Autos and transportation near retirement

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4nursebee
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Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by 4nursebee » Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am

We are fast approaching the end of our working lives (6 months for one of us, then 4-10 years for the other). Big picture post: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=282329

What I am thinking about today is how to handle transportation needs in retirement. We have always been prudent or cheap, driving average vehicles, nothing fancy or upmarket. We have a 14 year old pick em up truck good for occasional errands, less than 75,000 miles on it. Generally only use it when we need it as a truck, not all that often. At times we might put on 20 miles a month now. No mechanical issues. A 2016 car also as a daily driver. We work the same shifts and have only needed this one vehicle for a while. Later this year one of us is retiring, having a change of needs. We are considering a 2nd daily driver for the following reasons:
Truck lacks many safety features we have grown accustomed to. back up camera, adaptive cruise control, lane departure
Truck is tougher to park in tight parking lots @ work.
Stay at home spouse could more easily engage with the community with comfortable transportation.

Many options on the table, mostly considering between selling current truck for a different smaller truck with safety features (6 cylinder tacoma) versus keeping current truck for 20 mile/month needs and getting a 2nd daily driver. Additionally we are faced with the choice of going practical and cheap versus nicer and more expensive. We could likely afford most vehicles on the market and enjoy riding in a car to see new places.

In 4- 11 years when we are both retired we would not have as great a need for the 2nd daily driver.

Any advice? What do you do for near or in retirement transportation? How do you decide when to buy and what to buy? What do you value in a car and why?

Thank you.
4nursebee

flyphotoguy
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by flyphotoguy » Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:36 am

A couple of years ago, while waiting for my oil change to be completed. I was sitting next to an old guy driving a maybe late 90s early 00s lexus car. We chatted a while and I found out he's a retired doctor and he said the car he's driving just keeps on running and never gave him issues throughout the years. Long story short it's another story why I'll be buying lexus/toyota, the proven ones and not the new models or super high tech ones (more stuff to fail), forever unless their quality/durability goes down.

So if your truck is useful for you even if you don't need it often, you can keep it and add another reliable car like a lexus that you don't have to worry about and you should last you a very very very long time. Good luck!

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pondering
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by pondering » Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:44 am

I'm planning on getting a reliable bicycle to get the 2 miles from my house to the trolley or the car rental place. I was impressed with the engineering of a foldable bike recently, until I found out it had a $2000 price tag.
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Kenkat
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by Kenkat » Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:22 am

You need a Mustang or a Camaro, maybe a convertible, maybe a GT or SS. You are going to have to trust me on this. Go. Now. Just go now. :happy

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4nursebee
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by 4nursebee » Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:24 am

Kenkat wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:22 am
You need a Mustang or a Camaro, maybe a convertible, maybe a GT or SS. You are going to have to trust me on this. Go. Now. Just go now. :happy
hah, no
4nursebee

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lthenderson
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by lthenderson » Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:35 am

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
We have a 14 year old pick em up truck good for occasional errands, less than 75,000 miles on it. Generally only use it when we need it as a truck, not all that often.
How many times do you use the truck that you can't do the same thing with a SUV? For those rare times when I actually need a bed of a pickup, I have found it cheaper to just pay delivery fees or phone a friend. We buy those rubber cargo liners for the back of an SUV so we can haul messing things like ripped bags of mulch, potting soil, etc.

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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by tyrion » Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:40 am

Here's what I would want if I could set it up from scratch:
1- Nice/efficient sedan. For most driving needs.
2- Useful/larger vehicle. SUV or truck. Depends on what 'useful' means to you. For my family, it's a 3 row SUV. A 4 door truck would do the trick as well. Must be 4wd for us, to get to the mountain cabin.
3- A fun car.


It seems to me you have #1 and #2 covered, so in my opinion you should fill need #3. Define 'fun' however you want.

Cycle
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by Cycle » Sat Jun 01, 2019 12:05 pm

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
Any advice? What do you do for near or in retirement transportation? How do you decide when to buy and what to buy? What do you value in a car and why?
Move to a walkable neighborhood, one you'd be fine getting around in till you are 120. Cars are best rented, not owned. Running errands with a car seems lazy to me, not to mention annoying to neighbors with all the noise/air pollution.

Being very mobile many times throughout the day (EVERY DAY) will keep your engine running, and living in non-walkable neighborhoods make this require more effort.

I jog to my YWCA, which is 1.5 miles away. I probably get more exercise from the jog there and back than the weight lifting / swimming / yoga I do at the Y.

A good test is if u need a car to grab groceries, a coffee, or dinner, you are not in a walkable neighborhood. Also on redfin you can lookup the "walk score" of any given neighborhood.

