Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

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guyinlaw
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Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by guyinlaw » Fri Jul 31, 2020 12:06 am

Our school district had 55-60% of children choose in-person classes option vs. 40-45% of teachers choosing in-person option. To be able to have enough teachers for in-person learning, the board had to switch many of teachers who had given virtual teaching preference, to in-person teaching. I hear that many of these teachers decided to take a year of absence. I guess there was also lots of pressure from school unions. At the end the district decided to go 100% virtual.

confusedinvestor wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:58 pm
Hum, now I'm thinking if it is better for my family to enroll my 2 4th graders to private school, we can use our 529s.
Last school year our 5th grade teacher was excellent in virtual format. This was Public School(GT). I talked to many other parents, but their experience was not good. So I imagine our teacher was an exception. Hopefully this year with more training and materials more teachers will do better.
Time is your friend; impulse is your enemy. - John C. Bogle

confusedinvestor
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Re: Decision Model: How do you decide to send kids back to school ?

Post by confusedinvestor » Fri Jul 31, 2020 12:32 am

Tdubs wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 8:17 pm
Looked at the link, which county are you in?

I'm guessing you and your kids are low risk. If so, then it is more important to consider what their contact is like with at-risk adults. At their age, you should assume that they are as likely to infect others as adults who engage in risky behavior. Do they see grandparents? Aunts and uncles with conditions? Neighbors?

Their education is important, but they will become a hazard to others. What can you do to limit their contact with adults while in school?
thank you, we are in San Diego county.

RobLyons
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Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by RobLyons » Fri Jul 31, 2020 12:44 am

We are torn. My son is going into middle school and doesn't want to miss out. However, wearing a mask in a warm location makes him nauseous within minutes.

Also,
public schools here don't have good ventilation
the acceptable social distancing is now only 3 feet
schools have not received much funding

and looking around the globe there's no good head-to-head comparisons
-no country with such little control of the virus has reopened schools
-while the experiences of other nations can be illustrative, they’re not entirely instructive
"Great parenting sets the foundation for a better world"

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serbeer
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Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by serbeer » Fri Jul 31, 2020 2:19 am

guyinlaw wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 12:06 am
Our school district had 55-60% of children choose in-person classes option vs. 40-45% of teachers choosing in-person option. To be able to have enough teachers for in-person learning, the board had to switch many of teachers who had given virtual teaching preference, to in-person teaching. I hear that many of these teachers decided to take a year of absence. I guess there was also lots of pressure from school unions. At the end the district decided to go 100% virtual.
The same is happening in my school district. There is much discussion of Health-related issues with the decision, but I am pretty sure the real reason is explained under brief "Workforce Challenges" part of the announcement:
https://www.kcsd96.org/superintendent/b ... ge-7-30-20

Thegame14
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Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by Thegame14 » Fri Jul 31, 2020 1:25 pm

virtual as long as I can work from home, if I find a new job.

stoptothink
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Re: Decision Model: How do you decide to send kids back to school ?

Post by stoptothink » Fri Jul 31, 2020 1:45 pm

clip651 wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:37 pm
EddyB wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:27 pm

Did it include data about the long-term effects of the virus? That’s the piece I really want to see.
Long term effects can't be known yet - since the disease hasn't been around that long. Some guesses can be made from medical principles and observations to this point, but you can't do a long term study without a long time period passing. Here is a medical doctor describing studies of some medium term (months) effects in patients (mostly adults, I believe):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFXr14xmuGw
I am not a medical doctor (I am a health science researcher), but my boss is an infectious disease physician (who is also sending his kids physically back to school); not that our personal beliefs are relevant to anybody else. Based on what I have seen personally, as someone who sits on the board of a medical facility that has had more than 80 people test positive (none of them <20, and zero hospitalizations to date) and the data we have available from areas that did not close the schools; I am personally more concerned about the safety of my children when traveling to school than physically being there. The benefits of physically sending them to school are, in my personal opinion, greater than the risk (based upon our current understanding) and my kids are mentally and emotionally done with being at home. There is risk in everything. We are making the best decision for us with the information we have instead of having our life dictated by perpetual fear of the unknown. I have no objections to others who have a different perspective.

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SB1234
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Re: Decision Model: How do you decide to send kids back to school ?

