Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

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heerekj1
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Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by heerekj1 »

We are thinking of moving to Canada and am am looking for references: books, advisors, etc. We are both retired and would not be looking for employment. Questions I have include:

Qualifications: My son and his wife are also considering this. They are in their late 30's and work for big Pharma and believe they would qualify to emigrate and then we could apply as parents. We receive about $120K/Y in pensions and SS and have about $3.5M in retirement accounts. Is there another way to qualify?

Health: We currently are on Medicare part A and have BCBS through federal government employee retirement benefits. I understand we would lose part A but I think we would continue with BCBS. Are we eligible for Canadian BCBS and would FEHP continue to pay half the premiums?

Taxes: As long as I remain a US citizen I will need to pay taxes to US. Will I owe additional taxes to Canada? Our income with RMD's will be about $220K/Y. How much of that is subject to Canadian taxes.

Where to Live: I have siblings in Michigan so I am thinking Ontario. We are currently living in a small town and like the people or lack there of and would be looking for something similar. It would be nice to have a bit more culture and ethnic dining choices.

Thankd
Admiral
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Admiral »

heerekj1 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 10:00 am We are thinking of moving to Canada and am am looking for references: books, advisors, etc. We are both retired and would not be looking for employment. Questions I have include:

Qualifications: My son and his wife are also considering this. They are in their late 30's and work for big Pharma and believe they would qualify to emigrate and then we could apply as parents. We receive about $120K/Y in pensions and SS and have about $3.5M in retirement accounts. Is there another way to qualify?

Health: We currently are on Medicare part A and have BCBS through federal government employee retirement benefits. I understand we would lose part A but I think we would continue with BCBS. Are we eligible for Canadian BCBS and would FEHP continue to pay half the premiums?

Taxes: As long as I remain a US citizen I will need to pay taxes to US. Will I owe additional taxes to Canada? Our income with RMD's will be about $220K/Y. How much of that is subject to Canadian taxes.

Where to Live: I have siblings in Michigan so I am thinking Ontario. We are currently living in a small town and like the people or lack there of and would be looking for something similar. It would be nice to have a bit more culture and ethnic dining choices.

Thankd
You will need to wait until COVID restrictions end, for one thing, as applications are not being processed. Did you read this?

https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-re ... rship.html
Valuethinker
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

heerekj1 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 10:00 am We are thinking of moving to Canada and am am looking for references: books, advisors, etc. We are both retired and would not be looking for employment. Questions I have include:

Qualifications: My son and his wife are also considering this. They are in their late 30's and work for big Pharma and believe they would qualify to emigrate and then we could apply as parents. We receive about $120K/Y in pensions and SS and have about $3.5M in retirement accounts. Is there another way to qualify?

Health: We currently are on Medicare part A and have BCBS through federal government employee retirement benefits. I understand we would lose part A but I think we would continue with BCBS. Are we eligible for Canadian BCBS and would FEHP continue to pay half the premiums?

Taxes: As long as I remain a US citizen I will need to pay taxes to US. Will I owe additional taxes to Canada? Our income with RMD's will be about $220K/Y. How much of that is subject to Canadian taxes.

Where to Live: I have siblings in Michigan so I am thinking Ontario. We are currently living in a small town and like the people or lack there of and would be looking for something similar. It would be nice to have a bit more culture and ethnic dining choices.

Thankd
There is a Canadian Forum linked here if you go up a level on the board and they can provide you w a lot more specific advice.

My guess is you will need CA or CPA advice re taxes. Don't forget new wills as well (and US estate taxes).

Canada is a long bureaucratic process. Your children's employers will help them w that but you may need an immigration lawyer.

West of the Greater Toronto Hamilton Area has some nice places (beware commuter traffic on 401). Kitchener Waterloo for example. Stratford for the theatre Festival. Niagara on the Lake is expensive, tourist but absolutely charming.

