Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

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Jay Dee
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Jay Dee »

I'm an air gunner. You can shoot in low breeze at 50 to even a hundred yards. Roughly dime-quarter size groups at 50. Youtube or search for the forums chatting about stuff

The guns (and associated PCP air filling) aren't always cheap but you can get cheap to to high end gear with inexpensive pellets. But it can be a very addicting hobby in search of the holy grail.

[OT comment removed by admin LadyGeek]
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Shackleton
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Shackleton »

tm3 wrote: Fri Nov 05, 2021 8:07 am
csmath wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 10:32 pm
cashboy wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 7:49 pm some very good advice in this thread, so no need to repeat it but i will add this:

remember this mantra anytime you come close to firearms (yours or others)

safety first

safety first

safety first

it will serve you well.
And the two most important rules:
  1. All guns are loaded.
  2. Never point at anything you aren't willing to kill or destroy.
Excellent.

I will add that the very first firearm safety course I took also stressed

1) Never accept a firearm from someone unless the action is open and you can see that it is empty

2) Never hand a firearm to someone without opening the action so that they can see that it is empty
I have attended many firearms training classes, and the three basic safety rules I was taught are:

1. Treat every gun as a loaded gun
2. Never let the muzzle cover anything you don’t want to shoot
3. Finger is off the trigger unless your front sight is on the target

Additional rule (corallary of number 2 above) is: always know what is behind or beyond your target.
“Superhuman effort isn't worth a damn unless it achieves results.” ~Ernest Shackleton
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bertilak
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by bertilak »

I found skeet shooting quite enjoyable, although it's been a number of years.

It is a skill that can be cultivated.

It is on my list of things to do in retirement but I just haven't got around to it yet.
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rockstar
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by rockstar »

I joined a gun club. They taught me gun safety and maintenance before I could join the club. I also had to clean the range a few times to get membership as well. Your other alternative is to join the military.
Colorado Guy
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Colorado Guy »

fishmonger wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 10:05 am Each year I find a different hobby or task to take on, something that I've been interested in or wanted to learn. This year I'd like to learn how to shoot - not only for sport, but possibly to hunt next fall.
While there are lots of excellent responses to your query, stressing safety and training, I will make the counter argument that you should not consider this as your next hobby. To become competent, or even just less of a danger to those around you, takes a considerable amount of time and experience. If you are expecting to learn this hobby and then move onto a different hobby (guitar, stand up paddleboards, whatever) next year, this is not the sport for you to learn. It takes years to become proficient, and it is not a skill that can be mastered in a "hobby of the year" format.

If this is the new "hobby of the year" approach, you could invest in a weapon, take a class, shoot a few times, and then think you are ready to do something. I disagree. The gun will probably go back into a safe, to be pulled out for the infrequent range time, or to go hunting. One of the things I am most fearful of while I am hunting is someone who gets "buck fever" while hunting and takes a shot at movement (which could be me). I have had guns pointed at me before, and it is not a pleasant experience. I have a relative who was marginally into guns, treating guns as a hobby, show me his pistols once, with one of them in a box with other guns, loaded and cocked, stored on a shelf in a closet. That relative also was cleaning a weapon in their home with another person and accidentally shot the rifle, with the bullet going through several walls of the house. That put his entire family in the potential target zone.

Do you have a group of friends who are also hunters who can help guide you on your learning adventure? Are you going to invest the time required to become and stay competent? Do you go hiking all summer in huntable areas to scout out the terrain and animals? Have you ever considered how much work it is to harvest an elk and carry it out of an area for 3 miles or more?

For your next hobby, consider base jumping and wingsuit flying. At least for these, you are risking your own life, and not others. Unless you are willing to make a lifetime commitment for gun safety, this is not for you.

Apologies for being harsh. I sincerely do not believe "hobby of the year" is a suitable approach for gun safety.

FYI, I have been around guns and hunting for the last 50 years.
MattB
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by MattB »

The advice others have provided is all very reasonable, taking classes before purchasing guns, etc.

I'll add that if you find the classroom work engaging, you might (and should) purchase active hearing protection before going to the range. Gunfire is loud. Shooting will destroy your hearing over time. And you'll also find taking instructions at the range can be difficult with some ear protection.

