Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

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squirm
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Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by squirm » Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:28 am

Folks,
A few months ago, my credit ID was hacked, I started receiving credit statements from various banks, including Paypal. Fortunately all of those were caught in time. Most of the issuers wanted further verification so the thief got nowhere. However some slipped through such as Paypal. I was able to close those accounts and others in time. I also froze my credit at the three credit agencies.

T-Mobile has been a pain though. The thief opened an account about two months ago. I called T-Mobile up a month ago when I received the first bill from them and explained the situation, they said no problem the account was already closed and not to worry. Before the holidays, I received a bill from a collection agency for T-Mobile. When I came back from vacation, I received another bill from T-Mobile, for $4900.

I called T-Mobile again (first attempt couldn't understand the lady, heavy accent, hung up and called again. Second lady said, no problem, I'll email you a fraud report and transfer you to finance, never received any email. Got transferred to finance, talk to some guy and he said, hold on, waited on hold for 20 minutes, hung up and called back. Got a hold of another person, told them I was on hold for 20 minutes and guy must of decided to go to lunch). I gave T-Mobile the statement account and they said the account has been closed and transferred to fraud and not to worry about anything and the next bill I get from them will be zero.

The thief is charging I-phones etc, how? T-Mobile said the account was closed the first time and I called them and the most recent bill is from a items purchased a little over a week ago? Is this a good enough answer from them? What about the collection agency? Tmobile said this won't hurt my credit at all, but not sure if I believe that.

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Stinky
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by Stinky » Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:35 am

Have you put any of your T-Mobile correspondence in writing? If not, I would definitely do that now. Maybe start off with the whole chronology to date and go from there.

I don’t have any personal experience with a mess like this. Interested to see what others have to say.
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k3vb0t
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by k3vb0t » Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:39 am

I'd try sending one politely worded email, with documentation, dates, etc. to every executive contact here:

https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/t-mobile/

Rupert
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by Rupert » Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:47 am

Do you have a police report documenting the ID theft? If so, a certified letter to T-Mobile's legal department (not financial, legal) with a copy of the police report attached would be a good idea. Explain your prior efforts to clear up the matter in your letter, naming names of the T-Mobile employees you have previously spoken to.

are_cynic
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by are_cynic » Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:54 am

There is another credit bureau that deals with telecommunications; it may be too late to freeze your report with them now, but it couldn't hurt... https://www.nctue.com/Consumers

Also look at Chex https://www.chexsystems.com/web/chexsys ... lacefreeze

and Innovis https://www.innovis.com/personal/securityFreeze

It wouldn't hurt to proactively freeze everything. If you haven't already, I would recommend establishing an account with the Social Security Administration before the thief can.
"Invert, always invert" ~Carl Jacobi

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8foot7
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by 8foot7 » Tue Jan 01, 2019 11:20 am

As others have mentioned, it’s time to stop calling and start putting things in writing to legal and executive contacts. Further communications should happen entirely in writing.

Topic Author
squirm
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by squirm » Tue Jan 01, 2019 12:32 pm

Folks,
Thank you for the help, great suggestions, I'll keep you updated.

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F150HD
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by F150HD » Tue Jan 01, 2019 12:42 pm

There is another credit bureau that deals with telecommunications; it may be too late to freeze your report with them now, but it couldn't hurt... https://www.nctue.com/Consumers
Krebs on the National Consumer Telecommunications and Utilities Exchange (NCTUE), or nctue.com

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sperry8
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by sperry8 » Tue Jan 01, 2019 4:20 pm

are_cynic wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:54 am
There is another credit bureau that deals with telecommunications; it may be too late to freeze your report with them now, but it couldn't hurt... https://www.nctue.com/Consumers

Also look at Chex https://www.chexsystems.com/web/chexsys ... lacefreeze

and Innovis https://www.innovis.com/personal/securityFreeze

It wouldn't hurt to proactively freeze everything. If you haven't already, I would recommend establishing an account with the Social Security Administration before the thief can.
Thanks, I decided to freeze the major 3 and these 3 too. Took 10-15 minutes to register online with all and freeze. Annoying, but not as annoying as dealing with what OP is dealing with
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Topic Author
squirm
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by squirm » Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:15 pm

Folks,
This isn't ending. I just got a letter from Convergent a collection agency. The letter states this has gone to collection, it's a $4000 bill. I just called T-Mobile again. This time the rep said I need to go to a T-Mobile store with a police report to file a fraud report and until I do so, they can't do anything. This is turning into a nightmare. The last time I called T-Mobile as you can see from my first post, they stated they'd take care of this. Obviously they didn't do anything.