I'm 35, I won't ever retire, but when I switch to part time work and kids are gone, id like to live in a condo with a 90+ walk score. Walkers paradise ie.

Ideally the condo building would be large enough where one can just walk away for a few weeks to travel without any worry about the condo.

I've always lived in multi-family in adulthood, currently in a duplex I own and rent, so I'm a "city lover." I also love nature, like backpacking in the national parks, but nature gets boring real fast IMO, so I've always thought the notion of retiring to a cabin in the woods to be unattractive. Cities are a far more interesting place to be 75% of the time. The other 25% one can get a backcountry permit, go glamping, or VRBO.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

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Watty
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by Watty » Sat Jun 01, 2019 12:21 pm

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
Any advice? What do you do for near or in retirement transportation? How do you decide when to buy and what to buy? What do you value in a car and why?
We have a very similar Toyota pickup that my wife drives as her car and only puts about 5,000 miles a year on it. I have offered to get her a regular car instead of or in addition to the pickup but she does not want one.

I retired about four years ago and I had been driving a Honda Fit as a commuter car and it was fine for that but driving it for more than a few hours on a road trip did not work well. It was old enough that it not even have ESC much less any of the modern advanced safety features.

Last year I replaced the Honda Fit with a new 2018 Corolla LE. Toyota made a lot of the advanced safety features standard equipment in 2018 and the crash tests results have improved over the years so my feeling is that it is a much safer car than the Fit.

The Corolla is obviously not a luxury car but I took it on a 9,000 mile two month road trip last summer and it was fine for that. Since we are retired and are in no hurry there were only a few days that we dove over 300 miles a day when we were on the road trip so we did not have a lot of long days of driving.

In a normal month when I am not on a road trip I would guess that I might drive 750 miles, if that.

They tend to make cars larger over the years so the 2018 Corolla is almost the same size as 2002 Camry I had so it may be larger than you might be thinking. I plan on keeping it around ten years so the monthly cost of ownership should be reasonable.

I did not feel that I would gain much by getting a larger car like a Camry or Avalon since we very rarely have anyone riding in the back seat so there is little need for a larger car.
4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
In 4- 11 years when we are both retired we would not have as great a need for the 2nd daily driver.
You may not have a lot of real need for a second vehicle but having two cars sure is convenient for us. At least in early retirement we often will be doing different things during the day and some evenings and that would be hard to do with just one car.

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4nursebee
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by 4nursebee » Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:36 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:35 am
4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
We have a 14 year old pick em up truck good for occasional errands, less than 75,000 miles on it. Generally only use it when we need it as a truck, not all that often.
How many times do you use the truck that you can't do the same thing with a SUV? For those rare times when I actually need a bed of a pickup, I have found it cheaper to just pay delivery fees or phone a friend. We buy those rubber cargo liners for the back of an SUV so we can haul messing things like ripped bags of mulch, potting soil, etc.
Our main car is kind of an SUV, would be easy to do most of the stuff in a trailer behind it. A regular SUV could do just as well.
4nursebee

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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by 4nursebee » Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:38 pm

tyrion wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:40 am
Here's what I would want if I could set it up from scratch:
1- Nice/efficient sedan. For most driving needs.
2- Useful/larger vehicle. SUV or truck. Depends on what 'useful' means to you. For my family, it's a 3 row SUV. A 4 door truck would do the trick as well. Must be 4wd for us, to get to the mountain cabin.
3- A fun car.


It seems to me you have #1 and #2 covered, so in my opinion you should fill need #3. Define 'fun' however you want.
The decision for 3 - fun car is a tough one, especially coming from such practical people. It is desired but the little nagging angel on the shoulder says no
4nursebee

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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by 4nursebee » Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:45 pm

Cycle wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 12:05 pm
4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
Any advice? What do you do for near or in retirement transportation? How do you decide when to buy and what to buy? What do you value in a car and why?
Move to a walkable neighborhood, one you'd be fine getting around in till you are 120. Cars are best rented, not owned. Running errands with a car seems lazy to me, not to mention annoying to neighbors with all the noise/air pollution.

Being very mobile many times throughout the day (EVERY DAY) will keep your engine running, and living in non-walkable neighborhoods make this require more effort.

I jog to my YWCA, which is 1.5 miles away. I probably get more exercise from the jog there and back than the weight lifting / swimming / yoga I do at the Y.

A good test is if u need a car to grab groceries, a coffee, or dinner, you are not in a walkable neighborhood. Also on redfin you can lookup the "walk score" of any given neighborhood.

