Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

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dodecahedron
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Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by dodecahedron » Thu Mar 19, 2020 11:43 am

About a month ago, when COVID first hit my radar screen, I contacted my attorney´s office about updating my estate documents. I have an appointment for next Monday morning. Under the circumstances, my attorney´s office contacted me to let me know that she now does all client meetings by teleconference.

My current estate documents were done in 2008, five years before my husband died. At that time, it made sense to list him as my primary choice for executor, financial POA, and medical POA, and our older daughter, then 22, as backup for those roles.

Now my older daughter lives quite far away (I am in upstate NY, she is now in the midwest) and has no easy way to get home in the event I become incapacitated given the chaos of travel. My younger daughter, who was 18 when those documents were drawn up, is now 30 and it makes sense to designate her as primary for those roles (and leave my older daughter listed as secondary.)

I have discussed this with both daughters and we agree that this seems like a very prudent change. (My daughters have a great relationship with one another and I know they will consult with one another about any difficult decisions.)

I will also discuss an overall update of my current situation with my attorney and see if she has any recommendations for other changes.

I am wondering about how the logistics work for actually signing documents in front of witnesses in the current environment. A relative who happens to be an attorney in another state (but is not actually in the area of wills and estates) says that definitely wills need in person witnesses to wet ink signatures, that witnesses watching a video of me signing on Zoom won´t work.

I want to update my documents but do not want to put anyone else (or myself) at risk.

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ResearchMed
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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by ResearchMed » Thu Mar 19, 2020 11:52 am

dodecahedron wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 11:43 am
About a month ago, when COVID first hit my radar screen, I contacted my attorney´s office about updating my estate documents. I have an appointment for next Monday morning. Under the circumstances, my attorney´s office contacted me to let me know that she now does all client meetings by teleconference.

My current estate documents were done in 2008, five years before my husband died. At that time, it made sense to list him as my primary choice for executor, financial POA, and medical POA, and our older daughter, then 22, as backup for those roles.

Now my older daughter lives quite far away (I am in upstate NY, she is now in the midwest) and has no easy way to get home in the event I become incapacitated given the chaos of travel. My younger daughter, who was 18 when those documents were drawn up, is now 30 and it makes sense to designate her as primary for those roles (and leave my older daughter listed as secondary.)

I have discussed this with both daughters and we agree that this seems like a very prudent change. (My daughters have a great relationship with one another and I know they will consult with one another about any difficult decisions.)

I will also discuss an overall update of my current situation with my attorney and see if she has any recommendations for other changes.

I am wondering about how the logistics work for actually signing documents in front of witnesses in the current environment. A relative who happens to be an attorney in another state (but is not actually in the area of wills and estates) says that definitely wills need in person witnesses to wet ink signatures, that witnesses watching a video of me signing on Zoom won´t work.

I want to update my documents but do not want to put anyone else (or myself) at risk.
Could you use "any two" adults you know to be witnesses? Meet in a park, each use a pair of Nitrile gloves, and each person bring their own pen?
For some added security, you could take a video using your phone, and email that file to your attorney.
Ask the attorneys if something like that would work.

RM
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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by Alan S. » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:23 pm

Sounds like some of these documents are independent forms, and your changes are not complex.

Would it work to use another attorney or even para legal to replace these documents? If not, postpone the pending appointment to a time when she comes out of self quarantine?

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by dodecahedron » Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:00 pm

Alan S. wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:23 pm
Sounds like some of these documents are independent forms, and your changes are not complex.

Would it work to use another attorney or even para legal to replace these documents? If not, postpone the pending appointment to a time when she comes out of self quarantine?
You are right that the changes are not complex, especially if all I do is change the primary executor. Perhaps it could be done just as a simple codicil to the original will.

