Tips for new pet owner [puppy]

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JakeyLee
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by JakeyLee » Wed Jun 12, 2019 10:30 am

Best tip I can ever provide when it comes to puppies: invest in good training. No, don't send the pooch away. Instead sign up for a good class (most box pet stores have provide access), take the pooch and work with them. If your lucky, there will be other dog owners with different breeds in said class. Continue to work on the lessons everyday at home. Typically, it's one night a week. For a month or two. The dog will enjoy the "lessons/training", as nothing is more rewarding than playtime and positive reinforcements. Within 3-4 months of working on basics at home (10-15 mins a day) you will have the foundation of a good dog. One that listens, walks on a leash, doesn't run out the door and into the street at every opportunity, understands and controls agressive behaviors... All the stuff you dream of in a good companion dog.

Remember one thing... If you don't train your dog, your dog will train you. Good luck. Having a good dog continues to add happiness and fulfillment in my otherwise stressful life.

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DanMahowny
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by DanMahowny » Wed Jun 12, 2019 10:43 am

Great post JakeyLee.
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Gardening_at_night
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by Gardening_at_night » Wed Jun 12, 2019 12:03 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 10:12 am
Gardening_at_night wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 8:03 am
The biggest cost we've had for our Havanese is food expense. He is the pickiest eater I've ever seen in a dog. We have to continually buy different kinds of the best dog food and hope he will eat it. This probably comes from you know who feeding him people food from the table when he was young. So I suggest keeping his/her feeding area separate and not giving him food from your meals until old enough to get used to dog food..
Wife works with a dog behaviorist. Most of the time when people say their toy breeds are “picky eaters” is because they’re being overfed, and they just aren’t hungry. Those little dogs don’t need very much food.
That may be true in general but I can assure you our Havanese is not overfed. We worry constantly that he is not getting enough. And when he does decide to eat what is set before him he eats relatively small portions. He does a very good job through body language of indicating when he is truly hungry or not.

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bltkmt
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by bltkmt » Wed Jun 12, 2019 12:44 pm

Mr.BB wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 5:38 am
Get medical insurance for your dog, personally I like trupanion. Give your dog good / healthy food, no different than a person. A healthy person doesn't eat crappy, foods dogs are no different.
A puppy is not a dog! how you train it as a puppy will affect you and it as it becomes an adult dog.
Teach your puppy to walk with you. Don't let it pull you around when you're walking it will do that as an adult. I see it all time with people walking their dogs. Teach your dog to walk beside you for the most part, it will of course still need to go and sniff and search but if you let it drag you around it's not a good habit to teach them. Do not reward them for bad behavior. Take them to dog parks / dog beaches let them learn to socialize with other dogs, it is very important.
+ infinity on all of this advice. Trupanion was wonderful when our 8 month old puppy was hit by a car (she is fine now), and paid over $10k in medical costs.

Dontwasteit
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by Dontwasteit » Thu Jun 13, 2019 7:18 am

Do your self a favor and get the pet insurance. I learned the hard way...My sweet cat fell off my 5th floor terrace and broke her pelvis in 2 places..$8500.
2 months ago we got a puppy (Maltese) for my daughter. Besides neutering, shots, etc he has developed a reoccurring urinary problem. $275 per episode. Can happen again. Insurance is expensive but as you can see, I wish I had it!

Yooper16
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by Yooper16 » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:01 am

Old English Sheepdog onwers--present and past--lots of experience on the following items. Your Havanese will have the same issues.

Need to wash the muzzle a coople of times a week--- stinky food and crotch licking smells.

Maybe have to pluck hair from inside and trim hair around the outside to reduce redness/irritation/infection--provides air flow

Trim the hair between the toes to help prevent slipping on smooth surfaces.

Get the dog used to having its feet handles, so you can trim the nails. We use a Dremel grinding tool

long hair dogs will matt/knot very easily, particularly if they have a dense undercoat and even more so as a puppy. 3-4 times a week combing on our sheepie

Be prepared to have to clean and trim the butt hair as puppies digestiions can be a tad dicey at time and the dog will eat something that doesn't agree with it. If to much stuff accumulates it can be a cause of "scootching" on you carpet etc. It can also build up some so to prevent the dog from perfoming a body function.

Remove "eye" gunk from corners before it gets harden. Daily task.

Other than these little suggestions--- have fun.

MBJ0909
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by MBJ0909 » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:35 am

DanMahowny wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:08 pm
InvestorThom wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:55 pm
I'm always the cold-hearted anomaly in these conversations.

Growing up we had pets. Before each one my parents, who grew up on farms, told us they'd pay for normal vet visits. However, if the pet got really sick they would not pay for expensive treatment -- "It's a pet, an animal, not a human being" -- and would be put down.