Post by SB1234 » Fri Jul 31, 2020 1:56 pm

stoptothink wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 1:45 pm
clip651 wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:37 pm
EddyB wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:27 pm

Did it include data about the long-term effects of the virus? That’s the piece I really want to see.
Long term effects can't be known yet - since the disease hasn't been around that long. Some guesses can be made from medical principles and observations to this point, but you can't do a long term study without a long time period passing. Here is a medical doctor describing studies of some medium term (months) effects in patients (mostly adults, I believe):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFXr14xmuGw
I am not a medical doctor (I am a health science researcher), but my boss is an infectious disease physician (who is also sending his kids physically back to school); not that our personal beliefs are relevant to anybody else. Based on what I have seen personally, as someone who sits on the board of a medical facility that has had more than 80 people test positive (none of them <20, and zero hospitalizations to date) and the data we have available from areas that did not close the schools; I am personally more concerned about the safety of my children when traveling to school than physically being there. The benefits of physically sending them to school are, in my personal opinion, greater than the risk (based upon our current understanding) and my kids are mentally and emotionally done with being at home. There is risk in everything. We are making the best decision for us with the information we have instead of having our life dictated by perpetual fear of the unknown. I have no objections to others who have a different perspective.
Thanks for sharing your perspective.
One thing that I feel is sometimes missed in all debate, is that the post-pandemic in-person schooling is going to be so different than what it was pre-pandemic, I wonder if the benefits of in-person learning will transfer with all the additional protocols. Won't know until we try?
anecdotes are not data

GreenLawn
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Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by GreenLawn » Fri Jul 31, 2020 2:29 pm

If I lived in one of the Covid-heavy states like Florida I'd be hesitant to send a child into school. I'd think Covid is more contagious than lice, and the CDC says "Reliable data on how many people get head lice each year in the United States are not available; however, an estimated 6 million to 12 million infestations occur each year in the United States among children 3 to 11 years of age." Clearly there would be measures taken to minimize Covid spread in school, but it strikes me as a very contagious disease, and kids will be kids.

If a child brings home Covid, what are the odds that the parents will get it? Pretty high I'd say. Especially if colds and sneezes kick up in the fall. The odds are young parents will suffer no or minimal short term effects, but any disease that potentially clots the blood is nothing I want to experience.

I'm retired so this decision on children doesn't directly affect me, but just in the last week both my next door neighbor and my GF's cousin died of Covid. So any actions that increase the spread of the virus do concern me.

smitcat
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Re: Decision Model: How do you decide to send kids back to school ?

Post by smitcat » Fri Jul 31, 2020 2:52 pm

SB1234 wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 1:56 pm
stoptothink wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 1:45 pm
clip651 wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:37 pm
EddyB wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 11:27 pm

Did it include data about the long-term effects of the virus? That’s the piece I really want to see.
Long term effects can't be known yet - since the disease hasn't been around that long. Some guesses can be made from medical principles and observations to this point, but you can't do a long term study without a long time period passing. Here is a medical doctor describing studies of some medium term (months) effects in patients (mostly adults, I believe):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFXr14xmuGw
I am not a medical doctor (I am a health science researcher), but my boss is an infectious disease physician (who is also sending his kids physically back to school); not that our personal beliefs are relevant to anybody else. Based on what I have seen personally, as someone who sits on the board of a medical facility that has had more than 80 people test positive (none of them <20, and zero hospitalizations to date) and the data we have available from areas that did not close the schools; I am personally more concerned about the safety of my children when traveling to school than physically being there. The benefits of physically sending them to school are, in my personal opinion, greater than the risk (based upon our current understanding) and my kids are mentally and emotionally done with being at home. There is risk in everything. We are making the best decision for us with the information we have instead of having our life dictated by perpetual fear of the unknown. I have no objections to others who have a different perspective.
Thanks for sharing your perspective.
One thing that I feel is sometimes missed in all debate, is that the post-pandemic in-person schooling is going to be so different than what it was pre-pandemic, I wonder if the benefits of in-person learning will transfer with all the additional protocols. Won't know until we try?
I agree with stoptothink on this. I can add that the childcare centers I am fmailiar with in this area have never closed - and the learning experience for them has been altered but valuable. So far there have been no reported cases where children in these programs became ill or contagious. We were one of the first hit areas and have been heavily affected since mid March.