I am not sure if this is a temporary self-quarantine on her part, and I myself am trying to avoid unnecessary physical contact as much as possible. It seems like there should be a technology facilitated way to do this. Like if I read the codicil aloud on video in front of video witnesses and we all e-sign something attesting that I signed it. I am sure there must be many older people wanting to update estate plans without physical contact.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by Nate79 » Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:11 pm

As long as you maintain social distancing, 6ft, and surfaces are cleaned I don't see the issue.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by TomatoTomahto » Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:19 pm

Nate79 wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:11 pm
As long as you maintain social distancing, 6ft, and surfaces are cleaned I don't see the issue.
I think the paper surface can also carry the virus for a time. In my experience, witnessing and notarizing moves along quickly, shuffling papers to other participants, and obviously bleaching the paper won’t work. I don’t think I can sign anything without putting my non-dominant hand on the paper, although I could wear gloves.

All in all, it seems like E-signatures would fit a legit need here.

ETA: our attorney is still making her office available for document signing, witnessing, and notarizing, but as a high risk participant, I don’t think it’s worth the risk for the documents we have.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by quantAndHold » Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:27 pm

We are in the middle of the same. Went and saw the lawyer for our once a decade updates right before this all blew up. Once it did blow up, we realized that we really want the changes made now, and no, it can’t wait until things have calmed down, because the changes are significant. We did all the reviews online, and we’re signing docs today. We’re going to her office in person, but I’ve confirmed that we’re the only clients today. I’m guessing we’ll all just stand way back from each other in the lobby, and take turns getting close to the docs. Then we’ll all go scrub like crazy afterwards.
Yes, I’m really that pedantic.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by bsteiner » Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:55 pm

In New York, the witnesses don't have to be there when you sign. It's sufficient if, within 30 days, you acknowledge to the witnesses that it's your Will and you ask them to sign as witnesses, and they sign as witnesses. We can't be sure whether doing it by video is sufficient, but it's worth a try. When this is over, you can sign it again in the lawyer's office with witnesses and a notary for the self-proving affidavit.

It's usually better to sign a new Will rather than a codicil. With word processing, it's no more work (and often less work) to do a new Will.

But if you're near the New Jersey border, New Jersey allows holographic (in your handwriting) Wills even if not witnessed; and New York will recognize a Will that was valid where it was signed. In that case, you could handwrite a codicil, go to New Jersey, and sign it there. You would need a way to prove that you signed in in New Jersey.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by Nate79 » Thu Mar 19, 2020 2:12 pm

TomatoTomahto wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:19 pm
Nate79 wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:11 pm
As long as you maintain social distancing, 6ft, and surfaces are cleaned I don't see the issue.
I think the paper surface can also carry the virus for a time. In my experience, witnessing and notarizing moves along quickly, shuffling papers to other participants, and obviously bleaching the paper won’t work. I don’t think I can sign anything without putting my non-dominant hand on the paper, although I could wear gloves.

All in all, it seems like E-signatures would fit a legit need here.

ETA: our attorney is still making her office available for document signing, witnessing, and notarizing, but as a high risk participant, I don’t think it’s worth the risk for the documents we have.
You could wash your hands after touching the papers and surfaces. Or use hand sanitizer, etc.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by dodecahedron » Thu Mar 19, 2020 2:47 pm

bsteiner wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:55 pm
In New York, the witnesses don't have to be there when you sign. It's sufficient if, within 30 days, you acknowledge to the witnesses that it's your Will and you ask them to sign as witnesses, and they sign as witnesses. We can't be sure whether doing it by video is sufficient, but it's worth a try. When this is over, you can sign it again in the lawyer's office with witnesses and a notary for the self-proving affidavit.

It's usually better to sign a new Will rather than a codicil. With word processing, it's no more work (and often less work) to do a new Will.

But if you're near the New Jersey border, New Jersey allows holographic (in your handwriting) Wills even if not witnessed; and New York will recognize a Will that was valid where it was signed. In that case, you could handwrite a codicil, go to New Jersey, and sign it there. You would need a way to prove that you signed in in New Jersey.
Thanks Bruce. I am not close to the NJ border, but the approach you describe in the first paragraph definitely seems worth a try to me. COVID19 is quite prevalent in my area (Capital District of NY) and due to shortage of test kits, probably significantly more prevalent than the statistics suggest.