3m makes active hearing protection under the Peltor name that protect your ears while also allowing you to hear instructions and warnings from an instructor. (Peltor: https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/c/ppe/com ... al-safety/). I shot some as a kid and used regular ear muffs over foamies at the range. Could never hear my dad talking until he yelled at me. I shot several thousand rounds a day (military) and would use peltors + foamies at the range and peltors (alone) on deployment. So much better.

I'm sure there are other brands that sell similar hearing protection.
Last edited by MattB on Fri Nov 05, 2021 1:30 pm, edited 2 times in total.
palaheel
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by palaheel »

What about US Concealed Carry Association courses? How do they compare to the NRA ones?
Nothing to say, really.
MattB
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by MattB »

Colorado Guy wrote: Fri Nov 05, 2021 11:40 am
fishmonger wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 10:05 am Each year I find a different hobby or task to take on, something that I've been interested in or wanted to learn. This year I'd like to learn how to shoot - not only for sport, but possibly to hunt next fall.
While there are lots of excellent responses to your query, stressing safety and training, I will make the counter argument that you should not consider this as your next hobby. To become competent, or even just less of a danger to those around you, takes a considerable amount of time and experience. If you are expecting to learn this hobby and then move onto a different hobby (guitar, stand up paddleboards, whatever) next year, this is not the sport for you to learn. It takes years to become proficient, and it is not a skill that can be mastered in a "hobby of the year" format.

If this is the new "hobby of the year" approach, you could invest in a weapon, take a class, shoot a few times, and then think you are ready to do something. I disagree. The gun will probably go back into a safe, to be pulled out for the infrequent range time, or to go hunting. One of the things I am most fearful of while I am hunting is someone who gets "buck fever" while hunting and takes a shot at movement (which could be me). I have had guns pointed at me before, and it is not a pleasant experience. I have a relative who was marginally into guns, treating guns as a hobby, show me his pistols once, with one of them in a box with other guns, loaded and cocked, stored on a shelf in a closet. That relative also was cleaning a weapon in their home with another person and accidentally shot the rifle, with the bullet going through several walls of the house. That put his entire family in the potential target zone.

Do you have a group of friends who are also hunters who can help guide you on your learning adventure? Are you going to invest the time required to become and stay competent? Do you go hiking all summer in huntable areas to scout out the terrain and animals? Have you ever considered how much work it is to harvest an elk and carry it out of an area for 3 miles or more?

For your next hobby, consider base jumping and wingsuit flying. At least for these, you are risking your own life, and not others. Unless you are willing to make a lifetime commitment for gun safety, this is not for you.

Apologies for being harsh. I sincerely do not believe "hobby of the year" is a suitable approach for gun safety.

FYI, I have been around guns and hunting for the last 50 years.
Yes and no. A simple counter to this argument is that everyone including the OP would benefit from greater familiarity with firearms. And a two week hunters' safety course can and will provided greater familiarity with firearms than many people with otherwise have in their life.

[Political comment removed by moderator oldcomputerguy]
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vanbogle59
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by vanbogle59 »

Colorado Guy wrote: Fri Nov 05, 2021 11:40 am It takes years to become proficient, and it is not a skill that can be mastered in a "hobby of the year" format.
I share some of your concerns. But I wouldn't go this far.
I'm not sure what you are including in "proficient", but it certainly doesn't take years to become "safe".
That's just a matter of some training, and good decision making.

FWIW, back in the dark ages, I went to a Jesuit high school that had a rifle team. The range was in the basement of the rectory. Students could regularly be seen carrying their weapons from, to and around school. It was NOT a military school. Safety was never a concern.
And this was a bunch of ID10T teenagers!

Safety is a matter of basic knowledge and a lot of culture. I'm not even sure extra training adds to safety. It would have to be a special kind of training (not just shooting practice), and I've never seen any stats. Anecdotally, the few gun yahoos I've known were all VERY experienced. They just laughed at safety culture.

