Retiring to Canada

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Petrocelli
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Retiring to Canada

Post by Petrocelli »

Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?
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tj
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by tj »

Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?


Con: Cold. Literally the entire country.
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ResearchMed
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by ResearchMed »

Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?
There's been a rather recent post here on BH about moving to Canada, and how difficult it can be.
I found it rather discouraging, even for those who are fully self-supporting, and don't need the social services (e.g., health care... have own insurance that pays outside the USA, etc.)
Try a search.

RM
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k b
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by k b »

ResearchMed wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:28 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?
There's been a rather recent post here on BH about moving to Canada, and how difficult it can be.
I found it rather discouraging, even for those who are fully self-supporting, and don't need the social services (e.g., health care... have own insurance that pays outside the USA, etc.)
Try a search.

RM
This is purely an armchair comment because I have not spent too much time in Canada, except for (mostly summer) trips to some major cities. My "knowledge" is based on reading and chatting with people on this topic.

The big positive of Canada is health care, which helps if you need only generalist care (i.e., you are in good health). Old age is the time the average person needs more specialist care, which is available in the US in much better quality without long wait times. This would make me question Canada as a choice.

Also - perhaps COL is lower and your USD savings could go farther there?
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Callisto
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Callisto »

It's my backup, though I have the advantage of already having citizenship. First step would be to ensure you can get citizenship, otherwise you aren't going to be eligible for benefits.

The healthcare system is in a state where if you *really* need care, you'll get it. The problem is if you aren't in a time sensitive condition, you're going into a very long line. A sports injury that requires an mri, for example, might have a total wait time of 9mo - year.
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ResearchMed
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by ResearchMed »

k b wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:38 pm
ResearchMed wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:28 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?
There's been a rather recent post here on BH about moving to Canada, and how difficult it can be.
I found it rather discouraging, even for those who are fully self-supporting, and don't need the social services (e.g., health care... have own insurance that pays outside the USA, etc.)
Try a search.

RM
This is purely an armchair comment because I have not spent too much time in Canada, except for (mostly summer) trips to some major cities. My "knowledge" is based on reading and chatting with people on this topic.

The big positive of Canada is health care, which helps if you need only generalist care (i.e., you are in good health). Old age is the time the average person needs more specialist care, which is available in the US in much better quality without long wait times. This would make me question Canada as a choice.

Also - perhaps COL is lower and your USD savings could go farther there?
I'm not commenting on any aspect/quality of Canadian health care.
My comment is about their immigration rules that make it virtually impossible for us to immigrate if we wanted to do so.
(At least in our case, "getting health care in Canada" would not be a factor at all. There are other strong reasons we'd have liked to be able to seriously consider moving there.)

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.
k b
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by k b »

ResearchMed wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:56 pm
k b wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:38 pm
ResearchMed wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:28 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?
There's been a rather recent post here on BH about moving to Canada, and how difficult it can be.
I found it rather discouraging, even for those who are fully self-supporting, and don't need the social services (e.g., health care... have own insurance that pays outside the USA, etc.)
Try a search.

RM
This is purely an armchair comment because I have not spent too much time in Canada, except for (mostly summer) trips to some major cities. My "knowledge" is based on reading and chatting with people on this topic.

The big positive of Canada is health care, which helps if you need only generalist care (i.e., you are in good health). Old age is the time the average person needs more specialist care, which is available in the US in much better quality without long wait times. This would make me question Canada as a choice.

Also - perhaps COL is lower and your USD savings could go farther there?
I'm not commenting on any aspect/quality of Canadian health care.
My comment is about their immigration rules that make it virtually impossible for us to immigrate if we wanted to do so.
(At least in our case, "getting health care in Canada" would not be a factor at all. There are other strong reasons we'd have liked to be able to seriously consider moving there.)

RM
Oops. I meant my own comment is an armchair one, etc. Wasn't criticising yours. Sorry for the confusion!
Zonian59
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Zonian59 »

tj wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:24 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?


Con: Cold. Literally the entire country.
Fifty two years ago, my father was serious about retiring to Canada. Even got the permanent resident visa approved and was ready to go. Went to Vancouver, British Columbia and came back grumbling it was TOO COLD. Instead he decided to retired to California.

Wonder if the heating expenses in Canada are lower/higher than the air conditioning expenses in California, Arizona, Texas?

Still pondering emigrating to Canada, especially give the current situation in the U.S.

Is the health care system, especially for older people....65+, really that bad? Have heard/read conflicting opinions.
pasadena
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by pasadena »

ResearchMed wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:28 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?
There's been a rather recent post here on BH about moving to Canada, and how difficult it can be.
I found it rather discouraging, even for those who are fully self-supporting, and don't need the social services (e.g., health care... have own insurance that pays outside the USA, etc.)
Try a search.

RM
You will still use, and benefit from, the infrastructure, and lower prices. Not only healthcare related, but everything else as well.
Susan1963
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Susan1963 »

We live in Canada and have a winter house in Florida.
Heating costs in Canada are much, much higher than equivalent utilities in Florida.
Our 2000 sq ft home in Canada costs a monthly average of 150$ to heat, 150$ for power, 100$ for water and 50$ for garbage.
Deregulation about 20 years ago has added fees upon fees upon fees to our utility bills.
I also live in a province with reasonable utility fees.
The Maritimes heat with oil and that can be many hundreds of dollars per month in the winter.
Also, given our more expansive social benefits, and the COVID related government assistance to anyone economically affected by the virus (the federal government offered $2000 per month per person for 6 months), the government deficits (federal and provincial) have increased greatly and there is a broad consensus that all manner of taxes will have to increase substantially.
While our tax burden is higher than in the US, we benefit from a stronger social safety net, (you get what you pay for......)
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by muddlehead »

Susan1963 wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 3:24 pm We live in Canada and have a winter house in Florida.
[ quote fixed by admin LadyGeek]

Hi. Can you speak to the issue of ease/difficulty of attaining Canadian citizenship moving from USA. Thx.
hmw
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by hmw »

tj wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:24 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?


