Share your net worth progression

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azianbob
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by azianbob »

I'm thinking it will be helpful if people add in their salary/income as well. It gives a better idea how much of the net worth growth is due to high income vs investment returns.

I am reading about many people who jump from 0 - 1M in five years, so just wondering if you are able to do so because of your higher incomes or invest in riskier strategies.
jsapiandante
Posts: 146
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2015 5:58 pm

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by jsapiandante »

azianbob wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 7:56 pm I'm thinking it will be helpful if people add in their salary/income as well. It gives a better idea how much of the net worth growth is due to high income vs investment returns.

I am reading about many people who jump from 0 - 1M in five years, so just wondering if you are able to do so because of your higher incomes or invest in riskier strategies.
Our combined salary is $230k but live on 80k including taxes. I also have a little side gig that earns 5% of our income that goes to investing as well. We’ve jumped considerably due to a combination of good market returns (2013-2020) and high savings rate. Our aa is 75/25 total stock/total bond (no international). We started at 90/10 but have glided towards our current allocation since we will be financially independent soon.
texas lawdog
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Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2016 5:33 pm

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by texas lawdog »

Ok, I'll play along - 49 yr old, married with no kids (DINK)

2016 - $1.6M
2017 - $1.9M
2018 - $1.8M (2018 had a market crash)
2019 - $2.2M
2020 ytd - $2.4M

I'm planning to retire in the next few years, but will see what long term impact the pandemic will have.
stoptothink
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Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 9:53 am

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by stoptothink »

jsapiandante wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:20 pm
azianbob wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 7:56 pm I'm thinking it will be helpful if people add in their salary/income as well. It gives a better idea how much of the net worth growth is due to high income vs investment returns.

I am reading about many people who jump from 0 - 1M in five years, so just wondering if you are able to do so because of your higher incomes or invest in riskier strategies.
Our combined salary is $230k but live on 80k including taxes. I also have a little side gig that earns 5% of our income that goes to investing as well. We’ve jumped considerably due to a combination of good market returns (2013-2020) and high savings rate. Our aa is 75/25 total stock/total bond (no international). We started at 90/10 but have glided towards our current allocation since we will be financially independent soon.
I know I posted somewhere earlier in this thread; wife and I had maybe $150k (she had less than zero) when we married 6.5yrs ago, and we just hit the 2-comma club a few months ago (home equity included). We had an HHI of ~$80k in '14 and it has progressively gone up to ~$220k now and will probably remain stable (I'm kind of at a compensation ceiling, wife maybe has some room to grow). With childcare, wife in school, and a mortgage our expenses were ~$45k/yr. We made final payments on all of those things earlier this year so we're looking at ~$30k/yr in expenses for our family of 4 moving forward. That will ebb-and-flow as we're likely to buy more house in the next few years and my kids (and wife) are getting more competitive in their sports (which means more money), but we are simple people who enjoy a simple life. It's been a good handful of years in the market (we're at 85/15 stocks/bonds), but our net-worth growth has been primarily due to living well below our means and saving 50%+ of gross income.
saagar_is_cool
Posts: 211
Joined: Thu Jan 30, 2014 2:21 pm

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by saagar_is_cool »

kerfuffle wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 2:14 pm
mikejuss wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 1:08 pm
Normchad wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:53 pm
mikejuss wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:28 pm
Normchad wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:18 pm
Well done, congratulations! Hopefully, people read this thread in the future and see how well the “standard bogelhead” approach works.....

The total impact of all the great success stories in this thread is a real testament to simplicity and the power of being “just average” in our investments.....
But isn't this progression due less to index-investing returns and more to simply making and saving a lot of money? I'm fully on-board with the indexing philosophy, but let's be clear about one how one goes from zero to $3.75 million in a dozen years (for which achievement my compliments).
To me, the philosophy is primarily about index investing and sticking with it in good times and bad, for a long time. In addition though, this board really encourages living beneath your means and saving aggressively. These posters are doing those things. And certainly a lot of them earn a lot of money which helps, no doubt.

This is in stark contrast to the ideas of showing off your wealth, chasing hot stock tips, having a guy, etc. playing fast and loose and hoping for the best.

