Gardening 2019

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F150HD
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by F150HD » Tue Apr 30, 2019 9:00 pm

Earl Lemongrab wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 2:02 pm

I will be trying a new staking method, called the "Florida Weave":

hope you don't get arrested :happy

HEDGEFUNDIE
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Tue Apr 30, 2019 9:09 pm

I have a single avocado tree in my backyard that does not produce any fruit because it does not self-pollinate.

What is the best way to inseminate the tree, short of planting a second tree?

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Tue Apr 30, 2019 9:32 pm

F150HD wrote:
Tue Apr 30, 2019 9:00 pm
Earl Lemongrab wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 2:02 pm

I will be trying a new staking method, called the "Florida Weave":

hope you don't get arrested
Sorry, it's whooshing me.
This week's fortune cookie: "Your financial life will be secure and beneficial." So I got that going for me, which is nice.

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LadyGeek
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by LadyGeek » Tue Apr 30, 2019 9:49 pm

A friend gave me a pack of mammoth sunflower seeds, dated "Packed for 1989". :shock: I have no idea how they were stored, but the package was unopened.

I planted 8 seeds and will wait 10 days to see what happens.

I've also got tomatoes in pots. The hot pepper plants will go in the ground in a week or so.
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.

Pu239
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Pu239 » Wed May 01, 2019 12:10 am

Zone 5-b. Getting ready to plant Green Gage and Mt. Royal plums, Regent Serviceberry, Mars des Bois strawberry and Triple Crown blackberry plants - delayed by recent snows. Peat bale blueberry plants (local soil is alkaline requiring alternative media) are thriving except our Bluecrop which we will substitute with Elliot. Usual grow-light veg starts should be ready for planting mid-May. New trellises to build so there is much prep work left before planting starts.

Last years experiment with planting Zone 6 and 7 Alstroemerias in cold frames appear to have been a success with all plants surviving the winter. We buy from Costco ever 2-3 weeks so maybe this will eventually help cut back on floral costs during the summer. Might try a Zone 8 or 9 to test the limits.

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LilyFleur
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by LilyFleur » Wed May 01, 2019 12:29 am

Zone 24, with large pots on two patios (no yard)

The rain killed some of my pittosporum this year. Some I hacked back and they are leafing out. Now my beautiful podocarpus (I have ten of them) are getting horrendous mildew, so I have hacked them way back, which means I have lost a lot of the privacy they so beautifully provided.

My Christmas cactus, however, is beautiful and starting to bloom again.

Thinking of trying some fiddle leaf figs for something new.

Cody6136
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Cody6136 » Wed May 01, 2019 5:40 am

Zone 4 here and went running on the snowy mountain trails yesterday. Dreaming of 50 degrees!

likegarden
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by likegarden » Wed May 01, 2019 6:29 am

Kacang wrote :
When I used to garden in zone 5, I would start the seeds outdoors in milk jugs. When the snow melt and weather warms up, the seedlings sprouts and hardens off naturally. I had fantastic germination and survival rates. These plants also seem hardier and grow more vigorously once we are past late spring than the ones that I started indoors. Once I discovered how easy this approach (winter sowing) is, I got rid of my indoor seed starting gear.

Your seeds would sprout now outside, but with me doing gardening inside until now I already have sturdy plants the size of a partially open fist, plus I had all that fun for 5 months gardening in my basement since November when it was snowing outside. I will repot them this weekend and bring them outside. I have a chance of some of these plants blooming in July, permitting me to use them in hybridizing already.

forgeblast
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by forgeblast » Wed May 01, 2019 6:49 am

I have my greenhouse frame built, and in position now its just putting in the fencing. I am putting the fence 1' underground to stop moles/voles. Pa soil is really rocky.
I have a lot started inside, and should be getting dwarf mulberry and choke berry delivered soon. Same with the elderberry.
We planned out where the new fencing was going and the deer mowed it over, the first night. I have to get the tposts in place tonight.

