Do you drive old cars for long distance travels?

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foamypirate
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Re: Do you drive old cars for long distance travels?

Post by foamypirate » Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:19 pm

Absolutely, I'd have no qualms about it.

In the past, I've driven:

1993 Honda Accord with 265k from Utah to Texas, and back (circa 2008)
1991 Honda Accord with 211k from Utah to Texas (circa 2009, moved to Texas)

2007 Honda Accord with 116k (youngin') back and forth from Texas to Utah, on a yearly to semi-yearly basis. Never had a concern as the car got older or the mileage climbed. Fluids and tires checked, belt inspected, and spare fluids carried in trunk (coolant, oil, trans, powersteering).

None of the above cars ever skipped a beat on any of the trips. A few of them were even straight through, 22 hours non-stop.

I plan to drive my 2002 Corvette up to Utah sometime in the next year or so, as well; though it's a baby, with only 50k miles on the odometer.

IMO
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Re: Do you drive old cars for long distance travels?

Post by IMO » Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:46 pm

fareastwarriors wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 2:07 pm
No. I fly now. It takes too long driving. if you got the time and car is well maintained, then go for it. But I wouldn't be driving long periods of time to save money.
Great point! I typically recommend that to people, i.e. "why don't you just fly out"? Even with the hassles of airports/airlines it often is still much quicker for any 500 mile trip.

It can often be much cheaper to fly a typical long trip, especially if it's just 1 person on the trip.
Saves wear/tear on your vehicle, eliminates the risk of an old vehicle having a mechanical issue far from home.
You can read/shut your eyes/sleep/go to the bathroom/get up and walk some/have an alcoholic drink.
Statistically much less chance of being injured or dying.

And he's the long trip significant concern: Speeding ticket(s). Hard not to push the speed if one is driving for hours at a time.
In some states the cost of the speeding ticket can be quite high.

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dm200
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Location: Washington DC area

Re: Do you drive old cars for long distance travels?

Post by dm200 » Wed Jun 12, 2019 9:13 am

Discussion with our son - giving us a hard time about our older cars and trip.

He thinks we are taking terrible risk - breakdown, etc.

"No", we said. "We have credit cards, can rent if breakdown, etc. No huge deal. We are also, in our opinion, not at high risk either with our older car."

foamypirate
Posts: 102
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2017 9:36 pm

Re: Do you drive old cars for long distance travels?

Post by foamypirate » Wed Jun 12, 2019 4:07 pm

IMO wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:46 pm
fareastwarriors wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 2:07 pm
No. I fly now. It takes too long driving. if you got the time and car is well maintained, then go for it. But I wouldn't be driving long periods of time to save money.
Great point! I typically recommend that to people, i.e. "why don't you just fly out"? Even with the hassles of airports/airlines it often is still much quicker for any 500 mile trip.

It can often be much cheaper to fly a typical long trip, especially if it's just 1 person on the trip.
Saves wear/tear on your vehicle, eliminates the risk of an old vehicle having a mechanical issue far from home.
You can read/shut your eyes/sleep/go to the bathroom/get up and walk some/have an alcoholic drink.
Statistically much less chance of being injured or dying.

And he's the long trip significant concern: Speeding ticket(s). Hard not to push the speed if one is driving for hours at a time.
In some states the cost of the speeding ticket can be quite high.
The math changes when you have children, not to mention many other factors. With gas as cheap as it is, I'm hard pressed to travel anywhere cheaper on an airline. Four plane tickets adds up fast.

In the car, we can also pull over and stretch, get drinks, eat, walk some, whenever we want. We can pack anything we want, don't have to navigate the airport and security with kids, don't have to pay for parking for the entirety of the trip. We're not cramped in tiny seats next to a smelly neighbor with no leg room. We can stop and see interesting sights if we want. Don't have to worry about shushing the kids or keeping them from bothering other folks on the plain, nor coaching them through the pressure changes (chew, chew, chew!).

Easy solution to speeding tickets: Don't speed. Use cruise control. This is an easily controlled factor.

I can keep going, if you want.

OldBallCoach
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Re: Do you drive old cars for long distance travels?

Post by OldBallCoach » Wed Jun 12, 2019 4:12 pm

I have driven LandCruisers forever and I have taken many trips with trucks with over 250K on them and never really had an issue. I have mine serviced every 10K at the dealership and do whatever they tell me and they have all been tanks. My new one has 9300 on it and will go in next week for its first service.

bad1bill
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Location: Colorado

Re: Do you drive old cars for long distance travels?

Post by bad1bill » Wed Jun 12, 2019 4:55 pm

Just bought a 97 Land Cruiser with 230k miles (pristine condition, little old lady former owner) and plan to drive it 500+ miles this weekend. I plan on taking it four wheeling in the wilds/back mountain regions of Colorado all summer and on summer trips to Canada and Alaska in the next 2 years or so. My mechanic checked it out and said it was golden. He has 2 Camry's with 300,000 on both of them. I happen to agree with the previous assessment of the overall reliability of Japanese cars although I've had friends with Suburbans which also ran up to 300K.

My daily driver is a 2007 Highlander with 145K; also have a 97 Jeep Wrangler with 107K that I've taken (and will continue to take) into remote mountain places.....

I guess it's what your comfort level is with mechanical troubleshooting etc. I'm fairly handy and mechanical and will have some basic tools with me. As stated previously, AAA (or similar) is good insurance especially with cell phone coverage being ubiquitous in so many places. If I had small children (like many years ago), I'd perhaps be a little more cautious...but just a little :D

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