What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

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bt365
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by bt365 » Sun Jun 14, 2020 3:14 pm

Not so much reading as browsing. Here's one of those "browsing" books:
https://www.shelterpub.com/building/halfacrehomestead
Much to be admired living a life so in concert with sky, soil, nature and the best little things life has to offer.
I know one of lives great pleasures for me when I was younger in living on a small farm in NY Hudson Valley,
the annual apple harvest, the aroma of fresh tomato vines, milking the goats/cows. Eating farm-to-table.
Sitting out at night watching the stars. Every year more people fall away from ties that bind us to our planet.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jebmke » Sun Jun 14, 2020 3:21 pm

Final Judgement by Marcia Clark. Somewhat formulaic.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

anthonyphamy
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by anthonyphamy » Sun Jun 14, 2020 3:22 pm

Iron Gold by Pierce Brown.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fallible » Sun Jun 14, 2020 10:32 pm

abuss368 wrote:
Fri May 29, 2020 4:48 pm
1789 wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 1:02 pm
"ENOUGH" from Bogle. I thought this maybe a boring book, but honestly it looks pretty good so far. Especially the 2nd part related to business. Couple interesting notes from the book: At one point he talks about his family roots and immigrant background - (he was Scottish). I didn't think he would ever make a point about his roots as immigrants as I know Bogle always was super influenced with the idea of American idealism. But i am wrong it seems, which is good. Also he mentions that he has 5 dreams that he would love to see the fund industry to embrace to bring back "democratic capitalism". I doubt that would ever happen. (stopping short term speculations, trading, being on the side of investors etc...)
I am reading as well. This is my favorite book and in my opinion should be required reading in business school.
Especially required reading for all business school grads headed for Wall Street.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself – and you are the easiest person to fool. ~Richard Feynman

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Calli114 » Mon Jun 15, 2020 12:33 am

Disruptive Compassion by Hal Donaldson, founder of the charitable organization, Convoy of Hope.
He has quite an interesting life story.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Jun 15, 2020 8:17 am

Boundless by Ben Greenfield.

The book is very large and heavy, and is full of information on elite-level health and longevity. It is a comprehensive resource for those who already practice a healthful diet, sleep, and exercise and are interested in the latest approaches to maximum health such as elongating telomeres, enhancing autophagy, lasting brain health, etc.

Greenfield has a companion web site https://boundlessbook.com/ with additional resources for the book. To access these resources you have to create an account and forward a receipt of your purchase of the book. My Amazon.com receipt was accepted.

Victoria
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Mon Jun 15, 2020 1:45 pm

Indestructible, by JohnR. Bruning.

This history tells two parallel stories. One story is of legendary flyer Col. "Pappy" Gunn's World War II exploits in New Guinea and the Phillipines, and the other about his family's internment by the Japanese in Manila. I recommend this book
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

quantAndHold
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by quantAndHold » Mon Jun 15, 2020 3:40 pm

Christine_NM wrote:
Mon Apr 27, 2020 8:13 pm
The Great Influenza by John Barry. Audible version.

I sprung for an Audible subscription last year and enjoy listening while doing puzzles. This is a fascinating account of the era as well as the pandemic. I imagine listening is a bit easier than slogging through the text. It's definitely for the lay person with an interest in general history.
Reading this now. My grandfather’s parents both died in that epidemic, leaving him an orphan, so I’m reading it with that firmly in mind. The book covers the historical time period, the overflowing hospitals, the bodies everywhere, the race to fine a cure or a vaccine, and the political actions that made everything so much worse than they had to be, in sometimes excruciating detail.

Things are bad now. They were worse then.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Christine_NM » Mon Jun 15, 2020 4:34 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Mon Jun 15, 2020 3:40 pm
Christine_NM wrote:
Mon Apr 27, 2020 8:13 pm
The Great Influenza by John Barry. Audible version.