GreenLawn
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Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by GreenLawn » Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:21 pm

Rkoa63 wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 6:26 pm
We reluctantly decided on 100% online for our kid. We spoke with our pediatrician yesterday to get the opinion of someone other than a politician or "Aunt Susie" on Facebook and he favored 100% online if it was a viable option. We told him we were worried about our child's mental health and socialization since we only have one and he said, "what would mess them up more, not going to school for a year or two? Or possibly a dead mommy, daddy, grandma or grandpa?" Since my parents are both in their mid 60's and would be helping us with shuttling to and from school, I just didn't want to take the risk with getting them sick.

My wife and I both work full-time so we're not exactly sure how this is going to work out, but the district has given us the option to change our decision at any point during the school year. We decided that jobs are replaceable and family isn't, so we're going to continue to hunker down as best as we can.
Is there another way to socialize your child besides subjecting them to hundreds of other children? Maybe have play dates with a trusted circle of careful friends? That wouldn't help with schooling but something is better than nothing. Or find a stay a home Mom/Dad and discuss child care arrangements with them (barter or cash) so you can go to work? An awkward conversation sure, but the alternative isn't inviting either.

nokoast
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Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by nokoast » Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:49 pm

mikeyzito22 wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 9:30 pm
SchruteB&B wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 10:44 am
The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends in person school and cites “ "mounting evidence" that transmission of the coronavirus by young children is uncommon, partly because they are less likely to contract it in the first place.“

https://www.npr.org/sections/coronaviru ... -this-fall

Of particular note to me was the experience of YMCA child care centers in NYC caring for the children of essential workers:

Throughout the pandemic, many child care centers have stayed open for the children of front-line workers — everyone from doctors to grocery store clerks. YMCA of the USA and New York City's Department of Education have been caring for, collectively, tens of thousands of children since March, and both tell NPR they have no reports of coronavirus clusters or outbreaks.

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/24/88231664 ... -lockdowns

I am sending my child to school this fall if we have that option.
In the very same article:

"Our educators are overwhelmingly not comfortable returning to schools," said Tina Williams, president of Fairfax County Federation of Teachers. "They fear for their lives, the lives of their students and the lives of their families."

So, your kids may not transmit it to other kids, but have you thought of all the teachers, custodians, and other folks who work in schools?
mikeyzito22, I don't know about your school district, but in my own district with single teacher classrooms, since it is stating the kids are not great vectors for the virus it should not be a challenge for teachers, custodians, etc. to social distance from one another...this would just be a continuation of what they are doing while carrying out their current lives and taking precautions. I can't imagine what this disruption is doing to the young kids and I understand others have added precautions they must consider.

Luckily, mine are too young to be going to school and I hope this is a distant memory by the time school time rolls around....let me have this hope.
"What will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, yet forfeits his soul?" MW 16:26

NorCalDad
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Location: Northern California

Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by NorCalDad » Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:54 pm

We have never been a private school family, but we are for the first time considering a small private school for our K-3 student that will maintain small classes (less than half the size of our traditional public school). California is not allowing schools to hold campus classes in most counties for now, but elementary schools can get a waiver. Even if the private school doesn't, it will be the first to return to campus once restrictions lift, while our big city school district likely will not return for months or possibly the next school year.

I wouldn't feel comfortable sending our kids back to a traditional setting. But I would be ok with small classes of the same cohort with the same teacher for the duration of the school year, with social distancing, masks and temperature checks, among other precautions. It's a risk calculation, but our household has one essential worker who must go to the hospital and another working 50+ hours a week from home. Neither of us unfortunately has enough time to devote to our kids' learning and ensuring they have the necessary adult attention during the workday. I see almost zero value in distance learning for kids aged 5-6. The spring was a mess that exacted a heavy mental strain on all of us, and we just need something different. I considered quitting my job instead, but for now am not choosing that route.

mikeyzito22
Posts: 437
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Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by mikeyzito22 » Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:55 pm

nokoast wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:49 pm
mikeyzito22 wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 9:30 pm
SchruteB&B wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 10:44 am
The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends in person school and cites “ "mounting evidence" that transmission of the coronavirus by young children is uncommon, partly because they are less likely to contract it in the first place.“

https://www.npr.org/sections/coronaviru ... -this-fall

Of particular note to me was the experience of YMCA child care centers in NYC caring for the children of essential workers:

Throughout the pandemic, many child care centers have stayed open for the children of front-line workers — everyone from doctors to grocery store clerks. YMCA of the USA and New York City's Department of Education have been caring for, collectively, tens of thousands of children since March, and both tell NPR they have no reports of coronavirus clusters or outbreaks.

