction/joy so you can compare it to the dollars you are contemplating spending now. I seem to be hardwired/conditioned to need to do that comparison when I spend.

One thing to consider that I haven't seen mentioned is to look at the total cost of ownership for the two trim levels. Does the higher trim level have additional safety systems that will have a lower insurance cost? Does it have a higher MPG rating? The cost difference over the long haul might not be as much as you especially if you keep vehicles for a long time.
I would expect the model I want to have higher insurance premiums and probably slightly worse gas mileage depending on how I drive.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
3of10
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by 3of10 »

Marseille07 wrote: Mon Apr 04, 2022 12:19 am
3of10 wrote: Sun Apr 03, 2022 6:03 pm Timelord, I was in the same predicament as you. After I became FI, it turned into a mental situation. DW has been driving old used cars her entire life. When she needed to replace her car in 2019, the light bulb came on. I told her we have sacrificed enough, and that I was getting her a new car of her choice.
I don't think you need to hold back replacing an old car. That's just cost of living.

Budgeting is necessary when you're replacing a 5-year old car or getting a 3rd car. This is where need vs want comes into the picture.
Yes, I agree. For my situation, finances wasn't an issue. It was changing our way of dealing with cars, and purchasing something that was above our normally $$$ limit for them.
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Trism
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by Trism »

Image

It isn't easy.

Just 30 minutes ago I went to order a light fixture we'd picked out earlier this week, but the sale apparently ended and the price is now almost 20% more... so I decided to wait.

But thank you for the reminder. I'm going to order it anyway.
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by TheTimeLord »

dknightd wrote: Sat Apr 02, 2022 12:30 pm Run, You Clever Boy! Go buy the car you want! Before it is too late.
Following the wisdom that is the above post, I purchased a new car.
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KneeReplacementTutor
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by KneeReplacementTutor »

TheTimeLord wrote: Thu Mar 31, 2022 9:35 am Any advice on how best to start enjoying what we all work so hard to achieve?
None. It seems that many of the possessions, etc. I lusted after when I couldn't afford them, I no longer desire now that I can. The paradox of wanting what you can't have / not wanting what you can contributes to my experience of not spending even though I could.
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by Johndoefire65 »

I'm in FI because I learned how to not spend it :sharebeer
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by TheTimeLord »

KneeReplacementTutor wrote: Fri May 13, 2022 8:43 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Thu Mar 31, 2022 9:35 am Any advice on how best to start enjoying what we all work so hard to achieve?
None. It seems that many of the possessions, etc. I lusted after when I couldn't afford them, I no longer desire now that I can. The paradox of wanting what you can't have / not wanting what you can contributes to my experience of not spending even though I could.
The easiest things for me to enjoy have been clothes made of certain high tech fabrics. They make day to day life more comfortable. While expensive relative to alternates it isn't the same as buying a Lamborghini (which imho is a good thing).
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by KneeReplacementTutor »

TheTimeLord wrote: Fri May 13, 2022 8:48 am
KneeReplacementTutor wrote: Fri May 13, 2022 8:43 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Thu Mar 31, 2022 9:35 am Any advice on how best to start enjoying what we all work so hard to achieve?
None. It seems that many of the possessions, etc. I lusted after when I couldn't afford them, I no longer desire now that I can. The paradox of wanting what you can't have / not wanting what you can contributes to my experience of not spending even though I could.
The easiest things for me to enjoy have been clothes made of certain high tech fabrics. They make day to day life more comfortable. While expensive relative to alternates it isn't the same as buying a Lamborghini (which imho is a good thing).
I like that. Clothing seems to have come a long way. High tech fabrics feel and wear better than many previous fabrics. I do find myself splurging there as well. :thumbsup
dboeger1
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Re: Once you are FI how do you learn to spend it?

Post by dboeger1 »

One of the things that has helped me spend as I've gone up in net worth is focusing on certain spending that feels charity-adjacent. What I mean is that there are certain things that I feel good spending on because supporting the workers or business who provide those goods and services is good in my mind. The most obvious one is eating out. When I was growing up, I worked in my father's restaurants and would get to know all the staff. Although I never had a restaurant job outside of the family businesses, my siblings have depended on those kinds of jobs for years while figuring out their places in the adult world. Spending more and tipping generously at restaurants improves my experience while simultaneously helping out people in need who are working hard and in many cases don't have alternative options due to a lack of education, connections, etc.

It's not exclusive to low-wage workers, either. As an engineer, I value and admire technical work as well, and there are times when I consciously buy a certain product because I appreciate how well it's engineered and the amount of work that probably went into it from very smart people. I know it's not exactly charity at that point, but those people have families too, just like me, and it's not like I'm actively trying to keep my money away from those people. If I could dictate where my money went, I would want less of it to go to the super-wealthy executives, but I unfortunately don't have that power.

The way I see it, if I'm depending on publicly traded corporations and employees to fund my retirement, spending back into the economy is kind of a way of giving back and allowing some of that value to benefit others. Sure, I'm ultimately trying to keep more value for myself either way, and again, I'm not thrilled that most of that value is going to highly compensated executives, but people and companies buying the products I've worked on over the years is how I get paid and can afford to save and invest, so it doesn't seem fair to others for me to pinch pennies, especially when we're talking about getting valuable products and services in return. I don't expect anybody to cry me a river for getting to spend on luxuries, but I can at least feel like I'm supporting good work by honest people.

Another thing I've gotten more comfortable spending on is self-improvement, education, books, courses, tools, etc. Even if I never get a financial return from any of those things, they just help me feel like I'm living a fuller, better life, and they help me optimize certain processes in my life in a way I might not be able to do on my own using only free resources.
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