I sprung for an Audible subscription last year and enjoy listening while doing puzzles. This is a fascinating account of the era as well as the pandemic. I imagine listening is a bit easier than slogging through the text. It's definitely for the lay person with an interest in general history.
Reading this now. My grandfather’s parents both died in that epidemic, leaving him an orphan, so I’m reading it with that firmly in mind. The book covers the historical time period, the overflowing hospitals, the bodies everywhere, the race to fine a cure or a vaccine, and the political actions that made everything so much worse than they had to be, in sometimes excruciating detail.

Things are bad now. They were worse then.
I had a personal connection too -- my mom was born in Massachusetts at the height of the first wave that started at Fort Devens. Pregnant women were particularly vulnerable so I consider my grandma lucky to have made it through.

New book now listening to - Price of Peace: Money, Democracy and the Life of John Maynard Keynes by Zachary D. Carter. The 1918 flu shows up here too -- once you know about it, you notice that it shows up most everywhere in the period. Today's diehard pol conservatives will probably not like it. Anyone interested in philosophy, art, literature in the 20th century will probably like it -- it is more about ideas and events than strict economic theory.
18% cash 44% stock 38% bond. Retired, w/d rate 2.5%

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Artful Dodger
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Artful Dodger » Tue Jun 16, 2020 1:43 pm

Listened to Joyce, Ulysses, chapter 3 / Proteus, on the way to work this morning...

“INELUCTABLE MODALITY OF THE VISIBLE: AT LEAST THAT IF NO MORE, thought through my eyes. Signatures of all things I am here to read, seaspawn and seawrack, the nearing tide, that rusty boot. Snotgreen, bluesilver, rust: coloured signs. Limits of the diaphane. But he adds: in bodies. Then he was aware of them bodies before of them coloured. How? By knocking his sconce against them, sure. Go easy. Bald he was and a millionaire, maestro di color che sanno. Limit of the diaphane in. Why in? Diaphane, adiaphane. If you can put your five fingers through it, it is a gate, if not a door. Shut your eyes and see.

Happy Bloomsday! :D

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by MP173 » Wed Jun 17, 2020 4:29 pm

Currently reading Steven Levy's "facebook - The inside Story".

Also reading "The Pennsy in Chicago" by Edward DeRouin - a book about the Pennsylvania Railroad's historical operations in 1950s.

Just finished Jonathan Kellerman's "The Museum of Desire" another Alex Davenport and Milo Sturgis investigation into a grizzly murder.

Ed

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Wed Jun 17, 2020 6:30 pm

Isaac's Storm, by Eric Larson.

This is a history of the 1900 hurricane which demolished Galveston, Texas with 100+mph winds and huge storm surge, killing about 6,000 residents out of of a total population of about 38,000. The book is also about the birth of the U.S. Weather Bureau. I recommend this book.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by pezblanco » Wed Jun 17, 2020 7:30 pm

ruralavalon wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 6:30 pm
Isaac's Storm, by Eric Larson.

This is a history of the 1900 hurricane which demolished Galveston, Texas with 100+mph winds and huge storm surge, killing about 6,000 residents out of of a total population of about 38,000. The book is also about the birth of the U.S. Weather Bureau. I recommend this book.
This is a very good book ... in the same line and also excellent is The Weather Experiment by Peter Moore ... also recommended.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Random Poster » Wed Jun 17, 2020 7:36 pm

The Less People Know About Us: A Mystery of Betrayal, Family Secrets, and Stolen Identity, by Axton Betz-Hamilton.

Quick synopsis: A memoir by way of a true-crime story. For Axton Betz-Hamilton, the identity theft her family experienced when she was a child reshaped her personality, her relationships, and the way she experienced the world — a theft from which she never really recovered.

NPR review can be found here: https://www.npr.org/2019/10/20/77135867 ... se-to-home

It is a quick read and surprisingly good. There are some good Boglehadish takeaways from the book too, but I can’t say what they are without giving away too much.

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black jack
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by black jack » Thu Jun 18, 2020 1:07 am

ruralavalon wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 6:30 pm
Isaac's Storm, by Eric Larson.

