What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

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kvpmas
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by kvpmas »

I like the Pilot Vpen disposable, Fine in blue ink. Order by the box.

There is no hassle, but you get the good tactile response and line pressure variation.

I never worry about where I left them and I actually prefer the feel to other more expensive models I've tried.

This is a plastic outer so it is not built to impress, but I doubt Bogleheads are all that much impressed by "precious resin" anyway.
MarkBarb
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by MarkBarb »

I'm a Pilot Vanishing Point fan, but I hardly hand write anything anymore. I find that, when I do, using a wax stamp to seal the envelope always delights the recipient.
TXDoc21
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by TXDoc21 »

I enjoy vintage fountain pens. The history behind them is very interesting to me and it takes you back to a different era. They aren't all expensive either. There are a lot of great brands out there to choose from.
FireSekr
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by FireSekr »

I like taking handwritten notes during in person meetings. During a trip to New York a few years ago I stopped by the Lamy store thinking I’d get a 2000. They had a “limited edition” scala in a glacier blue color with a gold nib. The color was perfect for me, and I’ve been using that since.
This is the model: https://goldspot.com/products/lamy-scal ... al-edition
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Sandtrap
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by Sandtrap »

One of the most well thought out and presented courses in writing "American Cursive" by Sull
Available Amazon.
This is one of the "gold standard" courses on writing cursive in its degree of thoroughness.

It is a very thick stack of looseleaf pages that are hole punched and ready to put into a 3 ring binder.
Consists of sample pages and lesson practice pages.

Link to Amazon.com
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/098 ... UTF8&psc=1

Image
I practiced every day for 1 year, using this course.

The goal was to clean up my ancient 1800's "Palmer Business Script" as taught to me in the 50's with the occasional swatting of a yardstick on a wrist or body part. Or, loudly on the deeply etched face of an ink stained desk with wads of dried bubble gum stuck underneath it.

j :D
Last edited by Sandtrap on Mon Nov 22, 2021 10:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by Sandtrap »

Currently corresponding monthly in hopefully well thought out prose while putting fountain pen nib to fine paper to about 15 people around the world. At least one is a "boglehead". :D :D

Some of my fountain pens:
1941 Pelikan 400NN
1943 Parker Senior Duofold
1945 Parker 51
1947 Parker Vacumatic
1940 Skyline Eversharp
Namiki Falcons (several)
Pelikans (newer, several)
TWSBI's Diamond 580 ALR (several)
Lamy 2000

I tend to write with about 4-6 pens that fit my writing and so forth.
I also use several vintage restored typewriters.
PM me as you wish to correspond via snail mail.
j :D

Short article: "The Power of Writing By Hand".
https://www.artofmanliness.com/characte ... g-by-hand/

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https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/

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https://s-mail.proboards.com/forum
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Nicolas
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by Nicolas »

Franklin-Christoph, an American firm, makes fine pens too. (No affiliation). I have one of theirs: a Pocket 40 Fire & Ice (discontinued), it’s an eyedropper with a gold nib ground by the nibmeister Mike Masuyama AKA “Mike-It-Work”. http://mikeitwork.com/ Image
Image
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Jazztonight
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by Jazztonight »

Fountain Pens are an easy "collectible," probably because of their price (although there are jewel-encrusted and precious metal pens costing many thousands of dollars).

For me, it's always been about the writing and the "non-disposable" aspect of the pen. So I'm not personally in favor of disposable pens.

(But to each their own.)

If you are looking for a pen and browse the fountainpennetwork website, you will quickly be sucked down the vortex/rabbit hole. So, beware!

Here is an example of one of my favorite pens:
https://smile.amazon.com/PELIKAN-M400-F ... INSTRUMENT

Here's a lower priced model:
https://smile.amazon.com/Pelikan-M200-F ... UMENT&th=1

You can find these and similar pens at a variety of sources.
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BuddyJet
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by BuddyJet »

solaris17 wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 3:54 pm Jazztonight--I also enjoy writing with fountain pens. But I get annoyed when I get ink stains on my hands when refilling cartridges from ink bottles. Any recommendations for preventing that?
I use a 3ml syringe with a blunt tip needle. This gives me good control on filling. My biggest risk of getting ink on my fingers is from opening and closing the ink bottle.

https://www.amazon.com/Shintop-Dispensi ... 196&sr=8-3

Along with this, wearing gloves will prevent stains. I have a lifetime supply of gloves leftover from the early days of COVID.
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ResearchMed
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by ResearchMed »

Ages ago, I used to enjoy fountain pens, and even some really nice ball point pens. Some of those latter just had a very nice "feel" (balance?) to them.

