2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

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passiveTiger
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by passiveTiger » Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:44 pm

Charon wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:37 pm
If he's ready for calculus straight from high school (or has already completed it), he should do one year at a CC then transfer. If he needs remedial math, do that at the CC (perhaps 2 years total) then transfer. In either case, expect 3 years at the next school.

If there's a very special program at this CC with a defined pathway and they guarantee 2+2 and can give you lots of successful examples, then ignore my general advice.
The University of Texas at Austin engineering college has a transfer guide for the community college that the OP mentioned that appears to detail all of the courses that must be cleared before transferring.

https://utexas.box.com/shared/static/lh ... ssta31.pdf

haban01
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by haban01 » Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:51 pm

I think you have an excellent plan. Here in WI we have one if the top tech college syestems (WTCS) in the USA. I know Texas is up there too. I woukd also encourage him to potentially look at internships, scholarships and grants.

Best of luck to him!
Eric | | "Stay the Course" | "Press on Regardless"

Oakwood42
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by Oakwood42 » Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:58 pm

go_mets wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 5:11 pm
This type of arrangement is very common with Rutgers and the nearby community colleges.

If your nephew is guaranteed admittance to UT-Austin after finishing two years at community college, I don't see any reason not to do this.

I had a co-worker's whose son did something similar.
Two years at community college and then two years at Drexel.
+1

I went to The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) via community college. One of the best non-decisions of my life. I did it out of necessity however ended up being a great leg up on a lot of my peers.

caffeperfavore
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by caffeperfavore » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:11 pm

Am I the only poor kid that went to college on this board? Because I’m surprised anyone would just assume you can’t afford to go straight to a four year college.

My parents had nothing and I received nothing from them, which worked in my favor for financial aid. After grants, scholarships, and work study, I actually think a CC would have been a more expensive option.

Don’t assume anything. Apply and fill out the FAFSA. If that doesn’t work out, then you’ve got CC as a fallback.

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MossySF
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by MossySF » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:39 pm

caffeperfavore wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:11 pm
My parents had nothing and I received nothing from them, which worked in my favor for financial aid. After grants, scholarships, and work study, I actually think a CC would have been a more expensive option.
Here's the problem. "Poor" helps you get financial aid.

Majority of parents who can't help out with college money are just paycheck-to-paycheck middle class .. and that qualifies you for nothing but loans.

caffeperfavore
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by caffeperfavore » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:45 pm

MossySF wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:39 pm
caffeperfavore wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:11 pm
My parents had nothing and I received nothing from them, which worked in my favor for financial aid. After grants, scholarships, and work study, I actually think a CC would have been a more expensive option.
Here's the problem. "Poor" helps you get financial aid.

Majority of parents who can't help out with college money are just paycheck-to-paycheck middle class .. and that qualifies you for nothing but loans.
Possibly. But at least make a decision based on all the information first rather than assuming anything.

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Socrates
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I highly recommend a community college

Post by Socrates » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:20 pm

first 2 years.......save you money, small classes and the 4 year degree will say UT....if he is going to grad school, his GPA will likely be higher too

Community college in Texas is much more expensive than California. Here it is $46 a credit, so about half out there.

Many community colleges have TAG agreements - where if a student maintains a certain GPA, they automatically gain admission to the 4 year college.

I work for a community college.
“Don't waste your time looking back. You're not going that way.” ― Ragnar Lothbrok.

3504PIR
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by 3504PIR » Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:04 am

KlangFool wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:38 pm
3504PIR wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:23 pm
Your plan is very sound. The competition applying to schools like UT can be very tough. The sure fire way to bypass that is to do exactly what you plan. The transfer is virtually guaranteed assuming the student is an average or above student. Programs at the CCs are specifically set up to mirror the first 2 years at the university and the CCs work closely with the university to ensure the correct classes are taken etc.

