Battery powered weed Wacker

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BashDash
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Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by BashDash »

Hi all,
My worx trimmer/edger just stopped working after 6 or 7 years. ( It's not just a battery issue). I was contemplating buying another of the same model as I was happy with the usage for my small yard although I wish it would have lasted longer.

I am contemplating buying a DeWalt trimmer for the sole purpose of getting another battery with it for my 18v power drill. ( I believe there's an adapter that will let 20v work with it).

Has anyone used a DeWalt trimmer or have a better idea? It seems buying a DeWalt battery on its own for the drill is not cost effective.

Would love any thoughts or suggestions? Thanks!
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snackdog
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by snackdog »

I have a Ryobi 40v that is a champ. It whacks weeds up to 2 feet tall. I have an attachment for heavier bushes as well. It is really strong and runs for a long time; about as long as I care to drag it around. Highly recommended.
jebmke
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by jebmke »

I've been using an Ego 56V trimmer for a couple of years. Had a gave powered brush cutter (metal blade) but hardly ever use now.

Here is a thread from last year

viewtopic.php?t=322011
Last edited by jebmke on Sat Sep 11, 2021 11:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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livesoft
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by livesoft »

I've used a lot of Dewalt battery-power tools doing trail maintenance and they are great, but for home use I have Ryobi 40V motor with a string trimmer attachment and a hedge clipper attachment. They work fine. My neighbor even prefers to use my system instead of the system that his spouse bought for him. I use the string trimmer on St Augustine and the hedge clippers on Yaupon holly. I like that the battery will last longer than my body can hold out.
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SnowBog
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by SnowBog »

I use an Ego as well, been very happy with it.

But keep in mind what other cordless yard tools you have and/or want to have. Much like small cordless tools (like screwdrivers), the batteries can be used across many tools. Not all manufacturers make all tools (or make them well), so that might guide your decision.
Normchad
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by Normchad »

If you’ve already got a bunch of DeWalt stuff, then it makes a lot of sense to go with DeWalt here if the batteries are compatible. I’m general DeWalt makes good stuff.

Personally, I’ve got Makita for the outdoor stuff,(weed wacker, hedge trimmer, blower) and couldn’t be happier with it. I also have a Makita impact driver with compatible batteries.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by Sandtrap »

BashDash wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 11:06 am Hi all,
My worx trimmer/edger just stopped working after 6 or 7 years. ( It's not just a battery issue). I was contemplating buying another of the same model as I was happy with the usage for my small yard although I wish it would have lasted longer.

I am contemplating buying a DeWalt trimmer for the sole purpose of getting another battery with it for my 18v power drill. ( I believe there's an adapter that will let 20v work with it).

Has anyone used a DeWalt trimmer or have a better idea? It seems buying a DeWalt battery on its own for the drill is not cost effective.

Would love any thoughts or suggestions? Thanks!
We have the Dewalt 60V (flexvolt batteries are expensive) straight shaft trimmer. The stock line feed head is terrible and has a reputation for constantly jamming and being difficult to open up and re string. Fortunately, there are better line feed heads you can put on (echo) and also solid aluminum heads (we use .155 line with a center cable, manual feed strips), and also the Grass Gator steel swivel triple blade head (caution, boots, chaps, etc).
We have 20 acres with cross fencing, a long street cul de sac, and outbuildings that get weed eated and most of it is not lawn grass but tough brush and thistle and so forth. The Dewalt trimmer is powerful enough to handle all of the above head attachments and do the job. Our other weedeater is a very stout straight shaft Echo 25cc. Over time, we've found the Dewalt 60V well worth the price (pricey) and much more trouble free than the Echo gas trimmer.
We've had other electric trimmers and they died early deaths for what we use them for. Either batteries give out after awhile getting weaker and weaker and lasting not as long, or the build quality was not as tough as the Dewalt.
The batteries are very pricey. We bought 4 of them and have all of them charged up. But, again, our use is not a typical homeowner.
This morning, I put in about 2 hours to clear 3 foot high thistle from our front driveway drainage swale as well as the cul de sac end of the street drainage swales. Took only 1 battery and didn't run out.
On a small yard, this trimmer will do a great job in a fraction of the time of other trimmers. The speed of the head spin and torque is in a whole nuther class with the 60v system.