New York State seems to have overtaken Washington State as the epicenter of COVID19 in this country. Although downstate (NYC and suburbs) are the strongest concentration, the Capital District (where I am) is the second strongest, likely due to all the downstate state legislators and their staffs who travel back and forth between downstate and the Capital, particularly as this is peak budget/decisionmaking season.

A number of people I personally know extremely well have either tested positive or are under quarantine for close contact with a known confirmed case. I almost wound up in that latter situation (under mandatory quarantine) myself except that I decided to stay home from a small party 13 days ago.

I am not under official quarantine but I have not left my home for any reason other than walks in the great outdoors (nowhere near other human beings) since last Thursday and I would like to keep it that way.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by bsteiner » Thu Mar 19, 2020 3:29 pm

dodecahedron wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 2:47 pm
bsteiner wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:55 pm
In New York, the witnesses don't have to be there when you sign. It's sufficient if, within 30 days, you acknowledge to the witnesses that it's your Will and you ask them to sign as witnesses, and they sign as witnesses. We can't be sure whether doing it by video is sufficient, but it's worth a try. When this is over, you can sign it again in the lawyer's office with witnesses and a notary for the self-proving affidavit.

It's usually better to sign a new Will rather than a codicil. With word processing, it's no more work (and often less work) to do a new Will.

But if you're near the New Jersey border, New Jersey allows holographic (in your handwriting) Wills even if not witnessed; and New York will recognize a Will that was valid where it was signed. In that case, you could handwrite a codicil, go to New Jersey, and sign it there. You would need a way to prove that you signed in in New Jersey.
Thanks Bruce. I am not close to the NJ border, but the approach you describe in the first paragraph definitely seems worth a try to me. COVID19 is quite prevalent in my area (Capital District of NY) and due to shortage of test kits, probably significantly more prevalent than the statistics suggest.

New York State seems to have overtaken Washington State as the epicenter of COVID19 in this country. Although downstate (NYC and suburbs) are the strongest concentration, the Capital District (where I am) is the second strongest, likely due to all the downstate state legislators and their staffs who travel back and forth between downstate and the Capital, particularly as this is peak budget/decisionmaking season.

A number of people I personally know extremely well have either tested positive or are under quarantine for close contact with a known confirmed case. I almost wound up in that latter situation (under mandatory quarantine) myself except that I decided to stay home from a small party 13 days ago.

I am not under official quarantine but I have not left my home for any reason other than walks in the great outdoors (nowhere near other human beings) since last Thursday and I would like to keep it that way.
Happy to hear you missed the party.

I was in Albany a couple of weeks ago, speaking at the for the Eastern New York (Albany area) Estate Planning Council on planning under the SECURE Act. If it had been any later it would have been postponed indefinitely or cancelled.

A well respected law professor just said something similar on a listserv for trusts and estates lawyers:

"do the very best you can under these strange circumstances, warn the clients of the risks, tell them to come back for a redo when times improve, mark your calendar to remind them and hope the legislature will enact retroactive legislation or that judges will find creative, and currently unthought of, ways to probate wills that might not make it through in ordinary times."

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by dodecahedron » Thu Mar 19, 2020 4:08 pm

bsteiner wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 3:29 pm
I was in Albany a couple of weeks ago, speaking at the for the Eastern New York (Albany area) Estate Planning Council on planning under the SECURE Act. If it had been any later it would have been postponed indefinitely or cancelled.
Interesting coincidence. I think there is a good chance my attorney was at your talk. She is very active in professional educational activities. It will facilitate my conversation with her if she was at your talk.
A well respected law professor just said something similar on a listserv for trusts and estates lawyers:

"do the very best you can under these strange circumstances, warn the clients of the risks, tell them to come back for a redo when times improve, mark your calendar to remind them and hope the legislature will enact retroactive legislation or that judges will find creative, and currently unthought of, ways to probate wills that might not make it through in ordinary times."
Sounds like a good strategy. I am hopeful that odds are in my favor that I will survive to be around for a redo. And if not, I am hopeful that the main change I want to make will not be a problem as I believe both my daughters are in agreement that it makes sense, and it does not involve changing any beneficiaries in the will.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by gr7070 » Thu Mar 19, 2020 4:37 pm

Just let it be till all this passes.