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/24/88231664 ... -lockdowns

I am sending my child to school this fall if we have that option.
In the very same article:

"Our educators are overwhelmingly not comfortable returning to schools," said Tina Williams, president of Fairfax County Federation of Teachers. "They fear for their lives, the lives of their students and the lives of their families."

So, your kids may not transmit it to other kids, but have you thought of all the teachers, custodians, and other folks who work in schools?
mikeyzito22, I don't know about your school district, but in my own district with single teacher classrooms, since it is stating the kids are not great vectors for the virus it should not be a challenge for teachers, custodians, etc. to social distance from one another...this would just be a continuation of what they are doing while carrying out their current lives and taking precautions. I can't imagine what this disruption is doing to the young kids and I understand others have added precautions they must consider.

Luckily, mine are too young to be going to school and I hope this is a distant memory by the time school time rolls around....let me have this hope.
I can let you have this hope but it is guaranteed someone will get sick and then they will shut it down again with no comprehensive digital plans in place. You can hope the kids can stay away from each other (that's not going to happen). You can hope that each school in your district can have 35 sq ft. of space for each child. That's what our state requires. Good luck, but I doubt it. We live in an area currently not overly infected, our hospitals haven't been over run, and we STILL will not go to school. However, if teachers overwhelmingly don't want to go back, ultimately that is the choice the district has to abide by. Otherwise, you will have a strike and that's not good for anyone. Good luck and stay safe!

nokoast
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2019 8:53 am

Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by nokoast » Fri Jul 31, 2020 4:00 pm

mikeyzito22 wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:55 pm
nokoast wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:49 pm
mikeyzito22 wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 9:30 pm
SchruteB&B wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 10:44 am
The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends in person school and cites “ "mounting evidence" that transmission of the coronavirus by young children is uncommon, partly because they are less likely to contract it in the first place.“

https://www.npr.org/sections/coronaviru ... -this-fall

Of particular note to me was the experience of YMCA child care centers in NYC caring for the children of essential workers:

Throughout the pandemic, many child care centers have stayed open for the children of front-line workers — everyone from doctors to grocery store clerks. YMCA of the USA and New York City's Department of Education have been caring for, collectively, tens of thousands of children since March, and both tell NPR they have no reports of coronavirus clusters or outbreaks.

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/24/88231664 ... -lockdowns

I am sending my child to school this fall if we have that option.
In the very same article:

"Our educators are overwhelmingly not comfortable returning to schools," said Tina Williams, president of Fairfax County Federation of Teachers. "They fear for their lives, the lives of their students and the lives of their families."

So, your kids may not transmit it to other kids, but have you thought of all the teachers, custodians, and other folks who work in schools?
mikeyzito22, I don't know about your school district, but in my own district with single teacher classrooms, since it is stating the kids are not great vectors for the virus it should not be a challenge for teachers, custodians, etc. to social distance from one another...this would just be a continuation of what they are doing while carrying out their current lives and taking precautions. I can't imagine what this disruption is doing to the young kids and I understand others have added precautions they must consider.

Luckily, mine are too young to be going to school and I hope this is a distant memory by the time school time rolls around....let me have this hope.
I can let you have this hope but it is guaranteed someone will get sick and then they will shut it down again with no comprehensive digital plans in place. You can hope the kids can stay away from each other (that's not going to happen). You can hope that each school in your district can have 35 sq ft. of space for each child. That's what our state requires. Good luck, but I doubt it. We live in an area currently not overly infected, our hospitals haven't been over run, and we STILL will not go to school. However, if teachers overwhelmingly don't want to go back, ultimately that is the choice the district has to abide by. Otherwise, you will have a strike and that's not good for anyone. Good luck and stay safe!
Sorry, I was unclear with that last statement - I have a couple years till preschool (my hope is for by then all this will be behind us).
"What will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, yet forfeits his soul?" MW 16:26

mikeyzito22
Posts: 437
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:42 pm

Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by mikeyzito22 » Fri Jul 31, 2020 5:13 pm

nokoast wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 4:00 pm
mikeyzito22 wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:55 pm
nokoast wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:49 pm
mikeyzito22 wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 9:30 pm
SchruteB&B wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 10:44 am
The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends in person school and cites “ "mounting evidence" that transmission of the coronavirus by young children is uncommon, partly because they are less likely to contract it in the first place.“

https://www.npr.org/sections/coronaviru ... -this-fall

Of particular note to me was the experience of YMCA child care centers in NYC caring for the children of essential workers:

Throughout the pandemic, many child care centers have stayed open for the children of front-line workers — everyone from doctors to grocery store clerks. YMCA of the USA and New York City's Department of Education have been caring for, collectively, tens of thousands of children since March, and both tell NPR they have no reports of coronavirus clusters or outbreaks.

