Sports classes in Universities

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an_asker
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Sports classes in Universities

Post by an_asker » Fri Jun 07, 2019 1:56 pm

[Note to moderators: if this should be on a different forum, please move it]
A while back, I got my MS in Engineering from VA Tech. While I was in school, I took one-credit hour (Pass/Fail) classes in each of the following (not all in the same semester!):

- Tennis
- Racquetball
- Swimming
- Badminton

They were quite meticulous with the classes too - we had quizzes and stuff :-)

Fast forward to today, and DS is signing up for BS in Engineering at a local state school (FL). When I looked at the course schedule, I was unable to find any choice like the above - or even remotely similar. Is this a quirk of that time that those courses were offered back then? Or is it more university specific?

Just curious how we could see if any such courses are offered at his university (short of calling and talking with staff over there I would say)? Not specifically these sports - any other sports too!

PS: Yes, I know that we can always find a local tennis or table tennis or racquetball club ... but I am wanting to know about something within the university education system ...

Jack FFR1846
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:02 pm

Every college is different. I can tell you the Worcester Polytechnic Institute not only has classes, they are required to graduate from a Bachelor's program. I didn't learn I needed this until I was about to graduate. Fortunately, I had been on the cycling team, so was signed off by the cycling team president. My son is finishing up there right now and is completing his procrastinated phys ed requirement, taking 2 courses.

I know VT doesn't "require" these types of courses.....or at least didn't. MSEE from VT in 90.
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22twain
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by 22twain » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:15 pm

an_asker wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 1:56 pm
how we could see if any such courses are offered at his university
The university's web site should have an official catalog (sometimes called "bulletin") or other listing of all courses, including descriptions. This may be a big PDF file that you have to download (corresponding to the official printed catalog), or it may be spread out in sections among the various departments. Search for the "Physical Education" department or something similar.
Last edited by 22twain on Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Nestegg_User
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Nestegg_User » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:16 pm

I only remember taking one hour of VBall one summer to reach "full time" status.... was also taking physics , etc and working full time. Never saw any "requirements" for PE type courses.... this was in the mid-70's.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by livesoft » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:26 pm

an_asker wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 1:56 pm
- Tennis
- Racquetball
- Swimming
- Badminton
My university had a physical education requirement like mentioned by others in this thread. Team sports were not covered, but lifelong individual sports played by business folks for networking, marketing, and health were covered. Swimming was included to reduce your chances of drowning, too. So add golf, squash, and running to your list.
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BuckyBadger
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by BuckyBadger » Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:57 pm

There's a large sub set of universities that have a pledge that all their students have to know how to swim well enough so as to not drown! I remember having to take a swim test at freshman orientation and those who failed had to take swim classes.

I think you had to just tread water for a few minutes and make it from one end of the pool to the other. Skill and grace were not required.

Barefoot
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Barefoot » Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:08 pm

Many moons ago, I had to pass a swim test when starting college. Also required was 4 semesters of Phys Ed. Same requirement no matter what your major was.

If you couldn't pass the swim test, you were automatically put in swim class for your first semester of Phys Ed.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by jebmke » Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:47 pm

Barefoot wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:08 pm
Many moons ago, I had to pass a swim test when starting college.
Same here.

I ended up doing golf and badminton. I was in a badminton class with some guys from Pakistan. I learned that competitive badminton is nothing like "summer picnic" badminton.
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quantAndHold
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by quantAndHold » Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:55 pm

My university, a mid-sized private university (in the 80’s), required a year of PE classes. I personally took a class every term that I could get it scheduled. I played free golf, tennis, racquetball, volleyball, fencing, bowling, badminton, pocket billiards, etc. It was the best thing about that school. There was a whole cadre of graduate teaching assistants who had played intercollegiate sports teaching the classes.

Badminton was indeed an eye opener. Fencing was, too.

I was a grad of the local public school system, which required swimming proficiency to graduate, so IIRC, we were exempted from the need to prove we could swim.

My best friend went to the large flagship state school down the road. That school didn’t even offer any sports, much less require them.