And I wrote in neat, clearly readable cursive.

Now that I've spent "some" ( = too many!) years tap tap tapping away, my cursive has deteriorated very badly. Even my "signature" isn't really the same as it used to be. Alas, it's not the "scribble" type that isn't really meant to be legible. Mine is now just "sloppy". And I can't really fix it by trying to slow down. Hand coordination deteriorating from age, maybe?

So I just don't want to write by hand much anymore, and the cycle continues...

RM
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z91
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by z91 »

Since I originally posted the thread, I bought a Lamy 2000 and have been stupidly happy with it. I can't fathom spending any more than it. The nib is smooth as silk and the body construction is super solid, even though the material is light.

That said, I'd love to hear more about budget options as one thing the Lamy 2000 doesn't give me is variety :D
Rasputin13
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Rasputin13 »

The only pen anyone should every write with is a Mont Blanc.
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Sandtrap
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Sandtrap »

For those interested in restored vintage fountain pens (and new):

Peyton Street Pens.
https://www.peytonstreetpens.com/

D Nishimura Vintage Pens
https://www.vintagepens.com/vintage_pens_catalog.shtml

Parker 51 (for those dedicated to this classic unique pen).
https://parker51.com/

And, newer pens.
The Nibsmith. (will do custom nib tuning on pens they sell).
https://nibsmith.com/

j :D
(online pic)
Looks like Palmer Business Script with flourishes.
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hunoraut
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by hunoraut »

z91 wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 1:55 am Since I originally posted the thread, I bought a Lamy 2000 and have been stupidly happy with it. I can't fathom spending any more than it. The nib is smooth as silk and the body construction is super solid, even though the material is light.

That said, I'd love to hear more about budget options as one thing the Lamy 2000 doesn't give me is variety :D
waterman phileas, medium or fine tip. writes better than the lamy. though ive just learned its been discontinued but available as new old stock from some vendors.
Rasputin13 wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 7:50 am The only pen anyone should every write with is a Mont Blanc.
why?
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Nicolas
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Nicolas »

Sandtrap wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 2:00 pm For those interested in restored vintage fountain pens (and new):

Peyton Street Pens.
https://www.peytonstreetpens.com/
+1 for Peyton Street Pens. It’s where I got my 1930s celluloid lever-filler Waterman 32V fountain pen, black, extra fine flex nib. Flex nibs are great fun. They reconditioned it with a new sac. It was $155 in 2014. Great outfit. I’ve only inked it with Noodler’s bulletproof black.
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bertilak
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by bertilak »

I bought a TWSBI based on a recommendation on this (I think) forum. A 580 AL R model. It is very nice.

I do feel my handwriting is greatly outclassed by the pen!
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Sandtrap
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Sandtrap »

bertilak wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 3:30 pm I bought a TWSBI based on a recommendation on this (I think) forum. A 580 AL R model. It is very nice.

I do feel my handwriting is greatly outclassed by the pen!
+1
I've tried a boatload of various TWSBI's and the Diamond 580 ALR series is solid. If the nib feels wrong or scratchy, their factory return and full refund policy is excellent. A great one out of the box stays great. Trouble free and large ink capacity and outstanding value per dollar.
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Sandtrap
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Sandtrap »

z91 wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 1:55 am Since I originally posted the thread, I bought a Lamy 2000 and have been stupidly happy with it. I can't fathom spending any more than it. The nib is smooth as silk and the body construction is super solid, even though the material is light.

That said, I'd love to hear more about budget options as one thing the Lamy 2000 doesn't give me is variety :D
Also have a Lamy 2000.
Less spendy options.