I still maintain this POV today, mostly because I believe these costly decisions are made based on the emotions of the pet owner vs what is really best for the animal.
You're not alone. I share your attitude.

I have 2 German Shepherds. Both 3 years old. Paid $6,000 for one, and $7,000 for the other. Also spent a ton of cash on high end training, not to mention the time investment, energy investment.

I would not hesitate to put either dog down if they experience a serious health issue. The money I spent is gone forever (sunk cost), and they're animals, not humans.
[Off-topic comment removed by moderator oldcomputerguy] I would spend the money without hesitation if my my pet was curable but I was just faced with lymphoma in my cat last year. Thousands to pursue chemo to have maybe an additional 6-9 months. This would have required weekly trips to the vet for the chemo which would have been torture to my poor cat. So that was a very easy no decision for me. I'd make it again in the future if I have to, but I really, really hope I will not.

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by TomatoTomahto » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:38 am

Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 7:41 pm
Doom&Gloom wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 6:48 pm
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 6:06 pm
Notify your insurance company. They ask if you have pets for a reason.
I can't imagine notifying my insurance agent for adding a Havanese to my household. But I do enjoy living on the edge.
I have no idea what a Havanese is, but if it were a German Shepard or Rottweiler or pit bull, your Insurance company would be interested in knowing.
I don’t know what my big dog is (people dumping a dog at a shelter usually don’t provide AKC paperwork), but by appearance our rescue is a boxer, pit, and maybe a smidgeon of Great Dane mix. If I were a stranger, I’d be more worried about our smaller dog, a (presumed) Jack Russell Terrier and Chihuahua mix.

The insurance company asked if we had any dogs with a history of biting. I said no. End of discussion.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

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Doom&Gloom
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by Doom&Gloom » Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:55 am

TomatoTomahto wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:38 am
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 7:41 pm
Doom&Gloom wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 6:48 pm
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 6:06 pm
Notify your insurance company. They ask if you have pets for a reason.
I can't imagine notifying my insurance agent for adding a Havanese to my household. But I do enjoy living on the edge.
I have no idea what a Havanese is, but if it were a German Shepard or Rottweiler or pit bull, your Insurance company would be interested in knowing.
I don’t know what my big dog is (people dumping a dog at a shelter usually don’t provide AKC paperwork), but by appearance our rescue is a boxer, pit, and maybe a smidgeon of Great Dane mix. If I were a stranger, I’d be more worried about our smaller dog, a (presumed) Jack Russell Terrier and Chihuahua mix.

The insurance company asked if we had any dogs with a history of biting. I said no. End of discussion.
If you're feeling frisky, you can send a saliva sample for testing to determine their heritage :twisted:

DW did just that with a rescue dog we recently adopted. Only $79. She didn't tell me that she had done it until a few weeks afterward when I was wondering out loud exactly what he might be. I would never have paid that to satisfy my curiosity. Another example of separate finances coming in handy :beer

Spoiler: The results confirmed what we already knew for the majority of his genetic make-up. I am still skeptical about the minority contributions. The test did include a couple of genetic tests for hereditary medical conditions. I am still not sold on it--even if were available for $5--but it made her happy to have it done. She's happy; I'm happy; and the dog never got a better break in his life. We feel like we hit the jackpot with him--got everything we were looking and hoping for in a dog.

Thegame14
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by Thegame14 » Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:44 pm

doon wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 10:25 am
We are getting a puppy in couple of weeks and even though I am very happy for the new addition I cant help but be a little concerned about doctor and medical cost and other cost of new puppy. So wanted a few tips in that regard:

- How much should I expect to pay for a doctor visit on an average?
- Is this a good list to follow when looking at vaccine schedule? Based on your experience which vaccines have you skipped from the optional ones?
https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/healt ... ete-guide/
- Is it better to go to small clinic or a big hospital with multiple doctors?
- Should I buy dog insurance? Is it wort it?
- Any dog trainings etc.
- Food? Is Costco good or should I opt of fancy gourmet type of options which I am sure will be more expensive.

In case it matters the breed is Havanese. Any other suggestions would be most welcome
Depends on what the visit if for but usually $60-$100, heartworm and flea and tick is like another $300 a year, having the dog neutered I think is around $400, hair cuts are more expensive than you would think, but the aren't like us where it is done in 15 minutes, a hair cut is around $50. Food is probably $30 a month. I wouldn't get insurance right away, but ACL/CCL surgery can be around $3-4K if needed. Also DO NOT take your dog to petsmart for hair cuts.... google it.... We do Blue Buffalo for food, an 11 lb bag is around $30. we did dog training at petsmart for basics like sit stay stuff and it was fine. Biggest issue will be potty training and where does doggy sleep at night, crate/floor/your bed??