P.S. I wonder if anyone reading this can identify my HS. I'm pretty sure I have provided enough info. :D
Last edited by vanbogle59 on Fri Nov 05, 2021 12:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Colorado Guy
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Colorado Guy »

vanbogle59 wrote: Fri Nov 05, 2021 12:10 pm I share some of your concerns. But I wouldn't go this far.
I'm not sure what you are including in "proficient", but it certainly doesn't take years to become "safe".
That's just a matter of some training, and good decision making.
What provoked my response was the "hobby of the year" approach to guns and hunting, which scares me. I have seen too many people pick up a gun and put their finger on the trigger as part of their grip, even those who should know better. Apologies, my response was a visceral reaction.

While it may not take years to become safe, it does take constant vigilance. Every time I pick up a weapon (which is daily), I am reminded of this.
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vanbogle59
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by vanbogle59 »

Colorado Guy wrote: Fri Nov 05, 2021 12:20 pm
vanbogle59 wrote: Fri Nov 05, 2021 12:10 pm I share some of your concerns. But I wouldn't go this far.
I'm not sure what you are including in "proficient", but it certainly doesn't take years to become "safe".
That's just a matter of some training, and good decision making.
What provoked my response was the "hobby of the year" approach to guns and hunting, which scares me. I have seen too many people pick up a gun and put their finger on the trigger as part of their grip, even those who should know better. Apologies, my response was a visceral reaction.

While it may not take years to become safe, it does take constant vigilance. Every time I pick up a weapon (which is daily), I am reminded of this.
I believe we are in the same camp.
A few years ago, just after first grandbaby arrived, DIL asked me if she should get a gun for home protection. You know, to protect the baby.
We had a weeks-long conversation about what she should commit to for that to make sense. Eventually, she just forgot about it.
Baby is 6 now. DIL still hasn't even been to a gun range. All good.
Yooper
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Yooper »

TN_Boy wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 4:58 pm
RedDog wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 12:15 pm At some point, you may want to consider reloading your own ammunition. It’s an interesting hobby in itself and can be economical to boot.
Reloading is fun, but I don't think it costs out for most people unless they are shooting quite a bit. And there is a definite learning curve.
It's a terrible time to get into reloading. I'm still in a state of shock at witnessing an 8lb container of H4831SC going for $855 last night on GunBroker. Which didn't include $116 for shipping/handling and then state tax. I keep telling myself, "They must have gotten caught up in the excitement of the auction".
Last edited by Yooper on Fri Nov 05, 2021 1:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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oldcomputerguy
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by oldcomputerguy »

The discussion seems to be drifting away from the OP's question and into some off-topic and political directions. Let's bring it back to the original question: recommendations on learning to shoot. Thanks.
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bottlecap
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by bottlecap »

I agree that taking a class at a local range is an excellent first step. You can also prepare yourself by reading a book or two in advance of the class. The class will also likely address local laws, which is helpful if you live in a restrictive state.

You need to find a class or classes that teach you safety, mechanics, and gun care/cleaning, in that order.

Safety is number one. You cannot underestimate it. Luckily it is easy to learn. But you need abide by it in practice, all the time, no exceptions. You can't get a fired bullet back!

Now for the fun stuff. Assuming you will be hunting with a rifle, one of the best ways is to start out with a bolt action 22 rifle. 22lr is getting more expensive, but is also getting a little easier to find and is far less expensive than center-fire ammunition. But everything you learn directly translates to bigger calibers (except the kick!).

After class(es), I would look for a local competition. National Rifle League's NRL22 is a great way to learn. The competition is friendly, they highly emphasize safety, and they will often loan you a rifle and gear until you are ready to buy your own. This will give you some time to figure out the setup you want before you buy. Don't wait until you feel "good enough" for competition - you're first shoot will teach you a ton, even if you were a seasoned shooter. As long as you can be safe, sign up and do it!

The most important thing this will teach you is how to use an optic at different ranges. That will be a necessary skill for hunting. Some of the 22 rifles you can buy use the same platform as center-fire hunting rifles. If you get one of those, you can expect a smoother transition to your "big" rifle. But the mounting optics, calculating ballistics, ranging targets, and everything else is very similar.