Namiki Pilot f-EF soft flex nib variable line.
TWSBI Diamond 580 ALR

j🌺
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Lambert Strether
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Lambert Strether »

Worthwhile and inexpensive fountain pens include the Pilot Metropolitan, the TWSBI Eco, and the Lamy Safari or Al-Star. The TWSBI uses only bottled ink, which is the way to go if one is to bother with a fountain pen. The range of bottled inks vastly exceeds that of cartridges. Pilot Metropolitans and Lamys can take converters, which allow you to use bottled inks rather than be limited to cartridges.

The Pilot has the best nibs, particularly if your writing is small and you require a fine nib. But it is the smallest pen, and you may find that you prefer the somewhat larger TWSBI or a Lamy for longer writing sessions. A smaller pen has the advantage of easy fit in a shirt pocket.

Some people here have recommended Jet Pens, and my experiences with them have been good. For more expensive purchases, I have gone with Goulet Pens. Like, Jet, they have good information on their website about pens and inks. Paper is the third part of the equation, too, when it comes to fountain pens, as you will find out.

The best online information resource I know of that of the Fountain Pen Network.

I think it is best to start with a few inexpensive pens in different nib widths to figure out your preferences. Over time I went in the direction of the Pilot 823 (in medium and fine), and I use them a great deal. But they are too expensive to recommend for someone starting out, and I do not carry them around. For carrying I prefer my smaller Pelikan M200 or a TWSBI Eco. Incidentally, some people posting here mention the TWSBI 580; it, too, is a good pen, but it does not post, so I use mine less frequently.
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Nicolas »

Lambert Strether wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 7:19 pm Worthwhile and inexpensive fountain pens include the Pilot Metropolitan, the TWSBI Eco, and the Lamy Safari or Al-Star. The TWSBI uses only bottled ink, which is the way to go if one is to bother with a fountain pen. The range of bottled inks vastly exceeds that of cartridges. Pilot Metropolitans and Lamys can take converters, which allow you to use bottled inks rather than be limited to cartridges.

The Pilot has the best nibs, particularly if your writing is small and you require a fine nib. But it is the smallest pen, and you may find that you prefer the somewhat larger TWSBI or a Lamy for longer writing sessions. A smaller pen has the advantage of easy fit in a shirt pocket.

Some people here have recommended Jet Pens, and my experiences with them have been good. For more expensive purchases, I have gone with Goulet Pens. Like, Jet, they have good information on their website about pens and inks. Paper is the third part of the equation, too, when it comes to fountain pens, as you will find out.

The best online information resource I know of that of the Fountain Pen Network.

I think it is best to start with a few inexpensive pens in different nib widths to figure out your preferences. Over time I went in the direction of the Pilot 823 (in medium and fine), and I use them a great deal. But they are too expensive to recommend for someone starting out, and I do not carry them around. For carrying I prefer my smaller Pelikan M200 or a TWSBI Eco. Incidentally, some people posting here mention the TWSBI 580; it, too, is a good pen, but it does not post, so I use mine less frequently.
I prefer bottled ink but you can also fill empty cartridges from a bottle with a syringe. So if you have a pen that takes only cartridges you also have many ink options. But a piston, lever-filler, or eyedropper is more fun, and they usually hold more ink.

When I started using fountain pens many years ago I thought fine point nibs were best but over time I found that broad nibs were more to my liking as laying down a bold line is very satisfying. If you have a flex nib you have some of both.
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Lambert Strether »

Nicolas wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 9:21 pm
Lambert Strether wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 7:19 pm Worthwhile and inexpensive fountain pens include the Pilot Metropolitan, the TWSBI Eco, and the Lamy Safari or Al-Star. The TWSBI uses only bottled ink, which is the way to go if one is to bother with a fountain pen. The range of bottled inks vastly exceeds that of cartridges. Pilot Metropolitans and Lamys can take converters, which allow you to use bottled inks rather than be limited to cartridges.

The Pilot has the best nibs, particularly if your writing is small and you require a fine nib. But it is the smallest pen, and you may find that you prefer the somewhat larger TWSBI or a Lamy for longer writing sessions. A smaller pen has the advantage of easy fit in a shirt pocket.

Some people here have recommended Jet Pens, and my experiences with them have been good. For more expensive purchases, I have gone with Goulet Pens. Like, Jet, they have good information on their website about pens and inks. Paper is the third part of the equation, too, when it comes to fountain pens, as you will find out.