Financially, it’s also the cheapest way to go. Great plan, your nephew is lucky to have you on his side.
3504PIR,

I do not believe that is a safe assumption.

https://admissions.utexas.edu/explore/rankings

<< Academics
#1 in Petroleum Engineering, U.S. News & World Report
#4 in Chemical Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#4 in Civil Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#5 in Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#6 Undergraduate Business School, U.S. News & World Report, 2018
#9 Undergraduate Engineering Program, U.S. News & World Report, 2018>>

KlangFool
KlangFool,

I beg to differ. When I taught at the University of Florida, 2 years at Santa Fe CC and a 3.0 had an 100% acceptance rate for transfer students to UF.During the years I taught at UF, they had the highest % of national merit scholars in consecutive classes and was a very difficult school to get into as a freshman, still is. UF is very similar academically to UT. I don’t think it’s a safe assumption, I think it’s a very safe assumption and virtually a guarantee if his nephew takes the same curriculum at the CC that the students take at UT during the first two years.

passiveTiger
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by passiveTiger » Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:13 am

3504PIR wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:04 am
KlangFool wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:38 pm
3504PIR wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:23 pm
Your plan is very sound. The competition applying to schools like UT can be very tough. The sure fire way to bypass that is to do exactly what you plan. The transfer is virtually guaranteed assuming the student is an average or above student. Programs at the CCs are specifically set up to mirror the first 2 years at the university and the CCs work closely with the university to ensure the correct classes are taken etc.

Financially, it’s also the cheapest way to go. Great plan, your nephew is lucky to have you on his side.
3504PIR,

I do not believe that is a safe assumption.

https://admissions.utexas.edu/explore/rankings

<< Academics
#1 in Petroleum Engineering, U.S. News & World Report
#4 in Chemical Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#4 in Civil Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#5 in Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#6 Undergraduate Business School, U.S. News & World Report, 2018
#9 Undergraduate Engineering Program, U.S. News & World Report, 2018>>

KlangFool
KlangFool,

I beg to differ. When I taught at the University of Florida, 2 years at Santa Fe CC and a 3.0 had an 100% acceptance rate for transfer students to UF.During the years I taught at UF, they had the highest % of national merit scholars in consecutive classes and was a very difficult school to get into as a freshman, still is. UF is very similar academically to UT. I don’t think it’s a safe assumption, I think it’s a very safe assumption and virtually a guarantee if his nephew takes the same curriculum at the CC that the students take at UT during the first two years.
KlangFool is right. A 3.0 just isn’t trying very hard for transfer to a competitive program. The OP’s nephew should be aiming for a 4.0 with all of the recommended coursework completed, because there will be a lot of demand, but the space available is limited.

But, hey, what do I know...

https://utexas.box.com/shared/static/lh ... ssta31.pdf

passiveTiger
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Re: I highly recommend a community college

Post by passiveTiger » Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:14 am

Socrates28 wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:20 pm
Many community colleges have TAG agreements - where if a student maintains a certain GPA, they automatically gain admission to the 4 year college.
Not entirely true in this case.

https://utexas.box.com/shared/static/lh ... ssta31.pdf

NotWhoYouThink
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Wed Feb 13, 2019 9:14 am

caffeperfavore wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:11 pm
Am I the only poor kid that went to college on this board? Because I’m surprised anyone would just assume you can’t afford to go straight to a four year college.

My parents had nothing and I received nothing from them, which worked in my favor for financial aid. After grants, scholarships, and work study, I actually think a CC would have been a more expensive option.

Don’t assume anything. Apply and fill out the FAFSA. If that doesn’t work out, then you’ve got CC as a fallback.
If the student is graduating from high school in May, that ship has sailed. Too late to get into UT and get financial aid for the 2019 school year. He could take a gap year and try, or he could start CC this summer or fall.
Also the OP didn't mention whether the student has the stats to get into UT in the first place, it is quite competitive.
Also the OP hasn't mentioned whether the student's parents will agree even to fill out FAFSA, or what their financial situation really is. You can be broke with a decent income if you are sufficiently bad at managing money, most of us know someone like that.

KlangFool
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by KlangFool » Wed Feb 13, 2019 9:37 am

3504PIR wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:04 am
KlangFool wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:38 pm
3504PIR wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:23 pm
Your plan is very sound. The competition applying to schools like UT can be very tough. The sure fire way to bypass that is to do exactly what you plan. The transfer is virtually guaranteed assuming the student is an average or above student. Programs at the CCs are specifically set up to mirror the first 2 years at the university and the CCs work closely with the university to ensure the correct classes are taken etc.