Con: Cold. Literally the entire country.
Winter in greater Vancouver area is quite mild. A lot warmer than Chicago or Boston.
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by hmw »

ResearchMed wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:56 pm [
I'm not commenting on any aspect/quality of Canadian health care.
My comment is about their immigration rules that make it virtually impossible for us to immigrate if we wanted to do so.
(At least in our case, "getting health care in Canada" would not be a factor at all. There are other strong reasons we'd have liked to be able to seriously consider moving there.)

RM
Once you are a landed immigrant in Canada, there is no mechanism for the system to charge you for any public healthcare. You will be treated just like any other Canadian citizen. As far as I know, US Medicare will not cover you if you live in Canada or getting elective care in Canada. I believe that private insurance companies in Canada are not allowed by law to sell insurance that covers any medical service that is already covered by the public system. Essentially there is not a parallel private system in Canada that provides essential medical service.
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ResearchMed
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by ResearchMed »

hmw wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 4:29 pm
ResearchMed wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:56 pm [
I'm not commenting on any aspect/quality of Canadian health care.
My comment is about their immigration rules that make it virtually impossible for us to immigrate if we wanted to do so.
(At least in our case, "getting health care in Canada" would not be a factor at all. There are other strong reasons we'd have liked to be able to seriously consider moving there.)

RM
Once you are a landed immigrant in Canada, there is no mechanism for the system to charge you for any public healthcare. You will be treated just like any other Canadian citizen. As far as I know, US Medicare will not cover you if you live in Canada or getting elective care in Canada. I believe that private insurance companies in Canada are not allowed by law to sell insurance that covers any medical service that is already covered by the public system. Essentially there is not a parallel private system in Canada that provides essential medical service.
Please, I am NOT commenting on the Canadian health care system, not quality, waiting times, costs, nor whom is eligible.

My comment is about the difficulty for a non-citizen to move there (rather than "vacation a lot").
I assume that means difficulty becoming a "landed immigrant", and not just a full citizen.
And I've understood that also means just "living there long term/permanently", without needing to come and go, or pretend one is "vacationing frequently" or such.

(Don't "worry" about *how* we would pay for health care there. We know about that already. We are not trying/hoping to purchase private insurance in Canada, and we aren't expecting Medicare to help, either.)

RM
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Susan1963
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Susan1963 »

muddlehead wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 4:15 pm
Susan1963 wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 3:24 pm We live in Canada and have a winter house in Florida.

Hi. Can you speak to the issue of ease/difficulty of attaining Canadian citizenship moving from USA. Thx.
I only have anecdotal information. I believe is it difficult (but not impossible) to immigrate to Canada from a western first world country, especially if you are moving here without a job. I would certainly speak to a Canadian immigration lawyer to get advice on the most efficient way to do this. I do know that in the recent past there was a category of landed immigrant where one could bypass the regular system if you had a certain amount of $$ to invest in a local business (maybe $1MM?).

I think that the US does not recognize dual citizenship and since Americans pay taxes on their worldwide income, moving to Canada as an American, even if you get Canadian citizenship (but do not renounce US citizenship) you have to file taxes in both countries. And while I do know that there is a tax treaty between Canada and the US, it is a an added annual burden at tax time. Also, there are registered accounts in Canada that are not recognized by the IRS so "tax free" accounts in Canada are not necessarily "tax free" for US citizens living in Canada.
hmw
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by hmw »

ResearchMed wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 4:47 pm
hmw wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 4:29 pm
Once you are a landed immigrant in Canada, there is no mechanism for the system to charge you for any public healthcare. You will be treated just like any other Canadian citizen. As far as I know, US Medicare will not cover you if you live in Canada or getting elective care in Canada. I believe that private insurance companies in Canada are not allowed by law to sell insurance that covers any medical service that is already covered by the public system. Essentially there is not a parallel private system in Canada that provides essential medical service.
Please, I am NOT commenting on the Canadian health care system, not quality, waiting times, costs, nor whom is eligible.

My comment is about the difficulty for a non-citizen to move there (rather than "vacation a lot").
I assume that means difficulty becoming a "landed immigrant", and not just a full citizen.
And I've understood that also means just "living there long term/permanently", without needing to come and go, or pretend one is "vacationing frequently" or such.

(Don't "worry" about *how* we would pay for health care there. We know about that already. We are not trying/hoping to purchase private insurance in Canada, and we aren't expecting Medicare to help, either.)

RM
I am not super familiar with the Canadian immigration system. I am not an immigration attorney. I think the Canadian system operates on a point system in which a working aged person in a profession that is in demand is favored. Outside the point system, there was (? is) an investor class immigrant. I don't know how much money is required.
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by flaccidsteele »

Canada has strict immigration policies. We have an eastern wall called the Atlantic, a western wall called the Pacific, and a southern wall called the USA

Great healthcare. Both my parents got cancer and were treated with the best care at no cost. Non-urgent care can require a wait. Eye and dental are paid out of pocket unless the patient has insurance

Canadian retirees have it pretty good. No complaints here
The US market always recovers. It’s never different this time. Retired in my 40s. Investing is a simple game of rinse and repeat
reln
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by reln »

tj wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:24 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?


Con: Cold. Literally the entire country.
That's a pro for me lol 😉
tj
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by tj »

hmw wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 4:22 pm
tj wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:24 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?


Con: Cold. Literally the entire country.
Winter in greater Vancouver area is quite mild. A lot warmer than Chicago or Boston.
Definitely, but Vancouver isn't warm in the wiinter.
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by truenorth418 »

flaccidsteele wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 5:22 pm
Great healthcare. Both my parents got cancer and were treated with the best care at no cost.
This is not true. The Canadian healthcare system is single payer, socialized medicine which of course is paid for by taxes - which generally speaking are far higher in Canada than the USA (YMMV).

