What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

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lthenderson
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by lthenderson » Tue Mar 12, 2019 8:44 am

montanagirl wrote:
Tue Mar 05, 2019 8:44 pm
Went back a few years to read Guns, Germs and Steel. This is to go with the more recent 10,000 Year Explosion, Troublesome Inheritance, and Who We Are and How We Got Here.

Any other genetics-anthropology titles appreciated.
How about "How to Build a Dinosaur"? I really enjoyed this book when it came out.

https://www.amazon.com/How-Build-Dinosa ... 0452296013

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CollegePrudens
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by CollegePrudens » Tue Mar 12, 2019 2:30 pm

jjunk wrote:
Wed Mar 29, 2017 11:56 pm
Disrupted: Dan Lyons, 50yr old re-enters the workforce via startup, hilarity and sabotage ensues
I read this recently (in 2019). Good read. Stark reminder of toxic workplaces, ageism and the consequences of not saving enough early in one's career.

Lyons is too cynical for my taste, but I am glad that he got out in one piece. I shudder at the thought of somebody like Trotsky (Joe Chernov) as a manager and am thankful that I haven't had to deal with anything close (although one manager displayed shades of Trotsky-like behavior in the past).
We need to learn to want what we have, not to have what we want, in order to get stable and steady happiness - The 14th Dalai Lama

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CollegePrudens
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by CollegePrudens » Tue Mar 12, 2019 10:50 pm

crystalbank wrote:
Tue Mar 05, 2019 1:47 pm
Just finished reading Small Fry by Lisa Brennan-Jobs. It's a fascinating book even if you're not slightly interested in Steve Jobs as a person. I don't have strong opinions on any of the principal characters in the book, but after reading it made me realize that our future self is the best judge of our own character. You can fool everyone else, but you cannot fool yourself.
I read “small fry” a couple months ago. It reminds me (now) of what not to do as a parent. Jobs (the dad) comes across as a terrible person - the opposite of what one should aspire to as a parent.
We need to learn to want what we have, not to have what we want, in order to get stable and steady happiness - The 14th Dalai Lama

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FreeAtLast
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast » Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:27 pm

"SPQR - A History Of Ancient Rome", by Mary Beard (Live Right Publishing Co. 2015)

My father - in his retirement - worked his way through all eight volumes of Edward Gibbon's "The History of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire". I decided to take a less strenuous path and picked up Ms. Beard's tome. She is an eminent classicist at Cambridge. Her book is very readable and never boring. She delights in pointing out that too many of the tales told about ancient Rome and its emperors and its politicians and its citizens don't have a lot of believable evidence to back them up; in other words, they are probably just fables. However, what we do know with more certainty about the first millennium of the Roman Empire is astounding enough. After all - Rome started out as a sleepy little village of maybe 10,000 on the Tiber River, which eventually grew to a polity of 30,000,000 citizens proclaiming their allegiance to an Empire which covered a large part of the known world.
Illegitimi non carborundum.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jebmke » Thu Mar 14, 2019 8:18 pm

FreeAtLast wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:27 pm
"SPQR - A History Of Ancient Rome", by Mary Beard (Live Right Publishing Co. 2015)

My father - in his retirement - worked his way through all eight volumes of Edward Gibbon's "The History of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire". I decided to take a less strenuous path and picked up Ms. Beard's tome. She is an eminent classicist at Cambridge. Her book is very readable and never boring. She delights in pointing out that too many of the tales told about ancient Rome and its emperors and its politicians and its citizens don't have a lot of believable evidence to back them up; in other words, they are probably just fables. However, what we do know with more certainty about the first millennium of the Roman Empire is astounding enough. After all - Rome started out as a sleepy little village of maybe 10,000 on the Tiber River, which eventually grew to a polity of 30,000,000 citizens proclaiming their allegiance to an Empire which covered a large part of the known world.
Her "Fires of Vesuvius" is also worth reading.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

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aspirit
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by aspirit » Thu Mar 14, 2019 8:44 pm

‘Do not bet on on it’ by JBogle again.........