I hope this helps.
PM me as you wish.
Here's the link to the better replacement bump feed head.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00 ... UTF8&psc=1
But, like all auto feed heads, the largest line is still pretty small compared to the manual feed plate. It takes up to .090 line according to the manual but I've threaded .095 Husqvarna (Titanium Force) line through it.
j
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Topic Author
BashDash
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by BashDash »

Thanks sandtrap! Is there a adapter for 60v to my 18v drill? 60v might be too much power for my uses. Thanks for the detailed response! I read most of your posts unrelated to any issues my house is having just so I can learn!
Jeep4Life
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by Jeep4Life »

OP, two things: One suggestion would be to check Consumer Reports for their write-up, they liked the Ego and Echo brands. Second would be to upgrade your drill to use the 60V system SandTrap recommends, that would be my first option BTW.
SnowBog
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by SnowBog »

BashDash wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 12:55 pm Thanks sandtrap! Is there a adapter for 60v to my 18v drill? 60v might be too much power for my uses. Thanks for the detailed response! I read most of your posts unrelated to any issues my house is having just so I can learn!
Even if there was, you wouldn't want to do it... It takes more energy to run larger lawn tools than it does a cordless drill. Using an undersized battery seems a sure fire way to be disappointed...
Jeep4Life wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 1:02 pm ... would be to upgrade your drill to use the 60V system SandTrap recommends, that would be my first option BTW.
If you want to converge batteries, Jeep4Life has it right.

That said, I personally don't try to mix small tools/batteries with large tools/batteries. If you are loyal to a particular brand, there may be things like hybrid charges that can deal with any of their batteries.
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bottlecap
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by bottlecap »

18 volts is pretty light weight for a weed wacker. I imagine you'll want to go at least 40v.
michaelingp
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by michaelingp »

Another vote here for EGO. It's a great tool, but a lot of our love is because we really, really love their leaf blower, so we can share batteries.
Dude2
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by Dude2 »

Recently did research and bought some additional Ryobi batteries for my 3 devices (blower, hedge trimmer, weed eater). I was surprised to see so many reviews, especially on Amazon, that were saying not to buy off-brand imitations for batteries and chargers. You can easily save 50% or more going down that road (and these batteries/chargers are not cheap). There's just no way to know if the non-brand-name products have the same smarts in them to maintain health, e.g. it detects charge levels and stops when it should. The "Jim-Bob" version of the products look identical, and the specs are cut and paste from the OEM. However, many reviewers say don't risk it. I went with the name brand at the big box store versus Amazon and have had no trouble.
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surfinagin
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by surfinagin »

Ego brand is made by Chervon. Skil is also a Chervon product, and cheaper FWIW.
I recently bought a Skil dual line bump-feed 20V trimmer (new product) that I've been pleased with so far.
Has 4.0Ah Lithium-Ion Battery and Charger, lots of power/2 speeds, brushless motor, and a "Twist Load" head that makes loading string EZ.
Recommended.
brianH
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by brianH »

bottlecap wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 2:51 pm 18 volts is pretty light weight for a weed wacker. I imagine you'll want to go at least 40v.
This is pretty much just marketing. 18v, 20v, 40v, they all use the same 18650 or newer 21700 cells. The Milwaukee 18v lineup is just as powerful as Dewalt's '40v' offering. What matters is the watts (volts*amps) actually delivered to the motor, and the type/quality of the motor itself.

The 20v vs 18v is probably the best marking lie ever created. The batteries are exactly the same, 5 18650 cells, but most brands are honest and use the nominal voltage of the cells (3.6v) and Dewalt creatively uses the max voltage (4v). Deceptive, but brilliant. I'm sure that made them tons of money from people thinking 20>18.
Lacrocious
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by Lacrocious »

I've been happy with our Ryobi 18v trimmer and blower. A single 18v batter will easily trim my suburban yard after mowing. It won't go through the 3' tall, 1" diameter thistle I found out behind a pine tree where I only trim occasionally, but around the trees and edging near the house, even under pine trees where my riding mower doesn't go - it works fine. It edges the drive pretty well. Not as well as a high power, dedicated edger - but for occasional touch-ups, it works fine. The batteries are compatible with other Ryobi tools, although I don't have any other than the blower. It blows fine enough to clear the drive of grass clippings. It wouldn't blow a pile of leaves across the yard in fall - but that isn't what it is meant for.

