Discarding Music CDs

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illumination
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by illumination » Thu May 21, 2020 11:34 am

I'd hold on to them, get a CD book and you can store a massive amount with very little space. It can cost a fortune to buy all that back digitally.

I don't view CDs something like VHS movies, it's honestly hard to watch something like a VHS on a modern big screen but CDs still sound better than most music you can buy digitally.

I definitely would not just throw them away, sell them, donate them, find a friend that might want them, etc. Someone out there can use it and wants it.

DaftInvestor
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by DaftInvestor » Thu May 21, 2020 3:24 pm

Years ago I bought 5 books which hold 100 CDs each. Threw away all the jewel cases and put all the CDs in the books - they don't take up much space on the shelf. There is a chance that some day I may not be able to find a favorite artist/song/album on spotify and may want to go back to the CD (most of which I have ripped anyway but ...). But then again - on my next computer I may not bother with a disk drive -and maybe eventually DVD players will stop playing them or move on - so eventually we may have nothing left to play them on.

22twain
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by 22twain » Thu May 21, 2020 6:12 pm

You can buy CD pages designed to be used in ordinary 3-ring binders. For example:

https://www.amazon.com/Case-Logic-CDP-2 ... 000KMR2YK/

You do need a bookshelf deep enough to accommodate those binders.
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joe8d
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by joe8d » Thu May 21, 2020 8:43 pm

Any Music I want is on You Tube.
All the Best, | Joe

02nz
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by 02nz » Thu May 21, 2020 8:48 pm

UpperNwGuy wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 1:40 pm
My large CD collection is mostly classical music that I purchased in the 1990s and early 2000s. The thought of trying to put them on digital files in a computer seems overwhelming. I worry about the sound quality and about the ability to keep the tracks together for multi-movement musical works. So far, I'm still playing them on a CD player purchased in 1995 connected to a tuner/amplifier purchased in 2002 connected to speakers also purchased in 2002. I wonder what will happen when one of those components fails. Will I be able to replace it? I have also heard that CDs manufactured in the 1980s through the mid 1990s can oxidize and lose their ability to be played. I've only stumbled across a few of those in my collection, but they prove that a CD is not forever (as they were advertised in the 1980s when they began replacing LPs).
The vast majority of my classical CDs (pretty much all the major labels and some smaller labels, too) are available to stream from Tidal losslessly (or in the supposedly even better MQA, which is a gimmick). Gapless playback across multiple movements seems to work fine, too. Try it, if you like it, digitize just the CDs that are not available on Tidal.

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Nestegg_User
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by Nestegg_User » Thu May 21, 2020 8:59 pm

Kenkat wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 7:11 pm
Kagord wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 12:29 pm
Caduceus wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 10:51 am
hear it digitally in as good a quality as the CD?
Wow, you do realize CD quality is a pretty low bar you would ever want to subject your ears to interpret sound waves to. Though, I suppose the CD has an advantage in that you won't hear pops and crackles on a poorly maintained LP, CD quality is pretty abysmal. I wouldn't worry about tossing that garbage format, I would not donate so you can prevent any others being subjected to "CD quality".

My Marantz 2600 doesn't even have CD on the selector knob.
Yeah, but can you hook an 8 track deck to it?
It probably only has a selection for an Elcaset :oops:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elcaset

(yeah, you DO have to be pretty old to remember those)

JDofAZ
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by JDofAZ » Fri May 22, 2020 3:33 am

UpperNwGuy wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 1:40 pm
My large CD collection is mostly classical music that I purchased in the 1990s and early 2000s. The thought of trying to put them on digital files in a computer seems overwhelming. I worry about the sound quality and about the ability to keep the tracks together for multi-movement musical works. So far, I'm still playing them on a CD player purchased in 1995 connected to a tuner/amplifier purchased in 2002 connected to speakers also purchased in 2002. I wonder what will happen when one of those components fails. Will I be able to replace it? I have also heard that CDs manufactured in the 1980s through the mid 1990s can oxidize and lose their ability to be played. I've only stumbled across a few of those in my collection, but they prove that a CD is not forever (as they were advertised in the 1980s when they began replacing LPs).
My year old 4k UHD bluray player can play CDs so getting hardware is not an issue yet.

sd323232
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by sd323232 » Fri May 22, 2020 4:58 am

Caduceus wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 10:51 am
I have some music CDs that I'd like to either trash or just sell as one lot. If I should decide - in ten, or twenty, or thirty years time - that I really want to hear one of those songs, is it safe to assume I'd be able to hear it digitally in as good a quality as the CD?

I know there are lots of music streaming services these days like Spotify, but what I don't know is if there's some systematic effort out there in the world to digitize essentially most mainstream music (nothing too rare or esoteric) into good quality digital files. If so, I won't bother with ripping anything and will just toss them.
im sure you can find any of the songs on youtube. even the most rare and esoteric.