I'm 35, I won't ever retire, but when I switch to part time work and kids are gone, id like to live in a condo with a 90+ walk score. Walkers paradise ie.

Ideally the condo building would be large enough where one can just walk away for a few weeks to travel without any worry about the condo.

I've always lived in multi-family in adulthood, currently in a duplex I own and rent, so I'm a "city lover." I also love nature, like backpacking in the national parks, but nature gets boring real fast IMO, so I've always thought the notion of retiring to a cabin in the woods to be unattractive. Cities are a far more interesting place to be 75% of the time. The other 25% one can get a backcountry permit, go glamping, or VRBO.
We have kind of reached the point where we are committed to our current house/estate/farm. We bought acreage, planted, tended. It is an anchor that many people do not have, but it is ours and we enjoy it. Priceless. In ways we envy people that live in walk able neighborhoods that can just lock up and go. But we have some measure of envy for everyone we meet, everywhere we go. I am not sure we could be happy with the city life given the vast number of land based interests we have.

We do bike together for fitness and fun. Some of our transportation choices revolve around carrying our bikes to safe off road bike paths. Hence the current car and consideration for newer safer pick up, with a cab we could lock our bikes up without breaking them down.

I just rode in the car to the library 7 miles away, then went swimming at the club 3 miles away.
4nursebee

TN_Boy
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by TN_Boy » Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:46 pm

Cycle wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 12:05 pm
4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
Any advice? What do you do for near or in retirement transportation? How do you decide when to buy and what to buy? What do you value in a car and why?
Move to a walkable neighborhood, one you'd be fine getting around in till you are 120. Cars are best rented, not owned. Running errands with a car seems lazy to me, not to mention annoying to neighbors with all the noise/air pollution.

Being very mobile many times throughout the day (EVERY DAY) will keep your engine running, and living in non-walkable neighborhoods make this require more effort.

I jog to my YWCA, which is 1.5 miles away. I probably get more exercise from the jog there and back than the weight lifting / swimming / yoga I do at the Y.

A good test is if u need a car to grab groceries, a coffee, or dinner, you are not in a walkable neighborhood. Also on redfin you can lookup the "walk score" of any given neighborhood.

I'm 35, I won't ever retire, but when I switch to part time work and kids are gone, id like to live in a condo with a 90+ walk score. Walkers paradise ie.

Ideally the condo building would be large enough where one can just walk away for a few weeks to travel without any worry about the condo.

I've always lived in multi-family in adulthood, currently in a duplex I own and rent, so I'm a "city lover." I also love nature, like backpacking in the national parks, but nature gets boring real fast IMO, so I've always thought the notion of retiring to a cabin in the woods to be unattractive. Cities are a far more interesting place to be 75% of the time. The other 25% one can get a backcountry permit, go glamping, or VRBO.
I wouldn't mind living in a more walkable neighborhood than I do now, but I'd still need a car. In fact we'd still need two cars, because both of us have hobbies and interests that would be extremely painful to do without cars and we are sometimes going in different directions. We are also often taking car trips (i.e. 100 mile plus round trips for a weekend).

Running errands with a car is not necessarily lazy.

And it's awesome that you jog everywhere and are so darned fit, but you might find that when you get older that your mobility declines in ways you did not anticipate (and no, this has not happened to me yet).

To answer the OPs question directly our retirement scenarios show us having about the same vehicles that we did while both working. We do/will have multiple interests that require cars. We buy cars new and generally keep them over 100k miles. We can afford this, and do not want to waste time in retirement doing extra schedule planning (let's see, you need the car Wednesday so I guess I'll stay at home that day and do .... whatever). So we value exactly the same things in cars both pre- and post- retirement. Comfortable, reliable transportation. Handy for one of the vehicles to have extra storage space (e.g. an SUV). I like cars that are "fun" to drive as well.

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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:50 pm

My end of life transportation plan is to get DW a small SUV to keep miles off my wheelchair van. A new equipped van would set me back $35K - $45K, so making my current van my last one would save lots of dollars. Current van is only 10 years old with 87K on it. Still in perfect condition. The E-150 vans are pretty bullet proof, and should outlast me unless wrecked.

Might use my BIL to find us a CPO Mercedes SUV, with him doing maintenance on it.

Not needed yet, maybe in a couple of years.

Wife has driven vans so long she doesn't like sitting so low in a vehicle. Can't say I blame her.

Broken Man 1999
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flyphotoguy
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by flyphotoguy » Sat Jun 01, 2019 2:42 pm

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:38 pm
tyrion wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:40 am
Here's what I would want if I could set it up from scratch:
1- Nice/efficient sedan. For most driving needs.
2- Useful/larger vehicle. SUV or truck. Depends on what 'useful' means to you. For my family, it's a 3 row SUV. A 4 door truck would do the trick as well. Must be 4wd for us, to get to the mountain cabin.
3- A fun car.