2 of my kids’ schools offered, but didn’t require PE classes. I encouraged them to take as many as they could. One did, one didn’t. The 3rd school didn’t offer anything.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by IMO » Fri Jun 07, 2019 10:52 pm

an_asker wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 1:56 pm
PS: Yes, I know that we can always find a local tennis or table tennis or racquetball club ... but I am wanting to know about something within the university education system ...
Are you meaning for college credit?

Not for credit but perhaps more importantly associated with school/other students:

There are sports clubs that can be purely recreational and some that include more competitive aspects.

Does person currently have any sports interests/skills?

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by JonnyDVM » Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:08 am

Barefoot wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:08 pm
Many moons ago, I had to pass a swim test when starting college. Also required was 4 semesters of Phys Ed. Same requirement no matter what your major was.

If you couldn't pass the swim test, you were automatically put in swim class for your first semester of Phys Ed.
That’s very interesting. There’s no way a test like that would fly today. I graduated 20 years ago now. I recall there was a small PE credit hour requirement back then. I took racquetball one semester. It was a fun and great exercise. I’m sure many other students loathed having to take a PE credit to graduate so I wonder if the requirement still stands.
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Naismith
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Naismith » Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:45 am

Graduating undergrad 1980, my university also had a PE requirement. But it was satisfied by marching band, and waived for those of us who were veterans.

22twain
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by 22twain » Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:59 am

The college from which I retired a few years ago had three forms of organized physical activity for students:

1. Intercollegiate competition under the NCAA: football, basketball, baseball, soccer, etc. Students were recruited for these while in high school, and some of them got full or partial scholarships.

2. One-credit physical education courses in various activities. All students had to take at least two of these in order to graduate.

3. Intramural sports competition (softball, flag football, disc golf, etc.), organized by the office of student services, open to all students. Teams were often formed by fraternities, sororities and other student organizations. Sometimes a team was simply a group of friends.
Last edited by 22twain on Sat Jun 08, 2019 1:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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BuckyBadger
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by BuckyBadger » Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:02 am

JonnyDVM wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:08 am
Barefoot wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:08 pm
Many moons ago, I had to pass a swim test when starting college. Also required was 4 semesters of Phys Ed. Same requirement no matter what your major was.

If you couldn't pass the swim test, you were automatically put in swim class for your first semester of Phys Ed.
That’s very interesting. There’s no way a test like that would fly today. I graduated 20 years ago now. I recall there was a small PE credit hour requirement back then. I took racquetball one semester. It was a fun and great exercise. I’m sure many other students loathed having to take a PE credit to graduate so I wonder if the requirement still stands.
It still stood in 2002 at my alma mater at least.

warner25
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by warner25 » Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:25 am

I took a couple classes like that in college in the mid to late 00s: swimming and golf. Not required. Free to me since I had a full-tuition scholarship, and I'm not sure they'd be worth the money otherwise. I think if you were present for some percentage of classes you got a P and 1.0 credit appeared on your transcript, otherwise it didn't.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by montanagirl » Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:34 am

I didn't take any PE after junior college, but I wish now I'd taken billiards and golf for the social and rec advantages. But I was way too serious at the time.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by TomatoTomahto » Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:49 am

My kids in NE schools had opportunities for both club and “for credit” PE activities. Club hockey, while well below the levels of Division 1 hockey at one school, was very competitive; it was school supported at a lower financial level than Div I, but the buses for away games didn’t cost the students, nor did ice time, which can get pricey. Water polo (!) was interesting for kids who hadn’t grown up with it.

Horseback riding earned a college credit, as did mountain biking.

All of this was much better than when I went to school, where the only offerings were in the revenue sports and open only to recruited athletes.
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by EddyB » Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:53 am

BuckyBadger wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:02 am
JonnyDVM wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:08 am
Barefoot wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:08 pm
Many moons ago, I had to pass a swim test when starting college. Also required was 4 semesters of Phys Ed. Same requirement no matter what your major was.