In short - for a typical suburban home - it will be fine. For someone with larger needs - choose a larger option.
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Saving$
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by Saving$ »

Another vote for the Ryobi 18v
- It's alot lighter weight than the 40v or higher, even with a 4ah 18v
- 18v batteries are affordable and work with all the other Ryobi tools
- They have 3-5 different models so you can get the one that suits your needs best
- They are affordable
goldendad
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by goldendad »

Have a Ryobi 40 volt also. Works great.
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wornout
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by wornout »

And a third vote for the Ryobi One+ 18 volt. I’ve had the trimmer and blower for over a decade, love the light weight for my tired aging muscles. I’ve tried my son’s 40 volt and it’s way too heavy for me. I also have several other tools that use the same batteries.
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whodidntante
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by whodidntante »

I use a Greenworks Pro 80V. Bunch of amateurs! :D
sc173
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by sc173 »

wornout wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 9:59 pm And a third vote for the Ryobi One+ 18 volt. I’ve had the trimmer and blower for over a decade, love the light weight for my tired aging muscles. I’ve tried my son’s 40 volt and it’s way too heavy for me. I also have several other tools that use the same batteries.
Adding another vote for the Ryobi 18v as well. I use a Toro gas mower, Echo gas blower, so didn't want a whole different battery system. I got the one that can rotate and use the string as an edger. I have torn through some really thick weeds in my back yard with ease. I see no reason I'd need more power for a residential property.
squirm
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by squirm »

brianH wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 8:35 pm
bottlecap wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 2:51 pm 18 volts is pretty light weight for a weed wacker. I imagine you'll want to go at least 40v.
This is pretty much just marketing. 18v, 20v, 40v, they all use the same 18650 or newer 21700 cells. The Milwaukee 18v lineup is just as powerful as Dewalt's '40v' offering. What matters is the watts (volts*amps) actually delivered to the motor, and the type/quality of the motor itself.

The 20v vs 18v is probably the best marking lie ever created. The batteries are exactly the same, 5 18650 cells, but most brands are honest and use the nominal voltage of the cells (3.6v) and Dewalt creatively uses the max voltage (4v). Deceptive, but brilliant. I'm sure that made them tons of money from people thinking 20>18.

Most shoppers just think more volts means more power, unfortunately.
bikesandbeers
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by bikesandbeers »

If you have been using an 18v worx, the 18v/20v Dewalt should be plenty for you. If you have older nicad/nimh 18v dewalt, the 20v lithium with adapter would be a nice upgrade. I haven't use the Dewalt one, but I use an adpater on some old pod style Makita tools to work with the sliding lithium batteries.

some of the higher voltage options (ie Ego, 40v Ryobi) may have more power, but again if you already were happy with a 18v tool and you want to stick with the dewalt systems, it seems like and easy choice.
sowhatsnext
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by sowhatsnext »

snackdog wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 11:18 am I have a Ryobi 40v that is a champ. It whacks weeds up to 2 feet tall. I have an attachment for heavier bushes as well. It is really strong and runs for a long time; about as long as I care to drag it around. Highly recommended.
+1
onourway
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by onourway »

brianH wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 8:35 pm
bottlecap wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 2:51 pm 18 volts is pretty light weight for a weed wacker. I imagine you'll want to go at least 40v.
This is pretty much just marketing. 18v, 20v, 40v, they all use the same 18650 or newer 21700 cells. The Milwaukee 18v lineup is just as powerful as Dewalt's '40v' offering. What matters is the watts (volts*amps) actually delivered to the motor, and the type/quality of the motor itself.

The 20v vs 18v is probably the best marking lie ever created. The batteries are exactly the same, 5 18650 cells, but most brands are honest and use the nominal voltage of the cells (3.6v) and Dewalt creatively uses the max voltage (4v). Deceptive, but brilliant. I'm sure that made them tons of money from people thinking 20>18.
Your 18 vs 20v point is correct, however I don’t think your 18v vs 40v point stands. Yes, the nominal voltage of each cell is the same between products, however a 40v product has uses 10 cells to create 36 nominal volts rather than 5 at 18v. A 36v (‘40v’) tool is much more powerful than its 18v counterpart.