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lthenderson
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by lthenderson » Fri May 22, 2020 8:29 am

sd323232 wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:58 am
im sure you can find any of the songs on youtube. even the most rare and esoteric.
Yes buy you need to be sitting at a computer and perhaps clicking several videos after every search to find the version that you were wanting to hear. Not really how I prefer to listen to music. I like being able to name any old song title to my smart speaker and having it search through my scanned in music library and come up with the song, hands and computer free. I can also create custom playlists so I can have hours of music without a single input from me. I'm not sure YouTube can do that either.

wfrobinette
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by wfrobinette » Fri May 22, 2020 8:55 am

jeep5ter wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 11:11 am
If you plan to get rid of the CDs, you should rip them into .wav files or flac files first. Those formats preserve all of the data, where mp3 files sacrifice some quality in return for smaller file size.
And as others have said unless you have audiophile quality equipment 256k VBR mp3 or AAC is going to get you 99.97% of the way there. The humans ear can only hear 20hz to 20khz on a good day in your youth. By your 40's you won't even get close to that range. That's why I find it hilarious that people pay extra $ to have music in 24bit/96khz.

Kagord
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by Kagord » Fri May 22, 2020 9:08 am

Kenkat wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 7:11 pm
Kagord wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 12:29 pm
Caduceus wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 10:51 am
hear it digitally in as good a quality as the CD?
Wow, you do realize CD quality is a pretty low bar you would ever want to subject your ears to interpret sound waves to. Though, I suppose the CD has an advantage in that you won't hear pops and crackles on a poorly maintained LP, CD quality is pretty abysmal. I wouldn't worry about tossing that garbage format, I would not donate so you can prevent any others being subjected to "CD quality".

My Marantz 2600 doesn't even have CD on the selector knob.
Yeah, but can you hook an 8 track deck to it?
It was embedded in my brain that when listening to Ramble On in the car, there would be a fadeout, cut, fadein, in that song, when the track switched from 3 to 4 on LZII. I just finally got over this last year and could enjoy the song again, and you just re-wired my brain again by the mere mention of something which should never be mentioned. Thanks.

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tcassette
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by tcassette » Fri May 22, 2020 9:48 am

wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:55 am
jeep5ter wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 11:11 am
If you plan to get rid of the CDs, you should rip them into .wav files or flac files first. Those formats preserve all of the data, where mp3 files sacrifice some quality in return for smaller file size.
And as others have said unless you have audiophile quality equipment 256k VBR mp3 or AAC is going to get you 99.97% of the way there. The humans ear can only hear 20hz to 20khz on a good day in your youth. By your 40's you won't even get close to that range. That's why I find it hilarious that people pay extra $ to have music in 24bit/96khz.
The OP has classical music to save, which should benefit the most from a lossless digital format. A lossy format like 256k mp3 will not get you "99.7% of the way there." I can assure you that my 60s ears can tell the superiority of a 24bit/96kHz music file over mp3 in a decent sound system.

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by TomatoTomahto » Fri May 22, 2020 10:10 am

wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:55 am
jeep5ter wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 11:11 am
If you plan to get rid of the CDs, you should rip them into .wav files or flac files first. Those formats preserve all of the data, where mp3 files sacrifice some quality in return for smaller file size.
And as others have said unless you have audiophile quality equipment 256k VBR mp3 or AAC is going to get you 99.97% of the way there. The humans ear can only hear 20hz to 20khz on a good day in your youth. By your 40's you won't even get close to that range. That's why I find it hilarious that people pay extra $ to have music in 24bit/96khz.
I’m not a vinyl only guy, but it is clear to me that many things besides 20hz to 20khz ability matter to humans listening to music. You are repeating industry arguments about how awesome CD sound is; the same industry downplayed that propaganda when SACDs came out.
As recently as 1999, it was commonly stated that babies could not feel pain until they were a year old, but today it is believed newborns and likely even fetuses beyond a certain age can experience pain.
Sometimes, you just know something is or isn’t true, regardless of received wisdom.
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Kenkat
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by Kenkat » Fri May 22, 2020 10:26 am

Nestegg_User wrote:
Thu May 21, 2020 8:59 pm
Kenkat wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 7:11 pm
Kagord wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 12:29 pm
Caduceus wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 10:51 am
hear it digitally in as good a quality as the CD?
Wow, you do realize CD quality is a pretty low bar you would ever want to subject your ears to interpret sound waves to. Though, I suppose the CD has an advantage in that you won't hear pops and crackles on a poorly maintained LP, CD quality is pretty abysmal. I wouldn't worry about tossing that garbage format, I would not donate so you can prevent any others being subjected to "CD quality".

My Marantz 2600 doesn't even have CD on the selector knob.
Yeah, but can you hook an 8 track deck to it?
It probably only has a selection for an Elcaset :oops:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elcaset

(yeah, you DO have to be pretty old to remember those)
I don’t remember the Elcaset but in the Wikipedia article it is compared to the (at one time ubiquitous) TDK D60 cassette. That took me down memory lane and Google led me here:

http://audiochrome.blogspot.com/2019/04 ... ments.html

This article shows various cassette packaging including several iterations of the Maxell XLII 90, TDK SA90, and SA-X90. I still have some of these laying around along with some TDK MAs and still have a cassette deck in storage. Like many, I used to create cassette tapes from vinyl late 70s and 80s for the car (remember auto-reverse?).

If you are into vintage electronics / media at all, this stuff is gold.

