"The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

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Barsoom
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Barsoom » Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:02 pm

Texas is 38 in Health Care?

We have the MD Anderson Cancer Center here. We have the Memorial Hermann–Texas Medical Center here.

Michael Debakey revolutionized heart surgery at the Baylor College of Medicine here.

James "Red" Duke pioneered the Life Flight treatment for trauma patients here.

As a retiree living off of accumulated savings, I'd probably weigh affordability the highest, and trade off everything else.

-B

sergio
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by sergio » Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:19 pm

randomguy wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 6:41 pm
jibantik wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 6:24 pm
vitaflo wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:25 pm
btenny wrote:
Sat Mar 30, 2019 12:16 pm
I see no reason why Minnesota is so much higher than Florida and Arizona in QOL. Up there you have to hibernate for six months to not freeze.
Yes, MN is a frozen wasteland, please don't move here! You will die of frostbite just by looking outside! /s

Honestly, the weather is the reason MN is America's best kept secret. Unlike the Mountain West, I hope it stays that way.
That's the thing. In a cold place you can actively do something, i.e., wear warm clothes, to still be able to do things outside. In a place like Florida in the summer, you can run around buck neked and it will still be unbearable to do anything outside.
I can play golf in 100 degree weather with 100% humidity by adapting. Can't play golf outside with 1" of snow. Cold weather is a lot more limiting than hot. It is all about what you want to do. You can also get up at 6am to exercise outside.

People are going to differ on hot/cold, urban/rural and so on. Convincing others that you are right is futile. Knowing what you like is valuable.
There's a reason lots of people in cold states have winter homes in warmer locales. How many Floridians or Texans do you know that have summer homes in slightly colder locations so they can escape the heat for a few months? How many Floridians retire to WI or MN so they can finally get away from the heat and enjoy 5-6 months of freezing temps, icy roads, and minimal daylight?

Both excessive heat and excessive cold suck. But extreme cold and snow is far more limiting and dangerous (driving, walking outside on frozen pavement, etc.) than hot and humid.

MN has lots of good qualities that make the winter easier to digest as a working person with a family. But I wouldn't ever even consider it (or most of the midwest) for retirement once I finish up working. At the very least I'd spend Nov-April somewhere else.

brokendirtdart
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by brokendirtdart » Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:39 pm

Barsoom wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:02 pm
Texas is 38 in Health Care?

We have the MD Anderson Cancer Center here. We have the Memorial Hermann–Texas Medical Center here.

Michael Debakey revolutionized heart surgery at the Baylor College of Medicine here.

James "Red" Duke pioneered the Life Flight treatment for trauma patients here.
Putting a "score" on a state's health care is somewhat worthless. There are shining examples of good health care in most states. Some have just a few facilities or limited access due to distance/wait times which reduce options. Having spent some time everywhere except for the south in the spread out state of TX and currently living 45 miles from Jasper, there are large areas of the state where an individual would likely receive better care in a lower scoring state such as MS or LA-simply due to access/distance alone.

randomguy
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by randomguy » Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:40 pm

Barsoom wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:02 pm
Texas is 38 in Health Care?

We have the MD Anderson Cancer Center here. We have the Memorial Hermann–Texas Medical Center here.

Michael Debakey revolutionized heart surgery at the Baylor College of Medicine here.

James "Red" Duke pioneered the Life Flight treatment for trauma patients here.

As a retiree living off of accumulated savings, I'd probably weigh affordability the highest, and trade off everything else.

-B
The problem is the rest of the state😁 It isn't exactly a short trip from Waco(far from the remotest area) to Houston or Austin. You would have to look at their exact methodology to figure out why certain things work out. You might disagree with it. Look at the debate we are having about a few feet of snow😁

dixdak
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by dixdak » Mon Apr 01, 2019 3:28 pm

I’d rather spend a month in January in SD over a perfect day in Colorado listening to some transplant yap about how blessed they are living there.