The best online information resource I know of that of the Fountain Pen Network.

I think it is best to start with a few inexpensive pens in different nib widths to figure out your preferences. Over time I went in the direction of the Pilot 823 (in medium and fine), and I use them a great deal. But they are too expensive to recommend for someone starting out, and I do not carry them around. For carrying I prefer my smaller Pelikan M200 or a TWSBI Eco. Incidentally, some people posting here mention the TWSBI 580; it, too, is a good pen, but it does not post, so I use mine less frequently.
I prefer bottled ink but you can also fill empty cartridges from a bottle with a syringe. So if you have a pen that takes only cartridges you also have many ink options. But a piston, lever-filler, or eyedropper is more fun, and they usually hold more ink.

When I started using fountain pens many years ago I thought fine point nibs were best but over time I found that broad nibs were more to my liking as laying down a bold line is very satisfying. If you have a flex nib you have some of both.
That’s very true about refilling cartridges with bottled ink. Most people start out preferring fine nibs for a couple of reasons. One is that copy paper can become unreadable when a wide nib deposits too much of a free-flowing ink. The other is that the ballpoint pens with which we learn require more pressure than do fountain pens. One of the main reasons I use a fountain pen is that I’ve always written with a light touch. I also like broad nibs, though for ordinary writing a medium works well. And then there is the matter of matching up the nib with an ink that suits it. That’s when it helps me to read ink reviews from the Fountain Pen Network.
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tooluser
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by tooluser »

kvpmas wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 8:51 pm I like the Pilot Vpen disposable, Fine in blue ink. Order by the box.
I am running low on pens and just ordered some of those today, though in black ink. A good way for me to start.

I don't think I need the instructive course. I can remember and visualize from 48 years ago what I'm supposed to put on the paper, including three-humped m's and a very large 2 for the capital Q, though my hands have never been able to duplicate what is in my mind. I learned good printing in college too. I need to slow down again to get it right, or at least better, and then speed back up as I gain more skill.
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by Sandtrap »

tooluser wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 10:46 pm
kvpmas wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 8:51 pm I like the Pilot Vpen disposable, Fine in blue ink. Order by the box.
I am running low on pens and just ordered some of those today, though in black ink. A good way for me to start.

I don't think I need the instructive course. I can remember and visualize from 48 years ago what I'm supposed to put on the paper, including three-humped m's and a very large 2 for the capital Q, though my hands have never been able to duplicate what is in my mind. I learned good printing in college too. I need to slow down again to get it right, or at least better, and then speed back up as I gain more skill.
Tips to recover or gain consistent legible cursive:
(Improve)
1
Available Amazon.com
“Sulls:American Cursive” course in a thick stack of loose leaves that you put into your own binder.
Follow the sequence and do 1 practice page per night/day.
Takes minutes.
Over time, muscle memory and mentation happens by itself and your cursive will be renewed and improved.
2
Correspondence via snail mail letters.
(Letters must be answered, mind and skillsets engaged.
3
Daily journaling.

j🌺
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ResearchMed
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by ResearchMed »

Sandtrap wrote: Sat Nov 27, 2021 10:16 am
tooluser wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 10:46 pm
kvpmas wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 8:51 pm I like the Pilot Vpen disposable, Fine in blue ink. Order by the box.
I am running low on pens and just ordered some of those today, though in black ink. A good way for me to start.

I don't think I need the instructive course. I can remember and visualize from 48 years ago what I'm supposed to put on the paper, including three-humped m's and a very large 2 for the capital Q, though my hands have never been able to duplicate what is in my mind. I learned good printing in college too. I need to slow down again to get it right, or at least better, and then speed back up as I gain more skill.
Tips to recover or gain consistent legible cursive:
(Improve)
1
Available Amazon.com
“Sulls:American Cursive” course in a thick stack of loose leaves that you put into your own binder.
Follow the sequence and do 1 practice page per night/day.
Takes minutes.
Over time, muscle memory and mentation happens by itself and your cursive will be renewed and improved.
2
Correspondence via snail mail letters.
(Letters must be answered, mind and skillsets engaged.
3
Daily journaling.

j🌺
Hmmm.... is this "Sull: American Cursive" really something useful for Geezers (or wannabe Geezers!) who have simply been "only tap-tap-tapping" for so long that the handwriting quality has faded away? And not for those wanting to start learning cursive?
I'm assuming there might also have been some fine muscle, er, deterioration, if for no other reason than lack of use for so long.