On page xx last paragraph it’s slighted towards
David Einhorn @ Green light Capital whom claims if gov had not reconfigured the U.S.A’s inflations benchmarks it would be near 10%.
1950s to- 80s policy & Guidelines changed.
GOOD LUCK!
Time & tides wait for no one. A man has to know his limitations. | "Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes it's laws" | — Mayer Amschel Bauer Rothschild ~

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Wilderness Librarian » Thu Mar 14, 2019 9:41 pm

Walking by Henry David Thoreau.

Wanted to read this for a long time. Checked out the new 2017 printing with the intro by Adam Tuchinsky from the public library. Often considered Thoreau's second most important work with nature self-reflection and spiritual and physical exploration its dominant themes. I read it through fairly quickly knowing before I started I would want to buy this edition for later and deeper readings. I liked Tuchinsky's introduction as it really helps the modern reader place the work in context with Walden and critical interpretations. This ed. also has b&w photos some historical some contemporary from the Concord area.

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ruralavalon
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:31 am

FreeAtLast wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:27 pm
"SPQR - A History Of Ancient Rome", by Mary Beard (Live Right Publishing Co. 2015)

My father - in his retirement - worked his way through all eight volumes of Edward Gibbon's "The History of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire". I decided to take a less strenuous path and picked up Ms. Beard's tome. She is an eminent classicist at Cambridge. Her book is very readable and never boring. She delights in pointing out that too many of the tales told about ancient Rome and its emperors and its politicians and its citizens don't have a lot of believable evidence to back them up; in other words, they are probably just fables. However, what we do know with more certainty about the first millennium of the Roman Empire is astounding enough. After all - Rome started out as a sleepy little village of maybe 10,000 on the Tiber River, which eventually grew to a polity of 30,000,000 citizens proclaiming their allegiance to an Empire which covered a large part of the known world.
SPQR is an excellent book in my opinion, I enjoyed reading it.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

Halicar
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Halicar » Sat Mar 16, 2019 8:06 am

Stop Me if You've Heard This: A History and Philosophy of Jokes by Jim Holt. My current favorite non-fiction author--I highly recommend his books Why Does the World Exist and When Einstein Walked with Godel. A very short book--I read half of it last night and I'm sure I'll finish it tonight. It was originally written for a special humor edition of The New Yorker and I'm not sure that it really stands on it's own as a book.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius » Sat Mar 16, 2019 9:40 am

I can hardly say "are currently" because it is so short that I finished it very soon after starting it... part of a local program involving a lot of people of very mixed ages and reading ability reading the same book... but I found Seedfolks, by Paul Fleischman, to be wonderful and surprisingly moving.

The reason I say "surprisingly," and the reason I hate to try to describe it, is that from the descriptions I thought it would be unreasonably upbeat, positive, saccharine, etc. It isn't. It's quite well done. It isn't ironic black humor, I don't think it's likely become a Banned Book, but it's good.

It's about people in Cleveland who start a community garden in an vacant lot full of junk.

Darn it all, I lost you right there, didn't I? Sounds boring. I really liked it and I am not a gardener.

Described as being for "young adults," Lexile 710L.

I don't believe there's any actual Gibb Street in Cleveland. It's odd because there are dozens of reviews, study guides, etc. all over the Internet and they all just say the story is set on "Gibb Street in Cleveland" without the slightest note on whether the street itself is real or fictional. I'm pretty sure Cleveland is a real city, but (only Stan Freberg fans will get this) "I still ain't sure about Toledo."
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

quantAndHold
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by quantAndHold » Sat Mar 16, 2019 10:58 am

Fortunes of War: The Balkan Trilogy, by Olivia Manning

Harriet and Guy Pringle, British newlyweds, arrive in Bucharest to start Guy’s job as a college professor, just as World War II is breaking out. The books are a lightly fictionized version of Manning’s experience during WWII. The first two books take place in Romania, as the British colony there watches Romania gradually turn away from Britain and towards the Nazis, and the Nazi war machine creeps closer and closer. The third book takes place in Athens, where nobody has much of anything to do and, like the Greeks, not much to eat, and the British diaspora is becalmed in Greece without a way to leave.

The first book especially, is full of vivid descriptions of the time and place, from a different perspective than most books about the era. In the second book the war gets serious, the Nazis are coming, and the book oozes with that tension. The third book is still an interesting view of the war, but the internal office politics of the British community take over at times, which is much less interesting. Still a worthwhile read, but not as tightly written as the first two books.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Wilderness Librarian » Sat Mar 16, 2019 11:00 am

Sage Grouse: Icon of the West / photographs by Noppadol Paothong and text by Kathy Love.