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HomerJ
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by HomerJ » Mon Apr 01, 2019 3:48 pm

Nearly every response about the weather in this thread is "Great here, well except for these 4-6 months. but great the rest of the time!"

The answer to that is to have two homes in two different states.

Year-round great weather.

Or you could live in Southern CA. But its actually cheaper to have 2 homes in affordable states.
The J stands for Jay

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HomerJ
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by HomerJ » Mon Apr 01, 2019 3:53 pm

sergio wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:19 pm
There's a reason lots of people in cold states have winter homes in warmer locales. How many Floridians or Texans do you know that have summer homes in slightly colder locations so they can escape the heat for a few months?
This doesn't make any sense. It's the exact same number.

Someone who has a house in a cold state and a warm state fits in both groups.

Everyone in NH who has a winter home in Florida also has a summer home in NH that they use to escape the heat.
The J stands for Jay

stoptothink
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by stoptothink » Mon Apr 01, 2019 4:06 pm

Starfish wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 1:29 pm
stoptothink wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 9:33 am
jibantik wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 6:24 pm
vitaflo wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 2:25 pm
btenny wrote:
Sat Mar 30, 2019 12:16 pm
I see no reason why Minnesota is so much higher than Florida and Arizona in QOL. Up there you have to hibernate for six months to not freeze.
Yes, MN is a frozen wasteland, please don't move here! You will die of frostbite just by looking outside! /s

Honestly, the weather is the reason MN is America's best kept secret. Unlike the Mountain West, I hope it stays that way.
That's the thing. In a cold place you can actively do something, i.e., wear warm clothes, to still be able to do things outside. In a place like Florida in the summer, you can run around buck neked and it will still be unbearable to do anything outside.
Again, personal preference. I currently live in Utah, where it is cold at least 6 months a year, but I previously lived in Houston and Mesa where it pretty much never gets cold. A lot of people would say that Mesa and Houston are unbearable in the summer; in Mesa area, people rarely go outside between April and October. In both places I rode my bike to work and school year around and the heat didn't bother me. I'm sure I wouldn't be fond of the weather in Alaska, but for the most part I've found that weather isn't that big of a deal to me.
You are young. Most older people I know have issues with excessive heat, or cold.
I'm not that young. You are making blanket statements when it is all about personal preference. How can you argue that one place is superior to another for retirement when everybody values different things? I know quite a few people who retired and moved to areas which are mentioned in this thread as having unbearable weather. For me, having lived in weather on both ends of the extremes, weather isn't necessarily one of the primary factors in how much I enjoy a specific area.

Zonian59
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Zonian59 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:05 pm

Very interesting and thoughtful replies filled with lots of information to mull over.

Fifty years ago my father retired from the military after spending almost twenty-five years overseas. We traveled throughout the western, midwestern and southern parts of the U.S. searching for a state to settle. He preferred warm year-round climate and pretty much narrowed it down to California and Florida. Florida was ruled out because of the hurricanes. Arizona, New Mexico and Texas was too hot. The midwest has tornadoes and climate can be cold. My mother could not tolerate the Colorado high altitude. Seattle and Oregon was too cold. Back in the 1960s, most of the southern states were not very hospitable to mixed-race couples (my father is caucasian, mother is asian).

So we settled in Southern California. Positive factor in favor of Southern California is the climate; not too hot, not too cold, no snow. (Yes, there are earthquakes, but they happen infrequently compared to hurricanes that it was a calculated risk.....a risk that he was comfortable with.)

While I am currently in the early phase of my retirement, I have yet to do an indepth analysis and corellation of all the states to see how it matches up with the preferences I have. Over the past fifty years the California demographics, political and taxation climate has changed significantly to the point where it bears little resemblance to the California we originally came to.

But so far no single state seems to be the best compromise of the criteria I have. Not sure I'm going to remain in California for the next twenty years. Not sure which state I will relocate to if I have to.