You can get a decent 22lr setup (rifle and optic) for under $1,000, although like everything else, finding what you want takes some time in today's day and age.

Good luck!

JT
Independent George
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Independent George »

For a beginner, I would recommend starting with an NRA Basic Pistol or Basic Rifle course. Rifle is preferred, because shooting a rifle is way, way easier than a pistol and you will learn much more quickly, but depending on where you live it's probably easier to find a pistol course. The course materials are genuinely great, and covers the basics on how to safely operate and handle your firearm - I count it as essential for anyone starting the hobby.

For a first gun, I will echo the Ruger 10/22 recommendation. It's cheap enough (typically $200-$300) that it's not a huge sunk cost in case you lose interest later on, it's popular enough that accessories are ubiquitous and servicing is easy, and .22 LR is cheap to run even in an ammo shortage. I know the OP mentioned hunting & sport, but the skills you learn on a 10/22 will translate to shotguns and hunting calibers, for a fraction of the cost. I would never recommend a shotgun to a newbie.

After that, I'd recommend finding a range that rents out different guns before spending a lot. It will also give you a better idea of what kind of shooting you enjoy the most.
jayjayc
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by jayjayc »

Once you start shopping for a new firearm, you should visit a gun range that rents guns to test drive them. Please note that nearly every gun range has 2 rules. In order to rent a gun, you must:

1. Bring your own gun
or
2. Bring a friend

These rules are safeguards against suicide attempts.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Sandtrap »

You need hearing protection that also allows you to hear the RSO/RO (range officer, instructor commands, etc) clearly.
. . . . What?
I said. . . . You need hearing protection that also allows you to hear the RSO/RO (range officer, instructor commands, etc) clearly.

Like this one: Peltor Tac Pro
You need hearing protection that also a ... clearly.
And replace the lousy factory sealing rings with gel rings so they are more comfy and seal more sound.
Like this: Peltor Gel Rings.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00 ... UTF8&psc=1

If you really value your hearing: wear these under your Peltor Tac Pro muffs.
Hearos Extreme Protection Ear Plugs, (you will still be able to hear the RSO.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00 ... UTF8&psc=1
Wear these and not the cheap foam ones.

Othewise, you will end up hard of hearing, especially in indoor ranges. . . what?. . .

If you decide to give up target shooting, you can use the above hearing protection in your home shop or when mowing the lawn or when weedeating.

The above based only on past NRA Bullseye competition matches where you absolutely must here the buzzer and the RO.
I don't hunt so don't know about the application of the above for that.
j :D
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MadHungarian
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by MadHungarian »

csmath wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 5:56 pm
TierArtz wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 4:28 pm Safety first - take firearm handling and hunter safety courses.

As for shooting, consider starting as many mid-western kids do: With an air-rifle. Midwayusa.com has a wide selection: https://www.midwayusa.com/air-rifles/br ... &cid=23173 That assumes, of course, that you have a yard to practice in and shooting is allowed where you live. I personally only buy air-rifles made in the USA, Germany, Sweden, or England. Those cost a few multiples of a good firearm hunting rifle. Air-rifles are not technically firearms and the best are used in international competitions (in AZ and UT). The most powerful can be used to take large game, such as Elk, depending on state laws.
Airguns are a reasonable suggestion and they are nothing like how most adults remember them. PCP was a game changer. However, regarding the part I highlighted in red above, Illinois would like a word with you. https://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/i ... ActID=1657
"Firearm" means any device, by whatever name known, which is designed to expel a projectile or projectiles by the action of an explosion, expansion of gas or escape of gas; excluding, however:
(1) any pneumatic gun, spring gun, paint ball gun, or B-B gun which expels a single globular projectile not exceeding .18 inch in diameter or which has a maximum muzzle velocity of less than 700 feet per second;
To be clear, in Illinois, A .50 caliber PCP air rifle shooting at 699 fps capable of taking down an elephant or buffalo... not a firearm. A .22 caliber spring powered rifle shooting at 710 fps... firearm. No further comment.
Colonel Sebastian Moran (from Sherlock Holmes) would be delighted with this!
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dual
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Post by dual »

There have been several mentions of hearing protection. What about using suppressors? I know there are a lot of arcane laws and regulations but apparently they can be used in some states.