OP, do your research on this including run a Canadian tax return (federal and provincial) to understand how "no cost" this move would be for you.
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by flaccidsteele »

truenorth418 wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 5:50 pm
flaccidsteele wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 5:22 pm
Great healthcare. Both my parents got cancer and were treated with the best care at no cost.
This is not true. The Canadian healthcare system is single payer, socialized medicine which of course is paid for by taxes - which generally speaking are far higher in Canada than the USA (YMMV).

OP, do your research on this including run a Canadian tax return (federal and provincial) to understand how "no cost" this move would be for you.
No out of pocket costs

And there’s 0% chance of going bankrupt paying for cancer treatments
The US market always recovers. It’s never different this time. Retired in my 40s. Investing is a simple game of rinse and repeat
truenorth418
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by truenorth418 »

flaccidsteele wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 5:52 pm
truenorth418 wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 5:50 pm
flaccidsteele wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 5:22 pm
Great healthcare. Both my parents got cancer and were treated with the best care at no cost.
This is not true. The Canadian healthcare system is single payer, socialized medicine which of course is paid for by taxes - which generally speaking are far higher in Canada than the USA (YMMV).

OP, do your research on this including run a Canadian tax return (federal and provincial) to understand how "no cost" this move would be for you.
No out of pocket costs

And there’s 0% chance of going bankrupt paying for cancer treatments
Both of my parents battled cancer in the Canadian system. Both died. We'll never know whether they would have had better outcomes in the U.S. system But, it's true, they did not go bankrupt in the Canadian system.

My point stands, there are many benefits to the Canadian healthcare system, but it is not "no cost". If the OP is serious about a move to Canada and healthcare and taxes are a consideration, I recommend they do the research to understand the higher costs in taxes they are likely to pay.
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mrspock
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by mrspock »

I've been pondering this choice since I'm a dual citizen. Here's my list:

Pros
1. Public Healthcare System - This is pretty huge, as you have an ironclad system which covers you from a common cold to long term care.
2. Public Safety - This because more evident to me after living in the US. Canada has less crime, handguns are nearly non-existent, less violence, less everything... you can kinda just kick back and relax and not have your guard up because of this.
3. In-equality - The country has a very robust middle class, and a thinner upper middle class, and very thin "upper class" than the US. Because of this the tensions which come with in-equality are far less prevalent in Canada IMO. Canada's upper class also has a culture of very discrete out of sight consumption, they will have palatial homes perhaps even a private jet, but often humble cars for example. Again, this reduces the social tensions in the country IMO.
4. Robust Social Safety Net - As a more well off person, I've come to appreciate the benefits this has having lived in both countries. Part of what you get for paying for this is again, less blight in your city, begging, drug use, homelessness etc. Seeing this every single day in the US honestly takes it's toll, and folks are understandably more incentivized to commit crimes against you when they have basically no other alternative for their survival.
5. Education - If you plan on having kids, the public education system from k-12 to University is far (far) more accessible and nearly universally good quality. There's just way fewer bad schools, and to be fair...fewer truly excellent ones too, but that too is typically Canadian -- it prevents problem #3 above. Again, eye opening when I moved to the states and saw palatial high schools with giant amphitheaters, swimming pools, stunning architecture. You just aren't going to see that in Canada, but you won't see a rundown school either, you'll see "good" solid schools, with well paid teachers, where your kid is going to get a good fair shot at life.
6. Politics - Far less polarized, far more civil, publicly funded. Let me temper this comment by saying, Canada has only 35M people, vs. more than 350M in the US, so it's way easier to pull this trick off. The US doesn't give itself enough credit IMO, there's basically 3-4 countries worth of culture in the US and they all manage to make it work, it isn't pretty at times, but it works out in the end.
7. Housing - The costs would make an American blush. Far cheaper in equivalent "class" cities. $2M (2.6M CAD) USD in Silicon Valley gets you a home most Canadians would dare show their friends for fear they might start offering them money to help them out of their "hard times", in Vancouver you'd be living down the street from some business magnet, with people puzzled how you can afford to live in the home without renting out most of it to afford the mortgage. In other cities like Calgary, Edmonton, Regina, Winnipeg or the Maritimes -- you'd make the news buying a house for that kind of money. It would be a near mansion in the nicest part of town.
8. TV - Sorry....but it's just better. Less sleazy commercials, less religious stuff, less political ads, Science channels which actually show Science. To this day I don't subscribe to US cable, sorry...just can't handle it.

Cons
1. Weather - Winters are really cold, the best you can do is Vancouver and then endure an insufferable rainy winter.
2. Taxes - Capital gains taxes get similar treatment as the US (only 50% is taxed), Canadian dividends get preferential treatment, but beyond this, you can expect everything to be taxed straight up as income, and the higher taxation rates start at much lower rates in Canada vs. US. And things like Muni bonds? LOLz.... they don't exist.
3. Salaries - The flip-side to #3, is salaries are far less in Canada, so it's a great place to retire, but not super great if you are in the top 10% of your profession and could command a much higher comp in other countries. It's kind of antithetical in Canada to pay somebody a ton more than another person, even if they are far better at their job -- it just won't happen. In the US, they aren't shy about this, if somebody is worth a ton more to a company, US companies will pay (and promo) them accordingly and not even think twice about it. Again, eye opening when I moved to the US.
4. Travel - You can travel nearly anywhere in the world in the US for very reasonable prices, this just isn't the case in Canada. It's probably 25-30% more for similar destinations, so if you are a travel bug, keep this in mind (or be prepared to drive to the US when flying internationally).
5. Geographic Diversity - There just isn't the kind of diversity the US has, there's just a massive choice in the kind of climate or various other dimensions when choosing where to live (in the US).
6. Equality - Lets get real for a second...if you are the one with the money, the power, equality might be the last thing you want. Money talks in the US way more than it does in Canada, it can buy you safety, justice, connections, political favors, jobs, it allows your kids to get a much bigger edge in life than in Canada. If you are in the top 1%, you need to understand just how much of an edge you are giving up by moving to a place like Canada. Your kids will have to do way more of the heavy lifting themselves than in the US, and if they are exceptional in various ways, it won't be as highly valued/celebrated in Canada as it is in the US. Get busted for a DUI? Good luck with that in Canada.... in the US, once your high powered lawyer gets done with things, you'll probably walk with a slap on the wrist, probably a personal apology from the cop who stopped you.