(By the way, my moniker does not mean I'm a Arizona native, but lived in the former Canal Zone, Panama during my formative years. Sixty years ago, we considered it to be the ideal place to live and have fond memories of the place. Of course it no longer exists as we remembered it).

Starfish
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Starfish » Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:08 pm

stoptothink wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 4:06 pm
You are making blanket statements when it is all about personal preference. How can you argue that one place is superior to another for retirement when everybody values different things?


In a ranking of retirement places there is a score attributed to QOL. I believe very different criteria should be in QOL score. I have no problem with individual compromises and preferences, but I think we can all agree there are important things for retirement, at least on average.
If you don't want to make blanket statements than you cannot measure anything and you cannot write an article about places for retirement.

stoptothink
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by stoptothink » Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:11 pm

Starfish wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:08 pm
Were you ever old? You have no idea how it will be even for you. The only thing we can do is to look at other old people.

Anyway the idea was that in a ranking of places there is a score attributed to QOL. I belive very different criteria should be in QOL score. I have no problem with individual compromises and preferences, but I think we can all agree there are important things for retirement, at least on average.
If you don't want to make blanket statements than you cannot measure anything and you cannot write an article about places for retirement.
My parents are, they moved from California to Mesa in their 60's. And they are definitely not alone, that area has a huge population of retirees. Again, what's the point of these blanket statements? Look at the list of the most popular destinations for retirees, not all of them are in "moderate" weather areas.

Turbo29
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Turbo29 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:26 pm

Starfish wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 9:21 pm
THE most important thing), I hike, climb, ski, sail, mountain bike etc, but I doubt I will do them at 68. Walking around is still possible at that age, driving safely not so much.
Be careful what you think.

If you think you won't be able to do it at 68, it will become a self-fulfilling prophecy for you in 31 years. I deadlifted 390 pounds off the floor last Wed. when I am 68 In 4-1/2 years I plan to be doing more than that.

Starfish
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Starfish » Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:43 pm

OK, let me rephrase the discussion:
What would YOU put in a QOL ranking? Climate? Proximity and walkability? Social life? Nature? Possibility of doing sports? Great healthcare? Quietness? Good jobs? Architecture? Availability of good entertainment?

randomguy
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by randomguy » Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:01 pm

Turbo29 wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:26 pm
Starfish wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 9:21 pm
THE most important thing), I hike, climb, ski, sail, mountain bike etc, but I doubt I will do them at 68. Walking around is still possible at that age, driving safely not so much.
Be careful what you think.

If you think you won't be able to do it at 68, it will become a self-fulfilling prophecy for you in 31 years. I deadlifted 390 pounds off the floor last Wed. when I am 68 In 4-1/2 years I plan to be doing more than that.
You know I think I mentally transposed the 6 and the 8. Everyone in the world is driving safely at 68. A good chunk of them ( well assuming they were doing these activities at 38) are still biking,skiing, hiking and so on. Switch it to 86 and yeah a lot of that stuff drops off.

From what I have seen most people seem to lose the ability to walk a mile long before they stop driving.

visualguy
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by visualguy » Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:06 pm

HomerJ wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 3:48 pm
Nearly every response about the weather in this thread is "Great here, well except for these 4-6 months. but great the rest of the time!"

The answer to that is to have two homes in two different states.

Year-round great weather.

Or you could live in Southern CA. But its actually cheaper to have 2 homes in affordable states.
The two-home solution truly complicates your life, and I don't think many find it desirable, young or old.

Turbo29
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Turbo29 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:13 pm

randomguy wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:01 pm

From what I have seen most people seem to lose the ability to walk a mile long before they stop driving.
I brought my cat outside one day and was talking to my neighbor (about 70 at the time and with diabetic retinopathy). He asked (speaking of the cat about 15 feet away), "What is that gray ball there?" I told him it was my cat.