This is a history of the 1900 hurricane which demolished Galveston, Texas with 100+mph winds and huge storm surge, killing about 6,000 residents out of of a total population of about 38,000. The book is also about the birth of the U.S. Weather Bureau. I recommend this book.
There's a memorable song about that event: "Galveston Flood" (I like Tom Rush's version https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTnAxLOwGHQ)
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by mega317 » Sat Jun 20, 2020 4:49 pm

I'm doing two at once right now, one at home and one audiobook on commute.

Peaceful Parent, Happy Kids by Laura Markham. Our family has needed a reset after months of stay-at-home and this has some interesting techniques. One of them seemed to work well yesterday.

The Elements of Mentoring by W. Brad Johnson and Charles Ridley. It seems not enough material to justify a book--a pamphlet might work--but helpful nonetheless.

I hadn't been reading much, with the kids home there isn't much down time. It feels good to get back to it.
https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=6212

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by quantAndHold » Sat Jun 20, 2020 4:50 pm

ruralavalon wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 6:30 pm
Isaac's Storm, by Eric Larson.

This is a history of the 1900 hurricane which demolished Galveston, Texas with 100+mph winds and huge storm surge, killing about 6,000 residents out of of a total population of about 38,000. The book is also about the birth of the U.S. Weather Bureau. I recommend this book.
I'll have to read this. I recently read his book about Churchill. Also highly recommended.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Sun Jun 21, 2020 7:09 pm

A Fatal Grace, by Louise Penny.

Another murder in Three Pines, a small village in Quebec not found on any map. This time a very unpleasant newcomer is electrocuted while watching a curling match on a nearby lake. I recommend this mystery.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Dave55 » Sun Jun 21, 2020 7:19 pm

"White Doves at Morning" by James Lee Burke (my favorite author). A stand alone novel against the backdrop of the civil war.

Dave

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by mindboggling » Sun Jun 21, 2020 7:43 pm

"The Mirror and the Light". Part 3 of the Wolf Hall trilogy by Hilary Mantel. Historical novels about the life of Thomas Cromwell, who rose from a commoner to power in the court of King Henry VIII of England (1500s). The first two books won the Booker Prize. It's also been a TV mini-series (although I've never seen it). All her books are long so be prepared to commit.
In broken mathematics, We estimate our prize, --Emily Dickinson

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by chuckb84 » Sun Jun 21, 2020 8:43 pm

"Deadliest Enemy", about infectious diseases. It's not very uplifting, but a healthy dose of reality.

What we're going through now with covid is just a warm up exercise. I've become convinced that we need an ongoing investment of $100B/year to get prepared for the next one....and it's cheap at the price to avoid multiple trillions in bad consequences and millions of deaths.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by protagonist » Mon Jun 22, 2020 11:45 am

Matt Taibbi's "Hate, Inc."- a non-partisan skewering of the media (right and left) for inciting divisiveness rather than presenting real news.

I would give the book 3 stars....a very cogent and credible main point. I would delve further into what I see as its problems (why only 3 stars), but I can't think of a way to do so without potentially stimulating the kind of controversy that this site (admrably in my mind) goes out of its way to avoid, so I will leave it at that. I would say that at least the introduction is very well worth reading....most of the author's major points are revealed there, and they are important and not just obvious.
Last edited by protagonist on Tue Jun 23, 2020 11:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by cs412a » Mon Jun 22, 2020 12:09 pm

Oh, my. My wish list on Amazon has exploded due to this thread. :D

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by mickeyd » Wed Jun 24, 2020 1:27 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 8:36 pm
The Splendid and the Vile, by Erik Larson.

In depth look at Churchill’s first year as prime minister, May, 1940-41. Really fascinating. It became clear to me that Britain prevailed mostly due to Churchill's force of will.
Agreed. So far I found 2 interesting items: He took 2 baths/day and had sex only when wife (separate bedrooms) needed it.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Barkingsparrow » Wed Jun 24, 2020 3:02 pm

House of Rain - Craig Childs - sort of a personal detective narrative into the "disappearance" of the Anasazi, a native people(s) of the Southwest, although the proper term should be Ancestral Puebloans. It puts into perspective some of the ruins I've visited in Arizona and New Mexico (such as Bandalier for example).

