Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
User avatar
heartwood
Posts: 1834
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:40 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by heartwood »

lightheir wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 5:54 pm
I love the WSJ! I liked it more when they had a separate Personal Journal section and before Rupert Murdoch took over the editorial section, but the news reporting is excellent. To Rupert's credit, he appears to have left the news reporters unmolested, so I'm fine with leaving the opinion section to him. I read mostly the paper edition as I prefer that to online. Maybe because I've read newspapers for decades, the layout of the paper version is more conducive to browsing for me than the online version.

Are you talking about The National Observer? It was a weekly that Dow Jones published in the 60s and 70s. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_ ... ed_States)

In 1965 William F Buckley ran (in jest?) for Mayor of NYC against John Lindsay and Abe Beame. I remember the twinkle in his eyes during the debates. I also remember him once leaving the debate stage by swinging his leg over the much shorter Beame's head.

I was so intrigued by his wit and intelligence that I entered a subscription to his weekly. Except I had the name wrong. Instead of National Review, I got The National Observer. It was one of the best mistakes I made. I kept the subscription until they shuttered the paper.
GreenLawn
Posts: 108
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2020 10:58 am

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by GreenLawn »

heartwood wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 2:05 pm
lightheir wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 5:54 pm
I love the WSJ! I liked it more when they had a separate Personal Journal section and before Rupert Murdoch took over the editorial section, but the news reporting is excellent. To Rupert's credit, he appears to have left the news reporters unmolested, so I'm fine with leaving the opinion section to him. I read mostly the paper edition as I prefer that to online. Maybe because I've read newspapers for decades, the layout of the paper version is more conducive to browsing for me than the online version.

Are you talking about The National Observer? It was a weekly that Dow Jones published in the 60s and 70s. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_ ... ed_States)

In 1965 William F Buckley ran (in jest?) for Mayor of NYC against John Lindsay and Abe Beame. I remember the twinkle in his eyes during the debates. I also remember him once leaving the debate stage by swinging his leg over the much shorter Beame's head.

I was so intrigued by his wit and intelligence that I entered a subscription to his weekly. Except I had the name wrong. Instead of National Review, I got The National Observer. It was one of the best mistakes I made. I kept the subscription until they shuttered the paper.
I'm not familiar with The National Observer. I did enjoy William's twinkle when he debated on Firing Line. His use of language was unusual too, whether it was to show off his education or he just enjoyed rarely used words I don't know (probably both).

The early Journal was revitalized when they added the Personal Journal section. It broadened its appeal, and I wouldn't have subscribed without it. I believe they eliminated the separate Personal section to reduce daily page count, but in any case WSJ reporters have a surprising amount of latitude in their reporting and I consider the news section to be the most objective news in America.

Maybe Rupert only cares about the editorial section. That works for me, I can find diverse editorial opinion elsewhere, its all over the internet. I do enjoy reading the editorials occasionally, especially when I'm in a whimsical mood: "If Gordon Gecko was to write an editorial, would this be what he'd write?"
2marshmallow
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Apr 11, 2019 7:28 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by 2marshmallow »

NW_Nutmegger wrote: Fri Apr 30, 2021 11:58 pm I'm coming to the end of my spectacular "12 weeks for $12" promotion of the Wall Street Journal and am contemplating forking over the $45 a month to continue.

For those of you who subscribe: why do you continue to subscribe?

I'm curious to know some of the reasons you enjoy reading this iconic newspaper.

Bonus: for those of you who still read the physical paper (as I have done over the past 12 weeks): what is it about reading the physical paper that beats reading it via a phone, tablet or computer screen?

Looking forward to your comments.
Been reading hard copy for about 20 years now as a relief from constantly increasing screen time but the online version is handy when traveling. I learn a lot from the paper and find myself referencing information from the WSJ often in conversations. I am left of center and the paper, especially the opinions, are distinctly right of center but hey, not everyone has to agree with me. By comparison, the local paper seems written by high school students.

Finally, one full sheet plus one half sheet, scrunched up in the bbq charcoal chimney has been a 100% effective accelerant and even, bizarrely, seems to smell good doing it!