I’ve been at this longer than the poster above, but have also done extremely well, better than I ever could have imagined. And index investing is the biggest reason for it..... my portfolio is 3x bigger than what I have contributed to it.....
I agree that the longer one stays in the market the more one's investment returns will affect one's net worth. But the progression above, of merely a dozen years, is better explained by investment contributions, not investment yield. This is to take nothing away from the power of compounding; it's to note that meaningful index investing is a decades-long proposition.
I'll clarify that, while investment contributions absolutely play a key role for us, the 2020 figure above also includes about 1.2MM in returns, or about 1/3 of our net worth. So, index investing definitely played an important role in the progression, working hand-in-hand with steadily increasing savings and income. It would not have been possible without all of three of these, and it has certainly reinforced my willpower to stick with it for the long haul so that we can see the true power of compounding over decades, and maybe someday reach that fantastic 3x contributions figure (I'd love to know how many decades that was for you!).
What indexing strategy did you follow - Three fund portfolio ?
Wricha
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Wricha »

Folks that are wondering how someone has an 8 figure net worth. If you are making around $200k for most of your career (which is a terrific salary), the only source of income, with no extraordinary income events, and are a passive index investor give up the ghost the math is against you unless living beyond 110 is in the cards.
I am not sure where the break off is in salary to be in the 8 figure net worth club, my guess it begins around $500k.
Normchad
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Normchad »

Wricha wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 9:36 am Folks that are wondering how someone has an 8 figure net worth. If you are making around $200k for most of your career (which is a terrific salary), the only source of income, with no extraordinary income events, and are a passive index investor give up the ghost the math is against you unless living beyond 110 is in the cards.
I am not sure where the break off is in salary to be in the 8 figure net worth club, my guess it begins around $500k.
Time is the key. What would a 100% S&P500 portfolio be worth if you invested 40K per year, every year, since 1985. I think it’s 8 figures.... 35 years is common for a lot of people, and 40k is only 20% savings for the hypothetical 200K earner....
Wricha
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Wricha »

Normchad wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 9:52 am
Wricha wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 9:36 am Folks that are wondering how someone has an 8 figure net worth. If you are making around $200k for most of your career (which is a terrific salary), the only source of income, with no extraordinary income events, and are a passive index investor give up the ghost the math is against you unless living beyond 110 is in the cards.
I am not sure where the break off is in salary to be in the 8 figure net worth club, my guess it begins around $500k.
Time is the key. What would a 100% S&P500 portfolio be worth if you invested 40K per year, every year, since 1985. I think it’s 8 figures.... 35 years is common for a lot of people, and 40k is only 20% savings for the hypothetical 200K earner....
20% after taxes? Starting out $200k?
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Callisto
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Callisto »

Really cool seeing the success people have achieved over time. I am still early in my career, and while I don't ever see myself in the 8 figures club, it seems 7 figures is just a matter of time. Perhaps in a few years my progression will start to look like some of the more outstanding earners/investors here.

Image

Light blue line is balance from deposit/withdrawals only. Dark blue is total account balance.

When I was much younger, I just bought whatever stocks / mutual funds that seemed cool. An unfortunate mistake, to be sure. While it was not a lot of money, I ended up barely even beating just holding cash.

I now hold mostly SP500, or 2x SP500 in taxable. Hedgefundie in tax advantaged. Really nice literally seeing my investments starting to take off after so many years of going nowhere. That being said, it does go to show that early on, increasing one's income is far more important than trying to claw out higher returns from investments.
xStylezx
Posts: 1
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by xStylezx »

First post ever. Seemed like a good thread to be in. Extremely inspiring.

Married. DINK. I'm 36 and wife is 44. Live in rural Missouri.

Income: $130k gross
Expenses: usually between $26-30k

Started debt free journey in 2014. Completely debt free as of Jan 2020 with paid for home (est value $87.5k). We started tracking networth in 2018.

2014: $-149k
2018: $92k
2019: $155k
2020: $224k

Simple Index Fund investing approach.
mighty72
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by mighty72 »

xStylezx wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:51 am First post ever. Seemed like a good thread to be in. Extremely inspiring.

Married. DINK. I'm 36 and wife is 44. Live in rural Missouri.

Income: $130k gross
Expenses: usually between $26-30k

Started debt free journey in 2014. Completely debt free as of Jan 2020 with paid for home (est value $87.5k). We started tracking networth in 2018.