If you couldn't pass the swim test, you were automatically put in swim class for your first semester of Phys Ed.
That’s very interesting. There’s no way a test like that would fly today. I graduated 20 years ago now. I recall there was a small PE credit hour requirement back then. I took racquetball one semester. It was a fun and great exercise. I’m sure many other students loathed having to take a PE credit to graduate so I wonder if the requirement still stands.
It still stood in 2002 at my alma mater at least.
Columbia still requires a swim test.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by ohai » Sat Jun 08, 2019 8:32 am

It depends on the school. Where I went, they offer almost every (normal) sport you can imagine, including fencing, rock climbing or sailing (no horseback riding though, as far as I can tell). There's even yoga and aquatics classes that non students can take, apparently...

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by jpelder » Sat Jun 08, 2019 8:42 am

I took a Pilates class in college (University of Alabama 2007-2011) for a 1-hour graded credit. The kinesiology department offered similar classes in almost any sport you can think of. All were electives

ccieemeritus
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by ccieemeritus » Sat Jun 08, 2019 11:15 am

NCSU (Raleigh) has various PE classes. Taking a couple of them is even a graduation requirement.

I'm happy to see that lifeguarding is one of the options.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Beowulfto » Sat Jun 08, 2019 4:24 pm

jebmke wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:47 pm
Barefoot wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:08 pm
Many moons ago, I had to pass a swim test when starting college.
Same here.

I ended up doing golf and badminton. I was in a badminton class with some guys from Pakistan. I learned that competitive badminton is nothing like "summer picnic" badminton.
I took a racquet sports class at my state engineering school (3 phy-Ed credits were required for any degree) and enjoyed it immensely. I do recall the instructor telling me about a shoulder injury he had sustained while teaching the course and the frustrations he encountered. Apparently filing a workers compensation claim for an injury caused by teaching badminton raised red flags, at every step in the process! :wink: Not a slow backyard game at all.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Jun 09, 2019 1:04 pm

BuckyBadger wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:57 pm
There's a large sub set of universities that have a pledge that all their students have to know how to swim well enough so as to not drown! I remember having to take a swim test at freshman orientation and those who failed had to take swim classes.

I think you had to just tread water for a few minutes and make it from one end of the pool to the other. Skill and grace were not required.
Here is a guess.

In the days of military conscription a significant percentage of recruits did not know how to swim. This was a problem not only for the Navy and Marines but also Army and Air Force.

Thus a requirement that kids learn to swim pre induction either in High School graduation or university.

Could it have stemmed from that?

OldBallCoach
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by OldBallCoach » Sun Jun 09, 2019 1:56 pm

You should always sign up for the class on Football 101..if nothing else you will be more accurate when talking to the fan sitting to you about how mad the coaching is. Even better if you are sitting next to a coaches wife.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by randomguy » Sun Jun 09, 2019 1:58 pm

OldBallCoach wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2019 1:56 pm
You should always sign up for the class on Football 101..if nothing else you will be more accurate when talking to the fan sitting to you about how mad the coaching is. Even better if you are sitting next to a coaches wife.
It is probably a tough course. You will have all the freshman football players taking it to boost their gpa and they have been studying for that class for 4+ years:)

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by randomguy » Sun Jun 09, 2019 2:13 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2019 1:04 pm
BuckyBadger wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:57 pm
There's a large sub set of universities that have a pledge that all their students have to know how to swim well enough so as to not drown! I remember having to take a swim test at freshman orientation and those who failed had to take swim classes.

I think you had to just tread water for a few minutes and make it from one end of the pool to the other. Skill and grace were not required.
Here is a guess.

In the days of military conscription a significant percentage of recruits did not know how to swim. This was a problem not only for the Navy and Marines but also Army and Air Force.

Thus a requirement that kids learn to swim pre induction either in High School graduation or university.