If you like being on the water there are places on Lake Erie w are nice. Collingwood has savagely cold winters but is a nice retirement town - the drive from Toronto on a Friday night can take 5-6 hours though (traffic).

Rural Ontario has issues w healthcare access and you need to research that in any given locale.

Your children however may well wind up in Quebec because that's got a lot of the pharmaceutical industry although Toronto has a
big healthcare cluster. As they proceed in their jobs they may find the pull back to USA. If they stay in GTA the housing prices are insane (given that after tax people make a lot less than USA).

Much of Canada is highly diverse although small town Canada less so. There can be a hostile/ condescending attitude to the USA and American nationals (small town Ontario is something I am familiar with).

Beware Canadian taxes. They are high. And not going down. Remember "Peace, order and good government" not "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness ".
novemberrain
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by novemberrain »

heerekj1 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 10:00 am We receive about $120K/Y in pensions and SS and have about $3.5M in retirement accounts. Our income with RMD's will be about $220K/Y.
Thankd
I don't have an answer to your main question. But just admire the financial position you are in. Congrats.
capran
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by capran »

we logged on to their immigration website in 2017 and filled in all the boxes. We also have a substantial retirement income but only 2 mil in cash investments, and when we clicked submit it said "unless you are willing to invest 2 mil in a business you do not qualify for any of our immigration programs". we thought surely with a retirement income of 170k and a substantial portfolio (and a house we could sell with no mortgage) they would want people like that, but I guess not, at least at that time. Maybe things are different 3 years later. Good luck!
friar1610
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by friar1610 »

capran wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 2:40 pm we logged on to their immigration website in 2017 and filled in all the boxes. We also have a substantial retirement income but only 2 mil in cash investments, and when we clicked submit it said "unless you are willing to invest 2 mil in a business you do not qualify for any of our immigration programs". we thought surely with a retirement income of 170k and a substantial portfolio (and a house we could sell with no mortgage) they would want people like that, but I guess not, at least at that time. Maybe things are different 3 years later. Good luck!
From time-to-time I've looked at the immigration web sites for countries we've visited that 1) we thought were really nice; 2) have English as a national language (perhaps in addition to others); 3) have stable governments. Those countries are Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the U.K. and the Republic of Ireland. Our overall financial situation is more-or-less like that described above, perhaps a bit more modest. In every case there seem to be gotcha's that make us ineligible. I've concluded that old retired folks like us who can't make viable, active contributions to the economy (via employment or significant investment) and/or who pose a potential burden to the health care/social welfare system just aren't welcome.

But, we're welcome to bring our tourist dollars to any of them. :happy
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by TomatoTomahto »

friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:16 pm [snip...]I've concluded that old retired folks like us who can't make viable, active contributions to the economy (via employment or significant investment) and/or who pose a potential burden to the health care/social welfare system just aren't welcome.
Not to be argumentative, but can you blame them? Most things have a price; you wanted it at a discount.

ETA Disclosure: we have considered emigrating, but not immediately.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.
friar1610
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by friar1610 »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:34 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:16 pm [snip...]I've concluded that old retired folks like us who can't make viable, active contributions to the economy (via employment or significant investment) and/or who pose a potential burden to the health care/social welfare system just aren't welcome.
Not to be argumentative, but can you blame them? Most things have a price; you wanted it at a discount.
Jeesh. Gimme a break. Simply stating the results of my research. Never said these countries should be doing things differently.
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by TomatoTomahto »

friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:38 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:34 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:16 pm [snip...]I've concluded that old retired folks like us who can't make viable, active contributions to the economy (via employment or significant investment) and/or who pose a potential burden to the health care/social welfare system just aren't welcome.
Not to be argumentative, but can you blame them? Most things have a price; you wanted it at a discount.
Jeesh. Gimme a break. Simply stating the results of my research. Never said these countries should be doing things differently.
I explicitly said my intention wasn’t to be argumentative. I’m sorry you took it that way.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.
friar1610
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by friar1610 »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:41 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:38 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:34 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:16 pm [snip...]I've concluded that old retired folks like us who can't make viable, active contributions to the economy (via employment or significant investment) and/or who pose a potential burden to the health care/social welfare system just aren't welcome.
Not to be argumentative, but can you blame them? Most things have a price; you wanted it at a discount.
Jeesh. Gimme a break. Simply stating the results of my research. Never said these countries should be doing things differently.
I explicitly said my intention wasn’t to be argumentative. I’m sorry you took it that way.
Reacting to "you wanted it at a discount."
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Watty
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Watty »