Are suppressors at all commonly used or is it too big of a hassle?
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TierArtz
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by TierArtz »

Obtaining a suppressor would be way too much hassle and expense for the average beginner - perhaps $1K each, plus $200 tax.

I'm planning on getting a NFA Gun Trust and using that to expand my list of accessories and firearms; it will allow me to legally leave suppressors to my kids.
Independent George
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Independent George »

TierArtz wrote: Tue Nov 23, 2021 11:30 pm Obtaining a suppressor would be way too much hassle and expense for the average beginner - perhaps $1K each, plus $200 tax.

I'm planning on getting a NFA Gun Trust and using that to expand my list of accessories and firearms; it will allow me to legally leave suppressors to my kids.
Besides the cost, it also requires registering it with the ATF, and approval can take from six to eleven months.

Also, unless you're using subsonic ammunition, a long gun may still be loud enough to cause hearing damage. I've shot suppressed before, and I still wear earplugs. The main advantage is that I don't have to double-up with earmuffs (which I normally do when shooting rifles).
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dual
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Post by dual »

how about air guns for lower noise?

this website says they can be pretty noisy.


https://airgunplanet.com/how-loud-are-airguns/
fyre4ce
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by fyre4ce »

One piece of advice I didn't see mentioned is to pay careful attention to how the weapons are stored. There are risks that need to be managed if you intend to store the weapon in your home. If you have children, that raises the risk level enormously - the type of risk depends on the age of the children. Even if not, there's always a risk with any visitors in the home. There's also the risk of a break-in and your weapon being stolen, and/or used against you. Handguns are usually preferred for committing crimes and so will be a higher value for theft. But they aren't necessarily better than long guns for hunting and home defense (arguably - I'm sure some gun enthusiasts will be riled by this statement) so if you don't intend to carry the weapon outside the home, I would lean toward long guns. Tying this back to financial issues, if you were negligent in leaving a weapon unsecured and it was stolen and used to commit a crime, you could be the target of a lawsuit.

If you keep the weapon for home defense, among other things, consider the type of ammunition that will be kept loaded. The higher penetration from FMJ rounds, rifle rounds, shotgun slugs, and even heavier sizes of buckshot can penetrate walls. Hollow-point or other deforming rounds, and smaller sizes of buckshot are probably a better choice if you have people living in other rooms in your home, or live in an apartment building, etc.

One final piece of advice is to shoot regularly. Definitely gain the book knowledge needed to handle a gun safely (eg. different weapons have different style safeties) but you need to build and maintain the tacit skills of loading, handling, and firing a weapon safely if you ever need to use it. Having a gun without the skill level necessary to use it safely will certainly put you at a greater hazard than not having it at all.
Last edited by fyre4ce on Wed Nov 24, 2021 7:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by oldcomputerguy »

Some posts discussing making a home-made silencer / suppressor were removed. While ownership of guns and learning about gun safety is on-topic as a consumer issue, "do-it-yourself" experimentation with guns and gun add-ons is off-topic as well as being dangerous. As noted above, please center replies on the OP's original question, ie learning to shoot guns.
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Rasputin13 »

Someone here said something about a firearms safety course. I couldn't agree more with that. I had been handling guns for a few years when I took a course. I learned a lot. Also, if it's a good course, they'll have different guns for you to try out. That's a good way to see what you like. Also, a lot of gun ranges allow you to rent weapons. I have found some guns I really liked and later purchased by doing that. But respect the weapon. Take your time to learn how to use it properly, then you'll be busting caps in no time.
tm3
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by tm3 »

There are a lot of misconceptions about airguns, probably stemming from the reasoning that if they "use air they have to be quiet."

Here is the best analysis I have seen re airgun noise, based on measurements from a sound engineer using pro level equipment, not some yo-yo on YouTube sitting in his back yard with an iPhone app:

https://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2009/03 ... asurement/

which explains that the "impulse sound" is what matters.