GlennK
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by GlennK » Wed May 01, 2019 7:37 am

mancich wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:42 am
Now I just have to figure an inexpensive way to put some kind of fencing around it to keep out the critters and deer.
I bought re barb cut to 4 foot lengths to use in the corners and then bought chicken wire fencing. I then weave the fencing down the rebarb and go the next post and weave it. If you have a long garden, you need more than corner stakes.

This worked for the groundhogs that were eating my tomatoes. Actually, taking one bite from each tomato! Polite thing would have been to eat the whole tomato before moving on to the next one! :)

Mike Scott
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Mike Scott » Wed May 01, 2019 9:38 am

More rain this week and no daylight time at home for a couple more weeks so things will have time to dry out. The native grasses and wildflowers I planted last winter are getting a good start. I have not had to worry about the lake water level being low this year and it will be a few more weeks for the water to warm up enough to put in the aquatics.

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Wed May 01, 2019 2:53 pm

I have one bacon avocado, how’s that, I just bought this plant from the farmers market recently.

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Elsebet
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Elsebet » Wed May 01, 2019 3:37 pm

I have cherry/regular tomatoes and cucumbers that I started from seed in my indoor greenhouse. The weather is improving rapidly here in the Seattle area so I may plant them in a few weeks. I think that is all I will plant this year, just not in the gardening mood lately.
"...the man who adapts himself to his slender means and makes himself wealthy on a little sum, is the truly rich man..." ~Seneca

mancich
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by mancich » Wed May 01, 2019 3:50 pm

GlennK wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 7:37 am
mancich wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:42 am
Now I just have to figure an inexpensive way to put some kind of fencing around it to keep out the critters and deer.
I bought re barb cut to 4 foot lengths to use in the corners and then bought chicken wire fencing. I then weave the fencing down the rebarb and go the next post and weave it. If you have a long garden, you need more than corner stakes.

This worked for the groundhogs that were eating my tomatoes. Actually, taking one bite from each tomato! Polite thing would have been to eat the whole tomato before moving on to the next one! :)
Good idea thanks!

Pu239
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Pu239 » Wed May 01, 2019 5:54 pm

HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Tue Apr 30, 2019 9:09 pm
I have a single avocado tree in my backyard that does not produce any fruit because it does not self-pollinate.

What is the best way to inseminate the tree, short of planting a second tree?
Why not buy an avocado tree and give it to a neighbor, then split the fruit?

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Thu May 02, 2019 10:06 am

I don’t know if you need another avocado plant but the guy who sold me said they are self pollination. They have both male and female flowers. This morning I have a tiny Haas avocado which is potted next to a Bacon avocado, I don’t know if that helps or not. But I now have two tiny avocados, one of each type.

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F150HD
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by F150HD » Thu May 02, 2019 9:25 pm


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jabberwockOG
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by jabberwockOG » Thu May 02, 2019 9:43 pm

Think we are zone 8. We still have a little winter lettuce but most of it has bolted. Lot of mature green onions survived our winter. Pole beans are thick and 6-7 feet high and flowering. Tomatoes are set but still pretty small and green, maybe 2-3 weeks away from first picking. Eggplants are a couple of feet high and flowering. Last summer's jalapenos and habanero survived our mild winter this year and are flowering. Squash plants are just on the verge of flowering but mine are late our neighbor has been picking tons of squash/zucinni since last week. Blueberries are ripening - maybe another 2 weeks on some of the early varieties.

Yukon
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Yukon » Fri May 03, 2019 7:12 am

forgeblast wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 8:16 am
Zone 5b here.

Redoing our garden. Building (almost done) with our movable gothic arch greenhouse. This will let us open up the ground and plant all year long in NE PA. We are going to be following elliot colemans winter harvest handbook.
You have a plan that you used for the greenhouse? I've been wanting to consider this option
Don't Work Forever.

GlennK
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by GlennK » Fri May 03, 2019 8:45 am

Zone 6a here in NE Ohio.

I hope to till the garden this weekend. Might be too wet due to expected rain on Saturday so maybe take Monday off to get it done. Then it will be off to the garden store for tomatoes, hot peppers, and cucumbers.