Financially, it’s also the cheapest way to go. Great plan, your nephew is lucky to have you on his side.
3504PIR,

I do not believe that is a safe assumption.

https://admissions.utexas.edu/explore/rankings

<< Academics
#1 in Petroleum Engineering, U.S. News & World Report
#4 in Chemical Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#4 in Civil Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#5 in Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#6 Undergraduate Business School, U.S. News & World Report, 2018
#9 Undergraduate Engineering Program, U.S. News & World Report, 2018>>

KlangFool
KlangFool,

I beg to differ. When I taught at the University of Florida, 2 years at Santa Fe CC and a 3.0 had an 100% acceptance rate for transfer students to UF.During the years I taught at UF, they had the highest % of national merit scholars in consecutive classes and was a very difficult school to get into as a freshman, still is. UF is very similar academically to UT. I don’t think it’s a safe assumption, I think it’s a very safe assumption and virtually a guarantee if his nephew takes the same curriculum at the CC that the students take at UT during the first two years.
3504PIR,

I studied at a Texas Community College. I transferred to a lower tiered Texas University for my BSEE. The minimum CGPA required for the transfer was 3.50.

KlangFool

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AerialWombat
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by AerialWombat » Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:38 am

radiowave wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:54 pm
For those reading this thread with children in high school who are getting ready to go to college, one good strategy is to take advanced placement courses for college credit in high school especially those generic first year course requirements such as English comp, basic science with lab, psychology, etc. Unfortunately this does not apply to the OP's nephew since he is graduating this May. However, getting a few college courses in senior year HS (and sometimes junior year HS), can really help with the first year of college whether at community or university level. Also, taking college level classes over the summer can also help. If a student is motivated, this approach can cut BS/BA degree down to 3 years which reduces the overall cost of the degree but also gets the graduate into the job market a year earlier earning a salary.

Just an FYI.
This can be taken several steps further, even.

1). Some states offer dual enrollment options for high school students to attend nearby community colleges. In WA and FL, for example, it’s not uncommon for kids to graduate high school with an associates degree in hand.

2. If student is a good test taker, there are credit by exam programs that can knock out a lot of general ed credits. I completed about 1/3 of my undergraduate degree via CLEP, DANTES, and TESC exams. That was 20 years ago, there are even more options now.

3. If major doesn’t matter, it’s possible to complete a legit, regionally accredited BA in less than 6 months completely by examination. You end up with a business or psych degree, but it’s real. It’s an old site, but see BAin4weeks.com.
“Life doesn’t come with a warranty.” -Michael LeBoeuf

radiowave
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by radiowave » Wed Feb 13, 2019 7:03 pm

AerialWombat wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:38 am

This can be taken several steps further, even.

1). Some states offer dual enrollment options for high school students to attend nearby community colleges. In WA and FL, for example, it’s not uncommon for kids to graduate high school with an associates degree in hand.

2. If student is a good test taker, there are credit by exam programs that can knock out a lot of general ed credits. I completed about 1/3 of my undergraduate degree via CLEP, DANTES, and TESC exams. That was 20 years ago, there are even more options now.

3. If major doesn’t matter, it’s possible to complete a legit, regionally accredited BA in less than 6 months completely by examination. You end up with a business or psych degree, but it’s real. It’s an old site, but see BAin4weeks.com.
Some good points but use caution on item 2 and 3. Re 2, some programs require you have credits from an actual class. For 3. be sure that any class or degree is from a school accredited by US Department of Education body. There are a lot of programs out there that say they are accredited but not recognized by US Dept Ed. I had a situation a few years ago when I was dean of nursing at a college in FL where former service member received an associates degree from a place that was not accredited under his GI Bill benefits but were were not able take his credits or his degree for the prerequisites in our nursing program. Unfortunate that he essentially had to start over.
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3504PIR
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by 3504PIR » Wed Feb 13, 2019 8:27 pm

KlangFool wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 9:37 am
3504PIR wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:04 am
KlangFool wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:38 pm
3504PIR wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:23 pm
Your plan is very sound. The competition applying to schools like UT can be very tough. The sure fire way to bypass that is to do exactly what you plan. The transfer is virtually guaranteed assuming the student is an average or above student. Programs at the CCs are specifically set up to mirror the first 2 years at the university and the CCs work closely with the university to ensure the correct classes are taken etc.

