Downdraft ventilation system

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big bang
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Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2016 8:33 pm

Downdraft ventilation system

Post by big bang » Mon Oct 07, 2019 11:54 pm

Hi all,
We have a very old existing 36" downdraft that we need to replace. The current unit has an attached blower which connects to a slightly off centered under the floor venting.
We are looking for a reasonably good unit which is not too noisy, nice design, reliable and easy installation.
Please share your choice, experience and recommendations.
Thank you!
(1) save a lot, (2) select an asset allocation containing both stock and bond asset classes, (3) buy low cost, widely diversified funds, (4) allocate funds tax-efficiently, and (5) stay the course.

Topic Author
big bang
Posts: 48
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by big bang » Tue Oct 08, 2019 6:44 pm

....trying again to get some input.
(1) save a lot, (2) select an asset allocation containing both stock and bond asset classes, (3) buy low cost, widely diversified funds, (4) allocate funds tax-efficiently, and (5) stay the course.

123
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by 123 » Tue Oct 08, 2019 7:10 pm

I looked it up. A downdraft ventilation system is located behind a cooktop and basically pulls the cooking odors away and vents them outside. It is distinctly different from the typical vent hood system above a cooking surface.

Couldn't find much meaningful in the bogleheads archive. There was this thread from earlier this year viewtopic.php?t=281856
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renue74
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by renue74 » Tue Oct 08, 2019 8:42 pm

It’s tough to get info here on that.

Today’s systems are based on cfm removal of air from the house. If over X cfm, then you have to install make up air solution as well.

Your best bet is to maybe go to a kitchen showroom like Ferguson (I think they are nationwide) or similar.

Do your research. I just did a remodel of an Airbnb house I own and think I spent about $1200 on materials....range hood, blower, and electrical. I did the labor myself.

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by TomatoTomahto » Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:43 am

We had a Thermador downdraft in our old house. We installed it during a kitchen renovation. It didn’t do a very good job from day one, and we basically stopped turning it on. When we sold our house, we had to pay a repairman to make it functional again. Our current house has a range hood.
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g2morrow
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by g2morrow » Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:43 am

downdrafts are generally inefficient and expensive. After doing a lot of research we decided just to skip the downdraft and get a 5 burner stovetop. Don't miss the downdraft at all.

johnubc
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by johnubc » Wed Oct 09, 2019 7:02 am

You might have better traction on an answer on the http://www.houzz.com forums

CurlyDave
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by CurlyDave » Wed Oct 09, 2019 7:09 am

The biggest problem with downdraft systems is that cooking fumes and odors are warm to hot and naturally want to rise.

Trying to force them to go down is working against nature. This is almost always a losing proposition.

GO-UK
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by GO-UK » Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:22 am

My mother had a KitchenAid downdraft that worked fairly well. It matched the range brand. It was very powerful and would cause all steam, smoke, etc. to exhaust rather than continue it’s natural upward flow. It probably lasted around 10-12 years before the electrical motor to raise and lower the unit failed. I would only recommend one if you are doing a retrofit and replacing like for like. If you have the option of a range hood, that would be much preferred in my opinion.

hicabob
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by hicabob » Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:39 am

The popup's are a lot better than the old jennair downdrafts. I've had both. Neither are as good as an outdoor vented hood but a Thermador popup with a big fan motor and good venting (big diameter) is not too bad.

Snapper
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by Snapper » Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:41 am

We replaced a stove with a downdraft. Overhead was not a reasonable option. So we went with a pop up system that is recessed behind the stovetop. We went with whirlpool. It used the venting in place for the original downdraft. It works way better than the old down draft. Cost was about $1,000 installed last year. One of the best kitchen improvements we have made.

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JAZZISCOOL
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Re: Downdraft ventilation system

Post by JAZZISCOOL » Wed Oct 09, 2019 1:15 pm

hicabob wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:39 am
The popup's are a lot better than the old jennair downdrafts. I've had both. Neither are as good as an outdoor vented hood but a Thermador popup with a big fan motor and good venting (big diameter) is not too bad.
I had a Jenn-Air downdraft cooktop that lasted 18 years. They stopped making parts for it so I replaced it with a GE downdraft model this year and its fan is MUCH more powerful (3 speeds.) I don't use the fan a lot but it is working well so far. :happy

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