Glenn

forgeblast
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by forgeblast » Fri May 03, 2019 9:08 am

Yukon wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 7:12 am
forgeblast wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 8:16 am
Zone 5b here.

Redoing our garden. Building (almost done) with our movable gothic arch greenhouse. This will let us open up the ground and plant all year long in NE PA. We are going to be following elliot colemans winter harvest handbook.
You have a plan that you used for the greenhouse? I've been wanting to consider this option
Sure do! Here is the link https://www.johnnyseeds.com/growers-lib ... ators.html I am building (almost done!) the modular moveable gothic greenhouse. The xls spreadsheet will let you put in how many modular pieces you want to build. Right now I have supplies for more but only built one due to the fact that I need to put in a lot more fencing.
https://www.johnnyseeds.com/growers-lib ... anual.html is how you build it. Its pretty straight forward.

Miriam2
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Miriam2 » Fri May 03, 2019 5:57 pm

Zone 10b here in tropical paradise 8-) Those dang iguanas are digging holes around my plants and trees to lay their eggs. Ruins the root systems of the plants. According to my friend Google, iguanas can lay 20 to 70 eggs per year :annoyed

peppers
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by peppers » Fri May 03, 2019 6:04 pm

Miriam2 wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 5:57 pm
Zone 10b here in tropical paradise 8-) Those dang iguanas are digging holes around my plants and trees to lay their eggs. Ruins the root systems of the plants. According to my friend Google, iguanas can lay 20 to 70 eggs per year :annoyed

My.....My....My..... :wink:
"..the cavalry ain't comin' kid, you're on your own..."

Miriam2
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Miriam2 » Fri May 03, 2019 6:29 pm

peppers wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 6:04 pm
Miriam2 wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 5:57 pm
Zone 10b here in tropical paradise 8-) Those dang iguanas are digging holes around my plants and trees to lay their eggs. Ruins the root systems of the plants. According to my friend Google, iguanas can lay 20 to 70 eggs per year :annoyed
My.....My....My..... :wink:
peppers - truly, you've never seen the wrath of a gardener until you watch me go after those flower eating plant destroying slithery so-called creatures :twisted:

peppers
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by peppers » Fri May 03, 2019 6:36 pm

Miriam2 wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 6:29 pm
peppers wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 6:04 pm
Miriam2 wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 5:57 pm
Zone 10b here in tropical paradise 8-) Those dang iguanas are digging holes around my plants and trees to lay their eggs. Ruins the root systems of the plants. According to my friend Google, iguanas can lay 20 to 70 eggs per year :annoyed
My.....My....My..... :wink:
peppers - truly, you've never seen the wrath of a gardener until you watch me go after those flower eating plant destroying slithery so-called creatures :twisted:
Now..now...it is not for us to judge. All of Mother Nature's creatures need some love. 8-)
"..the cavalry ain't comin' kid, you're on your own..."

Miriam2
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Miriam2 » Fri May 03, 2019 7:11 pm

peppers wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 6:36 pm
Miriam2 wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 6:29 pm
peppers wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 6:04 pm
Miriam2 wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 5:57 pm
Zone 10b here in tropical paradise 8-) Those dang iguanas are digging holes around my plants and trees to lay their eggs. Ruins the root systems of the plants. According to my friend Google, iguanas can lay 20 to 70 eggs per year :annoyed
My.....My....My..... :wink:
peppers - truly, you've never seen the wrath of a gardener until you watch me go after those flower eating plant destroying slithery so-called creatures :twisted:
Now..now...it is not for us to judge. All of Mother Nature's creatures need some love. 8-)
peppers! it is an iguana invasion, a "green plague," destroying all gardens great and beautiful :annoyed

Image

https://www.wlrn.org/post/great-iguana- ... -around-us :annoyed

Dottie57
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Dottie57 » Fri May 03, 2019 7:33 pm

DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 2:53 pm
I have one bacon avocado, how’s that, I just bought this plant from the farmers market recently.
They made a hybrid of bacon and avocado? :confused

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Fri May 03, 2019 8:49 pm

Dottie57 wrote:
Fri May 03, 2019 7:33 pm
DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 2:53 pm
I have one bacon avocado, how’s that, I just bought this plant from the farmers market recently.
They made a hybrid of bacon and avocado? :confused
I wish, no I still have to buy bacon for my bacon and avocado sandwich, very nice combination. Crunchy and mushy.