If BashDash has been ok all these years using an 18v Worx trimmer, just getting something compatible with their existing 18v battery system will probably work ok. The run times will be relatively short unless you buy one of the higher capacity batteries than you likely have for a drill, and the line and feeder head of 18v systems are quite lightweight compared to the higher end systems, but for a smaller suburban yard of mostly grass and light weed trimming it’s likely ok.

I have a number of the Ryobi 18v tools and have found them plenty reliable enough for homeowner usage. My drill and impact wrench and their batteries are well over a decade old, and they have greatly increased the range of available tools in that time, maintaining battery compatibility for all those years. Just recently I’ve added a cordless shop vac and an angle grinder that use the same batteries. When I needed a hedge clipper this year I ended up with the Ryobi 40v system because I could get both a standard clipper and an extension plus battery for less than the price of a single clipper from the more expensive brands. So far so good even with my relatively heavy use by homeowner standards.

For our trimmer we ended up moving beyond the Ryobi 40v system several years ago and I went in on the Echo 58v line for the mower, blower and trimmer. These tools are much higher end - the mower runs circles around even my semi-commercial gas, and the trimmer uses the same best-in-class Echo bump head that never jams and is trivial to re-feed - and has more run time than my arms can stand even trimming heavy duty brush at full throttle. Great tool but probably overkill for light grass and weeds.
Laundry_Service
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by Laundry_Service »

I've got a Dewalt 20v string trimmer. I don't remember which model but I think it folds in sort of in half, which doesn't seem helpful for my purposes. I replaced the head with a Husqvarna replacement. Some quick reading online said this was a good idea and I never used the head that came with the trimmer. I've got a handful of other tools that use the Dewalt 20v system and overall I'm happy but don't have anything to compare to.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by Sandtrap »

BashDash wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 12:55 pm Thanks sandtrap! Is there a adapter for 60v to my 18v drill? 60v might be too much power for my uses. Thanks for the detailed response! I read most of your posts unrelated to any issues my house is having just so I can learn!
The 60v flexvolt batter is big and heavy. While it fits other Dewalt tools such as the impact driver, 1/2" hammer drill, reciprocating saw, skillsaw, blower, etc. I've found that it works well on the larger tools where the larger bulk and weight is not an issue.
For most of the other tools, the 20V lithium is a good all around Dewalt battery. As you can see, I have had the entire system ever since it was 12 v. and upgraded as needed over time.

It depends on the use and power drain of the tool. IE: the 60v battery works great on the blower because the 20v battery that came with it does not last long at all.

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dknightd
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by dknightd »

I have a love hate relationship with battery powered tools. Partially becuase battery tech is so much better now than it was 5-10 years ago. And batteries are expensive.
I would not buy a lawn/garden tool just because I could share the battery with an old drill. If I did that chances are the drill would die next.
For outdoor tools I've been happy with the ego products. Yes they are expensive. Yes I may one day regret my decision. But so far, so good.
I started with the lawn mower. Just over 3 years ago now. I was tired of the noise from my gas powered mower (25 year old honda, which still worked fine). After a couple weeks I gave away the Honda.
The following year I bought the ego leaf blower. That thing is a monster. Not as powerful as my neighbors gas fired backpack blower, but pretty close. Thankfully he lives two doors down. I can't imagine having that engine on my back, way too noisy even two doors away. Way more powerful than the plug in blower I used to use. It does eat batteries when used on full power. But using both its battery, and the lawn mower battery, it can clean up several maple trees. I kept my old plug in leaf blower because it has a suck and shred mode the ego does not.
Now to get to your question. Last year I bought the weed wacker because my old plug in one died. The ego wacks weeds much better than my plug in one did. It came with a smaller capacity battery, but does the job just fine.
Anybody have tips on good battery operated hand tools? I'm getting tired of lugging a cord around. Thanks
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brianH
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by brianH »

onourway wrote: Sun Sep 12, 2021 6:29 am
Your 18 vs 20v point is correct, however I don’t think your 18v vs 40v point stands. Yes, the nominal voltage of each cell is the same between products, however a 40v product has uses 10 cells to create 36 nominal volts rather than 5 at 18v. A 36v (‘40v’) tool is much more powerful than its 18v counterpart.
You do have to compare equivalent battery packs, which is easiest to do by physical size. The larger 18v packs actually start stacking the 5 cells in series, in parallel to up the amperage that can be delivered, and increase the total capacity. All the 40v packs do is keep stacking them in series.