From another source:

The key rule to always remember is that the effect of
shots is cumulative, meaning the greater the number of
impulse noises your ears are exposed to one after another,
the greater the danger to your hearing.


This source goes on to say that for an airgun with an impulse sound level of 119dB and an ear located 1m from the muzzle wearing hearing protection with 24dB attenuation that damage won't occur unless firing over 1,000,000 shots per day.

For a shotgun or 9mm pistol, it's 250 shots per day. For a 7.5mm rifle, 30 shots per day.

IMO hearing is precious and best to play it safe.
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Independent George »

I assumed everyone already knew this, but based on the description of the removed posts, Firearms Safety Rule #0 bears some repeating:

KNOW THE RELEVANT LAWS ON ALL THINGS FIREARMS BEFORE DOING ANYTHING.

Seriously. There are a LOT of ways to end up in federally subsidized housing by accident with firearms, and avoiding that starts with knowing the law. State statutes may have more stringent restrictions past Federal. Start with Google.
deikel
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by deikel »

1moreyr wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 4:53 pm
conservativeinvestor wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 11:13 am This is the worst time to get into shooting you could have picked. Ammo is expensive and incredibly hard to find. The good news is for hunting you won't need many rounds, a box to get your chosen firearm sighted in and a box for hunting should be all you need. Some hunters can make a single box of ammo last for a few years worth of hunting trips.
Ammo is getting to be more available, i just found my mom 1000 rounds of 38 special for her revolver. it is twice the price of 2 years ago but available. truth be told , the price was the lowest in the last decade prior to covid. a lot of people felt they needed firearms in that time frame. (not going there). $25 per box of 50 is high for 9mm vs $10/box it was but so it everything else we are buying lately.

ammo has always been variable based on the political climate. when the price comes down "buy it cheap and stack it deep!" for times like this.
if you are in a state that will allow shipments to your home , there are plenty of online shippers. nor real deals however, PM me if all else fails.

I am 58 and find more pleasure in handguns now. As my eyes go to progressive lenses I can't do rifles without a scope. As most of my rifles are collectable military rifles from WWII, it would be a crime to mount a scope and ruin their originality.

i find revolvers fun for people new to the sport. it is more intuitive as you can see the parts turn.

As a complete ignorant when it comes to guns.....why would anyone need 1000 rounds for a revolver every two years ? A revolver can hold 5, 6 (8?) rounds a piece and you need to pull the trigger a thousand times and reload 150 times....does that not cause carpal tunnel or something ?

Serious question though, when you have a day at the range, how many rounds can you do a day - do you do to train/stay sharp ?

Just to gauge what a day at the range would cost....
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by 1moreyr »

deikel wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 10:03 am
1moreyr wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 4:53 pm
conservativeinvestor wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 11:13 am This is the worst time to get into shooting you could have picked. Ammo is expensive and incredibly hard to find. The good news is for hunting you won't need many rounds, a box to get your chosen firearm sighted in and a box for hunting should be all you need. Some hunters can make a single box of ammo last for a few years worth of hunting trips.
Ammo is getting to be more available, i just found my mom 1000 rounds of 38 special for her revolver. it is twice the price of 2 years ago but available. truth be told , the price was the lowest in the last decade prior to covid. a lot of people felt they needed firearms in that time frame. (not going there). $25 per box of 50 is high for 9mm vs $10/box it was but so it everything else we are buying lately.

ammo has always been variable based on the political climate. when the price comes down "buy it cheap and stack it deep!" for times like this.
if you are in a state that will allow shipments to your home , there are plenty of online shippers. nor real deals however, PM me if all else fails.

I am 58 and find more pleasure in handguns now. As my eyes go to progressive lenses I can't do rifles without a scope. As most of my rifles are collectable military rifles from WWII, it would be a crime to mount a scope and ruin their originality.

i find revolvers fun for people new to the sport. it is more intuitive as you can see the parts turn.

As a complete ignorant when it comes to guns.....why would anyone need 1000 rounds for a revolver every two years ? A revolver can hold 5, 6 (8?) rounds a piece and you need to pull the trigger a thousand times and reload 150 times....does that not cause carpal tunnel or something ?