My 2 cents.
Northern Flicker
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Northern Flicker »

tj wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:24 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?


Con: Cold. Literally the entire country.
Vancouver has a milder winter than say Washington DC.
Risk is not a guarantor of return.
Ace1
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Ace1 »

Surprised no one has mentioned this one...
The Canadian beer is FAR superior to the watered down excuse for beer in the states 😎.
bhsince87
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by bhsince87 »

Ace1 wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 8:26 pm Surprised no one has mentioned this one...
The Canadian beer is FAR superior to the watered down excuse for beer in the states 😎.
That was true 30 years ago. Ridiculous statement today.
"If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace." Samuel Adams
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by bhsince87 »

I looked into this about 10 years ago. I was offered a job to move to Canada from the US to open up an engineering office.

It would have created jobs, which is one of the big boxes you must check if you want to become a citizen.

But still, they would only guarantee me "Resident" status. I think I had to do that for 5 years (might have been 3) and then I could apply for citizenship. But it still wasn't guaranteed.

IIRC, they would have let me come to work as an engineer, but I had to jump through much higher hoops as an engineering manager.

Maybe things have changed, but back then, you had to bring big bucks and/or create jobs, or have a special critical skill, or you would not get in. I can't imagine them accepting a retiree.
"If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace." Samuel Adams
RickyAZ
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by RickyAZ »

You can be a dual citizen of the US & Canada. Never had to surrender my Canadian passport when I became a US citizen.

If you retire in Canada and don't renounce your US citizenship you'll have to file taxes in both countries. You'll wait in line for healthcare though you can purchase supplemental insurance for some upgrades. A lot of people come to the US for non emergency care if they can afford it.

The cold will break you if you've never experienced it. Try spending February anywhere in Canada before settling there. Spring through fall can be glorious, if short.

With my parents passed, wouldn't consider moving back.
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kramer
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by kramer »

Canada is an interesting country in a lot of ways and I have learned so much more about the place and have more respect than ever for it after befriending many Canadians on my travels and even visiting friends there.

However, the cold weather alone would completely and absolutely rule it out for me ... I mean, it is not even in the ballpark, not even for 6 months per year anywhere in the country.
shess
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by shess »

Zonian59 wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:58 pm
tj wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:24 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?


Con: Cold. Literally the entire country.
Fifty two years ago, my father was serious about retiring to Canada. Even got the permanent resident visa approved and was ready to go. Went to Vancouver, British Columbia and came back grumbling it was TOO COLD. Instead he decided to retired to California.
That's funny, Vancouver doesn't have properly cold temperatures. Maybe he should have tried Winnipeg?
Valuethinker
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?
Pros

The people (generally)
More socially conscious people. So more of a welfare state, single payer healthcare, low cost university, smaller evident gap in wealth etc. I attended high school with the sons of a couple of billionaires and it is absolutely true that rich Canadians do not normally flash it around.
Genuine commitment to diversity, tolerance, accepting of new immigrants.

On YouTube you can find "Heritage Minutes". Both TV and radio 1 minute vignettes of our history. They are sometimes corny and sentimental but ones like "Boat People" about Vietnamese refugees to Canada and "D Day" about Major Archie McNaughton on D Day, still cause my eyes to well up. The one "Burnt toast" about neurosurgery is widely parodied but intrinsically very moving if you've ever suffered a major head injury.

The Scots and the Irish, and the French and the Ukrainians are major parts of the Canadian journey. See also the TV series "Canada: a People's History".

The national sense of humour is deliciously dry and ironic. There's a reason why so many Canadians have succeeded in Hollywood Comedy.

Low violent crime low gun related crime etc. Culture of law abidingness. Legal marijuana if that is a factor for you.

Cons

Treatment of the peoples of our First Nations has been awful. They are our third world. I was taught that we treated them better than the Americans but I am not sure cultural genocide & neglect is in the end better than actual massacre.

States are called provinces and the country can define "provincial " in its mindset. Regional tensions & lazy stereotypes are always there (but we all want to retire to the West Coast ;-)).

Complex inferiority & superiority complex re US and Americans. Tread carefully.


Taxes are relatively high particularly at the upper income brackets relative to USA. A friend worked in financial services for a mid 6 figure salary, (I presume) and said his taxes wh he lived in NYC and in Toronto were similar.

Crazy housing prices in Greater Toronto Area and Greater Vancouver area. Congestion in GTA (traffic) is as bad as any North American city ex perhaps LA & Bay area.

Climate is generally one of extremes except Vancouver and Victoria w are similar to Seattle. Toronto is mild compared to Buffalo NY or Chicago or MN or Wisconsin.

Immigration rules

As noted by others except if you are reuniting w family already there (OR you have a plausible claim for refugee status) retirees are unlikely to achieve permanent residency/ Landed Immigrant status.

Canada wants young people and skilled migrants. Practising law or medicine in Canada requires basically redoing your education in a Canadian school, for example. But a Registered Nurse or machine toolist would find it much easier.

If your employer moves you to Canada that might be a way in.