Could it have stemmed from that?
The urban myth was always something along "Wealthy alumni had a kid who drowned and donated millions but requires all kids to take a swim class". The real reason was probably Harvard had a swim class and the school that we copied stuff from had copied it from them decades ago and since elite schools had swim tests, we needed to have one also:) Though military meddling is also a legit theory.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by kramer » Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:59 am

I attended a University of California university in the early 90's for my undergraduate degree. My sub-school (the large university I attended had several sub-universities within it that you could choose from) claimed to have the highest number of and most rigorous graduation requirements of any American university. Examples included 4 quarters of foreign language, several quarters of science, a full year of Calculus, 2 years of civics/history, some fine arts, etc. However, there was NO physical education requirement.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Swansea » Mon Jun 10, 2019 5:19 am

Duke offers a variety of PE classes. I took many of them when I attended in the 60s. They greatly helped my GPA.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Tamarind » Mon Jun 10, 2019 6:05 am

In the mid 00s at a top tier state flagship, I was required to pass a swim test to graduate. A number of single credit PE classes were available and students were encouraged to take at least one. I took a more advanced swimming course to learn strokes one semester, and weight training another semester. It was good to have something different.

They have replaced the curriculum standards at least once since then so I don't know what is incentivized now.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by jfn111 » Mon Jun 10, 2019 6:16 am

Way back in the 70's when I graduated from State U PE classes were 1 credit and optional. I took a bowling class with several buddies and we had a blast. (The drinking age was 18 and the class was held off campus at a facility that had a full bar). :sharebeer

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by bottlecap » Mon Jun 10, 2019 6:34 am

I never heard of it for credit. Seems like a perfectly waste of good money.

As an adult, I never needed anyone to tell me to play a sport. There's a bunch of sports you can play at college, many you don't even have to pay for (or they are included in the mandatory "activity fee").

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Jun 10, 2019 7:03 am

randomguy wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2019 2:13 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2019 1:04 pm
BuckyBadger wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:57 pm
There's a large sub set of universities that have a pledge that all their students have to know how to swim well enough so as to not drown! I remember having to take a swim test at freshman orientation and those who failed had to take swim classes.

I think you had to just tread water for a few minutes and make it from one end of the pool to the other. Skill and grace were not required.
Here is a guess.

In the days of military conscription a significant percentage of recruits did not know how to swim. This was a problem not only for the Navy and Marines but also Army and Air Force.

Thus a requirement that kids learn to swim pre induction either in High School graduation or university.

Could it have stemmed from that?
The urban myth was always something along "Wealthy alumni had a kid who drowned and donated millions but requires all kids to take a swim class". The real reason was probably Harvard had a swim class and the school that we copied stuff from had copied it from them decades ago and since elite schools had swim tests, we needed to have one also:) Though military meddling is also a legit theory.
Compared to my middle class upbringing in North America (almost all high schools had a pool, or access to one) in the UK I have found not knowing how to swim is surprisingly common (especially for an island nation).

I know it's an issue for the military here, their recruits (mostly from working class) often don't know how to swim.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by SpaceMonkey » Mon Jun 10, 2019 7:54 am

randomguy wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2019 2:13 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2019 1:04 pm
BuckyBadger wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:57 pm
There's a large sub set of universities that have a pledge that all their students have to know how to swim well enough so as to not drown! I remember having to take a swim test at freshman orientation and those who failed had to take swim classes.

I think you had to just tread water for a few minutes and make it from one end of the pool to the other. Skill and grace were not required.
Here is a guess.

In the days of military conscription a significant percentage of recruits did not know how to swim. This was a problem not only for the Navy and Marines but also Army and Air Force.

Thus a requirement that kids learn to swim pre induction either in High School graduation or university.

Could it have stemmed from that?
The urban myth was always something along "Wealthy alumni had a kid who drowned and donated millions but requires all kids to take a swim class". The real reason was probably Harvard had a swim class and the school that we copied stuff from had copied it from them decades ago and since elite schools had swim tests, we needed to have one also:) Though military meddling is also a legit theory.
This thread inspired me to look up the history of the swimming test at Cornell, where I did my undergrad. Cornell was the first college in the country (other than the service academies) to require a swimming test. They still require it to graduate. My impression had been that it was a First World War thing, but it actually predates that (1905), though it was military inspired. It stemmed from a time when all male Cornell undergraduates apparently had to take a course in military drill. A women's swimming test was added in 1920.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by FlyAF » Mon Jun 10, 2019 9:14 am

For my PE credit, I took scuba diving. It was awesome.