2014: $-149k
2018: $92k
2019: $155k
2020: $224k

Simple Index Fund investing approach.
Welcome to the forum and congrats on the great progress. Good luck!
case_of_ennui
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Joined: Mon Aug 17, 2020 5:07 pm

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by case_of_ennui »

Single/unmarried, 32 living on the east coast. Income around $95k gross now, was making closer to $50k when I first started. I have a while to go but am starting to see things accelerate as pretty much all of my raises now can go straight to savings.


Image
Ron Ronnerson
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Location: Bay Area

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Ron Ronnerson »

Here's our update (I posted back on page 4 of this thread):

2005 (age 30): -$40k
2006 (age 31): -$20k
2007 (age 32): -$15k
2008 (age 33): $25k
2009 (age 34): $75k
2010 (age 35): $100k
2011 (age 36): $130k
2012 (age 37): $240k
2013 (age 38): $420k
2014 (age 39): $450k
2015 (age 40): $575k
2016 (age 41): $650k
2017 (age 42): $750k
2018 (age 43): $850k
2019 (age 44): $1M
2020 (age 45): $1.2M

Our retirement expenses should be fully covered by my pension ($100k/year with COLA and 100% survivor benefits around age 60).

I’m a public-school teacher and my wife is a stay-at-home parent. Over the past decade, we've gone from a five-figure net worth to seven-figures. This has been largely due to frugality, luck, and leverage. No inheritances have been involved.
invest2bfree
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun Jan 12, 2020 9:44 am

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by invest2bfree »

age 46, single wage earner, married , kids 7,7,10.
Wages averaged over time so did entered into the timeframe).

All dates are beginning of the year. Includes a home worth $300k.
All of these are net of taxes.


01/2000 - $0
01/2005 - $60k ( Wage Averaged between 65k to 100k)
01/2008 - $125k
01/2009 - $100k
01/2010 - $325k (Wage averaged between 100k-125k)
01/2016 - $1.5 million (Paid off home).
012017 - $2.5million (Got $1million from work after company I worked got sold).
01/2020 - $3.3 million. (Wages averaged between $175k- $225k)
10/2020- $4.3 million. (Net of any taxes).
Tingting1013
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Tingting1013 »

invest2bfree wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:38 pm 012017 - $2.5million (Got $1million from work after company I worked got sold).
How long did you work at this company for until the stock payout?
invest2bfree
Posts: 69
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by invest2bfree »

Tingting1013 wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:46 pm
invest2bfree wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:38 pm 012017 - $2.5million (Got $1million from work after company I worked got sold).
How long did you work at this company for until the stock payout?
17 years. Still work there.
kerfuffle
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by kerfuffle »

saagar_is_cool wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:59 am
kerfuffle wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 2:14 pm
mikejuss wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 1:08 pm
Normchad wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:53 pm
mikejuss wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:28 pm

But isn't this progression due less to index-investing returns and more to simply making and saving a lot of money? I'm fully on-board with the indexing philosophy, but let's be clear about one how one goes from zero to $3.75 million in a dozen years (for which achievement my compliments).
To me, the philosophy is primarily about index investing and sticking with it in good times and bad, for a long time. In addition though, this board really encourages living beneath your means and saving aggressively. These posters are doing those things. And certainly a lot of them earn a lot of money which helps, no doubt.

This is in stark contrast to the ideas of showing off your wealth, chasing hot stock tips, having a guy, etc. playing fast and loose and hoping for the best.