Leonardo Da Vinci - Walter Isaacson - biography of you know who. Detailed, well-written, bringing Da Vinci to life. However, wonder how of the author's bias (like all biographies) has shaped how the book sees Da Vinci as a person. Nonetheless, he shows the proper awe towards Da Vinci's greatness. I enjoyed reading in detail how Da Vinci approached and evolved some of his creations, but it seems he had a short attention span, and often put things aside to move on to something else.

Hemingway - Jeffrey Meyers - another biography. As such, same doubts as to the previous book in terms of author bias but still, very well written and detailed. Somewhat painful to read due to Hemingway's extremely flawed personality, misogyny, etc. Someone who tried too hard to be larger than life and paid the price for it.

Moscow 1812 - Napoleon's Fatal March - Adam Zamoys - Absorbing narrative of the fatal 1812 invasion of Russia. A horrifying account of the suffering and brutality of the campaign and the battles, and the historical consequences.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by quantAndHold » Wed Jun 24, 2020 4:37 pm

Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline

A book about a world where everyone spends their days ignoring the dystopian world they live in for a virtual reality world full of 80's pop culture references wouldn't normally be on my reading list. But surprisingly, it's a fun page turner. Go figure.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by bertilak » Wed Jun 24, 2020 6:19 pm

The Mystery of the Yellow Room, Gaston Leroux, 1907

Fairly famous as one of the first "locked Room" mysteries. The modern reader must be willing to forgive quite a few histrionic characteristics. I am not sure how much of this is in the original French or how much to attribute to the English translation. For example, one knows how clever the main character is by being constantly told how clever he is as opposed to experiencing his cleverness directly.

What is more interesting is how the main character, an amateur detective, resembles Hercule Poirot and how Agatha Christie was said to have been influenced by this novel before writing any of her Poirot books. I can see that. The book's narrator might have inspired Poirot's Captain Hastings.

===================== Select with mouse to read a minor spoiler:
There are red herrings, of course: They depend on the "sciences" of the day: Phrenology (head bumps), hypnotism, mater disassociation by electricity with associated brilliant scientist. To be fair, neither the plot nor its unraveling depend on them.
=====================

I was not overly impressed. Yes, I can see how the intricate plot is quite creative but it is not very believable. Agatha Christie, and many others after her, were able to make the plot more believable and the characters more interesting and sympathetic. Unless you are interested in the historical significance I say stick with Christie!
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by LadyGeek » Wed Jun 24, 2020 9:21 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Wed Jun 24, 2020 4:37 pm
Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline

A book about a world where everyone spends their days ignoring the dystopian world they live in for a virtual reality world full of 80's pop culture references wouldn't normally be on my reading list. But surprisingly, it's a fun page turner. Go figure.
Thanks! The book is also mentioned in Good Modern Science Fiction.

I downloaded the book to my Kindle. My post is in that thread here (I gave you credit).
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by cinghiale » Thu Jun 25, 2020 12:41 pm

Hard Times: An Oral History of the Great Depression By Studs Terkel. (1970)

One of those books I had always meant to read. I got a nudge from George Friedman writing in his Geopolitical Futures letter, and found it to be relevant, compelling, touching reading.

One key, hard-hitting takeaway? This isn’t a ancient history. The is a chronicle of just 80 to 90 years ago. While profound transformations have occurred since then, much that touches on social and economic relations remains salient.
"We don't see things as they are; we see them as we are." Anais Nin | | "Sometimes the first duty of intelligent men is the restatement of the obvious." George Orwell

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Mr. Rumples » Thu Jun 25, 2020 2:23 pm

When one of my grandfathers came to this county with his brother to avoid being drafted into the Russian Army in 1905 (he was 13 and his brother was 15), my great grandparents had 10 more children. All but one son died in WW2; he survived the Siege of Leningrad and one cousin still lives in St. Petersburg. Leningrad: Tragedy of a City Under Siege by Anna Reid is an excellent read on the Siege. Instead of just numbers and troop movements, this book describes what individuals endured during the siege in which about 800,000 civilians died (estimates vary from 650,000 to 1,000,000). Drawn from diaries, and other first hand accounts and recollections, it brings the abstract into reality.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Dave55 » Thu Jun 25, 2020 3:48 pm

"The Terminal List" by Jack Carr. Fast paced action thriller with Navy Seal James Reece as the central character whose entire Seal Team was ambushed and killed and then his family murdered. He discovers a Conspiracy at the highest levels of the government, makes his plan and the action and the intrigue begin.

