Retirement - Living in Colorado

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
rxv
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2018 6:38 pm

Re: Retirement - Living in Colorado

Post by rxv » Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:03 pm

We have been Minnesota residents for over 25 years. Our son (only child) wants to go out of state for college so we toured CO colleges this summer. Loved CSU compared to CU Boulder but son is gravitating towards UCCS (smaller school).
We have friends but no family in Minn., nothing holding us back, so planning a move to CS next summer. We saw some homes in CS and prices are comparable to Twin Cities (~450k) for a new(er) 3 bed/bath. The only thing for us (late 40s, 8 - 10 years from retirement) is finding comparable jobs in CS. I don't see that happening. Expecting a pay cut.
Love all Minn. has to offer but cold/long winters and humid/wet summers gets tiring after a while.

alfaspider
Posts: 2120
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2015 4:44 pm

Re: Retirement - Living in Colorado

Post by alfaspider » Mon Sep 23, 2019 1:13 pm

Shackleton wrote:
Sat Sep 21, 2019 3:33 pm
moneywise3 wrote:
Sat Sep 21, 2019 8:58 am
How about the winter and ice and snow there for a retiree?
The winter and snow make for great skiing for retirees! It's great to ski mid-week and only when the weather is perfect - which is most of the time. I always feel bad for the tourists that are out skiing when it's really coming down hard, or we get a heavy, wet spring snow that feels like skiing through concrete. The locals all avoid skiing in those conditions.
Depends on what sort of skier you are. Many die hard skiiers would argue that skiing when it's really coming down hard is the best time to ski. In-bounds Colorado powder gets skied off quick- got to get it while it's still falling. Late Spring snow is the best for the steeps- places like A-basin's North Pole area often don't open until April, and many back country steeps are only safe to ski late season.

JackoC
Posts: 970
Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2018 11:14 am

Re: Retirement - Living in Colorado

Post by JackoC » Mon Sep 23, 2019 1:44 pm

rustymutt wrote:
Sat Sep 21, 2019 4:49 pm
baritone wrote:
Sat Sep 21, 2019 12:04 pm
victorb wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:19 pm
Just entered retirement recently and have been reading about good cities to live in. Colorado Springs was one of the cities named and it looks like a nice place to live. Does anyone have first hand experience living in Colorado Springs or any other city in Colorado?
Currently living in Minnesota and the state is not tax friendly.
I love CO but you might try northern New Mexico for many of the same benefits while cheaper and less crowded.
New Mexico has very high taxes to go with it's warmer climate. I ruled it out for tax reasons.

And we looked at homes in Cheyenne, Wy. Found the winter to very windy, and much colder than southern Co front range area.
I don't see as NM income and sales tax are much higher than CO, 1% point each maybe. Prop tax?

The 'Best Places Comfort Index' backs your assessment on weather in Cheyenne v 'front range' cities in CO though not by a huge amount. It rates Cheyenne 6.8/10 in climate comfort, Fort Collins 7.2, Colorado Springs 7.1. Stats also say you're right about average wind speed in eastern WY v eastern CO, if somebody weighs that more heavily than the 'comfort index' does*, Cheyenne's avg is around 12mph v high single digits in the other two places. But it's much windier in southeast WY just west of Cheyenne according to wind speed maps.

We've only been to any of these places in spring/summer on road trips. We love WY scenery, and parts of CO, though probably wouldn't move to a crowded and expensive part of any state, the inner NY area can fully meet our needs for crowds and high property prices. :happy

*For comparison our town in NJ rates 7.3; LA, which is the only place in the US outside the NY area I've ever lived year round ranks 9.1, the town my daughter lived in central MN (where she found winter a real mental challenge for an outsider) rated 6.4. So I guess people could quibble with such ratings and perhaps you have to be there year round a few years to really know how it suits you.
https://www.bestplaces.net/find/

radiowave
Posts: 2242
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2015 5:01 pm

Re: Retirement - Living in Colorado

Post by radiowave » Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:21 pm

rxv wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:03 pm
We have been Minnesota residents for over 25 years. Our son (only child) wants to go out of state for college so we toured CO colleges this summer. Loved CSU compared to CU Boulder but son is gravitating towards UCCS (smaller school).
We have friends but no family in Minn., nothing holding us back, so planning a move to CS next summer. We saw some homes in CS and prices are comparable to Twin Cities (~450k) for a new(er) 3 bed/bath. The only thing for us (late 40s, 8 - 10 years from retirement) is finding comparable jobs in CS. I don't see that happening. Expecting a pay cut.
Love all Minn. has to offer but cold/long winters and humid/wet summers gets tiring after a while.
What is your son's interest or major? The 4 CU campuses have different strengths and programs so consider which campus fits his long range plans.
Bogleheads Wiki: https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Main_Page

