Transplanted Satsuma Tree

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bhwabeck3533
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Joined: Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:25 am
Location: Baldwin County, AL

Transplanted Satsuma Tree

Post by bhwabeck3533 »

Yes, I have Googled the topic above. Really not getting the specifics I'm looking for. So, here goes....

I live in South Alabama. I transplanted a satsuma tree in late-January. The tree was originally planted (by me about two years ago) in a location where rain water flowing off the roof knocked all the blossoms off in early spring and it bore no fruit. After transplanting it seemed fine for a few weeks, then it gradually lost about 75% of its leaves and appeared that it would not recover from the shock.

Surprisingly, it is showing some signs of new growth in the last few days. I had worked in a little fertilizer when it was transplanted. It seems to be a critical juncture in saving it. Anyone have experience watching and working through a similar issue with a citrus tree?
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ResearchMed
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Re: Transplanted Satsuma Tree

Post by ResearchMed »

bhwabeck3533 wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 10:43 am Yes, I have Googled the topic above. Really not getting the specifics I'm looking for. So, here goes....

I live in South Alabama. I transplanted a satsuma tree in late-January. The tree was originally planted (by me about two years ago) in a location where rain water flowing off the roof knocked all the blossoms off in early spring and it bore no fruit. After transplanting it seemed fine for a few weeks, then it gradually lost about 75% of its leaves and appeared that it would not recover from the shock.

Surprisingly, it is showing some signs of new growth in the last few days. I had worked in a little fertilizer when it was transplanted. It seems to be a critical juncture in saving it. Anyone have experience watching and working through a similar issue with a citrus tree?
Have you called a nursery (where did you get this tree/sapling?), or perhaps a governmental agricultural agency who may be familiar with the general conditions in your area?

RM
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Mr. Rumples
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Re: Transplanted Satsuma Tree

Post by Mr. Rumples »

How big was the tree? Was it grafted? If like some other citrus, it has a decent tap root, and that tap root was injured, it lessens the survivability. There is special fertilizer for citrus. Watch it carefully in this weaken state for mites, scale, mealy bugs, leaf-miner fly and vine weevils. It might just make it however. I make a hardware cloth tree guard for my transplants; they can be purchased ready made*. That keeps them from being disturbed by critters and allows good air circulation, especially during the winter when food is scarce. I avoid the wraps since up here in VA, I guess its similar further south, that dark moist area is loved by insects.

https://jigglygreenhouse.com/store/jigg ... -tree.html
curmudgeon
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Re: Transplanted Satsuma Tree

Post by curmudgeon »

They can be pretty tough (but slow growing). I had one that I planted, then realized after about three years was in the wrong location. I dug it up and moved it, and it looked sad for a year but then recovered fine. Then a couple of years later, the deer got into the area and ate every leaf off of it. I thought it was a goner, but it recovered and did quite well in subsequent years.

One thing you want to be sure of is to not let the root stock (below the graft) send up any shoots. Cut those off very short if they sprout. Sometimes if a citrus tree is sufficiently abused, the root stock will put out shoots and then take over, leaving you with poor/no fruit.
jebmke
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Re: Transplanted Satsuma Tree

Post by jebmke »

Our tree guy suggests not using any fertilizer the first year a tree is relocated. Generally the plant will be focusing most of its early growth in the roots.
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