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Kenkat
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by Kenkat » Fri May 22, 2020 10:30 am

Kagord wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 9:08 am
Kenkat wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 7:11 pm
Kagord wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 12:29 pm
Caduceus wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 10:51 am
hear it digitally in as good a quality as the CD?
Wow, you do realize CD quality is a pretty low bar you would ever want to subject your ears to interpret sound waves to. Though, I suppose the CD has an advantage in that you won't hear pops and crackles on a poorly maintained LP, CD quality is pretty abysmal. I wouldn't worry about tossing that garbage format, I would not donate so you can prevent any others being subjected to "CD quality".

My Marantz 2600 doesn't even have CD on the selector knob.
Yeah, but can you hook an 8 track deck to it?
It was embedded in my brain that when listening to Ramble On in the car, there would be a fadeout, cut, fadein, in that song, when the track switched from 3 to 4 on LZII. I just finally got over this last year and could enjoy the song again, and you just re-wired my brain again by the mere mention of something which should never be mentioned. Thanks.
That is hilarious; I car-pooled to high school with a guy who had an 8 track in his POS 71 Charger. He’d have the stereo cranked up way too loud and it would switch tracks in the middle - cha-chunk. Like a bomb going off. Partly my fault since I installed his power booster / equalizer.

I am dating myself...

wfrobinette
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by wfrobinette » Fri May 22, 2020 10:34 am

tcassette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 9:48 am
wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:55 am
jeep5ter wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 11:11 am
If you plan to get rid of the CDs, you should rip them into .wav files or flac files first. Those formats preserve all of the data, where mp3 files sacrifice some quality in return for smaller file size.
And as others have said unless you have audiophile quality equipment 256k VBR mp3 or AAC is going to get you 99.97% of the way there. The humans ear can only hear 20hz to 20khz on a good day in your youth. By your 40's you won't even get close to that range. That's why I find it hilarious that people pay extra $ to have music in 24bit/96khz.
The OP has classical music to save, which should benefit the most from a lossless digital format. A lossy format like 256k mp3 will not get you "99.7% of the way there." I can assure you that my 60s ears can tell the superiority of a 24bit/96kHz music file over mp3 in a decent sound system.
Read my caveat of "unless you have audiophile quality equipment". Most sound systems people own are so far from high quality so I stand by my statement. Bias comes into play too. You think it will sound better so it does. I guarantee your ears can't tell the difference between HDCD and 24/96khz.

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by TomatoTomahto » Fri May 22, 2020 10:39 am

Years ago Linn took a lot of guff for saying that whether or not you found yourself tapping your foot to music was a good “tell.”

I find that certain rooms and equipment and music formats make me return to listen to more, whereas other combinations of equally pricy stuff doesn’t. The proof of the pudding is in the eating.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

bad1bill
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by bad1bill » Fri May 22, 2020 10:58 am

Rip them to MP3. Exact Audio Copy will rip to FLAC and Mp3 formats and it's free....For me, a high quality Mp3 works just fine.

I like to 4wheel, mountain bike, ski etc. with my tunes blaring away and streaming ain't gonna work for that.

There are certain old albums that I haven't been able to find so I'm glad I ripped my entire vinyl and CD collection to Mp3's many years ago. Time consuming but worth it. I did actually reacquire digital copies of some/many albums that were scratched or too worn due to repeated play during my hippie days.

I had issues in the transition from Android to iPhone with folder playing apps (still prefer the Android format; sorry to open another can of worms) but I figured it out...

wfrobinette
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by wfrobinette » Fri May 22, 2020 11:03 am

TomatoTomahto wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 10:10 am
wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:55 am
jeep5ter wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 11:11 am
If you plan to get rid of the CDs, you should rip them into .wav files or flac files first. Those formats preserve all of the data, where mp3 files sacrifice some quality in return for smaller file size.
And as others have said unless you have audiophile quality equipment 256k VBR mp3 or AAC is going to get you 99.97% of the way there. The humans ear can only hear 20hz to 20khz on a good day in your youth. By your 40's you won't even get close to that range. That's why I find it hilarious that people pay extra $ to have music in 24bit/96khz.
I’m not a vinyl only guy, but it is clear to me that many things besides 20hz to 20khz ability matter to humans listening to music. You are repeating industry arguments about how awesome CD sound is; the same industry downplayed that propaganda when SACDs came out.

Sometimes, you just know something is or isn’t true, regardless of received wisdom.
I am doing no such thing. 20hz - 20khz has nothing to do with CD vs vinyl it has to do with audible ranges of the human ear. This has been tested quite well by the scientific community. Look no further than a Dog whistle tuned to 23khz or higher. You can't hear it. There may be some anomalies but we are talking fringe cases here.

So while 24bit has the capacity to store music outside that range doesn't necessarily mean it's going to sound better. Same with a record, you're only going to hear within the range of the human ear. I have CD's that sound way better the vinyl and I have vinyl that sounds better than CD. I'll tell you the Japanese "press" some really nice SACDs and there are a fair amount of decent HDCD out there.

95% of it has to do with how well the music was recorded and mastered.

The preamp, DAC, amp and speaker have a lot to do with it as well. Tubes vs SS. Which tube,which transistor not to mention which caps and resistors. But the moment I put any of this on an off the shelf consumer system, phone or car stereo the VBR 256k Mp3 or AAC gives the average listener more than enough.

Longdog
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by Longdog » Fri May 22, 2020 11:06 am

Caduceus wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 11:17 am
BBQ Nut wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 11:11 am
Have you considered donating them to your local library?