I don't wish to trigger the healthcare rants that some posters kick off on, when Canadian healthcare is mentioned but if you are accepted as an iimmigrant to Canada you are given a provincial billing number and you are part of the system. So I don't know how that would work with American Medicare etc.

There is an immigrant investor programme and I don't know much about it.

If considering Canada I would definitely consider Portugal as well, given that is an EU passport. And perhaps Malta?
Valuethinker
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

shess wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 1:13 am
Zonian59 wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:58 pm
tj wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:24 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?


Con: Cold. Literally the entire country.
Fifty two years ago, my father was serious about retiring to Canada. Even got the permanent resident visa approved and was ready to go. Went to Vancouver, British Columbia and came back grumbling it was TOO COLD. Instead he decided to retired to California.
That's funny, Vancouver doesn't have properly cold temperatures. Maybe he should have tried Winnipeg?
I would just like to put it out here that the idea of Winnipeg in January is a con put out by the government and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Its a conspiracy.

There are actually no people who live in "Winnipeg" in January. The city is a giant movie set and they fly in actors to make it look like there are people there. Human life cannot exist at those temperatures.

Check on YouTube. There are videos.
carolinaman
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by carolinaman »

mrspock wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 6:03 pm I've been pondering this choice since I'm a dual citizen. Here's my list:

Pros
1. Public Healthcare System - This is pretty huge, as you have an ironclad system which covers you from a common cold to long term care.
2. Public Safety - This because more evident to me after living in the US. Canada has less crime, handguns are nearly non-existent, less violence, less everything... you can kinda just kick back and relax and not have your guard up because of this.
3. In-equality - The country has a very robust middle class, and a thinner upper middle class, and very thin "upper class" than the US. Because of this the tensions which come with in-equality are far less prevalent in Canada IMO. Canada's upper class also has a culture of very discrete out of sight consumption, they will have palatial homes perhaps even a private jet, but often humble cars for example. Again, this reduces the social tensions in the country IMO.
4. Robust Social Safety Net - As a more well off person, I've come to appreciate the benefits this has having lived in both countries. Part of what you get for paying for this is again, less blight in your city, begging, drug use, homelessness etc. Seeing this every single day in the US honestly takes it's toll, and folks are understandably more incentivized to commit crimes against you when they have basically no other alternative for their survival.
5. Education - If you plan on having kids, the public education system from k-12 to University is far (far) more accessible and nearly universally good quality. There's just way fewer bad schools, and to be fair...fewer truly excellent ones too, but that too is typically Canadian -- it prevents problem #3 above. Again, eye opening when I moved to the states and saw palatial high schools with giant amphitheaters, swimming pools, stunning architecture. You just aren't going to see that in Canada, but you won't see a rundown school either, you'll see "good" solid schools, with well paid teachers, where your kid is going to get a good fair shot at life.
6. Politics - Far less polarized, far more civil, publicly funded. Let me temper this comment by saying, Canada has only 35M people, vs. more than 350M in the US, so it's way easier to pull this trick off. The US doesn't give itself enough credit IMO, there's basically 3-4 countries worth of culture in the US and they all manage to make it work, it isn't pretty at times, but it works out in the end.
7. Housing - The costs would make an American blush. Far cheaper in equivalent "class" cities. $2M (2.6M CAD) USD in Silicon Valley gets you a home most Canadians would dare show their friends for fear they might start offering them money to help them out of their "hard times", in Vancouver you'd be living down the street from some business magnet, with people puzzled how you can afford to live in the home without renting out most of it to afford the mortgage. In other cities like Calgary, Edmonton, Regina, Winnipeg or the Maritimes -- you'd make the news buying a house for that kind of money. It would be a near mansion in the nicest part of town.
8. TV - Sorry....but it's just better. Less sleazy commercials, less religious stuff, less political ads, Science channels which actually show Science. To this day I don't subscribe to US cable, sorry...just can't handle it.

Cons
1. Weather - Winters are really cold, the best you can do is Vancouver and then endure an insufferable rainy winter.
2. Taxes - Capital gains taxes get similar treatment as the US (only 50% is taxed), Canadian dividends get preferential treatment, but beyond this, you can expect everything to be taxed straight up as income, and the higher taxation rates start at much lower rates in Canada vs. US. And things like Muni bonds? LOLz.... they don't exist.
3. Salaries - The flip-side to #3, is salaries are far less in Canada, so it's a great place to retire, but not super great if you are in the top 10% of your profession and could command a much higher comp in other countries. It's kind of antithetical in Canada to pay somebody a ton more than another person, even if they are far better at their job -- it just won't happen. In the US, they aren't shy about this, if somebody is worth a ton more to a company, US companies will pay (and promo) them accordingly and not even think twice about it. Again, eye opening when I moved to the US.
4. Travel - You can travel nearly anywhere in the world in the US for very reasonable prices, this just isn't the case in Canada. It's probably 25-30% more for similar destinations, so if you are a travel bug, keep this in mind (or be prepared to drive to the US when flying internationally).
5. Geographic Diversity - There just isn't the kind of diversity the US has, there's just a massive choice in the kind of climate or various other dimensions when choosing where to live (in the US).
6. Equality - Lets get real for a second...if you are the one with the money, the power, equality might be the last thing you want. Money talks in the US way more than it does in Canada, it can buy you safety, justice, connections, political favors, jobs, it allows your kids to get a much bigger edge in life than in Canada. If you are in the top 1%, you need to understand just how much of an edge you are giving up by moving to a place like Canada. Your kids will have to do way more of the heavy lifting themselves than in the US, and if they are exceptional in various ways, it won't be as highly valued/celebrated in Canada as it is in the US. Get busted for a DUI? Good luck with that in Canada.... in the US, once your high powered lawyer gets done with things, you'll probably walk with a slap on the wrist, probably a personal apology from the cop who stopped you.