MtnTraveler
Posts: 213
Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2014 7:32 pm

Re: Retirement - Living in Colorado

Post by MtnTraveler » Mon Sep 23, 2019 5:49 pm

JackoC wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 1:44 pm


The 'Best Places Comfort Index' backs your assessment on weather in Cheyenne v 'front range' cities in CO though not by a huge amount. It rates Cheyenne 6.8/10 in climate comfort, Fort Collins 7.2, Colorado Springs 7.1. Stats also say you're right about average wind speed in eastern WY v eastern CO, if somebody weighs that more heavily than the 'comfort index' does*, Cheyenne's avg is around 12mph v high single digits in the other two places. But it's much windier in southeast WY just west of Cheyenne according to wind speed maps.
Wind comes before and after weather fronts, hence why it can get windy here. Being out on the plains will be 10x worse than anywhere else in CO. Seriously every encounter with frostbite in the last 10 yrs (5ish times?) have happened "on the plains" and being dressed appropriately. If you live next to mountains the wind is so much easier to deal with (you couldn't pay me enough to live on the plains but some people love it).

rxv
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2018 6:38 pm

Re: Retirement - Living in Colorado

Post by rxv » Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:29 am

radiowave wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:21 pm
rxv wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:03 pm
We have been Minnesota residents for over 25 years. Our son (only child) wants to go out of state for college so we toured CO colleges this summer. Loved CSU compared to CU Boulder but son is gravitating towards UCCS (smaller school).
We have friends but no family in Minn., nothing holding us back, so planning a move to CS next summer. We saw some homes in CS and prices are comparable to Twin Cities (~450k) for a new(er) 3 bed/bath. The only thing for us (late 40s, 8 - 10 years from retirement) is finding comparable jobs in CS. I don't see that happening. Expecting a pay cut.
Love all Minn. has to offer but cold/long winters and humid/wet summers gets tiring after a while.
What is your son's interest or major? The 4 CU campuses have different strengths and programs so consider which campus fits his long range plans.
radiowave - Math is his strong suite and will be in the mix as a minor if not major. He showed interest in the Bachelor of Innovation degree in Computer Security at UCCS. That is sounding good to us as well. He might be able to find something in Springs itself (internship and full time) with that concentration.

MtnTraveler
Posts: 213
Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2014 7:32 pm

Re: Retirement - Living in Colorado

Post by MtnTraveler » Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:39 pm

radiowave wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:21 pm
Math is his strong suite and will be in the mix as a minor if not major. He showed interest in the Bachelor of Innovation degree in Computer Security at UCCS. That is sounding good to us as well. He might be able to find something in Springs itself (internship and full time) with that concentration.
So I am very familiar with UCCS (alumni of the college of engineering) and I'd tell your son to stick with the BS in Computer Science. They introduced the Bachelor of Innovation while I was getting my masters and I like the concept but I really dislike that they didn't make it a concentration under a Bachelor of Science. No one outside of Colorado is going to know what a Bachelor of Innovation is and well based on its name it's going to sound like a degree that you get from a for-profit school which is the last thing you want employers looking at a CS grad to think. If your son stays in Colorado it won't be an issue because everyone knows UCCS is a good school but once you go outside of CO there is no telling what stigma, if any, it will cause. With that said being a hiring manager in Colorado I have pay attention to which colleges people go to as there are so, so, so many for-profit schools in the state with the military being so prevalent here. Especially in CS a for-profit education is not at the same level in the majority of cases compared to a state school with a decent CS program.

Your son should definitely get some internships while at UCCS as they will lead to full-time employment but he needs to be o.k. with the fact that there is probably a 80% or higher probability that the internships and employment possibilities will be related to defense here. If that is an issue for him, UCCS may not be the best fit.

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rustymutt
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Location: Oklahoma

Re: Retirement - Living in Colorado

Post by rustymutt » Sat Oct 12, 2019 9:09 am

I have enjoyed reading these post, thanks to all. I'm retired, and had a degree in computer information systems from a Friends University, a non profit pravate school in Wichita, Ks. I think the most important thing for young people wanting careers in this field is to get in with a IT company and learn on the job, while the employer pays for the education. It's how I did it, and it worked out wonderful, as I had no loans. Long hours yes, working full time at AT&T and going to college full time, with a new son. My assignments included 911 centers. Talk about databases.
I'm amazed at the wealth of Knowledge others gather, and share over a lifetime of learning. The mind is truly unique. It's nice when we use it!

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