The very slight inconvenience of travel from the Midwest to NY isn't worth the hassle to prevent its need, or even slight risk of exposure!! It's highly unlikely you'll pass anytime soon, anyway. So none if this is important.

Don't worry about it! Deal with it 6 months from now...

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by dodecahedron » Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:54 am

I just got off the phone with my attorney discussing the changes I want to make.

My attorney´s tentative plan at this time is to use the following procedure:

She and her assistant will drive to my home in separate cars. They will remain outside my home and I will remain inside my home. They will watch me sign the documents through the window. After I have finished signing the documents, I will put them in an envelope, open my front door and put the documents outside. One of them will retrieve the envelope wearing gloves and put it in a box to transport back to the office for processing.

(They are allowed to have one person at a time in the office.)

However, my attorney acknowledged that things are changing very fast and it is possible there will be a technology-enabled distance signing option by the time the documents are ready for my signature.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:57 am

TomatoTomahto wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:19 pm
Nate79 wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:11 pm
As long as you maintain social distancing, 6ft, and surfaces are cleaned I don't see the issue.
I think the paper surface can also carry the virus for a time. In my experience, witnessing and notarizing moves along quickly, shuffling papers to other participants, and obviously bleaching the paper won’t work. I don’t think I can sign anything without putting my non-dominant hand on the paper, although I could wear gloves.

All in all, it seems like E-signatures would fit a legit need here.

ETA: our attorney is still making her office available for document signing, witnessing, and notarizing, but as a high risk participant, I don’t think it’s worth the risk for the documents we have.
+1

OP: what would be the difference between updating the documents now or 3 months from now?

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by RudyS » Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:25 am

The issue is not so much legal as psychological. 'nuf said. But very understandable.

EDIT: Saw OP's explanation, downstream from here, and I agree. More than "psychological."
Last edited by RudyS on Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by dodecahedron » Mon Mar 23, 2020 12:39 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:57 am
TomatoTomahto wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:19 pm
Nate79 wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:11 pm
As long as you maintain social distancing, 6ft, and surfaces are cleaned I don't see the issue.
I think the paper surface can also carry the virus for a time. In my experience, witnessing and notarizing moves along quickly, shuffling papers to other participants, and obviously bleaching the paper won’t work. I don’t think I can sign anything without putting my non-dominant hand on the paper, although I could wear gloves.

All in all, it seems like E-signatures would fit a legit need here.

ETA: our attorney is still making her office available for document signing, witnessing, and notarizing, but as a high risk participant, I don’t think it’s worth the risk for the documents we have.
+1

OP: what would be the difference between updating the documents now or 3 months from now?

j :happy
I am the OP.

At age 66, in the current environment, the odds that I become incapacitated and need to have someone making important medical decisions on my behalf in the next three months (or however long this COVID19 crisis takes to resolve--could be much longer than three months) are not negligible. The odds that I die before this crisis is over are also not negligible. My current documents are 12 years old and I only have one living POA/executor named in those documents, a person now living halfway across the country at a time when even domestic travel is not easy. The odds that *she* dies (or becomes incapacitated) before this crisis resolves are not negligible.

Note that *my* attorney is not suggesting such a risky method as TomatoTomato and Nate79 are discussing above. I would not be leaving the safety of my home and they would not be coming inside. They would be separated from me by brick and glass, since they would be outside my home watching me signing while I would be staying inside my home. And they would be staying separated from one another by traveling here in separate cars and presumably staying well separated from one another as they watch me through the window.