My 2 cents.
+1. Great post! Thanks
retired early&luv it
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by retired early&luv it »

I could be wrong on this, but it is my understanding that if you go to a foreign country, not only can't get medicare coverage but if you stay there for several years and while out of the country you do not pay into medicare, if (or when) you return to USA years later you will then have to pay penalties for the years you did not pay medicare premiums.

I could be wrong, but you may want to research that. I for one would want to have the option to come back to USA several years later. And having to pay medicare premiums for the years I live outside USA to avoid penalties is not very palatable.

A lot of foreign banks will not let you open an account if you are a USA citizen due to the paperwork requirements.
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by friar1610 »

carolinaman wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 7:47 am
mrspock wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 6:03 pm I've been pondering this choice since I'm a dual citizen. Here's my list:

Pros
1. Public Healthcare System - This is pretty huge, as you have an ironclad system which covers you from a common cold to long term care.
2. Public Safety - This because more evident to me after living in the US. Canada has less crime, handguns are nearly non-existent, less violence, less everything... you can kinda just kick back and relax and not have your guard up because of this.
3. In-equality - The country has a very robust middle class, and a thinner upper middle class, and very thin "upper class" than the US. Because of this the tensions which come with in-equality are far less prevalent in Canada IMO. Canada's upper class also has a culture of very discrete out of sight consumption, they will have palatial homes perhaps even a private jet, but often humble cars for example. Again, this reduces the social tensions in the country IMO.
4. Robust Social Safety Net - As a more well off person, I've come to appreciate the benefits this has having lived in both countries. Part of what you get for paying for this is again, less blight in your city, begging, drug use, homelessness etc. Seeing this every single day in the US honestly takes it's toll, and folks are understandably more incentivized to commit crimes against you when they have basically no other alternative for their survival.
5. Education - If you plan on having kids, the public education system from k-12 to University is far (far) more accessible and nearly universally good quality. There's just way fewer bad schools, and to be fair...fewer truly excellent ones too, but that too is typically Canadian -- it prevents problem #3 above. Again, eye opening when I moved to the states and saw palatial high schools with giant amphitheaters, swimming pools, stunning architecture. You just aren't going to see that in Canada, but you won't see a rundown school either, you'll see "good" solid schools, with well paid teachers, where your kid is going to get a good fair shot at life.
6. Politics - Far less polarized, far more civil, publicly funded. Let me temper this comment by saying, Canada has only 35M people, vs. more than 350M in the US, so it's way easier to pull this trick off. The US doesn't give itself enough credit IMO, there's basically 3-4 countries worth of culture in the US and they all manage to make it work, it isn't pretty at times, but it works out in the end.
7. Housing - The costs would make an American blush. Far cheaper in equivalent "class" cities. $2M (2.6M CAD) USD in Silicon Valley gets you a home most Canadians would dare show their friends for fear they might start offering them money to help them out of their "hard times", in Vancouver you'd be living down the street from some business magnet, with people puzzled how you can afford to live in the home without renting out most of it to afford the mortgage. In other cities like Calgary, Edmonton, Regina, Winnipeg or the Maritimes -- you'd make the news buying a house for that kind of money. It would be a near mansion in the nicest part of town.
8. TV - Sorry....but it's just better. Less sleazy commercials, less religious stuff, less political ads, Science channels which actually show Science. To this day I don't subscribe to US cable, sorry...just can't handle it.

Cons
1. Weather - Winters are really cold, the best you can do is Vancouver and then endure an insufferable rainy winter.
2. Taxes - Capital gains taxes get similar treatment as the US (only 50% is taxed), Canadian dividends get preferential treatment, but beyond this, you can expect everything to be taxed straight up as income, and the higher taxation rates start at much lower rates in Canada vs. US. And things like Muni bonds? LOLz.... they don't exist.
3. Salaries - The flip-side to #3, is salaries are far less in Canada, so it's a great place to retire, but not super great if you are in the top 10% of your profession and could command a much higher comp in other countries. It's kind of antithetical in Canada to pay somebody a ton more than another person, even if they are far better at their job -- it just won't happen. In the US, they aren't shy about this, if somebody is worth a ton more to a company, US companies will pay (and promo) them accordingly and not even think twice about it. Again, eye opening when I moved to the US.
4. Travel - You can travel nearly anywhere in the world in the US for very reasonable prices, this just isn't the case in Canada. It's probably 25-30% more for similar destinations, so if you are a travel bug, keep this in mind (or be prepared to drive to the US when flying internationally).
5. Geographic Diversity - There just isn't the kind of diversity the US has, there's just a massive choice in the kind of climate or various other dimensions when choosing where to live (in the US).
6. Equality - Lets get real for a second...if you are the one with the money, the power, equality might be the last thing you want. Money talks in the US way more than it does in Canada, it can buy you safety, justice, connections, political favors, jobs, it allows your kids to get a much bigger edge in life than in Canada. If you are in the top 1%, you need to understand just how much of an edge you are giving up by moving to a place like Canada. Your kids will have to do way more of the heavy lifting themselves than in the US, and if they are exceptional in various ways, it won't be as highly valued/celebrated in Canada as it is in the US. Get busted for a DUI? Good luck with that in Canada.... in the US, once your high powered lawyer gets done with things, you'll probably walk with a slap on the wrist, probably a personal apology from the cop who stopped you.

My 2 cents.
+1. Great post! Thanks
+2. Was going to post the same but you beat me to it.
Friar1610
heerekj1
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by heerekj1 »

RickyAZ wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 9:04 pm You can be a dual citizen of the US & Canada. Never had to surrender my Canadian passport when I became a US citizen.

If you retire in Canada and don't renounce your US citizenship you'll have to file taxes in both countries. You'll wait in line for healthcare though you can purchase supplemental insurance for some upgrades. A lot of people come to the US for non emergency care if they can afford it.