Do you know how it compares to his
"The Art of Cursive Penmanship: A Personal Handwriting Program for Adults Spiral-bound – Illustrated, July 3, 2018"

The former is apparently for "grades 5 - adult" (per Amazon summary).

RM
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Sandtrap
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by Sandtrap »

ResearchMed wrote: Sat Nov 27, 2021 11:14 am
Sandtrap wrote: Sat Nov 27, 2021 10:16 am
tooluser wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 10:46 pm
kvpmas wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 8:51 pm I like the Pilot Vpen disposable, Fine in blue ink. Order by the box.
I am running low on pens and just ordered some of those today, though in black ink. A good way for me to start.

I don't think I need the instructive course. I can remember and visualize from 48 years ago what I'm supposed to put on the paper, including three-humped m's and a very large 2 for the capital Q, though my hands have never been able to duplicate what is in my mind. I learned good printing in college too. I need to slow down again to get it right, or at least better, and then speed back up as I gain more skill.
Tips to recover or gain consistent legible cursive:
(Improve)
1
Available Amazon.com
“Sulls:American Cursive” course in a thick stack of loose leaves that you put into your own binder.
Follow the sequence and do 1 practice page per night/day.
Takes minutes.
Over time, muscle memory and mentation happens by itself and your cursive will be renewed and improved.
2
Correspondence via snail mail letters.
(Letters must be answered, mind and skillsets engaged.
3
Daily journaling.

j🌺
Hmmm.... is this "Sull: American Cursive" really something useful for Geezers (or wannabe Geezers!) who have simply been "only tap-tap-tapping" for so long that the handwriting quality has faded away? And not for those wanting to start learning cursive?
I'm assuming there might also have been some fine muscle, er, deterioration, if for no other reason than lack of use for so long.

Do you know how it compares to his
"The Art of Cursive Penmanship: A Personal Handwriting Program for Adults Spiral-bound – Illustrated, July 3, 2018"

The former is apparently for "grades 5 - adult" (per Amazon summary).

RM
I've tried most of the books and cursive courses available to buy, over the many years.
There is no comparison IMHO in completeness and effectiveness and simplicity.
This course fits any "hand" and cleans up what one already has and/or fills in the gaps of what is missing.
The looseleaf stack is available on Amazon.com and other places online, (google) for less.
https://smile.amazon.com/American-Cursi ... =ABIS_BOOK
As for deterioration: with cognitive decline and an addled brain and loss of concentration, as well as arthritic fingers/hands, I think I manage a fairly descent (yes. . descent). . . Palmer Business Script as invented in the 1800's and taught in the finest disciplinarian parochial schools in the 1950's.

The Sull's folder course teaches American Cursive which is quite simple and very easy compared to Palmer and Spencerian. It is effective, leggibles, and easy to write and form letters and words, even for the most "Geezered" of Geezers and Geese.

But, one has to be consistently motivated for at least a few minutes a day over months, or years if one is a very very old Geezer or an unmotivated young'un.

j :D
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Dan S.
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Dan S. »

Hello,

I enjoy fountain pens as a writer and collector. I use one everyday. I would suggest a good starter pen is a Pilot Metropolitan. They are inexpensive and reliable. They can be filled with a cartridge or from a converter to use bottled ink. I used a Pilot Metro but eventually shifted to vintage pens. An excellent choice for vintage pens, in my opinion, is a Parker 45. They were in production for over forty years. They are plentiful, reliable and inexpensive. Another under rated pen is the Esterbrook J series. They are attractive, plentiful and well built. They have easily interchanged nibs. Good luck in your search.
AlwaysLearningMore
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by AlwaysLearningMore »

Sandtrap wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 10:53 pm Currently corresponding monthly in hopefully well thought out prose while putting fountain pen nib to fine paper to about 15 people around the world. At least one is a "boglehead". :D :D