Serious question though, when you have a day at the range, how many rounds can you do a day - do you do to train/stay sharp ?

Just to gauge what a day at the range would cost....
The answer is it depends, I used to go weekly and shoot 100 to 150 rounds in an outing. The cost at the time was $12/box for 40 caliber which is what i shot from my glock. I would probably shoot 50 rounds from some old pistol that hadn't been out of the safe (9mm) and 75-100 with the glock to maintain accuracy. Granted , i could have gotten away with a box of 50 but I enjoy the range and $36 for 3 boxes in an hour isn't bad. Those are not the prices today. I go now and shoot a box or maybe 2 and i no longer go every week as 2 boxes become a $50 day quickly

Granted if you shot the revolver one box a week 1000 rounds could last 20 weeks. every other week 40 weeks, once a month etc...
One thing to know is when you buy online and have it shipped there is some economy of scale on shipping to order 1000 rounds as it's one case of 20.


. It's like asking how often do i have to play golf to be good? I will never be good, it doesn't mean I don't enjoy an occasional trip. On average if I wanted to stay proficient, i would shoot a box a month. That is however after coming up a learning curve of probably 500 over 8 weeks or so to learn your firearm and practice practice practice

Just my .02
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Sandtrap
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Sandtrap »

deikel wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 10:03 am
1moreyr wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 4:53 pm
conservativeinvestor wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 11:13 am This is the worst time to get into shooting you could have picked. Ammo is expensive and incredibly hard to find. The good news is for hunting you won't need many rounds, a box to get your chosen firearm sighted in and a box for hunting should be all you need. Some hunters can make a single box of ammo last for a few years worth of hunting trips.
Ammo is getting to be more available, i just found my mom 1000 rounds of 38 special for her revolver. it is twice the price of 2 years ago but available. truth be told , the price was the lowest in the last decade prior to covid. a lot of people felt they needed firearms in that time frame. (not going there). $25 per box of 50 is high for 9mm vs $10/box it was but so it everything else we are buying lately.

ammo has always been variable based on the political climate. when the price comes down "buy it cheap and stack it deep!" for times like this.
if you are in a state that will allow shipments to your home , there are plenty of online shippers. nor real deals however, PM me if all else fails.

I am 58 and find more pleasure in handguns now. As my eyes go to progressive lenses I can't do rifles without a scope. As most of my rifles are collectable military rifles from WWII, it would be a crime to mount a scope and ruin their originality.

i find revolvers fun for people new to the sport. it is more intuitive as you can see the parts turn.

As a complete ignorant when it comes to guns.....why would anyone need 1000 rounds for a revolver every two years ? A revolver can hold 5, 6 (8?) rounds a piece and you need to pull the trigger a thousand times and reload 150 times....does that not cause carpal tunnel or something ?

Serious question though, when you have a day at the range, how many rounds can you do a day - do you do to train/stay sharp ?

Just to gauge what a day at the range would cost....
Highly variable.

"A long time ago in a land far away. . . " (aka: when I was young/no longer shoot), I practiced with LEO groups as well as those in IDPA and IPSC and NRA Bullseye competition groups. It was very common to "burn through" 2-300 rounds in a practice session. Depending on the setup and number of stages, and IPSC match (one match of 5 stages) might go through up to 300 rounds. The IDPA and PPSC and Bullseye matches are usually much less with the later the least. Whether semi auto or revolver, the round counts are still high.

However, for casual practice, you're correct, there's likely not anywhere near the round counts as what I mention above.
And, for "hunting" (oustide the scope of "revolver" which this posts addresses), I don't know as I have no experience in it.

"Staying sharp" varies per person but, safety protocols and accuracy and all that are "perishable skills" and usually, those that assume that practice is not needed to reinforce those habits, are incorrect.
"Staying sharp" for what. . . is the "elephant in the room" question.
IE: A "master class" level person in IPSC will go through a boatload of ammo to practice through the year, especially before matches.

If a revolver person practiced 50 rounds once a month for 2 years, (or 25 rounds 2x/mo) that would be about 1200 rounds.

Likely why, most very experienced competition people I have known do a lot of practice with .22 rimfire to keep costs down, reload, etc, etc. It can get pricey.
Of course, this likely does not apply to "a beginner".