Dave

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by protagonist » Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:33 pm

After hearing so many people rave about it on this site, I finally started Kahnemann's Thinking Fast and Slow.
I'm not far enough into it yet to say what I think of it.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Tue Jun 30, 2020 8:35 am

protagonist wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:33 pm
After hearing so many people rave about it on this site, I finally started Kahnemann's Thinking Fast and Slow.
I'm not far enough into it yet to say what I think of it.
I started reading Thinking Fast and Slow several years ago. I did not finish the book.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by protagonist » Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:35 am

ruralavalon wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 8:35 am
protagonist wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:33 pm
After hearing so many people rave about it on this site, I finally started Kahnemann's Thinking Fast and Slow.
I'm not far enough into it yet to say what I think of it.
I started reading Thinking Fast and Slow several years ago. I did not finish the book.
It is a bit of a commitment. I am only about 10% in, and I find some of his claims a bit difficult to accept without fact-checking....like if I see pictures of money I will be less likely to help a stranger. Or if I am told to think about stabbing somebody in the back I will be more inclined to buy soap than candy, because I will want to cleanse my soul.

I'm withholding judgment. If I do finish it , it will mean that I like it.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by tettnanger » Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:59 am

Making a commitment to go back and read some of the "classics" that I either haven't read or read so long ago (high school!?) that I barely remember. About quarter of the way into All Quiet on the Western Front. Such great writing!

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fallible » Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:16 am

:P
protagonist wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:35 am
ruralavalon wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 8:35 am
protagonist wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:33 pm
After hearing so many people rave about it on this site, I finally started Kahnemann's Thinking Fast and Slow.
I'm not far enough into it yet to say what I think of it.
I started reading Thinking Fast and Slow several years ago. I did not finish the book.
It is a bit of a commitment. I am only about 10% in, and I find some of his claims a bit difficult to accept without fact-checking....like if I see pictures of money I will be less likely to help a stranger. Or if I am told to think about stabbing somebody in the back I will be more inclined to buy soap than candy, because I will want to cleanse my soul.

I'm withholding judgment. If I do finish it , it will mean that I like it.
Not to get too psychological, but after citing these two examples at only 10% in, are you sure you're "withholding judgment"? :P
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself – and you are the easiest person to fool. ~Richard Feynman

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by protagonist » Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:05 pm

Fallible wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:16 am
:P
protagonist wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:35 am
ruralavalon wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 8:35 am
protagonist wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:33 pm
After hearing so many people rave about it on this site, I finally started Kahnemann's Thinking Fast and Slow.
I'm not far enough into it yet to say what I think of it.
I started reading Thinking Fast and Slow several years ago. I did not finish the book.
It is a bit of a commitment. I am only about 10% in, and I find some of his claims a bit difficult to accept without fact-checking....like if I see pictures of money I will be less likely to help a stranger. Or if I am told to think about stabbing somebody in the back I will be more inclined to buy soap than candy, because I will want to cleanse my soul.

I'm withholding judgment. If I do finish it , it will mean that I like it.
Not to get too psychological, but after citing these two examples at only 10% in, are you sure you're "withholding judgment"? :P
I forgot about the one about when young students hear words like "Florida" or "bingo" they think of old people and then walk slower.

Yes, I'm withholding judgment. I'm skeptical about how reproducible all those findings are, how large were his samples, did his studies stand up to scrutiny, etc.....and I will prob. try to fact check at some point.

My skepticism is System 1. Need to give System 2 a chance, rather than jump to conclusions, since my System 1 also tells me that because he won a Nobel and because he seems so well-respected by intelligent members of this forum (and a friend of mine whose opinions I generally respect a lot), I am probably more likely to believe him.