heerekj1 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 10:00 am We are thinking of moving to....
One thing to consider is how that will work if one of your survives the other. A couple retiring somewhere could be an adventure but as soon as one of you dies the survivor may feel pretty isolated.

Be sure to look into all the needed wills, medical directives, etc to make sure that you have paperwork that will be valid there. The is a chance that at least in the Quebec area the inheritance laws may be based at least in part of French laws so the laws could be very different and override what is in your will.
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mrspock
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by mrspock »

One thing I’d consider is spending the summer there in what can be your “vacation” home, then winter down in the USA in your “primary” home.

As long as you stay less than 6 months or so, I think you are fine. This basically what many affluent Canadian retirees do anyhow, you’ll fit right in :). You will need to rely on your US health insurance though, but this will even out as you’ll not have to pay any (higher) Canadian income taxes.

Longer term, if your kids become citizens they can sponsor you for perm residency IIRC. It’s called the “Parents and Grandparents” program, suspended for 2020 for obvious reasons. The other alternative is a “super visa” which is valid for two years, but doesn’t include health care, your kids would have to sign the visa indicating they are financially responsible for you.
Bobby206
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Bobby206 »

This is very exciting. We have toyed with moving abroad. I wish Canada wasn't so cold because we really like the people there. Congrats and good luck!
palanzo
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by palanzo »

friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:44 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:41 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:38 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:34 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:16 pm [snip...]I've concluded that old retired folks like us who can't make viable, active contributions to the economy (via employment or significant investment) and/or who pose a potential burden to the health care/social welfare system just aren't welcome.
Not to be argumentative, but can you blame them? Most things have a price; you wanted it at a discount.
Jeesh. Gimme a break. Simply stating the results of my research. Never said these countries should be doing things differently.
I explicitly said my intention wasn’t to be argumentative. I’m sorry you took it that way.
Reacting to "you wanted it at a discount."
Exactly. Someone with "$120K/Y in pensions and SS and have about $3.5M in retirement accounts" is not looking for a "discount" whatever that means. Some countries are more open than others to retirees. Canada is one of the ones that are less open which is a pity. Many other interesting countries are open to retirees and have a rich and flourishing expat community which contributes to their new country.
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ResearchMed
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by ResearchMed »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:34 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:16 pm [snip...]I've concluded that old retired folks like us who can't make viable, active contributions to the economy (via employment or significant investment) and/or who pose a potential burden to the health care/social welfare system just aren't welcome.
Not to be argumentative, but can you blame them? Most things have a price; you wanted it at a discount.

ETA Disclosure: we have considered emigrating, but not immediately.
We'll chime in here, too.
Have thought about it for a while, and not just recently (although... especially recently...).
I have dear friends who are Canadian citizens or residents, and spent a lot of time visiting, and loved it there.

In our case, we'd have our own health insurance, so we've wondered how we'd be a drag on the economy.
We'd just be spending our money, putting it into their economy...
It's not even like when i had a post-doc overseas (not Canada) way back, when it turned out that by "not taking any job from a citizen/etc.". that also meant not even leading any seminars for free. Apparently it was (locally?) considered that even though there wasn't such a seminar before, there *might* be, and thus someone else *might* have gotten paid. I didn't argue. It was a wonderful year, and most of the "seminar" ended up being just collegial conversation after all, just nothing formal.
But I can understand that they want to protect things, etc. I was just happy i was able to be there for the year, without any difficulty.