I donated some CDs and DVDs to my library and they were ecstatic at getting the donation.
I am sure the library would not want them. I had fairly atrocious tastes in music. You know, stuff like boybands and instrumental tracks to truly bad movies. Things like that. My fiance was excited when he found my CD collection and then after 10 minutes of flipping through them, he said, "I don't think we should get married" ... lol
Lol. Is dumping your CD collection part of the prenuptial agreement? :happy
Steve

TravelGeek
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by TravelGeek » Fri May 22, 2020 11:53 am

02nz wrote:
Thu May 21, 2020 8:48 pm
The vast majority of my classical CDs (pretty much all the major labels and some smaller labels, too) are available to stream from Tidal losslessly (or in the supposedly even better MQA, which is a gimmick). Gapless playback across multiple movements seems to work fine, too. Try it, if you like it, digitize just the CDs that are not available on Tidal.
I personally have two problems with that:

- Why would I want to discard a product I already paid for and then replace it with a subscription service and effectively pay again?

- If my goal is to ensure continued ("forever") access to my music, why would I create a dependency on the business model of a 3rd party?

If your goal is to try out lots of new music, a streaming service sounds like a great and cost effective way. But I wouldn't give up my own collection (in digital form)...

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by TomatoTomahto » Fri May 22, 2020 12:33 pm

TravelGeek wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 11:53 am
- Why would I want to discard a product I already paid for and then replace it with a subscription service and effectively pay again?
Because it’s much easier to find the track/artist/album you’re looking for, not to mention the opportunity to discover music you might not otherwise.

I have not ripped any but 3 of my hundreds (thousands?) of CDs or DVDs.
I have kept Blu-rays of Jeff Beck performing live.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

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imbogled
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by imbogled » Fri May 22, 2020 12:36 pm

Hold on to them, someday they will be cool again. Who would of thought that cassettes would be desirable again? They were/are recently.
Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago. | Warren Buffett

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rob
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by rob » Fri May 22, 2020 12:42 pm

TomatoTomahto wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 10:39 am
Years ago Linn took a lot of guff for saying that whether or not you found yourself tapping your foot to music was a good “tell.”

I find that certain rooms and equipment and music formats make me return to listen to more, whereas other combinations of equally pricy stuff doesn’t. The proof of the pudding is in the eating.
I've always gone with a simple rule of thumb.... Setup is good if you want to turn it up and bad if you want to turn it down.... My audio friends always laughed at me.... but I still feel it's a good ROT. I agree... the room is a big part of the equation.
| Rob | Its a dangerous business going out your front door. - J.R.R.Tolkien

TravelGeek
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by TravelGeek » Fri May 22, 2020 1:10 pm

TomatoTomahto wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 12:33 pm

Because it’s much easier to find the track/artist/album you’re looking for, not to mention the opportunity to discover music you might not otherwise.
Well, in my post I did mention the ability to explore new music. :D

I have no problems finding stuff in my ripped collection, so for me personally (I used that word in my post) it's not worth being on a monthly payment treadmill to have access to the same music I already paid for years ago. YMMV, of course.

For whatever reason, I find myself actively listening less and less to music, compared to just using it as background "noise". Too many other things competing for my limited time, I guess? Podcasts are an example. Desire to read more books. Online classes. So for me personally discovery of new music is actually a low priority and I am not planning to pay another monthly service to offer me something I don't have time for.

02nz
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by 02nz » Fri May 22, 2020 1:59 pm

TravelGeek wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 11:53 am
02nz wrote:
Thu May 21, 2020 8:48 pm
The vast majority of my classical CDs (pretty much all the major labels and some smaller labels, too) are available to stream from Tidal losslessly (or in the supposedly even better MQA, which is a gimmick). Gapless playback across multiple movements seems to work fine, too. Try it, if you like it, digitize just the CDs that are not available on Tidal.
I personally have two problems with that:

- Why would I want to discard a product I already paid for and then replace it with a subscription service and effectively pay again?

- If my goal is to ensure continued ("forever") access to my music, why would I create a dependency on the business model of a 3rd party?

If your goal is to try out lots of new music, a streaming service sounds like a great and cost effective way. But I wouldn't give up my own collection (in digital form)...
I'm not getting rid of my CDs either. I was just pointing out (in response to a poster saying the thought of digitizing so many CDs was daunting) that I don't need to digitize most of them, since they can be streamed with Tidal. The ease of access to a large portion of my own collection, on multiple devices and without the hassle of ripping them, plus a ton of other music, are well worth the cost ($20/mo) to me.