Do you know if these studies stood up to scientific scrutiny/rigor, Fallible? The conclusions seem pretty intuitively wild to me. If they are robust, he is on to something pretty revolutionary.

This is just about what he refers to as "framing". Like you said, I am only 10% in, so I also want to see what else he has to say.

I also want to learn to spell his name correctly. Only one "n" at the end. Oops.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:41 pm

Miracle at Midway, by Gordon Prange, Donald Goldstein and Katherine Dillon.

This is an excellent history of the Battle of Midway, June 4-7, 1942, a turning point in World War II in the Pacific. I recommend this book.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by birnhamwood » Tue Jun 30, 2020 6:54 pm

I'm halfway through (and thoroughly enjoying) Chris Wallace's "Countdown 1945: The Extraordinary Story of the Atomic Bomb and the 116 Days That Changed the World"

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fallible » Tue Jun 30, 2020 9:47 pm

protagonist wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:05 pm
Fallible wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:16 am
:P
protagonist wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:35 am
ruralavalon wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 8:35 am
protagonist wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:33 pm
After hearing so many people rave about it on this site, I finally started Kahnemann's Thinking Fast and Slow.
I'm not far enough into it yet to say what I think of it.
I started reading Thinking Fast and Slow several years ago. I did not finish the book.
It is a bit of a commitment. I am only about 10% in, and I find some of his claims a bit difficult to accept without fact-checking....like if I see pictures of money I will be less likely to help a stranger. Or if I am told to think about stabbing somebody in the back I will be more inclined to buy soap than candy, because I will want to cleanse my soul.

I'm withholding judgment. If I do finish it , it will mean that I like it.
Not to get too psychological, but after citing these two examples at only 10% in, are you sure you're "withholding judgment"? :P
I forgot about the one about when young students hear words like "Florida" or "bingo" they think of old people and then walk slower.

Yes, I'm withholding judgment. I'm skeptical about how reproducible all those findings are, how large were his samples, did his studies stand up to scrutiny, etc.....and I will prob. try to fact check at some point.

My skepticism is System 1. Need to give System 2 a chance, rather than jump to conclusions, since my System 1 also tells me that because he won a Nobel and because he seems so well-respected by intelligent members of this forum (and a friend of mine whose opinions I generally respect a lot), I am probably more likely to believe him.

Do you know if these studies stood up to scientific scrutiny/rigor, Fallible? The conclusions seem pretty intuitively wild to me. If they are robust, he is on to something pretty revolutionary. ...
Protag, I highly value a healthy skepticism and asking good questions. As far as social experiments go in general, I often question them, even Walter Mischel's famous marshmallow experiment with children (e.g., I wonder if they all really like marshmallows because I hated them as a kid; and I wonder whether some might simply be more hungry than others, increasing the temptation). The "Florida effect" you refer to in Kahneman's book (not his study but he does include it) raises many questions for me, such as how long was the "short" hallway and whether length might make a difference; and how much slower were some than others, and how do they walk normally, and did the students have an explanation for why they walked slower, e.g., were some chatting, looking around, etc.). A longtime criticism of these experiments is that they are with college students who are readily available; yet older, experienced adults may react quite differently.

The work of Kahneman and Tversky (never, ever forget Tversky, whose brilliance is admired even more than Kahneman's) have been praised by other pioneers in behavioral econ, including Thaler, Shefrin, Statman, Ariely, etc. Surely that says something?

So, you were friends with Danny?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself – and you are the easiest person to fool. ~Richard Feynman

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by protagonist » Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:23 pm

Fallible wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 9:47 pm
protagonist wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:05 pm
Fallible wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:16 am
:P
protagonist wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 10:35 am
ruralavalon wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 8:35 am

I started reading Thinking Fast and Slow several years ago. I did not finish the book.
It is a bit of a commitment. I am only about 10% in, and I find some of his claims a bit difficult to accept without fact-checking....like if I see pictures of money I will be less likely to help a stranger. Or if I am told to think about stabbing somebody in the back I will be more inclined to buy soap than candy, because I will want to cleanse my soul.