2marshmallow
jayk238
Posts: 825
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2017 1:02 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by jayk238 »

NW_Nutmegger wrote: Fri Apr 30, 2021 11:58 pm I'm coming to the end of my spectacular "12 weeks for $12" promotion of the Wall Street Journal and am contemplating forking over the $45 a month to continue.

For those of you who subscribe: why do you continue to subscribe?

I'm curious to know some of the reasons you enjoy reading this iconic newspaper.

Bonus: for those of you who still read the physical paper (as I have done over the past 12 weeks): what is it about reading the physical paper that beats reading it via a phone, tablet or computer screen?

Looking forward to your comments.
the vast majority of non-business news is almost entirely from a handful of sources- brookings, hoover, manhattan, Institute of Medicine, science, Nature etc. depending on the lean of these news sites. Thats the big secret for these guys. They get most of their information from them whether its politics, infrastructure, healthcare.

Most of these journalists travel in these same circles and all went to the same schools. Newer schools of thought arise and become more prominent- especially with the push for diversity today. But by and large this information is free and readily available. The big difference is that the think tanks generate white papers and policy pieces that are detailed but dry and long. due to the few sources used as a result by news sites there is definitely a significant group think within journalism.

I read the wsj and nytimes but it is out of boredom.

my news preference is bloomberg which definitley does not fall into the groupthink trap
tarheelboglehead
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2021 9:45 am

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by tarheelboglehead »

sam1838 wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 4:18 pm I read the news section (and avoid the opinion) every day. I consider it basically the only objective news section of a newspaper still around. Other sources like The New York Times and The Washington Post have shifted to "narrative journalism" where every story, every title, every omission is designed to push a certain perspective on the reader, and if you just read those sources you would think the world a very simple black and white place with easily identifiable good people and bad people.
Yes, this exactly.

I prefer to read my news rather than watch it and I'm willing to pay for quality news and reporting. I have bounced back and forth between several sources in recent years. I tried the NYT but got frustrated with its leftward drift and agenda-driven news stories. My local paper was pretty much good only for the comics and coupons, but even those are on the way down, so bye-bye. So I'm back at the WSJ and am happy with it. Objective high quality news reporting + center-right opinion pages is my personal sweet spot.
grok87
Posts: 9455
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 9:00 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by grok87 »

jayk238 wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 2:55 pm
NW_Nutmegger wrote: Fri Apr 30, 2021 11:58 pm I'm coming to the end of my spectacular "12 weeks for $12" promotion of the Wall Street Journal and am contemplating forking over the $45 a month to continue.

For those of you who subscribe: why do you continue to subscribe?

I'm curious to know some of the reasons you enjoy reading this iconic newspaper.

Bonus: for those of you who still read the physical paper (as I have done over the past 12 weeks): what is it about reading the physical paper that beats reading it via a phone, tablet or computer screen?

Looking forward to your comments.
the vast majority of non-business news is almost entirely from a handful of sources- brookings, hoover, manhattan, Institute of Medicine, science, Nature etc. depending on the lean of these news sites. Thats the big secret for these guys. They get most of their information from them whether its politics, infrastructure, healthcare.

Most of these journalists travel in these same circles and all went to the same schools. Newer schools of thought arise and become more prominent- especially with the push for diversity today. But by and large this information is free and readily available. The big difference is that the think tanks generate white papers and policy pieces that are detailed but dry and long. due to the few sources used as a result by news sites there is definitely a significant group think within journalism.

I read the wsj and nytimes but it is out of boredom.

my news preference is bloomberg which definitley does not fall into the groupthink trap
yep. this article talks about that (i haven't read the article as it is behind a paywall, just the abstract.
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... 6C36FE9D0B
wrote: Abstract

There is substantial evidence that voters’ choices are shaped by assessments of the state of the economy and that these assessments, in turn, are influenced by the news. But how does the economic news track the welfare of different income groups in an era of rising inequality? Whose economy does the news cover? Drawing on a large new dataset of US news content, we demonstrate that the tone of the economic news strongly and disproportionately tracks the fortunes of the richest households, with little sensitivity to income changes among the non-rich. Further, we present evidence that this pro-rich bias emerges not from pro-rich journalistic preferences but, rather, from the interaction of the media’s focus on economic aggregates with structural features of the relationship between economic growth and distribution
RIP Mr. Bogle.
jayk238
Posts: 825
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2017 1:02 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by jayk238 »

grok87 wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 3:23 pm
jayk238 wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 2:55 pm
NW_Nutmegger wrote: Fri Apr 30, 2021 11:58 pm I'm coming to the end of my spectacular "12 weeks for $12" promotion of the Wall Street Journal and am contemplating forking over the $45 a month to continue.