The cold will break you if you've never experienced it. Try spending February anywhere in Canada before settling there. Spring through fall can be glorious, if short.

With my parents passed, wouldn't consider moving back.
If I understand correctly Canada has a single payer system and you are not allowed to use alternative insurance to pay for services that are covered by the single payer system. As a retiree I understand why I should not benefit from the single payer system but does that require that I need to pay up front for the costs and then seek reimbursement from my current health insurance company(BCBS).

Also I would be paying income taxes in Canada which, in part, pays for the single payer system but could not benefit from it.

Thanks
theresearcher
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by theresearcher »

This discussion is largely theoretical unless you are a Canadian citizen or married to one, or are otherwise eligible to immigrate to Canada (U.S. citizens do not have automatic settlement rights in Canada). Canada does not have a "retiree" immigration category- and while a small number of retired persons may qualify for some other immigration category- parent migration, for example- the majority do not. https://www.canada.ca/en/services/immig ... nship.html
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by LadyGeek »

This thread is now in the Personal Consumer Issues forum (how you spend your money and your time).

Expert opinions and advice can be found in our sister Canadian forum: Financial Wisdom Forum

They also have a wiki: finiki, the Canadian financial wiki

There are a number of threads which discuss moving from the US to Canada. For example:

- Relocation from US to Canada
- Moving from US to Canada [permanently]

Disclaimer: I'm a member of both forums.
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furwut
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by furwut »

I think a Con is that proper immigration, as a retiree, is difficult unless you have enough cash to get an Investor Visa. You can, however, stay for up to 6 months at a time and buy or rent property. So if you just want to live there it’s very doable by making a trip outside Canada to reset the 6 month clock periodically.
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

theresearcher wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:06 pm This discussion is largely theoretical unless you are a Canadian citizen or married to one, or are otherwise eligible to immigrate to Canada (U.S. citizens do not have automatic settlement rights in Canada). Canada does not have a "retiree" immigration category- and while a small number of retired persons may qualify for some other immigration category- parent migration, for example- the majority do not. https://www.canada.ca/en/services/immig ... nship.html
That was more or less my understanding.

Spousal or family reunification. Or Investor.

I believe for similar reasons most Canadians retain residency in Canada even as "snowbirds"? As they do not qualify for US Medicare they retain eligibility for provincial health care by residing in Canada for, as I understood, 6 months + 1 day.

There is a piece of Florida that even has a French Canadian newspaper ;-). As New Yorkers say "who knew"?
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

furwut wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:42 pm I think a Con is that proper immigration, as a retiree, is difficult unless you have enough cash to get an Investor Visa. You can, however, stay for up to 6 months at a time and buy or rent property. So if you just want to live there it’s very doable by making a trip outside Canada to reset the 6 month clock periodically.
Plenty of Americans who spend the summer on our lakes.

Strangely, very few seem to spend winters in Canada ;-).
theresearcher
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by theresearcher »

The Canadian investor visa program was closed in 2014.
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-re ... stors.html

There is still a Quebec investor visa (Quebec manages some programs separately within the overall Canadian immigration framework) however appears to be suspended pending review.
http://www.immigration-quebec.gouv.qc.c ... index.html

It may be possible to spend shorter periods in Canada as a visitor or temporary resident however one should be careful about the rules for becoming tax resident of Canada. It is possible to become tax resident of Canada without having permanent residence or citizenship and that is something that should normally be avoided.
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by visualguy »

Canada recently made it quite easy to immigrate there if you have the right profession (tech in particular) and some other qualifications. If you want to retire there, but are ok with working for a few years first after arriving there, I think that is achievable these days.
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by mrspock »

heerekj1 wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 10:54 am
RickyAZ wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 9:04 pm You can be a dual citizen of the US & Canada. Never had to surrender my Canadian passport when I became a US citizen.

If you retire in Canada and don't renounce your US citizenship you'll have to file taxes in both countries. You'll wait in line for healthcare though you can purchase supplemental insurance for some upgrades. A lot of people come to the US for non emergency care if they can afford it.

The cold will break you if you've never experienced it. Try spending February anywhere in Canada before settling there. Spring through fall can be glorious, if short.

With my parents passed, wouldn't consider moving back.
If I understand correctly Canada has a single payer system and you are not allowed to use alternative insurance to pay for services that are covered by the single payer system. As a retiree I understand why I should not benefit from the single payer system but does that require that I need to pay up front for the costs and then seek reimbursement from my current health insurance company(BCBS).
Half right. You CAN however get private insurance to cover yourself if you aren't covered by the Canadian system for some reason, they don't care who pays the bill at the end of the day, that's between you and your insurance provider. What they don't want is private doctors setting up shop who don't serve the public system, and only serve private patients, this would typically be illegal in most (all?) provinces.

I'd also point out that healthcare is a provincial jurisdiction, the federal government puts their thumb on the scale by offering funding ("transfer payments") if provinces follow certain standards/practices per the Canada Health Act, principally universal coverage of all citizens/perm residents/refugees. Provinces are technically allowed to not offer universal coverage, but they'd be forgoing huge federal transfer payments. This is key to understanding how public healthcare began in Canada, it was started in Saskatchewan by a Provincial Premier named "Tommy Douglas" -- a Scotsman incidentally, then spreading to other provinces. This man is widely considered to be the Greatest Canadian who ever lived, above even the founders of the country.
heerekj1 wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 10:54 am Also I would be paying income taxes in Canada which, in part, pays for the single payer system but could not benefit from it.
To be fair, many folks living in the US pay into medicare but will never benefit from it if they don't ultimately become citizens. But your point does stand. The question in my mind here, is it even possible to be deemed a resident for tax purposes as a retiree and be allowed to live in the country >6 months/yr (the usual threshold for becoming a resident for tax purposes)? Perhaps, but I think these are pretty rare circumstances. As a US retiree, in Canada (without any path to Citizenship) you will likely be doing <6 month stints, then having to shift to another country as to not overstay your visitor visa, this would mean you wouldn't have to file a Canadian tax return (unless you sold Canadian property and triggered a tax event).
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by ResearchMed »

mrspock wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 1:06 pm As a US retiree, in Canada (without any path to Citizenship) you will likely be doing <6 month stints, then having to shift to another country as to not overstay your visitor visa,
Are there requirements about minimum numbers of days "out" that one must be "out" for, to be able to return for "almost 6 months", or per calendar year or such? We'd likely be traveling at least a bit anyway. Can one keep a long term rental as a foreigner, meaning spanning more than a single "just under 6 month visit", etc., or would one need to "vacate"?