I'm withholding judgment. If I do finish it , it will mean that I like it.
Not to get too psychological, but after citing these two examples at only 10% in, are you sure you're "withholding judgment"? :P
I forgot about the one about when young students hear words like "Florida" or "bingo" they think of old people and then walk slower.

Yes, I'm withholding judgment. I'm skeptical about how reproducible all those findings are, how large were his samples, did his studies stand up to scrutiny, etc.....and I will prob. try to fact check at some point.

My skepticism is System 1. Need to give System 2 a chance, rather than jump to conclusions, since my System 1 also tells me that because he won a Nobel and because he seems so well-respected by intelligent members of this forum (and a friend of mine whose opinions I generally respect a lot), I am probably more likely to believe him.

Do you know if these studies stood up to scientific scrutiny/rigor, Fallible? The conclusions seem pretty intuitively wild to me. If they are robust, he is on to something pretty revolutionary. ...
Protag, I highly value a healthy skepticism and asking good questions. As far as social experiments go in general, I often question them, even Walter Mischel's famous marshmallow experiment with children (e.g., I wonder if they all really like marshmallows because I hated them as a kid; and I wonder whether some might simply be more hungry than others, increasing the temptation). The "Florida effect" you refer to in Kahneman's book (not his study but he does include it) raises many questions for me, such as how long was the "short" hallway and whether length might make a difference; and how much slower were some than others, and how do they walk normally, and did the students have an explanation for why they walked slower, e.g., were some chatting, looking around, etc.). A longtime criticism of these experiments is that they are with college students who are readily available; yet older, experienced adults may react quite differently.

The work of Kahneman and Tversky (never, ever forget Tversky, whose brilliance is admired even more than Kahneman's) have been praised by other pioneers in behavioral econ, including Thaler, Shefrin, Statman, Ariely, etc. Surely that says something?

So, you were friends with Danny?
Danny as in Kahneman? No, not at all....I don't know what gave you that impression (maybe I was ambiguous when I referred to my friend who recommended the book). If we were friends (DK and I), I probably would have spelled his name correctly the first time. Clearly you are/were though. (Interesting....) I have read very little in the field of behavioral economics (or economics in general), but I do find the subject Kahneman is addressing quite fascinating.

I am a die-hard skeptic as you probably know from the years of knowing me through this forum. And I agree wholeheartedly with what you say about many experiments in social psychology. I am not accusing Kahneman of this....I haven't fact checked what I have read or looked to see how reproducible the results were. As stated they were, in my humble opinion, quite remarkable and some of the conclusions are, to me at least, frankly counter-intuitive and hard to believe. (So far he could probably use my thinking process here as a classic example of what he is talking about- I wish I could measure my pupils while reading the book).

I will get around to fact-checking those points at some time....or I hope I will anyway.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by LadyGeek » Wed Jul 01, 2020 7:43 am

The thread is getting derailed. Please continue the discussion here: Thinking Fast and Slow
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Eowyn » Thu Jul 02, 2020 1:38 pm

Recently finished:

The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes, audiobook: About packhorse librarians, set in Kentucky during the Depression. Historical soap opera-ish fiction. It was okay.

The Last Time I Lied by Riley Sager: A good phychological thriller about disappearances at a summer camp. It kept me feeling slightly unsettled from beginning to end. It switches back and forth between past and present events, a device I like but some don't.

The Eighth Sister by Robert Dugoni: A pretty good classic spy & legal thriller set in Russia and the Pacific Northwest.

Daytripper by Fabio Moon, Gabriel Ba & others: Beautiful, thought-provoking graphic novel about life & its meaning, and death. I recommend it.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by quantAndHold » Thu Jul 02, 2020 2:06 pm

“How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents”, by Julia Alvarez

Wealthy family with four daughters is forced to emigrate from the Dominican Republic to NYC in 1960, after the father is involved in an aborted coup. The story of how the family becomes American, told in reverse chronological order, from the perspective of the daughters. Published in 1991. I’m surprised I missed this one for so long.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.

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