For those of you who subscribe: why do you continue to subscribe?

I'm curious to know some of the reasons you enjoy reading this iconic newspaper.

Bonus: for those of you who still read the physical paper (as I have done over the past 12 weeks): what is it about reading the physical paper that beats reading it via a phone, tablet or computer screen?

Looking forward to your comments.
the vast majority of non-business news is almost entirely from a handful of sources- brookings, hoover, manhattan, Institute of Medicine, science, Nature etc. depending on the lean of these news sites. Thats the big secret for these guys. They get most of their information from them whether its politics, infrastructure, healthcare.

Most of these journalists travel in these same circles and all went to the same schools. Newer schools of thought arise and become more prominent- especially with the push for diversity today. But by and large this information is free and readily available. The big difference is that the think tanks generate white papers and policy pieces that are detailed but dry and long. due to the few sources used as a result by news sites there is definitely a significant group think within journalism.

I read the wsj and nytimes but it is out of boredom.

my news preference is bloomberg which definitley does not fall into the groupthink trap
yep. this article talks about that (i haven't read the article as it is behind a paywall, just the abstract.
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... 6C36FE9D0B
wrote: Abstract

There is substantial evidence that voters’ choices are shaped by assessments of the state of the economy and that these assessments, in turn, are influenced by the news. But how does the economic news track the welfare of different income groups in an era of rising inequality? Whose economy does the news cover? Drawing on a large new dataset of US news content, we demonstrate that the tone of the economic news strongly and disproportionately tracks the fortunes of the richest households, with little sensitivity to income changes among the non-rich. Further, we present evidence that this pro-rich bias emerges not from pro-rich journalistic preferences but, rather, from the interaction of the media’s focus on economic aggregates with structural features of the relationship between economic growth and distribution
Interesting.

Ive read more explicit pieces in the past. Would like to know the full text of the above.
grok87
Posts: 9455
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 9:00 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by grok87 »

jayk238 wrote: Tue May 04, 2021 9:15 am
grok87 wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 3:23 pm
jayk238 wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 2:55 pm
NW_Nutmegger wrote: Fri Apr 30, 2021 11:58 pm I'm coming to the end of my spectacular "12 weeks for $12" promotion of the Wall Street Journal and am contemplating forking over the $45 a month to continue.

For those of you who subscribe: why do you continue to subscribe?

I'm curious to know some of the reasons you enjoy reading this iconic newspaper.

Bonus: for those of you who still read the physical paper (as I have done over the past 12 weeks): what is it about reading the physical paper that beats reading it via a phone, tablet or computer screen?

Looking forward to your comments.
the vast majority of non-business news is almost entirely from a handful of sources- brookings, hoover, manhattan, Institute of Medicine, science, Nature etc. depending on the lean of these news sites. Thats the big secret for these guys. They get most of their information from them whether its politics, infrastructure, healthcare.

Most of these journalists travel in these same circles and all went to the same schools. Newer schools of thought arise and become more prominent- especially with the push for diversity today. But by and large this information is free and readily available. The big difference is that the think tanks generate white papers and policy pieces that are detailed but dry and long. due to the few sources used as a result by news sites there is definitely a significant group think within journalism.

I read the wsj and nytimes but it is out of boredom.

my news preference is bloomberg which definitley does not fall into the groupthink trap
yep. this article talks about that (i haven't read the article as it is behind a paywall, just the abstract.
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... 6C36FE9D0B
wrote: Abstract

There is substantial evidence that voters’ choices are shaped by assessments of the state of the economy and that these assessments, in turn, are influenced by the news. But how does the economic news track the welfare of different income groups in an era of rising inequality? Whose economy does the news cover? Drawing on a large new dataset of US news content, we demonstrate that the tone of the economic news strongly and disproportionately tracks the fortunes of the richest households, with little sensitivity to income changes among the non-rich. Further, we present evidence that this pro-rich bias emerges not from pro-rich journalistic preferences but, rather, from the interaction of the media’s focus on economic aggregates with structural features of the relationship between economic growth and distribution
Interesting.