Since the motor watts (amps x volts) are what matter, one can increase that by upping either value. There are potentially small efficiency gains to be had by using a higher voltage instead of higher amperage for the same number of watts, but if the tool is deigned right, things like the quality of the motor and gearbox are going to make much more of an actual difference.
dknightd
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by dknightd »

brianH wrote: Sun Sep 12, 2021 8:05 am
Since the motor watts (amps x volts) are what matter, one can increase that by upping either value. There are potentially small efficiency gains to be had by using a higher voltage instead of higher amperage for the same number of watts, but if the tool is deigned right, things like the quality of the motor and gearbox are going to make much more of an actual difference.
I agree. My concerns are two fold. Lower voltage means more current to do the same job, especially when pushed hard. And tools these days might be designed to wear out about when the battery does.
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BashDash
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by BashDash »

Thanks!!!! Just ordered a 40v worx trimmer/edger taking the advice to be consistent with my current tools. I ignored the DeWalt drill but I have a worx blower that takes 20v batteries. ( The 40v I bought takes two 20v).

Thanks for all the help and knowledge.
JBTX
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by JBTX »

snackdog wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 11:18 am I have a Ryobi 40v that is a champ. It whacks weeds up to 2 feet tall. I have an attachment for heavier bushes as well. It is really strong and runs for a long time; about as long as I care to drag it around. Highly recommended.
livesoft wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 11:33 am I've used a lot of Dewalt battery-power tools doing trail maintenance and they are great, but for home use I have Ryobi 40V motor with a string trimmer attachment and a hedge clipper attachment. They work fine. My neighbor even prefers to use my system instead of the system that his spouse bought for him. I use the string trimmer on St Augustine and the hedge clippers on Yaupon holly. I like that the battery will last longer than my body can hold out.
How is the string reloaded? I have a gas powered Ryobi with other attachments. I use the edger attachment for edging and avoid trimming with the weed eater attachment as long as possible because I find manually stringing the thing to be a PITA. Is the electric any easier? My elderly mom has one, probably 18v, and she uses it so it must be easy. I think she just replaces with a whole stung cartridge.
livesoft
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Re: Battery powered weed Wackt

Post by livesoft »

^String reloading sucks. So does string feed for that matter. I have NEVER had a string trimmer that dealt with the plastic string to my satisfaction, but this current system is the best that I have used in my life.
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onourway
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by onourway »

As mentioned a couple of times earlier in this thread, the Echo speed feed system is the gold standard. In my 3-years or so of ownership, it always works (as does the bump feed system for letting out additional line).
The line is fed through with no disassembly. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqO3kKZttWc It takes me longer to walk to the shed to get new line than to feed it.
andypanda
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by andypanda »

Two thumbs up for Echo and the speed feed head. If it does jam it pops apart in a second and pops back together.

For 4 or 5 years I used my new wife's old Worx little orange trimmer. It's good for delicate places and about 20 minutes. And it breaks line no matter what I put in it. (Hint: if you need the little $2 cap that holds the spool on order it on line from Walmart and have it shipped to the store - no shipping.)

I have 4 or 5 of the old Dewalt hand tools that use the 18v XRP batteries, but didn't like their trimmers at all.

Since I'm mowing 1.5 to 2 acres with a Toro 50" zero turn and have woods on 2.5 sides and a 125' driveway, I bought an Echo CDST-58VBT 58-Volt trimmer. Jeez, the thing is dangerous and fast and I don't even use the high speed setting yet. I LOVE IT. Love the speed feed head, too. Bought a Limbsaver shoulder strap for it. I didn't need a full harness.