Two days later I saw him driving down the street in his car. Scary.

koryg75
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by koryg75 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 7:40 pm

Glockenspiel wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:14 am
koryg75 wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 9:09 pm
As someone who currently resides in MN i question the sanity of those who compiled the list. The tax burden is crazy, the weather tries to kill you for 8-9 out of 12 months. The MSP metro area is expensive relative to many comparable areas of similar size. I’m baffled.Yes the jobs are plentiful, but in retirement who cares?
So mooove then! I personally find your entire post preposterous and a dramatic over-exaggeration.
I will when I retire for sure. This post reminded me of another issue: The state is filled with self-important people who think living here is a badge of honor. It’s just a northern state. It’s not like living here takes the courage of a Marine. Yeesh.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by HawkeyePierce » Mon Apr 01, 2019 9:34 pm

Starfish wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 3:21 pm
Colorado is beautiful, but it doesn't have good cities. Nature is great, but it covers only half of the requirement.
This why I have never understood the idea of quality of life in these studies. What quality of life when you have no sidewalk in front of your house and cannot walk to 5-10 places to meet, eat or drink a beer with your friends? Who wants to have to drive at 75?
I've found much of Colorado to be eminently walkable. Boulder, downtown Fort Collins, Louisville, Salida and others. LoHi in Denver.

moneywise3
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by moneywise3 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 9:39 pm

I'm in the two States camp - to tide over the weather extremes. Current choices are: FL in winter and WNC or Lehigh Valley PA in summer.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by radiowave » Mon Apr 01, 2019 10:04 pm

wwhan wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 5:19 pm
Colorado looks interesting, but has black ice and snow in the winter.

It seems most houses in populous Colorado areas are two story and the nice houses are huge.

A one story house with no winter black ice would seem to be good features for retirement.
Actually there is very little black ice here, at least in the Denver metro area. We are high desert and mostly sunny dry and cool/cold in the winter. Just had a blizzard two weeks ago, a foot and a half in the driveway and most of the snow evaporated and streets were clear second day after the storm. I grew up on Long Island and have bad memories of black ice, not the same thing out here in CO. And did I mention the 300 days of sunshine :) I can live with 20 something degrees, 20% humidity and not a cloud in the sky.
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MathIsMyWayr
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by MathIsMyWayr » Mon Apr 01, 2019 11:39 pm

Starfish wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 9:21 pm

I hike, climb, ski, sail, mountain bike etc, but I doubt I will do them at 68. Walking around is still possible at that age, driving safely not so much.
There is a huge difference in the ageing processes of physical abilities among people. I am a runner and I have seen many in their 30s struggling over a lap while many runners flying in long distance races in their 60s and over. If you quit trying, then it over no matter how old or young you are.

McDougal
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by McDougal » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:16 am

ankonaman wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:36 am
Surprised no one has mentioned Georgia.
Moved to ATL 20 years ago for my job from CT. Will definitely retire here. 4 grown kids are all over the US so can't follow them. Some counties (mine included) eliminate education portion of property tax when you turn 62. Mine is now down to $3700 from $11K! There is some income tax relief after 65 but have not researched yet, couple years to go on that. Weather is nice if you like hot heat and pollen. If in ATL or close, a lot of "big city" amenities, restaurants, entertainment. Other than that, the usual bad politics. In fact the politics is the one thing that could make me move, it is that bad.

Colorado13
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Colorado13 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 7:10 am

radiowave wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 10:04 pm
wwhan wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 5:19 pm
Colorado looks interesting, but has black ice and snow in the winter.

It seems most houses in populous Colorado areas are two story and the nice houses are huge.

A one story house with no winter black ice would seem to be good features for retirement.
Actually there is very little black ice here, at least in the Denver metro area. We are high desert and mostly sunny dry and cool/cold in the winter. Just had a blizzard two weeks ago, a foot and a half in the driveway and most of the snow evaporated and streets were clear second day after the storm. I grew up on Long Island and have bad memories of black ice, not the same thing out here in CO. And did I mention the 300 days of sunshine :) I can live with 20 something degrees, 20% humidity and not a cloud in the sky.
Let's all focus on the foot + of snow. Really, don't move here, that's a lot of snow in one day. Unbearable. :D

Kidding, in case that's not obvious. CO is not utopia by any means, but there is literally no comparison to CO winters to Midwest winters, partially due to that lovely sun that radiowave mentioned. Black ice is very rare here, snow is not rare. Those in MN can claim they can enjoy outdoors year-round, those in AZ can say CO is too cold; everyone is entitled to their opinion...it's fabulous that the US has such a wonderful diversity of climates, cultures, cities/rural areas, etc.