It is not going to be cheap, but it may be worth doing.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by Katietsu » Mon Mar 23, 2020 6:38 pm

dodecahedron wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 12:39 pm
Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:57 am
TomatoTomahto wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:19 pm
Nate79 wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:11 pm
As long as you maintain social distancing, 6ft, and surfaces are cleaned I don't see the issue.
I think the paper surface can also carry the virus for a time. In my experience, witnessing and notarizing moves along quickly, shuffling papers to other participants, and obviously bleaching the paper won’t work. I don’t think I can sign anything without putting my non-dominant hand on the paper, although I could wear gloves.

All in all, it seems like E-signatures would fit a legit need here.

ETA: our attorney is still making her office available for document signing, witnessing, and notarizing, but as a high risk participant, I don’t think it’s worth the risk for the documents we have.
+1

OP: what would be the difference between updating the documents now or 3 months from now?

j :happy
I am the OP.

At age 66, in the current environment, the odds that I become incapacitated and need to have someone making important medical decisions on my behalf in the next three months (or however long this COVID19 crisis takes to resolve--could be much longer than three months) are not negligible. The odds that I die before this crisis is over are also not negligible. My current documents are 12 years old and I only have one living POA/executor named in those documents, a person now living halfway across the country at a time when even domestic travel is not easy. The odds that *she* dies (or becomes incapacitated) before this crisis resolves are not negligible.

Note that *my* attorney is not suggesting such a risky method as TomatoTomato and Nate79 are discussing above. I would not be leaving the safety of my home and they would not be coming inside. They would be separated from me by brick and glass, since they would be outside my home watching me signing while I would be staying inside my home. And they would be staying separated from one another by traveling here in separate cars and presumably staying well separated from one another as they watch me through the window.

It is not going to be cheap, but it may be worth doing.
I think you have a great plan. I assume the papers will be emailed to you for you to print. If so, your risk seems to have been reduced to as close to zero as you can reasonably get to. In the meantime, your daughters would likely be able to honor the changes you wish to make even if your documents have not been changed.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by MrsBDG » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:39 pm

If you have a trust, in my experience, you can craft an amendment and not have it notarized or witnessed and still have it accepted. Many years ago we had a trustee resign, the self written and unwitnessed resignation was accepted by banks, Fidelity, etc. Perhaps not the optimal choice, but it could be fine for now if you want to have it redone later.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by TomatoTomahto » Tue Mar 24, 2020 2:08 pm

dodecahedron wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 12:39 pm
Note that *my* attorney is not suggesting such a risky method as TomatoTomato and Nate79 are discussing above.
UPDATE: my attorney has decided to work from home. I find this comforting because although my impression is that’s she’s young and in good health, she is pregnant and AFAIK nobody knows what consequences could be.

I have changed what I can from home (eg, some beneficiaries) and am opening new accounts to replace old ones where necessary. I need to contact Vanguard, seemingly impossible today, to change ownership of a mutual fund only taxable account; online only lets that happen by opening a new brokerage account (unacceptable to wife’s employer).
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by LeftCoast » Tue Mar 24, 2020 3:05 pm

When I was in law school (more than 40 years ago), the professor in Wills and Trusts class explained the origins of the procedures for signing wills. These procedures were developed in England hundreds of years ago. The basic idea is that the person signing the will must do so in front of two independent witnesses, who must also sign as witnesses in the presence of each other. The primary purpose of requiring two witnesses was to prevent fraudulent wills. Also, requiring witnesses should safeguard against coerced wills or wills signed by a person who was drunk or otherwise incompetent. Another purpose of the ceremony was to impress upon the signer that what they were doing was serious and important. Still, you would think that due to advances in technology, there should be alternative ways of validly executing a will.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by RetiredAL » Tue Mar 24, 2020 3:49 pm

I'm also stuck in limbo with my elderly Dad. The changes are only about line-of-procession. It's all about if I kick the bucket. My sister does want the duties, so we adding my adult children to the procession. One child is relatively local to me and my Dad, so he get the duties first.

I have the paperwork, just not the means/resources to accomplish the task. I can likely get the Pour-Over Will done by witnesses in the Elder Facility, but some the Trust paperwork needs to have me (Trustee) and my Dad (Grantor) signature's notarized on the same sheet. Here in CA, lawyers and their staff are "not considered essential".