And yes, I've experienced Canadian winters... several stays in Montreal. My colleague worked at Concordia, and lived on the other side of McGill. Walking to the office, especially in the dark... "brisk" comes to mind :D
But my old memories of nasty winters in Chicago suburbs, and elsewhere in the midwest, actually seem worse. Maybe the brutal winds?
I love it there, and Vancouver is also a favorite, but the weather is less harsh, not too different from when I lived in Seattle, where one just gets used to the rain/drizzle. However, I found the "damp chill" worse than "cold clear" wintery days, as long as I didn't need to just "stand outside", etc.

RM
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by furwut »

visualguy wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:55 pm Canada recently made it quite easy to immigrate there if you have the right profession (tech in particular) and some other qualifications. If you want to retire there, but are ok with working for a few years first after arriving there, I think that is achievable these days.
Some of the Indian H1-B holders I worked with in IT got fed up waiting on the US Greencard lottery and went to Toronto.
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by hicabob »

Zonian59 wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:58 pm
tj wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:24 pm
Petrocelli wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:23 pm Has anyone looked into retiring in Canada? If you have, what are the pros and cons?


Con: Cold. Literally the entire country.
Fifty two years ago, my father was serious about retiring to Canada. Even got the permanent resident visa approved and was ready to go. Went to Vancouver, British Columbia and came back grumbling it was TOO COLD. Instead he decided to retired to California.

Wonder if the heating expenses in Canada are lower/higher than the air conditioning expenses in California, Arizona, Texas?

Still pondering emigrating to Canada, especially give the current situation in the U.S.

Is the health care system, especially for older people....65+, really that bad? Have heard/read conflicting opinions.
Canadians live about 4 years longer than US citizens on average so healthcare for the average person would seem to be better?
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by theresearcher »

There is no specific requirement to leave Canada for a particular period of time in order to seek re-admission as a visitor. People in border communities (pre-pandemic) may enter and leave Canada many times over the course of a single year. However, there is no entitlement for a non-Canadian citizen or permanent resident to be admitted to Canada and persons attempting to establish de-facto residence while on tourist status could be denied entry. https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/ircc/ ... 04-eng.pdf
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by maribullah »

I retired from a US job and came (went?) to Canada as a Permanent Resident. My husband (dual Citizen) is working in Canada at present but will be retiring in a year or so. I came on in as a Family Class Sponsorship. My husband sponsored me. The entire process took me about one year, with a lot of vetting of the application before submission. Some government offices have slowed down with Covid; I do not know if this has delayed the immigration process. The Government of Canada has an online tool to determine if you are eligible to immigrate.

Depending on where you live in the US, I find the cost of living considerably higher. Realtor dot ca is a website that will give you something like an MLS listing for the area you are considering. Almost all houses and condos go for above the listing price; housing price wars are very common, esp in the metro areas. Groceries are higher. I'm often surprised at the cost of beef especially, to buy it is a rarity. A dozen generic large eggs costs almost $3; when I left the states, they were under a dollar. Milk is similarly more expensive. Gas is measured in litres, not gallons, but it's considerably more expensive.

My husband had an elective surgery last summer. The time from his original complaint with his family doctor to surgery was about 12 months, pre-Covid. I hear and read that some persons have trouble even getting a family doctor. How soon you become eligible for healthcare depends on the province. I belief it is immediate in Alberta for example; in Ontario a newcomer has to wait 3 months; most newcomers get a bridge policy.

Importing vehicles is a bit of a hassle but tolerable. Most of the work for this is done online. The actual rubber stamping pretty quick as long as the paperwork is in order. Make sure you check the driving records you need to make sure you qualify as an experienced driver when you exchange your drivers license, otherwise Canadian car insurance, already high, will be astronomical.

A website I used for my PR application and wait was canadavisa dot com. This was very helpful. There was also a free community resource I used to help vet my application. I found it using an internet search.

Canada is a beautiful country and most of the people are lovely. I do plan on returning to the US a few years after my husband retires, as my children and other family members are there. Hope this helps and good luck!
Last edited by maribullah on Sun Sep 20, 2020 2:35 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Wilderness Librarian
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Re: Retiring to Canada

Post by Wilderness Librarian »

A bit of a tangent I realize but there are two somewhat recent books you might want to look at and read at least selected chapters.

Canada and the United States: Differences that Count. 4th edition. David M. Thomas and David N. Biette. 2014.

Canadian Studies in the New Millennium. 2nd. ed. Mark Kasoff & Patrick James. 2013.


Both are academic anthologies intended as textbooks or at least as supplementary coursework. I bought both used from Amazon but only waiting a long time to see if the prices would come down which they didn't. They can be kind of a slog especially since at least my copy of Thomas & Biette had very light type and I could only read short sections before having to rest my eyes. But they are both very good. I made it through them while housebound in the early Covid shutdowns.

I a US citizen & resident who went to undergrad Canadian university in the early 70s. I took a course in Canadian regional geography which was easy but also very informative. There does not appear to be an updated version of the text we used for that class. The two above titles are as close as I have been able to come.
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