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burt
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by burt » Tue Apr 02, 2019 7:26 am

I retired 3 years ago and moved north.
Any place with no heat, no crime, no traffic, no snakes is a pretty nice place.
Michigan works for me.

burt

Alf 101
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Alf 101 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 7:30 am

Clearly there are some differences of opinion being expressed here. Personally, I've always thought that a place had to have something wrong with it (e.g., too cold, too hot, too wet, too dry, no jobs) to be an affordable place to live. I'm not exactly sure that retiring in San Francisco or Seattle would be the most cost effective move.

In general, people probably stay where they're comfortable (near family and the familiar setting they grew up), or would like to consciously get away from that; going somewhere warmer and more hurricane prone, for example. Quality of life and access to health care, nature, and culture aside; my question regards the consideration of property tax.

New Hampshire could be a good example. It ranks 3rd in the original link, and has no state income or sales tax. Yet, according to some charts at least, it has the 3rd highest property tax. In retirement I wouldn't be making a lot, other than investment income; and since I don't buy a lot now, I can't imagine that would increase. Yet this property tax would remain, and could be a significant anchor when on a fixed income. Most of the northeast is included in the states with highest property tax, leading me to think you could do better.

It's interesting to think about expenses in retirement, which is still some years away. We should be comfortable, though my wife and I come from long-living families, so figuring out how to stretch it is a reasonable strategy. From a distance, it kind of looks like the Midwest is the most affordable.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by KT785 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 7:58 am

zymurgist wrote:
Sat Mar 30, 2019 3:17 pm
All that said, I've always thought it's a shame far southern Illinois (~250 to 300 miles south of I-80 for all the Chicagoans out there :D ) isn't more of a retirement destination. The Shawnee National Forest region is beautiful country that doesn't fit the cornfields stereotype of much of the state. Winters are notably milder and shorter than in Chicago and the northern part of the state, plus it's not far from areas of Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri that are retirement destinations. On top of the previously mentioned exemption for retirement income, real estate taxes there tend to be significantly lower than other parts of the state. It just seems like the area should be doing better in drawing retirees. Again, the fiscal condition of state government, a regional economy that has struggled for a long time, and the distance from larger urban areas like St. Louis, Memphis, Nashville, and significantly farther away, Chicago, all likely don't help.
I was born and raised (and went to university and law school) in that part of the state and agree with your overall description; it's truly a unique and wonderful area, especially the beauty of the Shawnee National Forest. My wife and I live near San Antonio for work (the hill country north of SA where we live reminds me a lot of far southern Illinois) but I plan on returning back to "God's country" when we retire . . . 25 years or so from now. :D

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Glockenspiel » Tue Apr 02, 2019 8:41 am

radiowave wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 10:04 pm
wwhan wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 5:19 pm
Colorado looks interesting, but has black ice and snow in the winter.

It seems most houses in populous Colorado areas are two story and the nice houses are huge.