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tcassette
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by tcassette » Fri May 22, 2020 7:57 pm

wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 10:34 am
tcassette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 9:48 am
wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:55 am
jeep5ter wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 11:11 am
If you plan to get rid of the CDs, you should rip them into .wav files or flac files first. Those formats preserve all of the data, where mp3 files sacrifice some quality in return for smaller file size.
And as others have said unless you have audiophile quality equipment 256k VBR mp3 or AAC is going to get you 99.97% of the way there. The humans ear can only hear 20hz to 20khz on a good day in your youth. By your 40's you won't even get close to that range. That's why I find it hilarious that people pay extra $ to have music in 24bit/96khz.
The OP has classical music to save, which should benefit the most from a lossless digital format. A lossy format like 256k mp3 will not get you "99.7% of the way there." I can assure you that my 60s ears can tell the superiority of a 24bit/96kHz music file over mp3 in a decent sound system.
Read my caveat of "unless you have audiophile quality equipment". Most sound systems people own are so far from high quality so I stand by my statement. Bias comes into play too. You think it will sound better so it does. I guarantee your ears can't tell the difference between HDCD and 24/96khz.
First of all, we don't know what kind of sound system OP has, and "audiophile quality equipment" is very subjective, so my statement stands as well. Second, you just randomly threw HDCD into the mix (pun intended). I was comparing 256k mp3 to 24bit/96kHz, which were your original assumptions. HDCD claims 20 bit audio out of a 16 bit CD format, and it does typically sound a bit better than regular 16 bit CDs.

Third, I agree that bias can be significant, as we see with your bias against lossless and high definition audio formats. Finally, I don't think you can guarantee anything about my ears. However, like tastes in music, you have your opinion and I have mine.

BBQ Nut
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by BBQ Nut » Fri May 22, 2020 8:27 pm

You can join/pay to read the Audio Engineering Society (AES) papers that document/prove that there are test results with statistical significance that people can discern lossy/MP3 formats to hi-res formats (above 16/44).

If you can't - cool. Stuff your ears with the earbuds and fold socks while rocking out.

If you can - MP3s are less than satisfactory. I can tell the difference and won't settle for less/lossy.

It's a lifestyle choice; convenience at the loss of fidelity. Fidelity at the loss of convenience.

Just don't claim to know what a given format can offer unless you can demonstrate what your experience base is.

Otherwise it's like saying hamburger is as good as it gets without actually having tasted a gorgeously seared prime ribeye steak.

Invest4lt
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by Invest4lt » Fri May 22, 2020 10:26 pm

abuss368 wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 6:00 pm
I donated to charity many years ago. Have iTunes.
Same, except I use Google Play music. I’ve been pleasantly surprised by streaming services. Easy user interface, playlists, suggestions for other music, integrating new tracks into your lists. You might want to try some free trails before investing In ripping. I did and it turned out well.

rgs92
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Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2009 8:00 pm

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by rgs92 » Sat May 23, 2020 12:47 am

Amazon Music HD is quite good. The audio quality is excellent and they seem to have every recording ever made. I prefer it to Tidal.
(There is a cheap entry level subscription with just MP3-level sound, but the HD-level subscription has FLAC quality.)

(FLAC files are fully-lossless music files, as opposed to MP3 files which are compressed. This is what you hear on youtube.)
But you can try the cheap non-HD level of Amazon music and see if you like it, and then try the HD version.

I was surprised at the sound quality of Amazon music. I feel it's the best streaming service out there.

Link:
https://www.amazon.com/b?node=14063680011

anoop
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by anoop » Sat May 23, 2020 1:20 am

I ripped my CD collection using Apple Lossless.

I have a collection of ~130 CDs. It took several days. The entire collection is about 50G (after deleting songs I didn't like). Each CD takes around 300-600 MB.

wfrobinette
Posts: 1011
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:14 pm

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by wfrobinette » Sun May 24, 2020 12:43 pm

tcassette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 7:57 pm
wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 10:34 am
tcassette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 9:48 am
wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:55 am
jeep5ter wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 11:11 am
If you plan to get rid of the CDs, you should rip them into .wav files or flac files first. Those formats preserve all of the data, where mp3 files sacrifice some quality in return for smaller file size.
And as others have said unless you have audiophile quality equipment 256k VBR mp3 or AAC is going to get you 99.97% of the way there. The humans ear can only hear 20hz to 20khz on a good day in your youth. By your 40's you won't even get close to that range. That's why I find it hilarious that people pay extra $ to have music in 24bit/96khz.
The OP has classical music to save, which should benefit the most from a lossless digital format. A lossy format like 256k mp3 will not get you "99.7% of the way there." I can assure you that my 60s ears can tell the superiority of a 24bit/96kHz music file over mp3 in a decent sound system.
Read my caveat of "unless you have audiophile quality equipment". Most sound systems people own are so far from high quality so I stand by my statement. Bias comes into play too. You think it will sound better so it does. I guarantee your ears can't tell the difference between HDCD and 24/96khz.
First of all, we don't know what kind of sound system OP has, and "audiophile quality equipment" is very subjective, so my statement stands as well. Second, you just randomly threw HDCD into the mix (pun intended). I was comparing 256k mp3 to 24bit/96kHz, which were your original assumptions. HDCD claims 20 bit audio out of a 16 bit CD format, and it does typically sound a bit better than regular 16 bit CDs.

Third, I agree that bias can be significant, as we see with your bias against lossless and high definition audio formats. Finally, I don't think you can guarantee anything about my ears. However, like tastes in music, you have your opinion and I have mine.

I don’t have a bias against high quality formats. What I am saying is the higher quality formats are a waste of resources for the vast majority of today’s listeners. I’ll have to dig for it but there is a really good paper explaining why high quality lossy isn’t as bad as it’s made out to be. It also explains why 24bit 96khz and higher sucks up space for things that can not be heard by the human ear. I can guarantee you don’t hear all frequencies within the 20hz to 20khz any longer and it’s highly likely you don’t hear anything over 15khz anymore probably even lower.