So I bought the blower that uses the same battery. Yep, love it. Had the old weak Worx blower until it died. My wife bought Worx because they were very light and she's only 104#.
daheld
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by daheld »

brianH wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 8:35 pm
bottlecap wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 2:51 pm 18 volts is pretty light weight for a weed wacker. I imagine you'll want to go at least 40v.
This is pretty much just marketing. 18v, 20v, 40v, they all use the same 18650 or newer 21700 cells. The Milwaukee 18v lineup is just as powerful as Dewalt's '40v' offering. What matters is the watts (volts*amps) actually delivered to the motor, and the type/quality of the motor itself.

The 20v vs 18v is probably the best marking lie ever created. The batteries are exactly the same, 5 18650 cells, but most brands are honest and use the nominal voltage of the cells (3.6v) and Dewalt creatively uses the max voltage (4v). Deceptive, but brilliant. I'm sure that made them tons of money from people thinking 20>18.
+1. I replaced by Worx trimmer with a 18v Milwaukee M18 FUEL string trimmer and it is an absolute beast. As I recall it was basically the same price as the Dewalt--not the cheapest thing at Home Depot--but I went with Milwaukee because I have a Milwaukee impact/drill/charger set. It has absolutely as much power as any gas powered trimmer I've used. It is insanely powerful.
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Darth Xanadu
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by Darth Xanadu »

Normchad wrote: Sat Sep 11, 2021 12:29 pm If you’ve already got a bunch of DeWalt stuff, then it makes a lot of sense to go with DeWalt here if the batteries are compatible. I’m general DeWalt makes good stuff.

Personally, I’ve got Makita for the outdoor stuff,(weed wacker, hedge trimmer, blower) and couldn’t be happier with it. I also have a Makita impact driver with compatible batteries.
I don't want to hijack this thread, but many of these responses are highly relevant to my question (and I also see that the OP has made his decision).

I have newish (<1 year old) gas-powered lawn mower and weed wacker. I'm in the market for a chainsaw and exploring electric options. Anyone have any experience with the Makita? Could see myself getting a blower down the road too. This would be generally used for small trees (< 12") and branches. I would hire out for bigger jobs.

Thanks,
DX
kakemono
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Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2021 12:53 pm

Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by kakemono »

I have the Ryobi 40v. Something i find highly annoying is the string feed - it always feed more string when you stop power then apply power. In order to get more string, I was used to other ones where you pop it on the ground so i am always seeming to stop and start it. Likewise, I cant prevent it from feeding string if I need to stop for a normal reason.
retiredjg
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by retiredjg »

I've been a major fan of the EGO series for about 7 years. Unfortunately, I could never really love the weed wacker (straight shaft) even though it is very powerful and the trimmer line lasts forever. I just could not consistently get the head at the right angle to make a nice trim without making bad gouges. It also left me with a backache. I avoided trimming as long as I could.

I think it may be an excellent product but designed for a tall man, not an average height old lady. :happy It is also possible it was too powerful for good trimming work (the gouges) but would do a great job in an open field or ditch that needed a spring cleaning.

Since I needed a new drill anyway, I got one of the Ryobi 18 volt models (trimmer and edger) so I could share batteries. It is very lightweight (4=about 4 lbs if I recall correctly) and looks a bit like a toy, but gets the job done and without the backache or the gouges.

Having said that, my trimming job is pretty minimal compared to some - probably 20 minutes if I do it all at one time. I will be using this new one much more often than I used the EGO (which I hope to sell because it really is a good tool, just not for my body or my needs).
ThankYouJack
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Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by ThankYouJack »

For string trimmers, I don't think you need anything that powerful or fancy. I've had a cheap 20v black & decker for about a decade. Works great and I hardly ever have to charge the battery. Granted I only use it for a few minutes every couple weeks, but it's nice not having to charge it.

Seems like the OP is all set and I agree that it makes sense to go with the same eco-system with battery powered tools if one can swing it. For some battery powered things like lawn mowers, chain saws, leaf blowers, the more power the better. In my experience, string trimmers don't require much.
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NateH
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Location: Minnesota

Re: Battery powered weed Wacker

Post by NateH »

have the dewalt trimmer and blower (and 2 drills). Kids actually use them when doing our yardwork because they don't have to pull a starter cord. no complaints.
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