A one story house with no winter black ice would seem to be good features for retirement.
Actually there is very little black ice here, at least in the Denver metro area. We are high desert and mostly sunny dry and cool/cold in the winter. Just had a blizzard two weeks ago, a foot and a half in the driveway and most of the snow evaporated and streets were clear second day after the storm. I grew up on Long Island and have bad memories of black ice, not the same thing out here in CO. And did I mention the 300 days of sunshine :) I can live with 20 something degrees, 20% humidity and not a cloud in the sky.
Yeah the cool thing about Denver (experience from talking with friends who moved there from Minnesota), is that it can snow 6 inches one day and by the next day, you'll never know that it snowed, and it could be 60-70 degrees.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by CULater » Tue Apr 02, 2019 8:51 am

Here's the thing. Of most importance to many are family, close friends, connection, and community. All the studies of well-being in retirement, health, and longevity I'm aware of have not identified climate and being able to play golf in the winter as major factors. How many people when lying on their deathbed have been heard to say "I wish there had been more sunny, warm days to play golf and pickle ball?"
Faced with the choice between changing one’s mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof. ~ John Kenneth Galbraith

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by EddyB » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:05 am

CULater wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 8:51 am
Here's the thing. Of most importance to many are family, close friends, connection, and community. All the studies of well-being in retirement, health, and longevity I'm aware of have not identified climate and being able to play golf in the winter as major factors. How many people when lying on their deathbed have been heard to say "I wish there had been more sunny, warm days to play golf and pickle ball?"
I don’t play golf or pickle ball, but many of my adult friendships originated from sports and outdoors activities. When I moved in my late 30s, it was important to me that I’d be able to pursue my interests in my new area, as I expected them to be important factors in developing friendships. I don’t see why that would be categorically different in retirement (and I do know a decent number of retired people, from those same interests).

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HomerJ
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by HomerJ » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:08 am

Zonian59 wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:05 pm
But so far no single state seems to be the best compromise of the criteria I have.
TWO states is the answer :)
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HomerJ
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by HomerJ » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:16 am

visualguy wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:06 pm
HomerJ wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 3:48 pm
Nearly every response about the weather in this thread is "Great here, well except for these 4-6 months. but great the rest of the time!"

The answer to that is to have two homes in two different states.

Year-round great weather.

Or you could live in Southern CA. But its actually cheaper to have 2 homes in affordable states.
The two-home solution truly complicates your life, and I don't think many find it desirable, young or old.
Why is it complicated after you retire? The only thing I can think of is maintenance.

In our case, one of our houses is a condo, so we don't have to worry about landscaping, and there's a caretaker there who handles big problems.

The other house will be in Arizona, where again, I don't have to worry about landscaping very much when we're gone (hurray desert!).

You may be right that many may not find it desirable to own two homes.

But it is one solution to the "weather is great in THIS state only half the year" issue that many bring up.
The J stands for Jay

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HomerJ
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by HomerJ » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:16 am

Another option is to just have one home, but rent 3-4 months out of the year someplace warmer or cooler.
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by SrGrumpy » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:17 am

brokendirtdart wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:39 pm
There are shining examples of good health care in most states. Some have just a few facilities or limited access due to distance/wait times which reduce options.
Not sure why this isn't people's No. 1 criterion: Proximity to top healthcare, for example a thrombectomy hospital that's 5-10 minutes from your house. Weather, low taxes and pickleball probably lose their significance if you're imprisoned in a nursing home.

quantAndHold
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by quantAndHold » Tue Apr 02, 2019 10:43 am

Any decent sized city is going to have access to good healthcare. Smaller places are much more hit and miss, so if you don’t want to live in or near a city, healthcare becomes a bigger factor when deciding.

For early retirement, quality and price of the ACA plans might be a factor.

BBQ Nut
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by BBQ Nut » Tue Apr 02, 2019 10:49 am

HomerJ wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:08 am
Zonian59 wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:05 pm
But so far no single state seems to be the best compromise of the criteria I have.
TWO states is the answer :)
Or one low tax state (which isn't CA) and use the tax savings to travel - A LOT. :D

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by bhsince87 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 10:51 am

HomerJ wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:16 am
Another option is to just have one home, but rent 3-4 months out of the year someplace warmer or cooler.
This is our plan. We like the weather here in our part of PA, except for January and February. And this year, even those two months weren't very bad, to be honest.

But we're looking to rent near the coast, DE, MD, VA, NC for those months. It's off season, so rentals are readily available and pretty reasonable. I know some folks who actually live rent free in return for house sitting/maintenance.