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Elsebet
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by Elsebet » Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:34 pm

Yooper16 wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:01 am

Get the dog used to having its feet handles, so you can trim the nails. We use a Dremel grinding tool
Great advice! I clean our dogs ears and use a Dremel to trim our dogs' nails once per week. It only takes about 10 minutes to do both dogs. They don't love it but they tolerate since they get a dental chew treat afterward.

I have to admit I violate the table scraps rule, we give our dogs a half hard boiled egg and fresh vegetables daily with their dinner kibble. Our terrier also loves Thursday popcorn night and on the weekends they get a little taste of our homemade breakfast (oatmeal, sourdough waffles, eggs, buttermilk biscuits, etc). They also get a Thanksgiving and Christmas plate. We are careful about their weights though and adjust if needed.
"...the man who adapts himself to his slender means and makes himself wealthy on a little sum, is the truly rich man..." ~Seneca

Yooper16
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by Yooper16 » Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:28 pm

Elsebet wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:34 pm
Yooper16 wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:01 am

Get the dog used to having its feet handles, so you can trim the nails. We use a Dremel grinding tool
Great advice! I clean our dogs ears and use a Dremel to trim our dogs' nails once per week. It only takes about 10 minutes to do both dogs. They don't love it but they tolerate since they get a dental chew treat afterward.

I have to admit I violate the table scraps rule, we give our dogs a half hard boiled egg and fresh vegetables daily with their dinner kibble. Our terrier also loves Thursday popcorn night and on the weekends they get a little taste of our homemade breakfast (oatmeal, sourdough waffles, eggs, buttermilk biscuits, etc). They also get a Thanksgiving and Christmas plate. We are careful about their weights though and adjust if needed.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with giving scraps from the tabel----- just don't do it at the table--- lest you create a monster.

There was no kibble until the 1910s, if I recall correctly. If you/we knew where much of the protein and fat sources for pet food come from----YUCK

Always keep an eye out for "meat meal" or "meat byproduct meal". Mysterious stuff. It literally can be Boozer, who was euthanized, has found its way into the food chain. Also the grease cans behind a restruant are a good source of "fats" collected by renderers and used by kibble makers.

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LadyGeek
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Re: Tips for new pet owner [puppy]

Post by LadyGeek » Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:39 pm

This thread is now in the Personal Consumer Issues forum (dog). I also retitled the thread for clarity.
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palaheel
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Re: Tips for new pet owner [puppy]

Post by palaheel » Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:40 pm

We always subscribe to the local newspaper till the puppy is well house broken. :happy
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JackoC
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by JackoC » Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:49 pm

MBJ0909 wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:35 am
DanMahowny wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:08 pm
InvestorThom wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:55 pm
I'm always the cold-hearted anomaly in these conversations.
Growing up we had pets. Before each one my parents, who grew up on farms, told us they'd pay for normal vet visits. However, if the pet got really sick they would not pay for expensive treatment -- "It's a pet, an animal, not a human being" -- and would be put down.
I still maintain this POV today, mostly because I believe these costly decisions are made based on the emotions of the pet owner vs what is really best for the animal.
You're not alone. I share your attitude.
I have 2 German Shepherds. Both 3 years old. Paid $6,000 for one, and $7,000 for the other. Also spent a ton of cash on high end training, not to mention the time investment, energy investment.
I would not hesitate to put either dog down if they experience a serious health issue. The money I spent is gone forever (sunk cost), and they're animals, not humans.
I would spend the money without hesitation if my my pet was curable but I was just faced with lymphoma in my cat last year. Thousands to pursue chemo to have maybe an additional 6-9 months. This would have required weekly trips to the vet for the chemo which would have been torture to my poor cat. So that was a very easy no decision for me.
Yeah whenever this comes up I wonder what exact situations these decisions are truly hard, to reach yes or no I mean. Of course people generally love their dogs and feel bad when they have to be euthanized, that part is hard. I guess maybe it would on other forums where people would speak up and say they spent $k's on dog care when it was just to extend life with possible onerous treatment though no cure, like we'd mostly want for ourselves, to a point at least. I wouldn't do that with a dog. We spent ~$4k on care near the end of our most recent dog's life, but it started out if anything precautionary, a growth on her leg, no other bad symptoms, vet thought safest to remove. Maybe that was bad advice. She never bounced back fully from the operation, maybe complication of anesthesia, or the growth really was malignant and had spread to her brain or there was a coincidental neurological problem manifesting itself. But once the prognosis was going under anesthesia again just to do a PET scan to find out what was happening in her head: too late. We were very sad, but in complete agreement to spare her any further procedures by then. She had a great run with us after a bad start in life when she was used to breed fighting dogs (formidable ones I'd wager), her ears cut off, other signs of abuse. But she never held that against the human race and lived good years as, I believe, a happy dog. :D She was worth many times what we paid for her in total (only a $165 donation upfront but also some fixing of teeth apparently damaged by abuse, plus regular care and the final illness). Money wasn't the issue, only the possibility she underwent care that was rough on her when it was already too late, but you can't always know.