Here's a YouTube video montage of Jerry Miculek practicing and competing.
(to give an idea of the number or rounds used).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyIq9FdTgwM
j :D
Last edited by Sandtrap on Wed Nov 24, 2021 10:38 am, edited 4 times in total.
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TN_Boy
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by TN_Boy »

deikel wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 10:03 am
1moreyr wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 4:53 pm
conservativeinvestor wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 11:13 am This is the worst time to get into shooting you could have picked. Ammo is expensive and incredibly hard to find. The good news is for hunting you won't need many rounds, a box to get your chosen firearm sighted in and a box for hunting should be all you need. Some hunters can make a single box of ammo last for a few years worth of hunting trips.
Ammo is getting to be more available, i just found my mom 1000 rounds of 38 special for her revolver. it is twice the price of 2 years ago but available. truth be told , the price was the lowest in the last decade prior to covid. a lot of people felt they needed firearms in that time frame. (not going there). $25 per box of 50 is high for 9mm vs $10/box it was but so it everything else we are buying lately.

ammo has always been variable based on the political climate. when the price comes down "buy it cheap and stack it deep!" for times like this.
if you are in a state that will allow shipments to your home , there are plenty of online shippers. nor real deals however, PM me if all else fails.

I am 58 and find more pleasure in handguns now. As my eyes go to progressive lenses I can't do rifles without a scope. As most of my rifles are collectable military rifles from WWII, it would be a crime to mount a scope and ruin their originality.

i find revolvers fun for people new to the sport. it is more intuitive as you can see the parts turn.

As a complete ignorant when it comes to guns.....why would anyone need 1000 rounds for a revolver every two years ? A revolver can hold 5, 6 (8?) rounds a piece and you need to pull the trigger a thousand times and reload 150 times....does that not cause carpal tunnel or something ?

Serious question though, when you have a day at the range, how many rounds can you do a day - do you do to train/stay sharp ?

Just to gauge what a day at the range would cost....
I used to shoot competitively. I went through almost 10,000 rounds a year. The reason was to ..... get better .... so that I might win matches. That is also why I might have hundreds of rounds in the house at any given moment. I would, for example, buy .22 ammo in bulk. Because it was cheaper that way. And convenience. I didn't want to run to a store every few days for ammo. If I shot a match one weekend, then had a short practice (less than a full match) on a weekday, then another match the next weekend, I would shoot over 600 rounds in one week.

If that sounds like a lot -- and it does to people who know nothing about shooting -- consider a teenager trying to get better at shooting free throws in basketball. A dedicated kid might easily shoot hundreds of free throws in a week. Because they want to get better ....

Incidentally, most people find semi-auto pistols a lot easier to shoot than revolvers. I'd not recommend revolvers for beginners myself for that reason, but tastes differ. The competitions I shot in, like almost all pistol competitions today, use semi-autos.

Carpel tunnel, that's pretty funny.
Independent George
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by Independent George »

deikel wrote: Wed Nov 24, 2021 10:03 am As a complete ignorant when it comes to guns.....why would anyone need 1000 rounds for a revolver every two years ? A revolver can hold 5, 6 (8?) rounds a piece and you need to pull the trigger a thousand times and reload 150 times....does that not cause carpal tunnel or something ?

Serious question though, when you have a day at the range, how many rounds can you do a day - do you do to train/stay sharp ?

Just to gauge what a day at the range would cost....
My typical range session usually runs through about 200+ rounds in an hour. I haven't been to the range since covid, but back when I was shooting regularly, a 1,000 round brick might last 3-4 months. It takes a lot of practice to become proficient with a pistol.
jstert
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Re: Shooting Beginner - Where to Start?

Post by jstert »

start with proper instruction and a 22lr rifle or handgun.
any 22lr firearm allows plenty of easy, inexpensive and necessary practice.
a 22lr rifle is a gateway to https://appleseedinfo.org/programs/, which is a useful venue for learning.
please responsibly enjoy and cherish an enumerated, constitutional, unalienable right that is baked into our nation’s history.
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