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F150HD
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by F150HD » Sun May 05, 2019 9:39 am

wouldn't mind input in this thread from the gardening crowd: Bare Root Trees

I didn't want to post the question 'here' and derail this thread, its a very specific question so....separate thread. Thanks. :happy

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Kitty Telltales
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Kitty Telltales » Mon May 06, 2019 4:11 am

Growing zone 8ish here in the middle of Germany. We live in a river valley that tends to be a few degrees warmer than the surroundings due to chalk stone cliffs at the top of the hills. Unfortunately the soil is terribly heavy clay. There is also a predictable and reliable cold period in early May with nighttime temps 3 C to 10 C so all seedlings are being moved daily in containers between the terrace and the dining room.

I miss my New Jersey tomatoes, so I've smuggled some beefsteak seeds bought during the Bogleheads Conference in PA. I don't know if the "Fleisch Tomaten" seeds sold here are truly the same. Why take any chances. Although my father, an old New Jerseyian, used to say that Rutgers University ruined real Jersey tomatoes long ago. We've developed slightly raised beds and have added some specially mixed tomato soil and will add additional sand to replicate New Jersey soil. Hoping for a hot and humid summer like in NJ.

Now if I could only get a dogwood to bloom, life would be perfect.

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Conch55
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by Conch55 » Tue May 07, 2019 2:42 pm

As a followup to my posting about putting in my vegetable garden I have a Boglehead analogy to add. After planting, I wondered if I should continue to use a chicken-wire fence around the plot. I hadn't seen rabbits, our main problem, in a couple of years. I opted to "stay the course" and put in the fence. While working around the garden today I saw a rabbit under a shed within 5 feet of the plot. Glad I stayed with the plan. :sharebeer

MP173
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by MP173 » Tue May 07, 2019 4:42 pm

Big problem for us.

I typically plant about 100 garlic in the fall. Just the last week, a number are dying and others are showing yellow leaves.

Fortunately I planted in two locations and the second location is not showing the yellowing leaves. Unfortunately there are only about 20 plants in that location.

I had onions in that location last year and have read that you are not to follow garlic in an onion patch. Oops.

Ed

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Tue May 07, 2019 5:38 pm

I plant garlics to keep the thiefs out of my garden, they smell so bad, they don’t bother to come close. Onions and garlics are so prolific around here. Yesterday, I picked a bunch to go with my paella.
Last edited by DrGoogle2017 on Tue May 14, 2019 2:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

mrsbetsy
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by mrsbetsy » Tue May 14, 2019 12:22 pm

Mother's Day was a big day for my garden. 35 strawberry plants, 16 pepper plants from mild to hot, and 2 yards of soil.

Yeah...pretty easy to please this mom.

Also, a cheerful bright yellow watering can.

Now if it would just warm up so things can start growing!

I also put in some 16 bush beans and 16 Italian squash seeds last week. Bush beans have already sprouted.

I really need a manicure though.... :D

Mrs. Betsy

WhyNotUs
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by WhyNotUs » Tue May 14, 2019 6:08 pm

5b
Planted- Beets, lettuces, kales, carrots, garlic (last fall), onions, leeks, peas, snap beans
Starters that will go in Memorial Day- Squashes (summer and winter) and peppers and pumpkins
I own the next hot stock- VTSAX

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LadyGeek
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by LadyGeek » Tue May 14, 2019 6:30 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Tue Apr 30, 2019 9:49 pm
A friend gave me a pack of mammoth sunflower seeds, dated "Packed for 1989". :shock: I have no idea how they were stored, but the package was unopened.

I planted 8 seeds and will wait 10 days to see what happens.