However, as I stated below the most important thing is the quality of the recording from the mics used, to placement, to recording equipment, etc. What you are likely experiencing is that hdcd, sacd 24/96khz or even 48bit/192khz formats likely don’t have A poor recordings mastered on them so they appear to sound really good.

wfrobinette
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Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:14 pm

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by wfrobinette » Sun May 24, 2020 1:06 pm

BBQ Nut wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:27 pm
You can join/pay to read the Audio Engineering Society (AES) papers that document/prove that there are test results with statistical significance that people can discern lossy/MP3 formats to hi-res formats (above 16/44).

If you can't - cool. Stuff your ears with the earbuds and fold socks while rocking out.

If you can - MP3s are less than satisfactory. I can tell the difference and won't settle for less/lossy.

It's a lifestyle choice; convenience at the loss of fidelity. Fidelity at the loss of convenience.

Just don't claim to know what a given format can offer unless you can demonstrate what your experience base is.

Otherwise it's like saying hamburger is as good as it gets without actually having tasted a gorgeously seared prime ribeye steak.
For ear buds lossy is just fine, same with the car and any Bluetooth and 99% of the speakers sold in the US today.

I do know what an HQ format offers. I’ve streamed things up to 48bit 192khz into my high end system that consists of a McIntosh C52, MC452, an oppo bdl 105 and some Tekton double impact speakers. 256k vbr sounds ok converted via the oppo but know where near what a 30 year old cd sounds like. There was no discernible difference between the 24/96 and the 48/192 and to my 50 year old ears I can’t hear a difference between a very well recorded cd and 24/96 with my rig.

I use no more than 192 vbr mp3 into my car stereo or akg mass drop headphones and they sound really good.

Unless you’ve got the equipment to take advantage of said quality. It’s like putting a Ferrari on a road in a residential neighborhood when a civic would get you to point B just as fast.

User avatar
tcassette
Posts: 187
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Location: Southeast Tennessee

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by tcassette » Mon May 25, 2020 9:47 am

wfrobinette wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 12:43 pm
tcassette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 7:57 pm
wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 10:34 am
tcassette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 9:48 am
wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:55 am


And as others have said unless you have audiophile quality equipment 256k VBR mp3 or AAC is going to get you 99.97% of the way there. The humans ear can only hear 20hz to 20khz on a good day in your youth. By your 40's you won't even get close to that range. That's why I find it hilarious that people pay extra $ to have music in 24bit/96khz.
The OP has classical music to save, which should benefit the most from a lossless digital format. A lossy format like 256k mp3 will not get you "99.7% of the way there." I can assure you that my 60s ears can tell the superiority of a 24bit/96kHz music file over mp3 in a decent sound system.
Read my caveat of "unless you have audiophile quality equipment". Most sound systems people own are so far from high quality so I stand by my statement. Bias comes into play too. You think it will sound better so it does. I guarantee your ears can't tell the difference between HDCD and 24/96khz.
First of all, we don't know what kind of sound system OP has, and "audiophile quality equipment" is very subjective, so my statement stands as well. Second, you just randomly threw HDCD into the mix (pun intended). I was comparing 256k mp3 to 24bit/96kHz, which were your original assumptions. HDCD claims 20 bit audio out of a 16 bit CD format, and it does typically sound a bit better than regular 16 bit CDs.

Third, I agree that bias can be significant, as we see with your bias against lossless and high definition audio formats. Finally, I don't think you can guarantee anything about my ears. However, like tastes in music, you have your opinion and I have mine.

I don’t have a bias against high quality formats. What I am saying is the higher quality formats are a waste of resources for the vast majority of today’s listeners. I’ll have to dig for it but there is a really good paper explaining why high quality lossy isn’t as bad as it’s made out to be. It also explains why 24bit 96khz and higher sucks up space for things that can not be heard by the human ear. I can guarantee you don’t hear all frequencies within the 20hz to 20khz any longer and it’s highly likely you don’t hear anything over 15khz anymore probably even lower.

However, as I stated below the most important thing is the quality of the recording from the mics used, to placement, to recording equipment, etc. What you are likely experiencing is that hdcd, sacd 24/96khz or even 48bit/192khz formats likely don’t have A poor recordings mastered on them so they appear to sound really good.
I agree that the high definition formats are overkill for the majority of listeners. I know that excellent recording and mastering is a prerequisite to maximizing sound quality and enjoyment from any music system. I also believe that the environment and location of equipment is a limiting factor, e.g., in all but the quietest luxury cars, high bit rate lossy format music typically sounds good enough. I use 320Kbps AAC and MP3 in my car, and it is fine.

However, the high definition formats in a high quality home system will provide the best sound assuming an excellent recording. The key to me is that you can listen to these formats at elevated volumes (when you want to) with minimal hearing fatigue. Lossy formats and even some CDs are more fatiguing.

DetroitPresley
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by DetroitPresley » Mon May 25, 2020 11:48 am

You may not have an opportunity to listen to them in the future unless you download them yourself.