Ive read more explicit pieces in the past. Would like to know the full text of the above.
you and me both. it's a shame it's behind a paywall.
RIP Mr. Bogle.
User avatar
Topic Author
NW_Nutmegger
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2021 10:43 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by NW_Nutmegger »

Wellfleet wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 7:02 am I enjoy “unplugging” for a few minutes each day while reading the physical paper. I think it’s good for my children to see me looking at something other than a screen.
I totally agree with this.

I have three kiddos -- 17, 15 & 13 years old -- and I too would rather them see me reading from a printed newspaper vs a laptop, tablet or phone. There is a sense of guilt when I pull out my phone and stare at it when my kids are in the same room. I have enough screen time during the course of the day and thankfully, I thoroughly enjoy reading the news on dead trees.
“Rely on the ordinary virtues that intelligent, balanced human beings have relied on for centuries: common sense, thrift, realistic expectations, patience and perseverance.” — Jack Bogle
User avatar
Topic Author
NW_Nutmegger
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2021 10:43 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by NW_Nutmegger »

LilyFleur wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 11:58 am
I find social media rather alarming these days as so many people don't understand the value of a Pulitzer-prize winning newspaper with a stable of excellent editors and writers. It's nice to know there are others out there that appreciate the WSJ.
This.

Knowing the value of a newspaper like the WSJ is completely foreign to so many people who spend so much of their time on social media. They see links about news, yet rarely take the time to click and read the full article.

I had to completely abandon social media about a year ago -- Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Reddit -- and I'm much better for it mentally. What a breath of fresh air.

With the vast void that I created, I filled it with a subscription to the WSJ printed newspaper to my door 6 days a week and was pleasantly surprised how much more I was able to comprehend and focus on news articles versus seeing my news via the loud noise of social media.
“Rely on the ordinary virtues that intelligent, balanced human beings have relied on for centuries: common sense, thrift, realistic expectations, patience and perseverance.” — Jack Bogle
User avatar
Topic Author
NW_Nutmegger
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2021 10:43 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by NW_Nutmegger »

politely wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 2:36 am Also, the WSJ is much more expensive than NYT. Not sure that is warranted anymore.
Actually, for the printed subscription per month, the WSJ ($45) is significantly cheaper than the NYT ($80)...both including digital.

It's online where the NYT ($17) is way cheaper than WSJ ($37).
“Rely on the ordinary virtues that intelligent, balanced human beings have relied on for centuries: common sense, thrift, realistic expectations, patience and perseverance.” — Jack Bogle
User avatar
Topic Author
NW_Nutmegger
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2021 10:43 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by NW_Nutmegger »

tullera wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 1:18 pm I am early 40's and have gotten (and still get) the paper edition for probably over 10 years. Oh, and I prefer the paper because it sort of forces me to browse the articles in a way the website doesn't and I definitely end up reading more things that way and I am in front of a computer/device for my work so it's nice to take a break from all that for a bit.
Like you, I'm in my 40's (45). I grew up with the newspaper in the 80's and 90's -- reading it, as well as delivering it as a paperboy.

I started deviating from print to online news somewhere around the early 2000's via my desk computer and then, with the advent of the smart phone, found myself using that as my access to news. It wasn't until last year during the beginning of COVID that I wanted to go "old school", minimize my screen time and read from a good ol' fashioned newspaper, ink of the fingers and all. What a fantastic feeling of nostalgia I get when I open up the newspaper while relaxing in my chair.