It seems to me you have #1 and #2 covered, so in my opinion you should fill need #3. Define 'fun' however you want.
The decision for 3 - fun car is a tough one, especially coming from such practical people. It is desired but the little nagging angel on the shoulder says no
That's a good list.

How about a luxury crossover? Maybe that's a good compromise for your lifestyle having land and practicality/features of daily living. Maybe it's time to switch the mind a bit to enjoy what you saved but not waste it. Of course I'd suggest the toyota/lexus or maybe the honda/acura except for those
models that seem to have the engine issue (another thread going on crv with 1.5T engine).
I myself am on the process of getting #3. DW said just get a miata to get it over with because we enjoy driving around like going to wine country, tahoe, small towns, and beaches BUT because we also carry along iSUP and enjoy going to parks, lakes, etc. we need more space than a miata. I'm now on the hunt for a lexus IS convertible because it will fit stuff we bring and have the reliability/durability that we don't have to worry about it for years or maybe forever. I hope you find a good option and enjoy your new car and retirement. I like reading these kinds of "problems" here, I wish to have such problems when we're closer to retirement.

GreenGrowTheDollars
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by GreenGrowTheDollars » Sat Jun 01, 2019 4:06 pm

Consider giving the truck more of a run each week or get rid of it. On a per-mile basis, it is costly and not so wonderful if you're not getting it up to highway speeds for a bit pretty frequently.

I'm finding SUV's more comfortable for my hip than sedans. One of the wins of renting cars on vacation has been getting to try out a number of different SUV models.

I think we will likely look at a 3-year-old vehicle off lease. Meanwhile, our ancient Subaru is still going strong.

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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by NoblesvilleIN » Sat Jun 01, 2019 7:08 pm

Similar to you, we have a small farm that we have owned for close to 30 years. I have planted a couple hundred deciduous trees and 3000+ conifers over the years, so I get what you are saying about not wanting to move. I retired 5 months ago and I am finding that I'm only driving 2 or 3 days a week by myself - I'm having too much fun playing on the farm. Note: I am an introvert and, so far, I'm not craving social interaction. We have a 2010 full-sized pick-up, purchased new, about 35,000 miles on it; a 2013 mini-cooper (my commuter car when I was working), purchased used in 2014; and a 2016 Outback (DW's commuter car - she's still working), purchased new. All are paid for. I was thinking about selling the mini-cooper and going to just the truck and the Outback. My wife thinks that since they are paid for, why not keep them. We only drive the truck when we need a truck - towing, hauling kayak, etc. I last changed the oil in the truck in November and noticed the other day that it only has 1,200 miles or so on this oil change. Downside of not driving the truck frequently is mice and chipmunk nests and damage. We tend to drive the Outback on trips taken together. The mini-cooper is nice from a gas mileage standpoint when I want to head to a state park for a hike on a nice day when my wife is at work.

Here is a thought: Since your partner has an SUV, consider putting a trailer hitch on it (if it is not already set up) and getting a trailer for when you would currently drive the truck. For securing bikes, get a bike rack that fits the receiver and locks. A trailer doesn't have an engine that needs work or is susceptible to rodent damage (as much). A trailer doesn't need insurance (although your auto policy only covers a trailer when it is attached to a vehicle). Then get the newer car for driving around. On days when you need to use the trailer, trade vehicles with your partner. Before we could afford a truck as a 3rd vehicle, we had a utility trailer and a hitch on our largest vehicle. I actually towed with a Dodge Daytona in the 80's. The trailer was a godsend when we needed lumber, gravel, etc. and it could be hooked to our old tractor for chores.

Personally, I would keep the truck. We get some snow and our truck is 4-wheel drive and handy for those days. Also, I have a livestock trailer and a flatbed trailer that we use in addition to the truck. That combination allows me to take our utility tractor over to relatives and help out. The flatbed also can be towed behind the tractor for picking up hay and other chores. No idea of what your equipment needs are on your property, but I sure wouldn't want to be without a truck.

btenny
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by btenny » Sat Jun 01, 2019 7:22 pm

What car you drive in retirement is mostly driven by emotion IMO. Most of us really only need one car in retirement. We go almost everywhere together. We travel together. We go to the store together. If one of us has an appointment most times the other tags along. In our case we snow bird and can afford it so we have three cars, a nice road SUV and two older cars. So if you have the money and desire I think 2-3 cars is fine.