I suspect that in several years, CD drive ports will go away completely. Safe to say, I think you'll be able to find most music somewhere.

wfrobinette
Posts: 1011
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:14 pm

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by wfrobinette » Tue May 26, 2020 9:57 am

tcassette wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 9:47 am
wfrobinette wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 12:43 pm
tcassette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 7:57 pm
wfrobinette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 10:34 am
tcassette wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 9:48 am


The OP has classical music to save, which should benefit the most from a lossless digital format. A lossy format like 256k mp3 will not get you "99.7% of the way there." I can assure you that my 60s ears can tell the superiority of a 24bit/96kHz music file over mp3 in a decent sound system.
Read my caveat of "unless you have audiophile quality equipment". Most sound systems people own are so far from high quality so I stand by my statement. Bias comes into play too. You think it will sound better so it does. I guarantee your ears can't tell the difference between HDCD and 24/96khz.
First of all, we don't know what kind of sound system OP has, and "audiophile quality equipment" is very subjective, so my statement stands as well. Second, you just randomly threw HDCD into the mix (pun intended). I was comparing 256k mp3 to 24bit/96kHz, which were your original assumptions. HDCD claims 20 bit audio out of a 16 bit CD format, and it does typically sound a bit better than regular 16 bit CDs.

Third, I agree that bias can be significant, as we see with your bias against lossless and high definition audio formats. Finally, I don't think you can guarantee anything about my ears. However, like tastes in music, you have your opinion and I have mine.

I don’t have a bias against high quality formats. What I am saying is the higher quality formats are a waste of resources for the vast majority of today’s listeners. I’ll have to dig for it but there is a really good paper explaining why high quality lossy isn’t as bad as it’s made out to be. It also explains why 24bit 96khz and higher sucks up space for things that can not be heard by the human ear. I can guarantee you don’t hear all frequencies within the 20hz to 20khz any longer and it’s highly likely you don’t hear anything over 15khz anymore probably even lower.

However, as I stated below the most important thing is the quality of the recording from the mics used, to placement, to recording equipment, etc. What you are likely experiencing is that hdcd, sacd 24/96khz or even 48bit/192khz formats likely don’t have A poor recordings mastered on them so they appear to sound really good.
I agree that the high definition formats are overkill for the majority of listeners. I know that excellent recording and mastering is a prerequisite to maximizing sound quality and enjoyment from any music system. I also believe that the environment and location of equipment is a limiting factor, e.g., in all but the quietest luxury cars, high bit rate lossy format music typically sounds good enough. I use 320Kbps AAC and MP3 in my car, and it is fine.

However, the high definition formats in a high quality home system will provide the best sound assuming an excellent recording. The key to me is that you can listen to these formats at elevated volumes (when you want to) with minimal hearing fatigue. Lossy formats and even some CDs are more fatiguing.
We are on the same page here. Thanks for the "debate"

02nz
Posts: 3929
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2018 3:17 pm

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by 02nz » Tue May 26, 2020 10:24 am

I suspect that in many cases the inferior quality of lossy streaming has more to do with the encoder used, rather than the format itself. I just started a trial of Amazon Music Unlimited (streams at 256 kbps), and when I listened to tracks I know well, I can hear what seem to be encoding artifacts (e.g., on piano recordings). This is with decent but not high-end headphones plugged directly into my iPad. Trying the same tracks on Tidal's High setting (also lossy, 320 kbps) do not show the same artifacts, actually even Tidal's lowest quality setting (96 kbps) do not show the same artifacts. When I've encoded tracks myself from WAV files, using a high-quality encoder, I've found that MP3 is transparent (to me at least) from about 256 kbps; other formats like AAC may be transparent at an even lower bitrate. So I suspect that the artifacts are due to the encoder Amazon uses. Some decoders are better than others, and also the settings matter - you can trade-off speed for quality, and Amazon probably chose to go for speed of decoding rather than the highest quality.

gbronc
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by gbronc » Tue May 26, 2020 10:45 am

I've struggled with getting rid of the thousands of never played CDs in a large tower that everyone wants me to remove. This thread motivated me to purchase this 1000 CD metal case: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CDWQK7A

Will probably have to order a second one since all my CDs will not fit in one. Will be a painful day recycling/disposing of all those jewel cases, but have to do it sooner or later. Haven't decided on whether to keep liner notes and inserts since that will reduce storage.

I am definitely not an audiophile, but do listen to all the music on earbuds, car stereo and home stereo system.

I ripped all my CDs years ago and stopped buying them and went Spotify with the Premium family subscription. Have not regretted it because of the ease use and the additional music Spotify suggests. I will sometimes play the ripped MP3s and there are many songs that I have on CD that are not on Spotify yet. I listened to 85,000+ hours minutes of music in 2019 according so Spotify, so getting my money's worth.
Last edited by gbronc on Tue May 26, 2020 5:17 pm, edited 2 times in total.

02nz
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Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2018 3:17 pm

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by 02nz » Tue May 26, 2020 10:49 am

DetroitPresley wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 11:48 am
You may not have an opportunity to listen to them in the future unless you download them yourself.

I suspect that in several years, CD drive ports will go away completely. Safe to say, I think you'll be able to find most music somewhere.
Carmakers are doing away with CD players on cars (my 2018 Volt doesn't have one), but how else would "CD drive ports go away completely"? If you have a CD player, it will obviously continue to work. And CD players/drives will be available for a long, long, long, long time to come, not least because players for newer formats like DVD and Blu-Ray also play CDs.

alfaspider
Posts: 2658
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2015 4:44 pm

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by alfaspider » Tue May 26, 2020 10:53 am

BBQ Nut wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:27 pm
You can join/pay to read the Audio Engineering Society (AES) papers that document/prove that there are test results with statistical significance that people can discern lossy/MP3 formats to hi-res formats (above 16/44).