I've also got tomatoes in pots. The hot pepper plants will go in the ground in a week or so.
The sunflower seed experiment has ended with 0 yield. I planted an entire package of brand new mammoth sunflower seeds in every part of my backyard and garden that has a possibility of sun. My plan is to relocate the new seedlings in better locations once I see what comes up.

The hot pepper plants are in the ground and coming along well.
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.

mrsbetsy
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by mrsbetsy » Tue May 14, 2019 9:07 pm

"The sunflower seed experiment has ended with 0 yield. I planted an entire package of brand new mammoth sunflower seeds in every part of my backyard and garden that has a possibility of sun. My plan is to relocate the new seedlings in better locations once I see what comes up."


Bummer, but nice try for 30 year old seeds. You might be surprised in a few years though that they regenerate after their long dormancy. Keep watching.

I have several packs of sunflowers that were given to me in at an auction. I can't decide how/where to plant them. Do I scatter them here and there or plant them in a group? Would they shadow other plants too much if they got too tall? My backyard faces south so full sun all day. I think they would be quite happy back there but I've never planted any.

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LadyGeek
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by LadyGeek » Tue May 14, 2019 9:22 pm

The mammoth sunflowers are, well, huge. The stalks can be up to 12 feet high, but I typically see them closer to 7 or 8 feet before the heads tip over due to their sheer size.

I should also mention that I have several bird feeders. I expect every sunflower head to be bird food as soon as the seeds mature. I've also tried roasting the seeds (for me to eat), but it's a lot of work.

==================

Sunflowers come in many sizes and colors. Some have more than one head. The mammoth varieties are not all that common, so I'm guessing you won't have these. My guess is they will have multiple heads and be about eye level or shorter. I would plant them on the back side of the garden so they won't shade anything behind them.

The planting instructions for my seeds are: 8" apart at a depth of 1" (fine soil). Firm lightly and keep moist. Seedlings emerge in 7 - 14 days, thin to stand 12" to 18" apart. 100 days to bloom, full sun (6+ hours).
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.

protagonist
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Advice on heath/heather?

Post by protagonist » Tue May 21, 2019 10:51 am

When at wit's end, always try the polymaths at Bogleheads. Here is my issue...

I planted a mixture of heath (Erica darlyensis) and heather (Calluna vulgaris) along the edge of my garden about 5 years ago- Zone 5b-6 (MA), partial sun. I have had mixed results year to year.

Parts of it look gorgeous, all green with red and purple flowers.

Other parts look dead....just twigs (usually, unfortunately, in the center of the plants....the new life emerges along the edges).

Should I radically cut the dead-looking branches to the ground?
Or will they eventually leaf out and bloom like hydrangeas do? (I'm not sure if they leaf out on old growth or not).
Is there anything I can do to improve their health?
To paraphrase Roseanne Roseannadanna, do I ask a lot of questions for a guy from New England?

protagonist
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Best gardening forum on web

Post by protagonist » Tue May 21, 2019 11:50 am

What is the best gardening forum to ask questions (such as mine above) on the web?

I have used GardenWeb but now it is part of Houzz....very few people respond and it is a very commercial site.

NoblesvilleIN
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by NoblesvilleIN » Tue May 21, 2019 12:26 pm

"by protagonist » Tue May 21, 2019 12:50 pm

What is the best gardening forum to ask questions (such as mine above) on the web?"

Take a look at the National Gardening Association forums. I don't post there, but I have browsed their forums when I have had a question.

https://garden.org/forums/

Years ago, they had a pretty good magazine that I subscribed to.

protagonist
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Re: Gardening 2019

Post by protagonist » Tue May 21, 2019 7:59 pm

NoblesvilleIN wrote:
Tue May 21, 2019 12:26 pm
"by protagonist » Tue May 21, 2019 12:50 pm

What is the best gardening forum to ask questions (such as mine above) on the web?"

Take a look at the National Gardening Association forums. I don't post there, but I have browsed their forums when I have had a question.

https://garden.org/forums/

Years ago, they had a pretty good magazine that I subscribed to.
Thanks! I tried signing up ...they supposedly sent me a confirmation email but I never received it. Worth the try anyway.

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