Winner of the 2018 National Outdoor Book award in the category of design & artistic merit. A large format (larger than most books but smaller than coffee table size). Sage grouse are an amazing species totally dependent on sagebrush for food shelter mating and nesting. As such it is a keystone and indicator of the health and vibrancy of the entire threatened sagebrush ecology. Photographs especially closeups good but I thought the text was the best part as it went into more scientific detail and public policy discussion than most of this format. A timely book as New York Times reported only yesterday the Trump administration's finalization of plans to roll back habitat protection in favor of increased oil & gas exploration & development.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by crystalbank » Sun Mar 17, 2019 3:28 pm

CollegePrudens wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 10:50 pm
crystalbank wrote:
Tue Mar 05, 2019 1:47 pm
Just finished reading Small Fry by Lisa Brennan-Jobs. It's a fascinating book even if you're not slightly interested in Steve Jobs as a person. I don't have strong opinions on any of the principal characters in the book, but after reading it made me realize that our future self is the best judge of our own character. You can fool everyone else, but you cannot fool yourself.
I read “small fry” a couple months ago. It reminds me (now) of what not to do as a parent. Jobs (the dad) comes across as a terrible person - the opposite of what one should aspire to as a parent.
To me, even the author of the book didn't come off as good. I think she also comes off somewhat narcissistic and impulsive just like her father.

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CollegePrudens
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by CollegePrudens » Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:26 pm

Indeed. The author had a tough childhood on account of her father and a mother who seemed fiscally irresponsible and mentally unstable at times (if the book is to be believed). Obviously, it is hard to tell how much of this is nature vs (lack of) nurture. Regardless, I took away from the book that kids can absorb or remember a lot from their parents, even at a young age. And that has some major implications for parenting (at least for me).
crystalbank wrote:
Sun Mar 17, 2019 3:28 pm
CollegePrudens wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 10:50 pm
crystalbank wrote:
Tue Mar 05, 2019 1:47 pm
Just finished reading Small Fry by Lisa Brennan-Jobs. It's a fascinating book even if you're not slightly interested in Steve Jobs as a person. I don't have strong opinions on any of the principal characters in the book, but after reading it made me realize that our future self is the best judge of our own character. You can fool everyone else, but you cannot fool yourself.
I read “small fry” a couple months ago. It reminds me (now) of what not to do as a parent. Jobs (the dad) comes across as a terrible person - the opposite of what one should aspire to as a parent.
To me, even the author of the book didn't come off as good. I think she also comes off somewhat narcissistic and impulsive just like her father.
We need to learn to want what we have, not to have what we want, in order to get stable and steady happiness - The 14th Dalai Lama

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by TheAccountant » Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:46 pm

Too Big to Fail by Andrew Ross Sorkin. It's an inside look on the 2008 financial crisis.

Of course my local library gets a copy after I already bought one, but it was only about $ 7 shipped on eBay. I forgot how much easier on the eyes a paperback copy is. Amazon wanted $ 15 just for the Kindle version.

Well worth the read IMO:

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5320 ... _sacat%3D0
A real-life thriller about the most tumultuous period in America's financial history by an acclaimed New York TimesReporter Andrew Ross Sorkin delivers the first true behind-the-scenes, moment-by-moment account of how the greatest financial crisis since the Great Depression developed into a global tsunami. From inside the corner office at Lehman Brothers to secret meetings in South Korea, and the corridors of Washington, Too Big to Failis the definitive story of the most powerful men and women in finance and politics grappling with success and failure, ego and greed, and, ultimately, the fate of the world's economy. "We've got to get some foam down on the runway!" a sleepless Timothy Geithner, the then-president of the Federal Reserve of New York, would tell Henry M. Paulson, the Treasury secretary, about the catastrophic crash the world's financial system would experience. Through unprecedented access to the players involved, Too Big to Failre-creates all the drama and turmoil, revealing neverdisclosed details and elucidating how decisions made on Wall Street over the past decade sowed the seeds of the debacle. This true story is not just a look at banks that were "too big to fail," it is a real-life thriller with a cast of bold-faced names who themselves thought they were too big to fail.
Making cents out of every dollar.

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