Also like you, I find that I read many more articles in the newspaper, as they are right there in front of me, than I would if I saw the title online. One sentence leads to another, then a few paragraphs in, I'm learning about something interesting.
“Rely on the ordinary virtues that intelligent, balanced human beings have relied on for centuries: common sense, thrift, realistic expectations, patience and perseverance.” — Jack Bogle
User avatar
Topic Author
NW_Nutmegger
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2021 10:43 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by NW_Nutmegger »

2marshmallow wrote: Mon May 03, 2021 12:12 am
I learn a lot from the paper and find myself referencing information from the WSJ often in conversations.
I was in a work meeting awhile back and dropped a WSJ stat that I had come across earlier in the day and it's pretty amazing how folks seem to respect your comment a bit more. :wink:
“Rely on the ordinary virtues that intelligent, balanced human beings have relied on for centuries: common sense, thrift, realistic expectations, patience and perseverance.” — Jack Bogle
wfrobinette
Posts: 1465
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:14 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by wfrobinette »

squirm wrote: Sat May 01, 2021 12:06 am I subscribe to the print addition for thirty years. Unlike reading things online there's no annoying animated ads jumping around, it's easier to read and I can read it wherever I want. Reading things online is getting very tough with video ads now. Anyways the articles are well written. Our local paper is crap.
There are plugins for your browser that will disable HTML5 autoplay therefore no embedded video will start without you clicking on the button to start it.
User avatar
LadyGeek
Site Admin
Posts: 71864
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:34 pm
Location: Philadelphia
Contact:

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by LadyGeek »

Discussions of dishonest behavior or bypassing the law is totally unacceptable. I removed a post and several replies which link to a site that bypasses the WSJ Subscriber Agreement.
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.
VictorStarr
Posts: 160
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:13 pm
Location: California

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by VictorStarr »

NW_Nutmegger wrote: Fri Apr 30, 2021 11:58 pm I'm coming to the end of my spectacular "12 weeks for $12" promotion of the Wall Street Journal and am contemplating forking over the $45 a month to continue.
If you are not sure about paying $45/month you can have digital only access for $4/month for 12 months.
I am not sure if you can use this promotion after your "12 weeks for $12" promotion.
Here is the link:
https://store.wsj.com/v2/US/US/1130800064
squirm
Posts: 3308
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 11:53 am

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by squirm »

I miss the old wsj when it was a large and thick paper with lots of articles and barely any pictures.
Red Zebra
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:25 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by Red Zebra »

We get the print WSJ and the digital is included. I enjoy having an actual print copy as I am less likely to miss something interesting and find it easier to read paper than computer screen or phone. I have often said that if the only news/analysis we received from the WSJ was the Saturday Exchange section and the financial supplements (Personal Journal), I would still be a subscriber. Also, I love the human interest articles they typically appear on the bottom of page one.
HereToLearn
Posts: 747
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2018 5:53 pm

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by HereToLearn »

NW_Nutmegger wrote: Tue May 04, 2021 11:39 pm
politely wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 2:36 am Also, the WSJ is much more expensive than NYT. Not sure that is warranted anymore.
Actually, for the printed subscription per month, the WSJ ($45) is significantly cheaper than the NYT ($80)...both including digital.

It's online where the NYT ($17) is way cheaper than WSJ ($37).
Once your 17 year old enrolls in college, you should inquire about a student subscription rate. I had not realized the NYT is up to $80; I am still struggling with the $40/month I pay for home delivery. I had been enjoying a $99/year WSJ home delivery subscription when the older child was in college, but it ended when he graduated. I tried enrolling for the same via the younger child, and ended up with a free online WSJ subscription instead. I miss the physical paper, even though it has changed since Murdoch bought it. My children read much more of their news online. The older one will read the paper while eating breakfast or lunch alone, but the younger one has never touched it.

I should add that I fell into the student rate by accident. Older son had asked for a WSJ delivery subscription his first year of college b/c he missed reading it. The NYT was free all over campus, but the WSJ was not, so I ordered it. After a couple of months of never receiving it at his school mailbox, I shifted the subscription home, where I happily renewed it until he graduated.
User avatar
LadyGeek
Site Admin
Posts: 71864
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:34 pm
Location: Philadelphia
Contact:

Re: Questions for Wall Street Journal Subscribers

Post by LadyGeek »

The OP has a similar discussion: Do you still read the print newspaper?

Let's continue discussion in that thread.

(Thread locked to redirect the discussion.)
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.
Locked