And with just a 3-6 hour drive, we can pick up 8-10 degrees in warmth, which is huge that time of the year.
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by A440 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 11:23 am

HomerJ wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:16 am
Another option is to just have one home, but rent 3-4 months out of the year someplace warmer or cooler.
+1 Although, I could probably afford 2 months max.
And you can change where you rent each year to enjoy all the diverse places and people in our country.
Last edited by A440 on Tue Apr 02, 2019 11:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by lazydavid » Tue Apr 02, 2019 11:45 am

randomguy wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 6:41 pm
I can play golf in 100 degree weather with 100% humidity by adapting.
I don't buy this for a second. That's a heat index of 195 degrees, or 210 if you're in full sun! The National Weather Service categorizes any heat index in excess of 125 degrees as "extremely dangerous".

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by dsmclone » Tue Apr 02, 2019 12:27 pm

Zonian59 wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:05 pm
The midwest has tornadoes [/size]
I always laugh when I see quotes like this. Would you not move to somewhere it rains because you're about 30x likely to be killed by lightning as by a tornado? On average, 70 people a year die in tornadoes. Imagine about any form of dying and you're more likely to die in that way.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by EvanRude » Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:02 pm

Keep in mind that temperatures in both Minnesota and South Dakota are 68 degrees year round - IF you just don't go outside.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by randomguy » Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:12 pm

lazydavid wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 11:45 am
randomguy wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 6:41 pm
I can play golf in 100 degree weather with 100% humidity by adapting.
I don't buy this for a second. That's a heat index of 195 degrees, or 210 if you're in full sun! The National Weather Service categorizes any heat index in excess of 125 degrees as "extremely dangerous".
Its golf. You walk 20 ft to a ball, make a swing, and walk back to the cart and drink a some water in the shade for 3 mins while you wait for your partners to play. It isn't exactly the peak of physical activity.:) And I am sure it was only 100 for an hour or so of the round. The other 2.5 were more like 95;)

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by dave_k » Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:14 pm

visualguy wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 6:06 pm
HomerJ wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 3:48 pm
Nearly every response about the weather in this thread is "Great here, well except for these 4-6 months. but great the rest of the time!"

The answer to that is to have two homes in two different states.

Year-round great weather.

Or you could live in Southern CA. But its actually cheaper to have 2 homes in affordable states.
The two-home solution truly complicates your life, and I don't think many find it desirable, young or old.
I know it will add complexity, but we plan to live in FL and summer in RI. If we get tired of it, we'll just stay in FL and visit other places for shorter durations.

We lived in Southern CA for years, and loved the weather and the mountains and beaches and have many friends there, but we could not afford anything like the waterfront properties we have in FL and RI (or currently WI) there, even if it was our only home. Visiting will have to suffice.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by randomguy » Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:15 pm

HomerJ wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:16 am
Another option is to just have one home, but rent 3-4 months out of the year someplace warmer or cooler.
This and the two house solution both have the issue of being away from your normal life for 3-4 months. That is a set of friends, associations (churches, volunteer activities, rec leagues,...), and activities that you aren't doing. Thats the downside. On the upside you get to stimulate yourself by being in a different area for 3-4 months. It solves the weather problem but introduces others. Up to you to decide if that is a win or not.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:30 pm

Florida looks interesting. Anyone know what it costs to register a snow machine there?
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Glockenspiel » Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:32 pm

dsmclone wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 12:27 pm
Zonian59 wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:05 pm
The midwest has tornadoes [/size]
I always laugh when I see quotes like this. Would you not move to somewhere it rains because you're about 30x likely to be killed by lightning as by a tornado? On average, 70 people a year die in tornadoes. Imagine about any form of dying and you're more likely to die in that way.
I always see this on this board as well and laugh hysterically. Tornadoes impact an EXTREMELY small area, for an EXTREMELY short period of time, are EXTREMELY RARE, in an EXTREMELY low-density area. 90-95% of tornadoes in the Midwest will never impact a person.

