Low water pressure/flow in house

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Pete12
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Re: Low water pressure/flow in house

Post by Pete12 » Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:07 pm

We are in the process of negotiating the contract. We got a very good deal on the house, the seller isn't going to give us another penny off the price. Other than the question on the water line the house is in very good shape according to our engineer. I will investigate the water line insurance further to see what I can find.

criticalmass
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Re: Low water pressure/flow in house

Post by criticalmass » Fri Nov 01, 2019 12:14 am

Pete12 wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:39 am
He recommended that after we close on the house we immediately sign up for the city's water line insurance ($5/month), wait 30 days for it to kick in, then call the city to file a complaint about the pressure. If they investigate and find it's a problem with our line, the replacement would be covered by the insurance. If it's not the line and is just a general pressure problem in the neighborhood, then installing a booster pump would help.
Sounds like plumber is recommending insurance fraud. Note that if the problem is pre-existing before you sign up for the water service line plan, it will not be covered. It sounds like this house service line already has a pre-existing condition. These type of plans (almost always underwritten by a separate company than your city or water company) scrutinize claims made to new accounts very closely. If there is a galvanized rusting issue (which develops at a predictable rate over a long time), it is going to be very hard to explain to them that it is a sudden "new" condition a month (or several) after signing up. Read the terms very carefully.

The seller says they won't assist toward a resolution? You have more negotiating leverage with the seller than you realize. If you back out of the deal for a known problem with the property, they have to disclose the problem to any future buyer AND they will probably have to fix or compensate anyway.

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Pete12
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Re: Low water pressure/flow in house

Post by Pete12 » Fri Nov 01, 2019 9:23 am

criticalmass wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 12:14 am
Pete12 wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:39 am
He recommended that after we close on the house we immediately sign up for the city's water line insurance ($5/month), wait 30 days for it to kick in, then call the city to file a complaint about the pressure. If they investigate and find it's a problem with our line, the replacement would be covered by the insurance. If it's not the line and is just a general pressure problem in the neighborhood, then installing a booster pump would help.
Sounds like plumber is recommending insurance fraud. Note that if the problem is pre-existing before you sign up for the water service line plan, it will not be covered. It sounds like this house service line already has a pre-existing condition. These type of plans (almost always underwritten by a separate company than your city or water company) scrutinize claims made to new accounts very closely. If there is a galvanized rusting issue (which develops at a predictable rate over a long time), it is going to be very hard to explain to them that it is a sudden "new" condition a month (or several) after signing up. Read the terms very carefully.

The seller says they won't assist toward a resolution? You have more negotiating leverage with the seller than you realize. If you back out of the deal for a known problem with the property, they have to disclose the problem to any future buyer AND they will probably have to fix or compensate anyway.
Very good point and I am certainly not looking to cause ourselves any further problems. At this stage I am inclined to leave the whole situation alone since the water is usable, just don't have three showers going at once! For context, we negotiated almost 30% off the asking price of the home due to various factors so based on the money we have saved there I am not too worried about possible future costs if we have to cover ourselves...

wilked
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Re: Low water pressure/flow in house

Post by wilked » Mon Dec 02, 2019 11:41 am

Pete12 wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 9:23 am
criticalmass wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 12:14 am
Pete12 wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:39 am
He recommended that after we close on the house we immediately sign up for the city's water line insurance ($5/month), wait 30 days for it to kick in, then call the city to file a complaint about the pressure. If they investigate and find it's a problem with our line, the replacement would be covered by the insurance. If it's not the line and is just a general pressure problem in the neighborhood, then installing a booster pump would help.
Sounds like plumber is recommending insurance fraud. Note that if the problem is pre-existing before you sign up for the water service line plan, it will not be covered. It sounds like this house service line already has a pre-existing condition. These type of plans (almost always underwritten by a separate company than your city or water company) scrutinize claims made to new accounts very closely. If there is a galvanized rusting issue (which develops at a predictable rate over a long time), it is going to be very hard to explain to them that it is a sudden "new" condition a month (or several) after signing up. Read the terms very carefully.

The seller says they won't assist toward a resolution? You have more negotiating leverage with the seller than you realize. If you back out of the deal for a known problem with the property, they have to disclose the problem to any future buyer AND they will probably have to fix or compensate anyway.
Very good point and I am certainly not looking to cause ourselves any further problems. At this stage I am inclined to leave the whole situation alone since the water is usable, just don't have three showers going at once! For context, we negotiated almost 30% off the asking price of the home due to various factors so based on the money we have saved there I am not too worried about possible future costs if we have to cover ourselves...
what was the ultimate resolution? Have you been living with it?

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onthecusp
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Re: Low water pressure/flow in house

Post by onthecusp » Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:03 am

Since the pressure is being measured at the meter, either the meter itself is restricted or the city side supply line is restricted. This should be on the utility to correct in most locations I've been in. Now convincing them the problem is on their side may be as hard as convincing some posters here. Hire a plumber to look at this and provide a report. If they want to re-pipe your house, find a different plumber.

If it is a 1" line the drop at the meter should be only 2-3 psi unless it is hundreds of feet from a larger branch line. If the lines in the house are small/restricted as some have suggested, then the pressure drop at the meter should be even less. Basic hydraulics here. Chemical engineer with 30+ years experience looking at similar issues in much more complicated installations than this.

wilked
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Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 1:50 pm

Re: Low water pressure/flow in house

Post by wilked » Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:44 pm

onthecusp wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:03 am
Since the pressure is being measured at the meter, either the meter itself is restricted or the city side supply line is restricted. This should be on the utility to correct in most locations I've been in. Now convincing them the problem is on their side may be as hard as convincing some posters here. Hire a plumber to look at this and provide a report. If they want to re-pipe your house, find a different plumber.

If it is a 1" line the drop at the meter should be only 2-3 psi unless it is hundreds of feet from a larger branch line. If the lines in the house are small/restricted as some have suggested, then the pressure drop at the meter should be even less. Basic hydraulics here. Chemical engineer with 30+ years experience looking at similar issues in much more complicated installations than this.
I'm thinking we have similar looking resumes :beer

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onthecusp
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Re: Low water pressure/flow in house

Post by onthecusp » Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:55 am

wilked wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:44 pm
onthecusp wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:03 am
Since the pressure is being measured at the meter, either the meter itself is restricted or the city side supply line is restricted. This should be on the utility to correct in most locations I've been in. Now convincing them the problem is on their side may be as hard as convincing some posters here. Hire a plumber to look at this and provide a report. If they want to re-pipe your house, find a different plumber.

If it is a 1" line the drop at the meter should be only 2-3 psi unless it is hundreds of feet from a larger branch line. If the lines in the house are small/restricted as some have suggested, then the pressure drop at the meter should be even less. Basic hydraulics here. Chemical engineer with 30+ years experience looking at similar issues in much more complicated installations than this.
I'm thinking we have similar looking resumes :beer
And apparently, similar tastes: :sharebeer

michaeljc70
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Re: Low water pressure/flow in house

Post by michaeljc70 » Thu Dec 05, 2019 9:51 am

If the incorrect size copper was run to the bathrooms, a booster/pump won't really help. That is what I would be worried about. Here it is standard to have 3/4" pipe run to each bathroom and then split off to 1/2" for each fixture (toilet, sink, shower). Though it would be unusual for a clean water line, there could be some kind of blockage from mineral build up.

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