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/24/88231664 ... -lockdowns

I am sending my child to school this fall if we have that option.
In the very same article:

"Our educators are overwhelmingly not comfortable returning to schools," said Tina Williams, president of Fairfax County Federation of Teachers. "They fear for their lives, the lives of their students and the lives of their families."

So, your kids may not transmit it to other kids, but have you thought of all the teachers, custodians, and other folks who work in schools?
mikeyzito22, I don't know about your school district, but in my own district with single teacher classrooms, since it is stating the kids are not great vectors for the virus it should not be a challenge for teachers, custodians, etc. to social distance from one another...this would just be a continuation of what they are doing while carrying out their current lives and taking precautions. I can't imagine what this disruption is doing to the young kids and I understand others have added precautions they must consider.

Luckily, mine are too young to be going to school and I hope this is a distant memory by the time school time rolls around....let me have this hope.
I can let you have this hope but it is guaranteed someone will get sick and then they will shut it down again with no comprehensive digital plans in place. You can hope the kids can stay away from each other (that's not going to happen). You can hope that each school in your district can have 35 sq ft. of space for each child. That's what our state requires. Good luck, but I doubt it. We live in an area currently not overly infected, our hospitals haven't been over run, and we STILL will not go to school. However, if teachers overwhelmingly don't want to go back, ultimately that is the choice the district has to abide by. Otherwise, you will have a strike and that's not good for anyone. Good luck and stay safe!
Sorry, I was unclear with that last statement - I have a couple years till preschool (my hope is for by then all this will be behind us).
That is my hope too. I have a first grader and a preschooler that does go to preschool currently. I'm also glad they are young and all of this will not be remebered by my little one, but I am having to explain the ins and outs to my first grader. She's a strong one though. Top of the class. Good luck to you my friend.

mikeyzito22
Posts: 437
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:42 pm

Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by mikeyzito22 » Fri Jul 31, 2020 5:21 pm

mikeyzito22 wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 5:13 pm
nokoast wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 4:00 pm
mikeyzito22 wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:55 pm
nokoast wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:49 pm
mikeyzito22 wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 9:30 pm

In the very same article:

"Our educators are overwhelmingly not comfortable returning to schools," said Tina Williams, president of Fairfax County Federation of Teachers. "They fear for their lives, the lives of their students and the lives of their families."

So, your kids may not transmit it to other kids, but have you thought of all the teachers, custodians, and other folks who work in schools?
mikeyzito22, I don't know about your school district, but in my own district with single teacher classrooms, since it is stating the kids are not great vectors for the virus it should not be a challenge for teachers, custodians, etc. to social distance from one another...this would just be a continuation of what they are doing while carrying out their current lives and taking precautions. I can't imagine what this disruption is doing to the young kids and I understand others have added precautions they must consider.

Luckily, mine are too young to be going to school and I hope this is a distant memory by the time school time rolls around....let me have this hope.
I can let you have this hope but it is guaranteed someone will get sick and then they will shut it down again with no comprehensive digital plans in place. You can hope the kids can stay away from each other (that's not going to happen). You can hope that each school in your district can have 35 sq ft. of space for each child. That's what our state requires. Good luck, but I doubt it. We live in an area currently not overly infected, our hospitals haven't been over run, and we STILL will not go to school. However, if teachers overwhelmingly don't want to go back, ultimately that is the choice the district has to abide by. Otherwise, you will have a strike and that's not good for anyone. Good luck and stay safe!
Sorry, I was unclear with that last statement - I have a couple years till preschool (my hope is for by then all this will be behind us).
That is my hope too. I have a first grader and a preschooler that does go to preschool currently. I'm also glad they are young and all of this will not be remembered by my little one, but I am having to explain the ins and outs to my first grader. She's a strong one though. Top of the class. Good luck to you my friend.

worthit
Posts: 225
Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2018 2:10 pm

Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by worthit » Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:39 am

For parents contemplating sending their kids to school or not, I would humbly request that they google MIS-C. This hasn't received the kind of attention it deserves in the media. The press release by American Academy of Pediatrics that kids are in general immune is a joke. Very premature to conclude and very irresponsible to say the least. Nothing against pediatricians. But try telling this to those parents whose kids had to be intubated. The point is, all this is still evolving and we should exercise caution and not jump to conclusions based on lack of signals or worse yet based on weak signals. Also, the testimony by Dr. Fauci in the Congress yesterday reinforces this.