Just found that from 2011 through 2017, exactly one person was killed by a tornado in the entire state of Minnesota.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Spirit Rider » Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:45 pm

randomguy wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:12 pm
Its golf. You walk 20 ft to a ball, make a swing, and walk back to the cart and drink a some water in the shade for 3 mins while you wait for your partners to play.
Which is the exact reason why I never took up golf.

I could never see the point of whacking a little ball with a club, driving a cart to where it came to rest, rinse and repeat several time until you manage to get it in a little hole, drive the cart to the next tee, rinse and repeat to a total of 9 or 18 times and then return to the courthouse to drink.

I prefer going directly to the last step without the intervening waste of time. :beer

randomguy
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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by randomguy » Tue Apr 02, 2019 2:02 pm

Spirit Rider wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:45 pm
randomguy wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:12 pm
Its golf. You walk 20 ft to a ball, make a swing, and walk back to the cart and drink a some water in the shade for 3 mins while you wait for your partners to play.
Which is the exact reason why I never took up golf.

I could never see the point of whacking a little ball with a club, driving a cart to where it came to rest, rinse and repeat several time until you manage to get it in a little hole, drive the cart to the next tee, rinse and repeat to a total of 9 or 18 times and then return to the courthouse to drink.

I prefer going directly to the last step without the intervening waste of time. :beer
Why go on a vacation? Why not go directly to the last step of arriving home without the intervening waste of time?:) You either enjoy the journey or you don't.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by lazydavid » Tue Apr 02, 2019 2:48 pm

randomguy wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:12 pm
lazydavid wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 11:45 am
randomguy wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 6:41 pm
I can play golf in 100 degree weather with 100% humidity by adapting.
I don't buy this for a second. That's a heat index of 195 degrees, or 210 if you're in full sun! The National Weather Service categorizes any heat index in excess of 125 degrees as "extremely dangerous".
Its golf. You walk 20 ft to a ball, make a swing, and walk back to the cart and drink a some water in the shade for 3 mins while you wait for your partners to play. It isn't exactly the peak of physical activity.:) And I am sure it was only 100 for an hour or so of the round. The other 2.5 were more like 95;)
I can acknowledge that golf is not the most strenuous activity in the world. But you still never played it in a heat index 30 degrees hotter than the highest one ever recorded worldwide in all of history, which is 178 in Saudi Arabia in 2003 (108 degrees, 68% humidity). It has never been remotely close to 100F/100% in any part of Florida....ever.

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by Artsdoctor » Tue Apr 02, 2019 2:50 pm

tennisplyr wrote:
Sat Mar 30, 2019 5:29 pm
Hard to argue with Florida (especially Sarasota) at #1......I'm good :happy
It is true that parts of Florida are gorgeous and the weather is terrific. Add the favorable state tax structure, and it's no wonder that so many people retire there.

However, Florida has always been regarded as having among the worst healthcare set-ups in the country. This has been a paradox because you'd think that having so many retirees would mandate medical excellence. However, that is not the case. There are numerous studies ranking Florida in the lowest tier of medical quality in the country. Here's hyperlink although it's just one of dozens which you've probably seen because it was so heavily publicized last year:

https://www.nbcmiami.com/news/local/Why ... 16211.html

There are definitely centers of excellence. Certainly Miami institutions are top tier. But the rest of the state would generally be regarded suspiciously . . .

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Re: "The best and worst U.S. states for retirement"

Post by DaftInvestor » Tue Apr 02, 2019 2:59 pm

Artsdoctor wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 2:50 pm

It is true that parts of Florida are gorgeous and the weather is terrific.
Regarding the weather - that is somewhat up for debate (although I realize many might agree with you). Personally - Florida is one of the last places I would want to live year round because of the weather. I can't stand the humidity - 90 degrees with 90 percent humidity is hardly "terrific" in my book. Florida weather is okay during the winter - but unbearable in the summer.

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