And with the mini-farm you describe I bet you use a pickup often. Plus while your wife is still working and you are home you do need a second vehicle. The gotcha with keeping and driving your current old truck is the big size in town. It is hard to park and gets poor MPG and is older. Plus I hear you saying you want a new car for retirement as a perk.

So for lots of utility and emotional reasons and some safety reason I suggest you trade in your old truck for a newer small Tacoma or Colorado or Ranger small pickup truck.

Good Luck. Enjoy your retirement.

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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by Cycle » Sun Jun 02, 2019 9:56 am

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:45 pm

We have kind of reached the point where we are committed to our current house/estate/farm. We bought acreage, planted, tended. It is an anchor that many people do not have, but it is ours and we enjoy it. Priceless. In ways we envy people that live in walk able neighborhoods that can just lock up and go. But we have some measure of envy for everyone we meet, everywhere we go. I am not sure we could be happy with the city life given the vast number of land based interests we have.

We do bike together for fitness and fun. Some of our transportation choices revolve around carrying our bikes to safe off road bike paths. Hence the current car and consideration for newer safer pick up, with a cab we could lock our bikes up without breaking them down.

I just rode in the car to the library 7 miles away, then went swimming at the club 3 miles away.
The other side of the coin is that having a garden or land to maintain can bring much daily joy and exercise. if one lives in a high rise condo with all ammenities on site, one may be as mobile as they would at the country estate. Depends on the individual.

The key is to design a life that includes lots of mobility and social interaction, as these will keep the mind/body strong where ever one lives. Swimming and walking are great.

I think the answer to all boglehead car questions is a 5-10 year old Honda CRV.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by MrBobcat » Sun Jun 02, 2019 10:20 am

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
We are fast approaching the end of our working lives (6 months for one of us, then 4-10 years for the other). Big picture post: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=282329

What I am thinking about today is how to handle transportation needs in retirement. We have always been prudent or cheap, driving average vehicles, nothing fancy or upmarket. We have a 14 year old pick em up truck good for occasional errands, less than 75,000 miles on it. Generally only use it when we need it as a truck, not all that often. At times we might put on 20 miles a month now. No mechanical issues. A 2016 car also as a daily driver. We work the same shifts and have only needed this one vehicle for a while. Later this year one of us is retiring, having a change of needs. We are considering a 2nd daily driver for the following reasons:
Truck lacks many safety features we have grown accustomed to. back up camera, adaptive cruise control, lane departure
Truck is tougher to park in tight parking lots @ work.
Stay at home spouse could more easily engage with the community with comfortable transportation.

Many options on the table, mostly considering between selling current truck for a different smaller truck with safety features (6 cylinder tacoma) versus keeping current truck for 20 mile/month needs and getting a 2nd daily driver. Additionally we are faced with the choice of going practical and cheap versus nicer and more expensive. We could likely afford most vehicles on the market and enjoy riding in a car to see new places.

In 4- 11 years when we are both retired we would not have as great a need for the 2nd daily driver.

Any advice? What do you do for near or in retirement transportation? How do you decide when to buy and what to buy? What do you value in a car and why?

Thank you.
I'd go for the second car and keep the truck. We've been a 3 vehicle couple for a quite a while. I would not want to drive my truck on a daily basis for long, though I've done it. I only use the truck for truck things (and as a spare vehicle when a car is in the shop). Camping, hunting and taking yard waste to the dump. Bought the truck 14 years ago with 107k miles on it and I now have 131K... and it runs great. It costs me oil changes and liability insurance ($280/year).

I really toyed with selling the truck and the older car last year and going the smaller truck route but pricing tocomas even used put me off that real quick. The truck is a sunk cost and does what I need it to do and at the rate I drive it, it will last forever and there are better/cheaper alternatives for daily drivers.
Last edited by MrBobcat on Sun Jun 02, 2019 11:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

THY4373
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by THY4373 » Sun Jun 02, 2019 10:28 am

Personally when I retire my plan is to move someplace with good public transpiration (moving back to DC area is on my short list right now) and in a walk-able location to things like a grocery, drug store and gym. I'll likely do what I have done my whole life car-wise and buy a reliable used domestic make sedan (assuming there are any left when I retire) that is at the bottom of the steep portion of the depreciation curve 5 years +/-. At this point the cost of the car is minimal to me. The most expensive car I have ever bought for myself is my last one at $11,500. That is a very small portion of my current annual income. I would hope to use it infrequently.