Some of my fountain pens:
1941 Pelikan 400NN
1943 Parker Senior Duofold
1945 Parker 51
1947 Parker Vacumatic
1940 Skyline Eversharp
Namiki Falcons (several)
Pelikans (newer, several)
TWSBI's Diamond 580 ALR (several)
Lamy 2000

I tend to write with about 4-6 pens that fit my writing and so forth.
I also use several vintage restored typewriters.
PM me as you wish to correspond via snail mail.
j :D

Short article: "The Power of Writing By Hand".
https://www.artofmanliness.com/characte ... g-by-hand/

Fountain Pen Network Forum
https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/

Snail Mail Forum
https://s-mail.proboards.com/forum
Your post inspired me to find my fountain pen collection (first ones purchased in the 1980s). My late father had a Pelikan on his desk, and I recall the distinct color even today. Wrote out all my holiday cards today using one the the "old reliable" Cross fountain pens today (after cleansing the nib -- hadn't been used in years.) I purchased this one after seeing one of my mentors write with one, and it performed better than my Waterman.
Now have to try and gently clean the nib of a Montblanc with the all-gold plated nib (crafted long before the nibs went to mostly rhodium).

Thank you for the trip down memory lane.
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mrsbetsy
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by mrsbetsy »

The pen is important, but the paper is also just as important.

I'm an educational therapist and I teach cursive to students with dysgraphia. I start them off with just a Pilot fountain pen, but I use a Lamy. Once they have mastered cursive, I buy them a Lamy as a reward, which they love!

These pens are so important because students must slow down enough so they can get the ink flowing at a consistent pace.

Some of the papers have a subtle dot pattern that helps the writer without being distracting.

https://www.jetpens.com/blog/The-Best-F ... iderations

Beware! Trying out different fountain pens/papers can become a bit of an obsession.
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Sandtrap
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Re: What fountain pen(s) should I buy?

Post by Sandtrap »

mrsbetsy wrote: Sun Nov 28, 2021 11:37 am The pen is important, but the paper is also just as important.

I'm an educational therapist and I teach cursive to students with dysgraphia. I start them off with just a Pilot fountain pen, but I use a Lamy. Once they have mastered cursive, I buy them a Lamy as a reward, which they love!

These pens are so important because students must slow down enough so they can get the ink flowing at a consistent pace.

Some of the papers have a subtle dot pattern that helps the writer without being distracting.

https://www.jetpens.com/blog/The-Best-F ... iderations

Beware! Trying out different fountain pens/papers can become a bit of an obsession.
Great points.
Well said

My “go to” after many years is either Rhodia lined or dotted. I notice that lined Rhodia has a wider line spacing than dotted. Half or full sheets.
Rhodia is perfect for fountain pens especially fine to EF nibs.

j🌺
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tooluser
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Re: Fountain Pen Users

Post by tooluser »

Sandtrap wrote: Sat Nov 27, 2021 10:16 am
tooluser wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 10:46 pm
kvpmas wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 8:51 pm I like the Pilot Vpen disposable, Fine in blue ink. Order by the box.
I am running low on pens and just ordered some of those today, though in black ink. A good way for me to start.

I don't think I need the instructive course. I can remember and visualize from 48 years ago what I'm supposed to put on the paper, including three-humped m's and a very large 2 for the capital Q, though my hands have never been able to duplicate what is in my mind. I learned good printing in college too. I need to slow down again to get it right, or at least better, and then speed back up as I gain more skill.
Tips to recover or gain consistent legible cursive:
(Improve)
1
Available Amazon.com
“Sulls:American Cursive” course in a thick stack of loose leaves that you put into your own binder.
Follow the sequence and do 1 practice page per night/day.
Takes minutes.
Over time, muscle memory and mentation happens by itself and your cursive will be renewed and improved.
2
Correspondence via snail mail letters.
(Letters must be answered, mind and skillsets engaged.
3
Daily journaling.

j🌺
I received the Pilot Vpens today and tried one out. Pretty good. I will have to practice keeping track of which way the nib is pointing. I have bookmarked the Sulls course, but will likely not have time for it until after I retire.

In the try-out of the new pens, I was supremely aware of when I was rushing, and it makes a noticeable difference in the penmanship. This is from years of rushing to complete sentences while my thoughts, and/or the thoughts of the speaker I am taking notes on, hurried to completion.
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