Mr.BB
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Re: Tips for new pet owner [puppy]

Post by Mr.BB » Thu Jun 13, 2019 5:26 pm

You should also decide what vet you will be taking your new puppy too. Check out a few of your vet places around you to get a pricing list from everything from teeth cleaning to annual checkups to shots etc. You may find a big price discrepancy. Also check reviews online.
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bondsr4me
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Re: Tips for new pet owner [puppy]

Post by bondsr4me » Thu Jun 13, 2019 7:10 pm

if you want lap dogs, Chihuahua all the way.

We love ours....I really do mean “love”....they are “family” members.

After having just one Chi for 11 years, 8 years ago we had the heart-breaking experience of having to say “See you in Heaven”.

After the healing, we went out and bought 2 Chihuahuas.....the absolute best decision we could ever make.
The two brothers had lots of fun chasing each other thru the house...tons of love from both of them.

Only 4 weeks ago, after months of medical issues, we had the heart-breaking experience again...absolute sadness is the only way I can describe it.

Now, after 4 weeks, we are getting another one this weekend. The one left behind has been sad and we want company for him.

Vet fees, shots, licenses, food, care....it’s all a part of having them.

Wishing you “Good Luck”!

fasteddie911
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Re: Tips for new pet owner [puppy]

Post by fasteddie911 » Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:37 am

Got a puppy a year ago. He's been an amazing addition to our family. Our vet charges $50 per visit, vaccines, tests, etc. are extra on top of that. I find vet bills reasonable. Money is little to no object when it comes to our pup. We got pet insurance, healthypaws. We blasted thru the deductible the first year being overly neurotic new dog owners but we've settle down since. We'll probably keep it as it's not too much (~$40/mo), but everyone's opinion differs on this. We use a multi-vet clinic and have no issues, just do whatever suits you. I actually have no idea of a dog's vaccine schedule so we just follow the vet. Definitely consider dog training. Start with puppy classes, where they mostly socialize with other dogs and humans, learn basic commands. While sit, lie down, etc. is fine, I've found the more important skills to be drop it, leave it, recall, etc. We're still working on these. We fed costco puppy kibble and it was fine, but dogs can vary. Do some reading on dog food and there's a wealth of research, opinions, etc. in particular on "gourmet" brands. We did adult costco kibble too but realized the bag was so big for our guy (20lbs) that it'll take him forever to go thru it and possibly go stale. We've since moved to Royal Canin which seems to be well recommended brand, but in small bag sizes. For small dogs, food expense isn't a big deal thankfully. Also don't forget grooming costs.
Last edited by fasteddie911 on Fri Jun 14, 2019 11:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

livesoft
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by livesoft » Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:54 am

Teague wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 7:54 pm
... and crazy to boot, but fearless.
So what has happened when people boot it?

I didn't read all the posts, but did anyone suggest going to the library and checking out some books on dog care/training and reading them? Check out youtube.com as well.
Last edited by livesoft on Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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3hrs
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Re: Tips for new pet owner [puppy]

Post by 3hrs » Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:01 am

Ditto on identifying a vet as soon as possible. When we adopted our six month old mutt from the local Humane Society last February we were given a list of local vets who provided a courtesy welcome exam. I picked one based on friends' advice. Took him in for the visit three days after adoption. Very pleased with the vet and practice. Good thing we visited, because ten days after adoption he became very ill with a blocked and perforated intestines (our household trash was not as secure as we thought). Being comfortable with the vet helped make a terrible situation (surgery, multiple overnight stay) go a bit smoother. Fortunately he came through just fine. We lucked out getting a wonderful pet.

I also agree with previous posts re the need for obedience training, daily exercise, and not overfeeding your dog. Our Cocker Spaniel lived to seventeen years and I like to think it was due in part to maintaining him at a healthy weight. Wish someone would do that for me! Good luck and have fun with your new dog.

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DanMahowny
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Re: Tips for new pet owner [puppy]

Post by DanMahowny » Fri Jun 14, 2019 8:06 am

Surprised at all the people buying pet insurance, and trying to convince the rest of us that it's a good deal.
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Doom&Gloom
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Re: Tips for new pet owner

Post by Doom&Gloom » Fri Jun 14, 2019 12:58 pm

livesoft wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:54 am
Teague wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 7:54 pm
... and crazy to boot, but fearless.
So what has happened when people boot it?

I didn't read all the posts, but did anyone suggest going to the library and checking out some books on dog care/training and reading them? Check out youtube.com as well.
Before making a trip to the library, I would explore this site: http://www.canismajor.com/dog/index.html

I found a lot of information there that I was curious about before we acquired our pups recently.

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