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an_asker
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by an_asker » Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:32 am

Thanks to everyone that responded. It appears that each university is unique in this aspect. I think the best advice I can give DS is to just stay active and find some physical activity to pursue now that he no longer has the organized water polo that he had in high school.
Jack FFR1846 wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:02 pm
Every college is different. I can tell you the Worcester Polytechnic Institute not only has classes, they are required to graduate from a Bachelor's program. I didn't learn I needed this until I was about to graduate. Fortunately, I had been on the cycling team, so was signed off by the cycling team president. My son is finishing up there right now and is completing his procrastinated phys ed requirement, taking 2 courses.

I know VT doesn't "require" these types of courses.....or at least didn't. MSEE from VT in 90.
I finished undergrad before coming to the USA, so didn't encounter any of those required PE issues. I took my classes purely for fun - and since I was already a full time MS student at VT, those classes didn't (IIRC) negatively impact my wallet.

But it sure was fun hitting tennis balls as well as racquetballs with the undergrads. Swimming was nice. I at least learned to stay afloat :-) Badminton was just a timepass as I knew the game well enough so I was among the top few folks in the class.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by miles monroe » Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:25 am

jebmke wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:47 pm


I ended up doing golf and badminton. I was in a badminton class with some guys from Pakistan. I learned that competitive badminton is nothing like "summer picnic" badminton.
i was on my high school badminton team. quite an eye opener -- you're right -- it's nothing like we played in the back yard!

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by TSR » Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:38 am

I would be legitimately surprised to hear that there were no for-credit PE classes at a given school. As a practical matter, there are a lot of coaches who get paid full time but may not be doing that much on a regular basis (e.g., even for a school with a very competitive squash program, the squash coach may not be coaching squash full time). It may be that they are not published in the handbook (or wherever) because they are the last classes to be scheduled. In college I took several for-credit PE courses. For those claiming it's a waste of money, these are usually half-credit courses that don't really contribute to a degree but do offer a chance for non-athletes to learn how to play a sport and/or get some exercise. They may make more sense in schools where you're paying by the semester, not the credit.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:44 am

Just curious how we could see if any such courses are offered at his university (short of calling and talking with staff over there I would say)? Not specifically these sports - any other sports too!
The larger question is whether your son has the skills to navigate the university requirements for graduation. If he can't find out what credits he needs to graduate in his major, or whether Pilates and Russian language classes are offered, you need to coach him to be more self-sufficient. It's his education, he needs to take charge of it.

I found out how it worked at my school, my kids figured it out at theirs. Son had no PE requirements, daughter had to take a PE class even though she was a varsity athlete. It depends. My school had a drownproofing class required for the men, but the women were allowed to sink or swim on our own.

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by an_asker » Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:59 am

NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:44 am
Just curious how we could see if any such courses are offered at his university (short of calling and talking with staff over there I would say)? Not specifically these sports - any other sports too!
The larger question is whether your son has the skills to navigate the university requirements for graduation. If he can't find out what credits he needs to graduate in his major, or whether Pilates and Russian language classes are offered, you need to coach him to be more self-sufficient. It's his education, he needs to take charge of it.

I found out how it worked at my school, my kids figured it out at theirs. Son had no PE requirements, daughter had to take a PE class even though she was a varsity athlete. It depends. My school had a drownproofing class required for the men, but the women were allowed to sink or swim on our own.
My son has more than enough skills to navigate the university requirements. He drove himself and two friends over, stayed overnight on campus with them, discussed with advisor(s) and selected classes (and schedule) and signed up for them all by himself.