I've wondered about just "visiting a lot"?? :wink:
(Er, like when the borders weren't closed...)

However, we might end up being ready for the assisted living facility we seem to have selected (here in the USA) before we get around to doing anything about "moving", temporarily or longer.

RM
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TropikThunder
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by TropikThunder »

friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:44 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:41 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:38 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:34 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:16 pm [snip...]I've concluded that old retired folks like us who can't make viable, active contributions to the economy (via employment or significant investment) and/or who pose a potential burden to the health care/social welfare system just aren't welcome.
Not to be argumentative, but can you blame them? Most things have a price; you wanted it at a discount.
Jeesh. Gimme a break. Simply stating the results of my research. Never said these countries should be doing things differently.
I explicitly said my intention wasn’t to be argumentative. I’m sorry you took it that way.
Reacting to "you wanted it at a discount."
I think Tomato's point is that health care in Canada is nationalized, and people pay into the system via taxes during their working lives. Moving there in retirement and expecting to be covered by "the health care/social welfare system" without having paid into it is like someone immigrating to the US in retirement and expecting to have access to Social Security and Medicare.
getthatmarshmallow
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by getthatmarshmallow »

So, when things are normal, Canada and the U.S. generally permit long stays of up to six months. One has to be careful with residency for taxes, etc., but it's reasonably common for 'snowbirds' to winter in the warmer parts of the U.S. and spend summer in Canada. That might be an option; it's quite hard as even a middle-aged person without a job to qualify for Canadian immigration without a family connection.
newyorker
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by newyorker »

I would consult a canadian/us cpa. Theres few who does it for expats and Ive used one without having to go through an accounting firm.
palanzo
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by palanzo »

TropikThunder wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:50 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:44 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:41 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:38 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:34 pm
Not to be argumentative, but can you blame them? Most things have a price; you wanted it at a discount.
Jeesh. Gimme a break. Simply stating the results of my research. Never said these countries should be doing things differently.
I explicitly said my intention wasn’t to be argumentative. I’m sorry you took it that way.
Reacting to "you wanted it at a discount."
I think Tomato's point is that health care in Canada is nationalized, and people pay into the system via taxes during their working lives. Moving there in retirement and expecting to be covered by "the health care/social welfare system" without having paid into it is like someone immigrating to the US in retirement and expecting to have access to Social Security and Medicare.
No-one is expecting that since you would not be eligible for Social Security and Medicare. Most expats have private health insurance and outside of the US that is quite affordable. In some countries you pay a lump sum and have access to national (not nationalized) health care and in others you are eligible after a number of years.
tj
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by tj »

palanzo wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 5:02 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:44 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:41 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:38 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:34 pm
Not to be argumentative, but can you blame them? Most things have a price; you wanted it at a discount.
Jeesh. Gimme a break. Simply stating the results of my research. Never said these countries should be doing things differently.
I explicitly said my intention wasn’t to be argumentative. I’m sorry you took it that way.
Reacting to "you wanted it at a discount."
Exactly. Someone with "$120K/Y in pensions and SS and have about $3.5M in retirement accounts" is not looking for a "discount" whatever that means. Some countries are more open than others to retirees. Canada is one of the ones that are less open which is a pity. Many other interesting countries are open to retirees and have a rich and flourishing expat community which contributes to their new country.
Can you name some of these many countries? The ones that I typically see with retirement visas are poorer countries....
palanzo
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by palanzo »

tj wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 11:12 pm
palanzo wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 5:02 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:44 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:41 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:38 pm