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TeamArgo
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by TeamArgo » Sun Jun 02, 2019 10:33 am

When we retired six years ago, my wife and I left the workforce at nearly the same time. We ditched our Volvo and pick-up, keeping only our 2008 Prius. My intent was to rent a car or truck when necessary, while getting our insurance and car maintenance costs down. Since then I have rented a truck twice (about $50 each time), a car once (~$75), and taken Uber once (~$25). We also replaced the 2008 Prius with a 2010 Prius e/w a solar panel operated fan to keep the car interior cooler, after we moved to Florida (it also has a sunroof, booming sound system, and nice wheels 'cause you do need to have a little fun :D ).

So I guess I am saying that maybe you will not be using your vehicles as much after retirement. I would strongly disagree with getting or keeping three of them. Maybe you can buy one newer/nicer vehicle with the thought of both of you using it after your spouse retires. Ditch the truck immediately and strongly consider dumping the 2016 after your spouse leaves the workforce.
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midareff
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Location: Biscayne Bay, South Florida

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by midareff » Sun Jun 02, 2019 10:55 am

Ordered a new ride for my retirement..... one car family as she doesn't drive in the USA. Replaced a near 8 year old Jeep that was causing problems. Ordered it with all the safety features available then and replaced that at 5 years (last year) again with all the safety features.... proximity alarms, 360 camera, next lane advisement, pedestrian alarms, closing to fast alarm, adaptive speed control, over dividing line advisement, self parking, remote start, lock's itself, auto on and off for most everything, keyless lock/unlocks and ignition ... I'm probably forgetting a few.. oh, forgetting is part of the deal in your 70's. Maybe the next one will be full auto-drive and not be named Lyft or Uber.

Golf maniac
Posts: 362
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2017 2:02 pm
Location: Florida

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by Golf maniac » Sun Jun 02, 2019 11:00 am

For OP lifestyle a used small pick up to replace the old pick up would best fit your needs. I wouldn’t want the hassle of having 3 vehicles to maintain in retirement plus the insurance. The “newer” used pick up would meet the needs best for bikes and any hauling so your not bugging friends for their pick up (I always hated that when I had a pick up).

Topic Author
4nursebee
Posts: 1386
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 7:56 am
Location: US

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by 4nursebee » Sun Jun 02, 2019 4:24 pm

Sat in a small Toyota truck today, did not like it. That idea is off the table.
Corolla too small.
Prius size felt good but it was high end.
Gonna sleep on it a few.

Argh!
4nursebee

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lthenderson
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Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by lthenderson » Mon Jun 03, 2019 8:39 am

4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:36 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:35 am
4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
We have a 14 year old pick em up truck good for occasional errands, less than 75,000 miles on it. Generally only use it when we need it as a truck, not all that often.
How many times do you use the truck that you can't do the same thing with a SUV? For those rare times when I actually need a bed of a pickup, I have found it cheaper to just pay delivery fees or phone a friend. We buy those rubber cargo liners for the back of an SUV so we can haul messing things like ripped bags of mulch, potting soil, etc.
Our main car is kind of an SUV, would be easy to do most of the stuff in a trailer behind it. A regular SUV could do just as well.
We have a RAV4 that I think would be perfect in retirement of similar sized SUV. It can haul quite a bit of stuff (covered which is a plus), seats four quite comfortable, has a short wheel base so it is easy to fit into tight parallel parking and isn't too wide so if fits into narrow parking. It also gets decent gas mileage. I would much prefer it to a small truck unless I was just hauling big items on a regular basis to justify it.

jharkin
Posts: 2438
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2016 7:14 am
Location: Boston suburbs

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by jharkin » Mon Jun 03, 2019 10:16 am

Cycle wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 9:56 am
4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 1:45 pm

We have kind of reached the point where we are committed to our current house/estate/farm. We bought acreage, planted, tended. It is an anchor that many people do not have, but it is ours and we enjoy it. Priceless. In ways we envy people that live in walk able neighborhoods that can just lock up and go. But we have some measure of envy for everyone we meet, everywhere we go. I am not sure we could be happy with the city life given the vast number of land based interests we have.

We do bike together for fitness and fun. Some of our transportation choices revolve around carrying our bikes to safe off road bike paths. Hence the current car and consideration for newer safer pick up, with a cab we could lock our bikes up without breaking them down.

I just rode in the car to the library 7 miles away, then went swimming at the club 3 miles away.
The other side of the coin is that having a garden or land to maintain can bring much daily joy and exercise. if one lives in a high rise condo with all ammenities on site, one may be as mobile as they would at the country estate. Depends on the individual.

The key is to design a life that includes lots of mobility and social interaction, as these will keep the mind/body strong where ever one lives. Swimming and walking are great.