As far as taking sports classes are concerned, it is a "hostile witness" kinda scenario - I want him to do something that requires it to be on a schedule so he doesn't take physical activities lightly (like I did back in the day!) and makes it part of his regular lifestyle (like I do - hello 'tennis weekends'). And as a parent, I want to make sure that he takes advantage of classes available at the university (even if they might not be part of the graduation requirements).

He did show me the catalogs didn't have any such classes. But reading some of the responses above, apparently such classes might not even show up through a nominal search unless they are part of a degree requirement which, in his case, doesn't appear to be the case.

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an_asker
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by an_asker » Mon Jun 10, 2019 12:00 pm

miles monroe wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:25 am
jebmke wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:47 pm


I ended up doing golf and badminton. I was in a badminton class with some guys from Pakistan. I learned that competitive badminton is nothing like "summer picnic" badminton.
i was on my high school badminton team. quite an eye opener -- you're right -- it's nothing like we played in the back yard!
One thing is true. I had assumed that it is quite tough to get into a high school team for any activity. But it looks like it is not as tough as I had assumed (though it is obviously not easy either).

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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Mon Jun 10, 2019 12:08 pm

If you are paying for college, you can set requirements like making his grades available, and taking PE classes or joining an intramural team. My parents required 2 years of a foreign language, even though my degree didn't require that. I figured it out.

22twain
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by 22twain » Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:58 pm

an_asker wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:59 am
He did show me the catalogs didn't have any such classes. But reading some of the responses above, apparently such classes might not even show up through a nominal search unless they are part of a degree requirement which, in his case, doesn't appear to be the case.
Or they might offer intramural sports activities as I described earlier. These probably wouldn't be listed specifically in the catalog. Instead, the student activities office or fitness center or whatever, would announce them on a semester-by-semester basis.
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Topic Author
an_asker
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by an_asker » Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:45 pm

OK, I decided to bite the bullet and ask around. After a couple of dead ends, I was directed to the Registrar's office. When I asked my question through the form, I received a response a couple of hours ago. They indeed don't have any such classes scheduled for the near future except a couple of scuba diving classes (which DS and I had already found online); however, the lady did send me a link that showed a plethora of such courses having (last?) been offered in 2013-14. She gave me a phone number to call and enquire whether there were any plans to offer them again...

I guess smartphones are to blame for the lack of student interest in such classes which then resulted in their shelving maybe?

TallBoy29er
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by TallBoy29er » Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:01 pm

I had a couple of 1 hr electives I had to find classes for. Camping and Bowling fit the bill. A heckuva lot easier then Thermo or Fluids classes. But I would have rather spent the time sleeping or studying for the harder stuff.

BigMoneyNoWhammies
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by BigMoneyNoWhammies » Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:02 pm

an_asker wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 1:56 pm
[Note to moderators: if this should be on a different forum, please move it]
A while back, I got my MS in Engineering from VA Tech. While I was in school, I took one-credit hour (Pass/Fail) classes in each of the following (not all in the same semester!):

- Tennis
- Racquetball
- Swimming
- Badminton

They were quite meticulous with the classes too - we had quizzes and stuff :-)

Fast forward to today, and DS is signing up for BS in Engineering at a local state school (FL). When I looked at the course schedule, I was unable to find any choice like the above - or even remotely similar. Is this a quirk of that time that those courses were offered back then? Or is it more university specific?

Just curious how we could see if any such courses are offered at his university (short of calling and talking with staff over there I would say)? Not specifically these sports - any other sports too!

PS: Yes, I know that we can always find a local tennis or table tennis or racquetball club ... but I am wanting to know about something within the university education system ...
every school is different in terms of course offerings, and how much if any phys ed a student must take as a graduation requirement. Also, if DS is a collegiate athlete, they will likely be exempt from this requirement. I've had friends who went to schools that also allowed an additional math/science course to be substituted for each required phy ed course (usually math/science/engineering majors). If the options aren't appealing they can always look into the courses offered over the summer at the local community college to see if they're more to their liking and transfer them back to the home school.

investingdad
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by investingdad » Tue Jun 11, 2019 6:06 pm

I went to Big 10 U in the 90s and once you hit 18 credits, additional credits were no cost.