Jeesh. Gimme a break. Simply stating the results of my research. Never said these countries should be doing things differently.
I explicitly said my intention wasn’t to be argumentative. I’m sorry you took it that way.
Reacting to "you wanted it at a discount."
Exactly. Someone with "$120K/Y in pensions and SS and have about $3.5M in retirement accounts" is not looking for a "discount" whatever that means. Some countries are more open than others to retirees. Canada is one of the ones that are less open which is a pity. Many other interesting countries are open to retirees and have a rich and flourishing expat community which contributes to their new country.
Can you name some of these many countries? The ones that I typically see with retirement visas are poorer countries....
A number of European countries that I would not consider "poorer countries".
tj
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by tj »

palanzo wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 11:31 pm
tj wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 11:12 pm
palanzo wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 5:02 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:44 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:41 pm
I explicitly said my intention wasn’t to be argumentative. I’m sorry you took it that way.
Reacting to "you wanted it at a discount."
Exactly. Someone with "$120K/Y in pensions and SS and have about $3.5M in retirement accounts" is not looking for a "discount" whatever that means. Some countries are more open than others to retirees. Canada is one of the ones that are less open which is a pity. Many other interesting countries are open to retirees and have a rich and flourishing expat community which contributes to their new country.
Can you name some of these many countries? The ones that I typically see with retirement visas are poorer countries....
A number of European countries that I would not consider "poorer countries".
I've never heard of European countries offering retirement visas. Most of the popular ones are Southeast Asia, Caribbean and Latin America. I know Portugal has something, but it's not as easy/cheap as the other countries I don't think.
palanzo
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by palanzo »

tj wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 11:33 pm
palanzo wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 11:31 pm
tj wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 11:12 pm
palanzo wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 5:02 pm
friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:44 pm

Reacting to "you wanted it at a discount."
Exactly. Someone with "$120K/Y in pensions and SS and have about $3.5M in retirement accounts" is not looking for a "discount" whatever that means. Some countries are more open than others to retirees. Canada is one of the ones that are less open which is a pity. Many other interesting countries are open to retirees and have a rich and flourishing expat community which contributes to their new country.
Can you name some of these many countries? The ones that I typically see with retirement visas are poorer countries....
A number of European countries that I would not consider "poorer countries".
I've never heard of European countries offering retirement visas. Most of the popular ones are Southeast Asia, Caribbean and Latin America. I know Portugal has something, but it's not as easy/cheap as the other countries I don't think.
Portugal is quite easy and requires no large financial outlay. Likewise for several other European countries. With a search you will find various sources of information on retirement visas and other visas for Europe.
Valuethinker
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

capran wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 2:40 pm we logged on to their immigration website in 2017 and filled in all the boxes. We also have a substantial retirement income but only 2 mil in cash investments, and when we clicked submit it said "unless you are willing to invest 2 mil in a business you do not qualify for any of our immigration programs". we thought surely with a retirement income of 170k and a substantial portfolio (and a house we could sell with no mortgage) they would want people like that, but I guess not, at least at that time. Maybe things are different 3 years later. Good luck!
The problem is the healthcare.

80% of our healthcare spending is in retirement years. Maybe more.

You would not have paid taxes as a working person in the system, but you would now potentially be an expensive liability on the healthcare and basic pensions (not sure how the latter works if you haven't paid CPP).

There's a reason Canadians don't usually retire full time to America. You still get healthcare if you are resident in the Province for more than a certain number of days.

I don't defend the Canadian system of attracting wealthy immigrants. I think it has been abused.
Last edited by Valuethinker on Wed Sep 16, 2020 1:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
manatee2005
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by manatee2005 »

Oh man, why would you move to small town Ontario? Why?
If you need a change come to California. Lots of things to see and do here. Can also check out Arizona, Utah, Colorado. Canada doesn’t get you any benefit once you have Medicare.