I think the answer to all boglehead car questions is a 5-10 year old Honda CRV.
One of reasons bogleheads is intimidating to newcomers is the strong consensus that there is a one size fits all "correct" answer that we all have to conform whether we like it or not:

- advanced degree
- high paying tech/finance/medical job
- must save up $5mm +
- Must only drive a Toyota corolla
- Must buy clothes from thrift store
- must live in a city, never retire and not actually spend any of the money



No thanks. The reality is everybody is different and not all of us *like* cities, or *want* to live right on top of our neighbors. I like to go into my backyard and see nothing but trees, hear nothing but birds. On weekends we like to go to place far away in nature, and last time I checked I cant get an uber to drive me 3 hours with a couple hundred lb of outdoor gear, then wait all day to drive me home at some unpredictable odd hour.... And I wouldn't want to if I could as I actually *gasp* enjoy driving.

And I'm not exactly in the "sticks" I'm only 25 miles from downtown Boston!

And that's not even talking about the farmer in Kansas a hundred miles from anything remotely like a city.... show me how they are going to live in this "car free" future?


OP - if you want a nice car, buy a nice car. 40 years of the grindstone has earned you some enjoyment.

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dm200
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Location: Washington DC area

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by dm200 » Mon Jun 03, 2019 10:30 am

Now in semi-retirement, I suppose DW and I could get alone with one car - HOWEVER -

We have chosen to have two cars. We have, though, because of decreased driving (no long commute for me and no regular long trips to grandparents/family) we are fine with older cars that we both can drive. I have a part time job (20 hours a week) and it is much more convenient for me to drive to work the 4 days. With older cars, there is increased need for service/maintenance - and we are fine with one car for those periods. last month, for example, it took almost a week to get repairs on out 1998 Camry.

We believe that our 2002 Camry is a reliable enough travel car when we need/want to take a trip. I believe the 1998 Camry could travel since we replaced the timing belt and water pump.

In the event that we believed neither car would be reliable enough for a long trip, renting from Enterprise if quite economical as well.

I believe the net total cost per year of our two older cars is less than one later model car. Insurance, state property tax, depreciation, "cost of funds"/opportunity cost, etc. Our insurance (no collision or comprehensive) is only about $67 per month for both cars. We are both very satisfied with driving the older cars and do not feel "deprived" by not having the latest and greatest features. In a few years, when we get a newer, but still older, model - we will "enjoy" the features that were new that model year.

Cycle
Posts: 1540
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Location: Minneapolis

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by Cycle » Mon Jun 03, 2019 11:58 am

jharkin wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 10:16 am

No thanks. The reality is everybody is different and not all of us *like* cities, or *want* to live right on top of our neighbors. I like to go into my backyard and see nothing but trees, hear nothing but birds. On weekends we like to go to place far away in nature, and last time I checked I cant get an uber to drive me 3 hours with a couple hundred lb of outdoor gear, then wait all day to drive me home at some unpredictable odd hour....
I can be in and driving a car rental through Hertz gold in 5 minutes from leaving my couch at home. Not a big deal, certainly worth the trade off of participating in a sustainable lifestyle (Ie being a low consumer of housing/land/resources)
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

TN_Boy
Posts: 1413
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:51 pm

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by TN_Boy » Mon Jun 03, 2019 12:29 pm

Cycle wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 11:58 am
jharkin wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 10:16 am

No thanks. The reality is everybody is different and not all of us *like* cities, or *want* to live right on top of our neighbors. I like to go into my backyard and see nothing but trees, hear nothing but birds. On weekends we like to go to place far away in nature, and last time I checked I cant get an uber to drive me 3 hours with a couple hundred lb of outdoor gear, then wait all day to drive me home at some unpredictable odd hour....
I can be in and driving a car rental through Hertz gold in 5 minutes from leaving my couch at home. Not a big deal, certainly worth the trade off of participating in a sustainable lifestyle (Ie being a low consumer of housing/land/resources)
This would not be worth the tradeoff to me or my spouse (not to mention there is no five minute option for us, which would be needed like every day). I am happy for you to apply your values to yourself.

But we are far afield (aforest?). The OP is not interested in Cycle's lifestyle. Efforts to convert her [edited: don't know why I said "her" here; from the post I have no idea of the OPs gender] or the rest of us are probably off-topic.

The Wizard
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Location: Reading, MA

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by The Wizard » Tue Jun 04, 2019 7:26 am

I'm single and retired in 2013 with two vehicles, a 2004 Ford Ranger pickup and a 2008 Mustang convertible, both bought new.
As with some others here, I tend to use the truck for hauling things and in winter weather. I also use it at the girlfriend's place, with 10 acres of trees for firewood.