This is just a glimpse of what would happen if kids congregate.

https://www.livescience.com/summer-camp ... break.html

Of course, in this instance masks were not required and that may have contributed to the spread. But the schools and teachers will find it challenging to enforce this amongst kids, if this is a requirement. Also, how many kids will end up keeping their masks on for more than 2 minutes and that too without touching their face and self? These are very real and practical questions.

As someone in a post above suggested, to the OP, if you have the choice, then I would wait till an effective therapeutic or a vaccine is in sight. May be the virus looses it virulence naturally and disappears? Who knows? Sorry to be blunt, but personally I would rather wait than be a statistic.

nigel_ht
Posts: 1003
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:14 am

Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by nigel_ht » Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:58 am

GaryA505 wrote:
Thu Jul 16, 2020 9:39 pm
Normchad wrote:
Thu Jul 16, 2020 9:30 pm
Very tough question. I’m glad I don’t have a child of that age. Mrs. Chad works in an elementary school though.

I don’t think it’s possible to place adequate safeguards in the school. I’d be in favor of delaying the start of school until things are under control.

All of us with kids in school are very familiar of all the colds, etc that they bring home.

Depending on what the local school district decides, Mrs. Chad is seriously considering quitting. She doesn’t want to, but it’s just not worth the risk. She’s not eligible for retirement yet. I imagine a lot of teachers who are eligible for retirement might also nope out.
You're not the only one. We're having a problem here getting enough teachers, and now even more may retire early.
Yep, we were going to do hybrid but the school system decided to kick the can down the road and be all virtual until Jan because teachers were going to quit.

I do not believe it helped when one idiot in the administration was asked by a school board member what would happen to teachers in the high risk category if forced to teach and answered that their contract had no provisions for staying out in these circumstances.

That went over really well...this is a district where parents are very involved...most moved here for the school system and the teachers union is very well supported by board members. There was a huge house cleaning of the board and the old superintendent let go.

RJC
Posts: 588
Joined: Fri Dec 14, 2018 1:40 pm

Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by RJC » Sat Aug 01, 2020 8:21 am

It's all virtual in our county, even the private schools.

health teacher
Posts: 348
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 7:27 am

Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by health teacher » Sat Aug 01, 2020 8:50 am

I would like to add that in March when this all started, teachers were left to develop all curriculum on their own. Some were able to do this successfully but many struggled as instructional design is pretty complicated and time consuming.

This upcoming school year, most, if not all, public schools will be adopting an online curriculum similar to traditional online schools. For example, students in West Virginia who choose virtual will all have the same curriculum throughout the entire state.In Ohio, school districts will be adopting district wide curriculum that will be uniform throughout the schools.

This will be a completely different experience compared to the spring. In person is still best, but the virtual experience should be improved.

KESP
Posts: 200
Joined: Sat May 07, 2016 8:24 pm

Re: Elementary school in Fall - choose Virtual or In-person

Post by KESP » Sat Aug 01, 2020 10:20 am

I work in both a elementary and middle school in a state that originally hard hit, but is doing OK now. We will be starting in-person classes in the fall. If we have to go virtual or hybrid at some point, we will be better prepared. All students will now have iPads, teachers have been properly trained, and we have learned a lot from the shutdown in March. I don't understand these comments from people saying the school is going virtual because the teachers didn't want to go back and/or they threatened to quit. We were asked our opinion, but it is up to the administration and Board of Ed to make the call. Our collective bargaining agreement does not cover not wanting to return to work due to fear of contracting a disease, and teachers would have to pursue an ADA claim on their own. Some viable reasons to pursue an ADA claim would be if you had a serious heart condition like heart failure, or kidney disease etc. which puts you in a high risk category to suffer serious illness if you contract coronavirus. I'm sure there are lots of recent grads who would love to take the place of people who choose to not return to work.
I am 63, and have nothing that would put me in a high risk category. My husband is 69 and has heart issues that put him in a very high risk category. I will be as careful as I can possibly be, and hope for the best.

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