I’ve been at this longer than the poster above, but have also done extremely well, better than I ever could have imagined. And index investing is the biggest reason for it..... my portfolio is 3x bigger than what I have contributed to it.....
I agree that the longer one stays in the market the more one's investment returns will affect one's net worth. But the progression above, of merely a dozen years, is better explained by investment contributions, not investment yield. This is to take nothing away from the power of compounding; it's to note that meaningful index investing is a decades-long proposition.
I'll clarify that, while investment contributions absolutely play a key role for us, the 2020 figure above also includes about 1.2MM in returns, or about 1/3 of our net worth. So, index investing definitely played an important role in the progression, working hand-in-hand with steadily increasing savings and income. It would not have been possible without all of three of these, and it has certainly reinforced my willpower to stick with it for the long haul so that we can see the true power of compounding over decades, and maybe someday reach that fantastic 3x contributions figure (I'd love to know how many decades that was for you!).
What indexing strategy did you follow - Three fund portfolio ?
I wish I could, but unfortunately with 401k options that don’t perfectly match this approach, I’ve sliced and diced it more than I would honestly like to. And some tax-loss harvesting has made things just that much uglier. But I do shoot for an overall allocation across all our accounts that pretty closely mimics the 3-fund portfolio numbers with the addition of a little bit of REIT funds (the worst of any of the funds at the moment, of course!)
novemberrain
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by novemberrain »

invest2bfree wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:38 pm age 46, single wage earner, married , kids 7,7,10.
Wages averaged over time so did entered into the timeframe).

All dates are beginning of the year. Includes a home worth $300k.
All of these are net of taxes.


01/2000 - $0
01/2005 - $60k ( Wage Averaged between 65k to 100k)
01/2008 - $125k
01/2009 - $100k
01/2010 - $325k (Wage averaged between 100k-125k)
01/2016 - $1.5 million (Paid off home).
012017 - $2.5million (Got $1million from work after company I worked got sold).
01/2020 - $3.3 million. (Wages averaged between $175k- $225k)
10/2020- $4.3 million. (Net of any taxes).
How did you gain 1M YTD when the market only went up 7% YTD ?
mushyyy
Posts: 63
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2015 1:34 pm

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by mushyyy »

xStylezx wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:51 am First post ever. Seemed like a good thread to be in. Extremely inspiring.

Married. DINK. I'm 36 and wife is 44. Live in rural Missouri.

Income: $130k gross
Expenses: usually between $26-30k

Started debt free journey in 2014. Completely debt free as of Jan 2020 with paid for home (est value $87.5k). We started tracking networth in 2018.

2014: $-149k
2018: $92k
2019: $155k
2020: $224k

Simple Index Fund investing approach.
Income to house price higher than 1 is truly outstanding!
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abuss368
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by abuss368 »

invest2bfree wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:38 pm age 46, single wage earner, married , kids 7,7,10.
Wages averaged over time so did entered into the timeframe).

All dates are beginning of the year. Includes a home worth $300k.
All of these are net of taxes.


01/2000 - $0
01/2005 - $60k ( Wage Averaged between 65k to 100k)
01/2008 - $125k
01/2009 - $100k
01/2010 - $325k (Wage averaged between 100k-125k)
01/2016 - $1.5 million (Paid off home).
012017 - $2.5million (Got $1million from work after company I worked got sold).
01/2020 - $3.3 million. (Wages averaged between $175k- $225k)
10/2020- $4.3 million. (Net of any taxes).
Wow and congrats on your awesome and amazing journey!
John C. Bogle: “Simplicity is the master key to financial success."
Broken Man 1999
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Location: West coast of Florida, inland on high ground!

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

OutrageousBasilone11 wrote: Sun Aug 09, 2020 7:24 am
Normchad wrote: Sat Aug 08, 2020 8:43 pm
cusetownusa wrote: Sat Aug 08, 2020 8:40 pm
OutrageousBasilone11 wrote: Sat Aug 08, 2020 6:26 pm Facinated with some of the replies in this thread. I'm going to contribute though my numbers are neither impressive or frankly very interesting. For whomever is interested.

Started working at 17, supermarket job, zero quals required bottom of the barrel type work. ($13.70/hr) $0 to my name
18: $6,500
I moved for work at 19, spent all my savings on a car and expenses as the paycheck didn't come through for the first month or so.
20: $2000
21: $8500

About to start my third year of uni whilst working - Degree paid off by my work.

I figure I'm right at the bottom of the barrel here, if nothing else my reply can serve as something different to all the incredible net worths you folk have built up.
You are doing great. I bet most of the high net worth numbers you see here are from people that had a negative net worth at your age. I know I was.
You are far ahead of where I was at your age. I don’t think I reached a networth of 0 until I was 28 years old.