The Ranger started having rust and mechanical issues a while back, so I bought a new 2016 F-150 3-1/2 years ago, factory ordered with the options I wanted. This has worked out well.

Before long, I expect to replace the Mustang, possibly with the new hybrid version that is rumored to be coming...
Attempted new signature...

Shallowpockets
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Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by Shallowpockets » Tue Jun 04, 2019 7:54 am

My end of life vehicle is a hearse or an ambulance. Until then I don't waste my time speculating on all this, I drive what I have and will make changes to that as necessary. Getting a new vehicle for retirement purposes that are now being taken care of with what you have is like timing the market.

jlawrence01
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Location: Southern AZ

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by jlawrence01 » Tue Jun 04, 2019 8:10 am

Cycle wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 12:05 pm
4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
Any advice? What do you do for near or in retirement transportation? How do you decide when to buy and what to buy? What do you value in a car and why?
Move to a walkable neighborhood, one you'd be fine getting around in till you are 120. Cars are best rented, not owned. Running errands with a car seems lazy to me, not to mention annoying to neighbors with all the noise/air pollution.

Being very mobile many times throughout the day (EVERY DAY) will keep your engine running, and living in non-walkable neighborhoods make this require more effort.

I jog to my YWCA, which is 1.5 miles away. I probably get more exercise from the jog there and back than the weight lifting / swimming / yoga I do at the Y.

A good test is if u need a car to grab groceries, a coffee, or dinner, you are not in a walkable neighborhood. Also on redfin you can lookup the "walk score" of any given neighborhood.

I'm 35, I won't ever retire, but when I switch to part time work and kids are gone, id like to live in a condo with a 90+ walk score. Walkers paradise ie.

Ideally the condo building would be large enough where one can just walk away for a few weeks to travel without any worry about the condo.

I've always lived in multi-family in adulthood, currently in a duplex I own and rent, so I'm a "city lover." I also love nature, like backpacking in the national parks, but nature gets boring real fast IMO, so I've always thought the notion of retiring to a cabin in the woods to be unattractive. Cities are a far more interesting place to be 75% of the time. The other 25% one can get a backcountry permit, go glamping, or VRBO.

Spoken like a true 35 year old. Wait until you get to be about 70 and you have issues that preclude you from walking 10 block for your groceries. You will see how unrealistic those "walkability indexes" actually are.

Cycle
Posts: 1540
Joined: Sun May 28, 2017 7:57 pm
Location: Minneapolis

Re: Autos and transportation near retirement

Post by Cycle » Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:49 pm

jlawrence01 wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 8:10 am
Cycle wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 12:05 pm
4nursebee wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 10:08 am
Any advice? What do you do for near or in retirement transportation? How do you decide when to buy and what to buy? What do you value in a car and why?
Move to a walkable neighborhood, one you'd be fine getting around in till you are 120. Cars are best rented, not owned. Running errands with a car seems lazy to me, not to mention annoying to neighbors with all the noise/air pollution.

Being very mobile many times throughout the day (EVERY DAY) will keep your engine running, and living in non-walkable neighborhoods make this require more effort.

I jog to my YWCA, which is 1.5 miles away. I probably get more exercise from the jog there and back than the weight lifting / swimming / yoga I do at the Y.

A good test is if u need a car to grab groceries, a coffee, or dinner, you are not in a walkable neighborhood. Also on redfin you can lookup the "walk score" of any given neighborhood.

I'm 35, I won't ever retire, but when I switch to part time work and kids are gone, id like to live in a condo with a 90+ walk score. Walkers paradise ie.

Ideally the condo building would be large enough where one can just walk away for a few weeks to travel without any worry about the condo.

I've always lived in multi-family in adulthood, currently in a duplex I own and rent, so I'm a "city lover." I also love nature, like backpacking in the national parks, but nature gets boring real fast IMO, so I've always thought the notion of retiring to a cabin in the woods to be unattractive. Cities are a far more interesting place to be 75% of the time. The other 25% one can get a backcountry permit, go glamping, or VRBO.

Spoken like a true 35 year old. Wait until you get to be about 70 and you have issues that preclude you from walking 10 block for your groceries. You will see how unrealistic those "walkability indexes" actually are.
Not likely, I'll age healthy since i walk / bike everywhere, eat a Paleo diet, and practice fasting. Most mobility issues are a consequence of poor lifestyle choices. How we age is within our circle of control. The fasting bit can help arthritis, which my family has a lot of.

I'm raising this walking alternative on this vehicle thread bc I believe strongly in the correlation of being very mobile to being healthy in old age.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

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