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by MarkerFM » Tue Mar 24, 2020 3:52 pm

We just finished signing two gift trusts, which we started before recent precautions were put in place. We are not under shelter in place orders, and do not consider ourselves to be in a high-risk category.

Our primary attorney is self-isolating because he considers himself to be in a high-risk category. So, he was on a large TV on the wall. Another attorney, a paralegal and an assistant were in the room. We were all spread far apart in the large conference room, except my wife and I who sat together on camera for the Attorney. Took all of seven minutes.

Our primary attorney made some passing reference to a new rule allowing remote witnessing. I didn't pay much attention since it didn't apply to us. I did find this https://www.natlawreview.com/article/ne ... comes-norm that might be of interest to New Yorkers.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by RudyS » Tue Mar 24, 2020 8:42 pm

RetiredAL wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 3:49 pm
I'm also stuck in limbo with my elderly Dad. The changes are only about line-of-procession. It's all about if I kick the bucket. My sister does want the duties, so we adding my adult children to the procession. One child is relatively local to me and my Dad, so he get the duties first.

I have the paperwork, just not the means/resources to accomplish the task. I can likely get the Pour-Over Will done by witnesses in the Elder Facility, but some the Trust paperwork needs to have me (Trustee) and my Dad (Grantor) signature's notarized on the same sheet. Here in CA, lawyers and their staff are "not considered essential".
You say you need a notary. Any chance someone in the Elder Facility is a notary? We in a CCRC and several of the staff are notaries public.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by motorcyclesarecool » Tue Mar 24, 2020 8:57 pm

I was just corresponding with our attorney via email for the same purpose. It appears that our state will need to pass emergency legislation. Which may or may not happen.

Our attorney thinks he can handle our closing for our refinance. I’d hate to lose the lock on our new rate.
Understand that choosing an HDHP is very much a "red pill" approach. Most would rather pay higher premiums for a $20 copay per visit. They will think you weird for choosing an HSA.

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Re: Updating my estate documents in COVID19 time

Post by RetiredAL » Wed Mar 25, 2020 2:03 am

RudyS wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 8:42 pm
RetiredAL wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 3:49 pm
I'm also stuck in limbo with my elderly Dad. The changes are only about line-of-procession. It's all about if I kick the bucket. My sister does want the duties, so we adding my adult children to the procession. One child is relatively local to me and my Dad, so he get the duties first.

I have the paperwork, just not the means/resources to accomplish the task. I can likely get the Pour-Over Will done by witnesses in the Elder Facility, but some the Trust paperwork needs to have me (Trustee) and my Dad (Grantor) signature's notarized on the same sheet. Here in CA, lawyers and their staff are "not considered essential".
You say you need a notary. Any chance someone in the Elder Facility is a notary? We in a CCRC and several of the staff are notaries public.
As far as I know, no one on the staff is a notary. They have an arrangement with a local bank which comes in once a week to provide onsite banking functions for the residents, and they advertise they will sent over the banks notary on request. However, the facility is now locked down to visitors. As of the end of last week, it was undetermined if they would resume banking on a lessor schedule.

Today I got the bank's own special POA form back from the Care Facility, as witnesses by staff to my Dad signing, for adding my son as POA Agent to the bank, now I have to get my mine done ( I am joint to my Dad's Bank Accounts ) and all owners of the account must sign. The person that runs a local Annex Post Office here is also a notary and it is open. Once my Son is officially an agent per the bank, he can make sure the bills get paid. That is my greatest worry. I've moved extra money into Dad's checking so ample balance for just about anything exists.

Worst case that I can't get this done, all the paperwork is complete, Dad's lawyer understands the intent, so if my sister inadvertently becomes Trustee, she can decline and the lawyer and settle it all with my Dad and Son when things get somewhat more normal.

I've intermittently worried about for months, since I have somewhat increased risk driving 90 miles each way 2x a week to visit and take care of his affairs, but alas, I procrastinated.

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