Way to go, keep up the good work!
I appriciate the kind words fellas, totally suprised by the support.
Can't beat receiving an education paid for by someone else! :thumbsup :thumbsup

MegaCorp paid nearly 100% for my undergraduate and graduate degrees, very few dollars spent by me. My goal was to have my undergratuate degree completed by the time my 10 year HS reunion rolled around. I graduated from HS in 1971, and received my undergraduate degree a couple of weeks before the class reunion in 1981.

I encouraged DW to get at the least an AA degree to act as a good role model for the daughters. She really enjoyed the experience, but stopped at the AA level. But, the DDs saw how difficult it was for her to go to work 40 hours a week, and take classes 2-3 nights a week. Of course that was one of the lessons I wanted them to see.

Our route to higher education was marriage, children, education. Not the best financially, but, all things said, it worked splendidly for us. Fortunately DDs route was different: higher education, marriage, children. And, they have been more prosperous than we were at their ages.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven then I shall not go. " -Mark Twain
MostlyABogleHead
Posts: 38
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by MostlyABogleHead »

case_of_ennui wrote: Sat Oct 17, 2020 3:03 pm Single/unmarried, 32 living on the east coast. Income around $95k gross now, was making closer to $50k when I first started. I have a while to go but am starting to see things accelerate as pretty much all of my raises now can go straight to savings.


Image
Very nice progress. Given the low expenses, your savings rate will grow quickly and will be closer to your goals soon.
Broken Man 1999
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Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2015 11:31 am
Location: West coast of Florida, inland on high ground!

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

mikejuss wrote: Sat Sep 05, 2020 1:43 pm Well done, all.

But I wonder how much of these extraordinary wealth progressions is basically owing to windfalls such as raises, inheritances, or sales (and the resultant savings), rather than to index investing (which, at best, grows one's capital at relatively modest rates). I say this as a committed Boglehead. I think there's value in remaining clear-eyed about the many factors that drive wealth creation, and it seems that a high income and one's willingness to save a substantial amount of it are the prerequisites to successful index investing.
Excellent observation! I had zero earned income from the end of 1999. DW retired in 2008 to watch our grandchildren as they came along.

As Mr Larimore has said, there are many roads to Dublin. I took a different route than most here. But, it worked for us.

I received a lot of free money along the path from 1999 to today.
Around $200,000 for an accident claim, $125,000 from life insurance (and I didn't even have to die! :D ). However, I would not advise this wealth-building path for anyone!

Later on I received about $400,000 as an inheritance from my father, along with my two siblings. He was able to amass $1.2 mil from selling his citrus groves. He was frugal, but never cheap with his family, only himself.

In August of 2015 I took my pension as a lump-sum and rolled it all over to my TIRA. It added almost $900,000.

12/31 balances
2013 $1,069,000
2014 $1,142,000
2015 $1,960,000
2016 $2,017,000
2017 $2,164,000
2018 $2,015,000
2019 $2,288,000
2020 $2,451,000 (balance through 10/16/2020)

The above represents our Vanguard mutual funds, ETFs, and Vanguard Variable Annuity sub-accounts.

It does not include our I-bonds (S164,066.68, last valued in May, 2020), or our 529 plans for the grandchildren, which collectively hold $23,000. Also for NW I would conservatively estimate our mortgage-free home value at $315,000. Home across the street sold for $345,000 a month ago, it is several years younger. OTOH, it has never been updated, and our home has been remodeled. So, who knows?

I don't believe we could be considered very frugal, perhaps we just have what we want and thus aren't big spenders other than a few home projects.

DW and I have enough.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven then I shall not go. " -Mark Twain
Lee_WSP
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Location: Arizona

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Lee_WSP »

mikejuss wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:28 pm
Normchad wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:18 pm
kerfuffle wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 10:14 am Loooong-time lurker, first-time poster! Don't ask me why today is finally the day.

Background: Two professional incomes/3 kids; includes home equity

2006: -37,000 (partner 1 graduates professional school)
2007: -20,000 (partner 2 graduates professional school)
2008: +70,000
2009: +215,000
2010: +330,000
2011: +500,000
2012: +715,000
2013: +1,030,000
2014: +1,380,000
2015: +1,575,000 (first kid!)
2016: +2,065,000
2017: +2,570,000 (a couple more kids!)
2018: +2,665,000
2019: +3,500,000
2020: +3,750,000

We've been very lucky with our jobs, saved aggressively (especially early on) and invested simply. Maybe I'm posting because I still find it hard to believe. We owe so much to the wisdom found in the Bogleheads philosophy and the insights in this forum.
Well done, congratulations! Hopefully, people read this thread in the future and see how well the “standard bogelhead” approach works.....