In your post I never saw one sentence of why?
Valuethinker
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

friar1610 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:16 pm
capran wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 2:40 pm we logged on to their immigration website in 2017 and filled in all the boxes. We also have a substantial retirement income but only 2 mil in cash investments, and when we clicked submit it said "unless you are willing to invest 2 mil in a business you do not qualify for any of our immigration programs". we thought surely with a retirement income of 170k and a substantial portfolio (and a house we could sell with no mortgage) they would want people like that, but I guess not, at least at that time. Maybe things are different 3 years later. Good luck!
From time-to-time I've looked at the immigration web sites for countries we've visited that 1) we thought were really nice; 2) have English as a national language (perhaps in addition to others); 3) have stable governments. Those countries are Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the U.K. and the Republic of Ireland. Our overall financial situation is more-or-less like that described above, perhaps a bit more modest. In every case there seem to be gotcha's that make us ineligible. I've concluded that old retired folks like us who can't make viable, active contributions to the economy (via employment or significant investment) and/or who pose a potential burden to the health care/social welfare system just aren't welcome.

But, we're welcome to bring our tourist dollars to any of them. :happy
I am not sure the UK has a stable government ;-)

The basic principle is that the planet is aging fast and these countries need more young working people, not non working retirees.

The big cost society incurs on us is in old age. Pensions, healthcare, care home.

They don't want to take that on if another country has had the benefit of your working years.

Canada at least allows reunification for family reasons. Plenty of countries don't.

UK rules on just bringing your spouse are very restrictive.

My spouse is married to a Canadian citizen but has restricted rights if she wanted to immigrate to Canada.
Valuethinker
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

manatee2005 wrote: Wed Sep 16, 2020 1:26 am Oh man, why would you move to small town Ontario? Why?
If you need a change come to California. Lots of things to see and do here. Can also check out Arizona, Utah, Colorado. Canada doesn’t get you any benefit once you have Medicare.

In your post I never saw one sentence of why?
Family reasons I think.
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by TomatoTomahto »

TropikThunder wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:50 pm I think Tomato's point is that health care in Canada is nationalized, and people pay into the system via taxes during their working lives. Moving there in retirement and expecting to be covered by "the health care/social welfare system" without having paid into it is like someone immigrating to the US in retirement and expecting to have access to Social Security and Medicare.
Precisely. Hey Canada, here I am, 70+ years old, T2 diabetic, hypertensive, etc., never paid a nickel into the system, now I’ve decided I’d like to benefit from your single payer health care.

There’s a price at which that is attractive to Canada, and they’ve set it at a level some posters think is unfairly high. Wanting the benefit (residence and healthcare) for a price lower than Canada set is wanting it at a discount. No need to take it personally.

There are other countries. My son’s good Bulgarian friend told him that Bulgaria is a bargain to buy residency in. Portugal is supposed to be affordable. Both are EU countries.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Wed Sep 16, 2020 5:45 am
TropikThunder wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:50 pm I think Tomato's point is that health care in Canada is nationalized, and people pay into the system via taxes during their working lives. Moving there in retirement and expecting to be covered by "the health care/social welfare system" without having paid into it is like someone immigrating to the US in retirement and expecting to have access to Social Security and Medicare.
Precisely. Hey Canada, here I am, 70+ years old, T2 diabetic, hypertensive, etc., never paid a nickel into the system, now I’ve decided I’d like to benefit from your single payer health care.

There’s a price at which that is attractive to Canada, and they’ve set it at a level some posters think is unfairly high. Wanting the benefit (residence and healthcare) for a price lower than Canada set is wanting it at a discount. No need to take it personally.

There are other countries. My son’s good Bulgarian friend told him that Bulgaria is a bargain to buy residency in. Portugal is supposed to be affordable. Both are EU countries.
If you emigrate to Canada as the result of family reunification you may be older and you should qualify for Provincial healthcare & also for the baseline pension (but you won't have paid into the SS equivalent Canada Pension Plan/ Quebec PP).

However neither Canada nor Australia or NZ are keen to attract those sorts of immigrants in preference to young people.

Other countries often have a language test for citizenship. Finnish is so difficult that Brits in Finland, to retain an EU citizenship, study for a Swedish language exam as Swedish is a recognised official language in Finland!
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by heerekj1 »

Thanks for the info. I have done the drive from Sarnia to Niagara multiple times. The Toronto/Hamilton traffic is terrible.
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by SQRT »

Seasonal wrote: Wed Sep 16, 2020 8:14 am
truenorth418 wrote: Wed Sep 16, 2020 5:59 am

The Canadian health care system is not "free". It is paid for by people's taxes. Tax rates in Canada are much typically much higher than most people pay in the U.S.