Financially, it’s also the cheapest way to go. Great plan, your nephew is lucky to have you on his side.
3504PIR,

I do not believe that is a safe assumption.

https://admissions.utexas.edu/explore/rankings

<< Academics
#1 in Petroleum Engineering, U.S. News & World Report
#4 in Chemical Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#4 in Civil Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#5 in Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering U.S. News & World Report
#6 Undergraduate Business School, U.S. News & World Report, 2018
#9 Undergraduate Engineering Program, U.S. News & World Report, 2018>>

KlangFool
KlangFool,

I beg to differ. When I taught at the University of Florida, 2 years at Santa Fe CC and a 3.0 had an 100% acceptance rate for transfer students to UF.During the years I taught at UF, they had the highest % of national merit scholars in consecutive classes and was a very difficult school to get into as a freshman, still is. UF is very similar academically to UT. I don’t think it’s a safe assumption, I think it’s a very safe assumption and virtually a guarantee if his nephew takes the same curriculum at the CC that the students take at UT during the first two years.
3504PIR,

I studied at a Texas Community College. I transferred to a lower tiered Texas University for my BSEE. The minimum CGPA required for the transfer was 3.50.

KlangFool
Fair enough.

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AerialWombat
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by AerialWombat » Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:26 pm

radiowave wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 7:03 pm
AerialWombat wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:38 am

This can be taken several steps further, even.

1). Some states offer dual enrollment options for high school students to attend nearby community colleges. In WA and FL, for example, it’s not uncommon for kids to graduate high school with an associates degree in hand.

2. If student is a good test taker, there are credit by exam programs that can knock out a lot of general ed credits. I completed about 1/3 of my undergraduate degree via CLEP, DANTES, and TESC exams. That was 20 years ago, there are even more options now.

3. If major doesn’t matter, it’s possible to complete a legit, regionally accredited BA in less than 6 months completely by examination. You end up with a business or psych degree, but it’s real. It’s an old site, but see BAin4weeks.com.
Some good points but use caution on item 2 and 3. Re 2, some programs require you have credits from an actual class. For 3. be sure that any class or degree is from a school accredited by US Department of Education body. There are a lot of programs out there that say they are accredited but not recognized by US Dept Ed. I had a situation a few years ago when I was dean of nursing at a college in FL where former service member received an associates degree from a place that was not accredited under his GI Bill benefits but were were not able take his credits or his degree for the prerequisites in our nursing program. Unfortunate that he essentially had to start over.
Yep, that's why I mentioned the regional accreditation. The three schools that most degree-by-exam are done through are Excelsior (NY, private college), Charter Oak (CT state school), and Thomas Edison (NJ state school). These colleges are all accredited by the same body that accredits Harvard, MIT, etc.
“Life doesn’t come with a warranty.” -Michael LeBoeuf

psy1
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by psy1 » Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:57 pm

The difference between the two plans is just ~$16,000. That is not inordinate debt for a mechanical engineer. Getting into the engineering program at UT Auston would be far more difficult than paying off the debt once completing the program. I would think that transferring into the engineering department as a junior at UT Austin is not a slam dunk. I would have a hard time believing that after two years at community college the student would be on par with the juniors at UT Austin. Assuming he could be accepted at UT Austin, I would jump at the chance to attend given the $16K total price difference.

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Socrates
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In California, public 4 year is expensive

Post by Socrates » Thu Feb 14, 2019 1:53 pm

Am I the only poor kid that went to college on this board? Because I’m surprised anyone would just assume you can’t afford to go straight to a four year college.
I can't speak for other states, but in California, you can essentially attend a community college for 2 years for free with various programs (financial aid, the Promise grant, etc.).

UCs, University of California- UCLA, UC Davis, UC Santa Barbara, etc., are about $15,000 a year just in tuition. That does not include living expenses which are off the charts in places like Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, San Diego and yes, even Davis, California (Northern California).

In California, we have transfer agreements with many colleges (not all). That said, you can still apply to any college once you have matriculated and get into a 4 year.
“Don't waste your time looking back. You're not going that way.” ― Ragnar Lothbrok.

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Bammerman
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Re: 2 years in community college, then transfer? need opinion please

Post by Bammerman » Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:54 pm

I haven't read through all the posts here, so please excuse me if someone else has said this already.

I used to score and rank-order candidates for foreign service appointments, and to that end, read many, many of their personnel applications. I never cared where someone started their education. What mattered to me was whether they showed increasingly serious, challenging and responsible activities, and developing capabilities, over time.

So if the student starts at community college and progresses to a 4-year school and does good work, I would say, that's what counts.

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