The total impact of all the great success stories in this thread is a real testament to simplicity and the power of being “just average” in our investments.....
But isn't this progression due less to index-investing returns and more to simply making and saving a lot of money? I'm fully on-board with the indexing philosophy, but let's be clear about one how one goes from zero to $3.75 million in a dozen years (for which achievement my compliments).
Yes. By my quick math, they're dumping 130,000 each year from the first year of graduation. Then in 2012, it looks like they got some pay raises and dumped even more in. Fast forwarded a decade and you've got a million and a half at least from pure brute rate savings.
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vitaflo
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by vitaflo »

Here's a progression for those of you who may be reading this thread and perhaps thinking "I can't make year to year jumps as big as these people". I've been tracking my NW since I started investing at 24 (at the top of the dot com boom!). It was a slow slog for a while, but by increasing my salary (mainly by becoming an independent contractor at 34) and compounding got me to where I am today. No inheritance, no gifts, no stock options. Just income. Nothing fancy about my investments, typical bogleheads approach, even using the "dreaded" international at market cap weight (oh the horror). Still on track to retire early.

LBYM, save, keep it simple, and stay the course. You too can get there.

2000: 3,000 (age 24)
2001: 10,000
2002: 13,000
2003: 21,000
2004: 43,000
2005: 68,000
2006: 96,000
2007: 118,000
2008: 108,000
2009: 142,000
2010: 204,000 (Aug 2010, started consulting business, income increased 2x)
2011: 314,000
2012: 455,000
2013: 634,000
2014: 876,000
2015: 1,020,000
2016: 1,198,000
2017: 1,563,000
2018: 1,638,000
2019: 1,931,000
2020: 2,126,000 (age 44)
Broken Man 1999
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

Nice job!

I hope those piling up these incredible amounts of wealth do not find themselves unable to retire and enjoy the fruits of their labor.

It is very discouraging to read posts where the poster seems unable to spend after their savings are at a level that would last two lifetimes of withdrawals.

So, enjoy the journey along the way.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven then I shall not go. " -Mark Twain
RXfiles
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by RXfiles »

28 income 130k. Spouse income 180k. Wife just graduated this spring

2019 -300k
2020 -150k

Student loans for the win.
Normchad
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Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by Normchad »

RXfiles wrote: Sun Oct 18, 2020 2:26 pm 28 income 130k. Spouse income 180k. Wife just graduated this spring

2019 -300k
2020 -150k

Student loans for the win.
I didn’t attain a net worth of zero until I was about 30. I will still be able to retire comfortably by 55.

It looks like you’re doing all the right things, and heading in the right direction. The difference from 2019 to 2020 is very impressive. Keep up the good work!
RXfiles
Posts: 43
Joined: Tue May 26, 2020 1:23 pm

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by RXfiles »

Normchad wrote: Sun Oct 18, 2020 2:31 pm
RXfiles wrote: Sun Oct 18, 2020 2:26 pm 28 income 130k. Spouse income 180k. Wife just graduated this spring

2019 -300k
2020 -150k

Student loans for the win.
I didn’t attain a net worth of zero until I was about 30. I will still be able to retire comfortably by 55.

It looks like you’re doing all the right things, and heading in the right direction. The difference from 2019 to 2020 is very impressive. Keep up the good work!

Thank you. We've been together all the way thru school and lived on less than 30k a year the whole way. Plan is to keep that going for maybe 5 more years. Pay our debt. Max all tax advantaged accounts and save for down payment for a pretty nice house. Then slack up from there. My plan is to be in the position to retire by 50.
herpfinance
Posts: 232
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2014 4:52 pm
Location: Denmark

Re: Share your net worth progression

Post by herpfinance »

$100k Sep 2014
$150k July 2016
$300k July 2019
$400k Oct 2020

Got a couple of windfalls over the past year which helped out.
"The intelligent investor is a realist who sells to optimists and buys from pessimists" - Benjamin Graham
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