I loaded up on P.E. classes when I could. I took bowling, archery, ice skating, badminton, and racquetball through 4 years of engineering school. Got pretty good at racquetball pretty quickly. Loved doing those classes.

Think they were 0.5 credits each.

tesuzuki2002
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by tesuzuki2002 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 7:30 pm

These type of classes were required for my BS in engineering in Michigan....

Rather than pay the high tuition cost for PE classes at university...

I took those classes at a local community college that offered hiking and back packing environmental science classes that would transfer to the university.

It was much cheaper and I got to go a few backpacking trips at a minimal cost to me. Double win!

Walkure
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by Walkure » Wed Jun 12, 2019 5:53 pm

Midwestern private school I attended in 2007 had a swim test and two semesters of Phys Ed required. Rumor on the swim test had something to do with liability due to the presence of lakes on campus that would occasionally develop a thin layer of ice attracting drunk "skaters." The phys ed requirement was ditched a few years after I graduated, not sure if the swim test is still in force. I was very annoyed that I could never get fencing or ballroom dance to work with my schedule. Had to settle for golf, ultimate frisbee, handball, and tennis.

deikel
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by deikel » Thu Jun 13, 2019 8:20 am

BuckyBadger wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:57 pm
There's a large sub set of universities that have a pledge that all their students have to know how to swim well enough so as to not drown! I remember having to take a swim test at freshman orientation and those who failed had to take swim classes.

I think you had to just tread water for a few minutes and make it from one end of the pool to the other. Skill and grace were not required.
Not trying to derail the post, but this seems odd to me. Its certainly nice if you can swim and at a time with rampant obesity forcing students to some physical exercise is a good idea for sure. But being able to swim in a pool might help you not to drown in a puddle of water maybe. But seriously, when you go overboard at sea your chances of surviving in the water for more than a couple of minutes are pretty independent of swimming lessons in a pool (clothes, temperature, waves, weather, panic and exhaustion).

I once was a decent swimmer and had the opportunity to partake in a rescue class - dragging someone from one end to the pool to the other - I was shocked how difficult that is, how exhausted I was and what a difference it makes to wear clothes (not even having the challenge of temperature or waves)....being able to swim is no marker for drowning survival as far as I am concerned, if you don't wear a 'flotation device' you are toast...
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BuckyBadger
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Re: Sports classes in Universities

Post by BuckyBadger » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:16 am

deikel wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 8:20 am
BuckyBadger wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:57 pm
There's a large sub set of universities that have a pledge that all their students have to know how to swim well enough so as to not drown! I remember having to take a swim test at freshman orientation and those who failed had to take swim classes.

I think you had to just tread water for a few minutes and make it from one end of the pool to the other. Skill and grace were not required.
Not trying to derail the post, but this seems odd to me. Its certainly nice if you can swim and at a time with rampant obesity forcing students to some physical exercise is a good idea for sure. But being able to swim in a pool might help you not to drown in a puddle of water maybe. But seriously, when you go overboard at sea your chances of surviving in the water for more than a couple of minutes are pretty independent of swimming lessons in a pool (clothes, temperature, waves, weather, panic and exhaustion).

I once was a decent swimmer and had the opportunity to partake in a rescue class - dragging someone from one end to the pool to the other - I was shocked how difficult that is, how exhausted I was and what a difference it makes to wear clothes (not even having the challenge of temperature or waves)....being able to swim is no marker for drowning survival as far as I am concerned, if you don't wear a 'flotation device' you are toast...
Well, since testing is in the ocean would be difficult in Indiana I'm sure they did the best that they could ☺️

My experience swimming in open water during triathlons versus training in a pool definitely tracks with your statement that it's easier to swim in a pool.

However, I'm sure you would agree that someone who can tread water in a pool is at at least a bit of an advantage over someone who drowns in a pool.

And until they put us through Army Ranger training and dump us in the water fully clothed and with 50 pounds of gear strapped to us i think the pool is better that nothing.

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