The Canadian health care system has its merits, but it is not "free".
Healthcare per capita is about $11,200 in the US and $5,300 in Canada (according to quick googling), so it's unlikely many are paying far more in Canada.
I’m a proud Canadian. Personal income taxes are the prime source of healthcare spending in Canada. Accordingly, income tax rates tend to be higher than they are in the US. This is especially true for high income tax payers. The Canadian maximum rate for regular income ranges from about 48% to 54% depending on your province. For dividends it’s about 32% to 40%. For capital gains it’s about 24% to 27% (half of of regular income). Sales taxes (VAT tax) are usually higher in Canada than the US also. Property taxes would be similar to MCOL areas in the US.

The “kicker” is that these higher marginal tax rates start at around $200-300k of annual income. Much lower than in the US.

So a high income earner (like me) would typically pay much more in higher (than US) taxes than what they would consume in health care. Lower income residents get a much better “deal”.

I’m not complaining. I think our system is a reasonable approach with many advantages. The average Canadian would never give up their health care system.
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Valuethinker »

heerekj1 wrote: Wed Sep 16, 2020 7:46 am Thanks for the info. I have done the drive from Sarnia to Niagara multiple times. The Toronto/Hamilton traffic is terrible.
It's certainly a major concern.

The 401 Highway is essentially the transport artery for the whole region from Montreal to Detroit, and branching down through into New York State & Ohio as well. And it's the commuter route for the 7 million or so people in the Golden Horseshoe (GT + Hamilton Area).

So it jams. Urban transport infrastructure has not kept up with the growth. Metrolinx is an effort to address that, but the financial resources necessary are just huge.
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by Bobby206 »

tibbitts wrote: Wed Sep 16, 2020 8:31 am
Bobby206 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:59 pm This is very exciting. We have toyed with moving abroad. I wish Canada wasn't so cold because we really like the people there. Congrats and good luck!
That's like saying you like the people in the U.S. Presumably you like some people in the U.S. - but do you really like people in every state and city equally? Generally most people will be comfortable with the typical person in one area but not others. Which people in Canada specifically? It's not really possible to "like" everyone when you have such a heterogeneous group. People in some regions/provinces/cities surely appeal to you more than others.
.
In my personal experience I have met many Canadians and I like them. I worked for a Canadian company for a period of years. I know, on a personal level, many Canadians. I know more Americans so I suppose my sample size is larger for Americans. I haven't met any Canadians I don't like but I know MANY Americans I don't care for. I find, and yes I am generalizing, that Canadians are more relaxed, friendlier, more polite, less racist and I could go on. That's my experience. Perhaps yours is different I don't know but if you have a different experience perhaps start a fresh post rather than contradict mine. Thank you and have a good day.
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by LadyGeek »

I removed a number of off-topic posts regarding a comparison of healthcare between the US and Canada. The discussion was derailed.

Please stay on-topic, which are the financial aspects.
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by heerekj1 »

I did not mean to imply that I planned to take advantage of Canada's National Health Service. We would have private insurance thru BCBS. I do wonder if there is some option for paying for service. I was in Australia for 3 months last year and had two health issues and they have a single payer system. I needed to pay up front and then got partially reimbursed by BCBS for doctor's visits and meds. This worked fine but would not be tenable for major health issues.

Also I would owe taxes on pension income and IRA withdrawals. To whom? What about Roth withdrawals? Not subject to US tax, how about Canadian?
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Re: Thinking of moving/emigrating to Canada

Post by LadyGeek »

^^^ There's a comprehensive answer in your Canadian thread: Re: Moving from US to Canada [permanently] - Financial Wisdom Forum
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