If you can't - cool. Stuff your ears with the earbuds and fold socks while rocking out.

If you can - MP3s are less than satisfactory. I can tell the difference and won't settle for less/lossy.

It's a lifestyle choice; convenience at the loss of fidelity. Fidelity at the loss of convenience.

Just don't claim to know what a given format can offer unless you can demonstrate what your experience base is.

Otherwise it's like saying hamburger is as good as it gets without actually having tasted a gorgeously seared prime ribeye steak.
Have you actually passed a blind test? There's basic software that can administer it if you care to try.

I'm a classically trained musician with a moderately high end headphone setup (AKG 701 with a dedicated headphone amplifier and DAC). With a high quality variable bitrate encoder, I could not pass a blind test between 256kb variable bitrate mp3 and 320kb Mp3, let alone the difference between high bitrate mp3 and a WAV or FLAC file. Perception of sound quality can vary greatly based on your mood and the placebo effect- that's why people will swear that silly things like $1,000 digital cables and props that hold up your speaker wire make a difference. It doesn't matter if the playback soundwave is 100% identical, people feel like they make a difference, so they do in fact change the perceived experience.

That said, there is certainly a level where compressed audio is quite noticeable. Listening to a 48kb/s news stream is incredibly annoying with a high quality sound setup- it's full of artifacts. Regular earbuds or car speakers don't reproduce the artifacts, so it's fine for most users. I could also tell the difference between 192 and 256kb variable bitrate encoding when listening closely on a good sound system, but the effect was subtle and I really had to strain to hear the occasional artifact in the 192kb recording

alfaspider
Posts: 2658
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by alfaspider » Tue May 26, 2020 10:55 am

02nz wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 10:49 am
DetroitPresley wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 11:48 am
You may not have an opportunity to listen to them in the future unless you download them yourself.

I suspect that in several years, CD drive ports will go away completely. Safe to say, I think you'll be able to find most music somewhere.
Carmakers are doing away with CD players on cars (my 2018 Volt doesn't have one), but how else would "CD drive ports go away completely"? If you have a CD player, it will obviously continue to work. And CD players/drives will be available for a long, long, long, long time to come, not least because players for newer formats like DVD and Blu-Ray also play CDs.
CDs will be available for many many years. You can still buy turntables and new records on vinyl. However, they are already falling into general disuse. I have not listened to music on a CD in a decade. The CD player in my car is being used as a smartphone mount.

TravelGeek
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by TravelGeek » Tue May 26, 2020 11:18 am

gbronc wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 10:45 am
I listened to 85,000+ hours of music in 2019 according so Spotify, so getting my money's worth.
On what planet are you living? On earth the year 2019 had 8760 hours.

bberris
Posts: 1423
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 9:44 am

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by bberris » Tue May 26, 2020 11:40 am

CDs are proof that you own the right to play the music. Admittedly you are more likely to win the lottery than be accused of music piracy for privately playing your songs.

02nz
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Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2018 3:17 pm

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by 02nz » Tue May 26, 2020 12:53 pm

TravelGeek wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 11:18 am
gbronc wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 10:45 am
I listened to 85,000+ hours of music in 2019 according so Spotify, so getting my money's worth.
On what planet are you living? On earth the year 2019 had 8760 hours.
Apparently Jupiter (or Saturn, or Uranus, or Neptune)!

gbronc
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Contact:

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by gbronc » Tue May 26, 2020 5:11 pm

TravelGeek wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 11:18 am
gbronc wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 10:45 am
I listened to 85,000+ hours of music in 2019 according so Spotify, so getting my money's worth.
On what planet are you living? On earth the year 2019 had 8760 hours.
Doh! Typo, should have been minutes. Corrected.

GoldenFinch
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by GoldenFinch » Tue May 26, 2020 5:23 pm

We kept my husband’s cd collection from the (I think) late 80s-90s for 20 years until I finally donated them all to the library. We’ve been married since 1992 and I don’t think he’s listened to them once since then. Pandora is free and really good. We got a tax deduction. :happy

Dregob
Posts: 103
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Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by Dregob » Tue May 26, 2020 5:34 pm

Hey I know people listen to audiobooks at 2x speed. I thought maybe you listened to your tunes as 10X!

tettnanger
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Location: Michigan

Re: Discarding Music CDs

Post by tettnanger » Tue May 26, 2020 5:37 pm

Just my two cents, but instead of giving the CDs away for virtually nothing, you could sell them on eBay for a notch above next to nothing. I just did that recently and sold a couple hundred. Charge $3.30 apiece with shipping or 5 / $15 with free shipping. Cleared me out pretty quick.

Now it may depend on what you're selling. I grouped together a bunch of rock, metal, punk, alternative. I didn't put any of my classical or jazz out there. Still figuring out how/if I plan to sell those.

I also found I had some "rare" CDs from the 80s/90s and sold those for more. Some upwards of $20.

For me now it's all streaming and vinyl.

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