I'm not sure what else I can do, I'm sure my credit has taken a big hit because of this.

I feel like I'll have to get an attorney to get this resolved with T-Mobile, but I have no experience with that. Is there a someone that specializes in this?

k3vb0t
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by k3vb0t » Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:44 pm

squirm wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:15 pm
Folks,
This isn't ending. I just got a letter from Convergent a collection agency. The letter states this has gone to collection, it's a $4000 bill. I just called T-Mobile again. This time the rep said I need to go to a T-Mobile store with a police report to file a fraud report and until I do so, they can't do anything. This is turning into a nightmare. The last time I called T-Mobile as you can see from my first post, they stated they'd take care of this. Obviously they didn't do anything.

I'm not sure what else I can do, I'm sure my credit has taken a big hit because of this.

I feel like I'll have to get an attorney to get this resolved with T-Mobile, but I have no experience with that. Is there a someone that specializes in this?
Have you reached out directly to the executives of the organization with a politely worded description of events as noted above?

Topic Author
squirm
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by squirm » Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:51 pm

k3vb0t wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:44 pm
squirm wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:15 pm
Folks,
This isn't ending. I just got a letter from Convergent a collection agency. The letter states this has gone to collection, it's a $4000 bill. I just called T-Mobile again. This time the rep said I need to go to a T-Mobile store with a police report to file a fraud report and until I do so, they can't do anything. This is turning into a nightmare. The last time I called T-Mobile as you can see from my first post, they stated they'd take care of this. Obviously they didn't do anything.

I'm not sure what else I can do, I'm sure my credit has taken a big hit because of this.

I feel like I'll have to get an attorney to get this resolved with T-Mobile, but I have no experience with that. Is there a someone that specializes in this?
Have you reached out directly to the executives of the organization with a politely worded description of events as noted above?
I just did that, I reached out to Mr Legere and CC'd the Customer Service Vice President, Ms Callie Field. Hoping this will help to some degree, if at all.

typical.investor
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by typical.investor » Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:16 am

What is a credit ID?

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2pedals
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by 2pedals » Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:42 am

I would start here https://www.identitytheft.gov/ and follow the instructions. All of the recovery steps must be done and it a very long process. You must report the identity theft to the FTC or the local police and file a report.

Here are some sample letters
https://www.identitytheft.gov/Sample-Letters

fru-gal
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by fru-gal » Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:55 am

I have never dealt with this, but in the past I have found that when customer service for a company is doing nothing long enough, a polite (one page) letter to the CEO has worked wonders. Postal mail. Attach any supporting documentation like the police report.

I would also postal mail a letter to the collection agency. I think they have to stop harassing you, although I am not sure of the details, if you do so.

I think email is easy to ignore. A genuine letter, not so much.

mancich
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by mancich » Sat Feb 09, 2019 5:31 am

As other posters have said, put everything in writing, and I would send it certified mail, return receipt requested.

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legio XX
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by legio XX » Sat Feb 09, 2019 8:19 am

F150HD wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 12:42 pm
There is another credit bureau that deals with telecommunications; it may be too late to freeze your report with them now, but it couldn't hurt... https://www.nctue.com/Consumers
Krebs on the National Consumer Telecommunications and Utilities Exchange (NCTUE), or nctue.com
Thanks for this. AT&T, huh? Without repeating an old and long story, I wouldn't touch them if they offered me a free account. The amount involved was much less, and the "dispute" was over trying to close my account - they did everything they could to delay this while the tab kept increasing - not ID theft, but putting it in writing had no result. The "response" was a postcard with their useless 800-number.

Ditto with the collection agencies that kept at it for years - they just want to collect; they don't give a **** about anything else, and they will definitely lie to sucker you into sending some $$ so they can keep the game going. After one certified letter with all documentation resulted in a form letter saying essentially "pay up now," I mostly ignored them except for sending the same things with a "see attached" cover letter when a new enforcer appeared. The file at one point was over an inch thick. Probably spent more on certified mail/return receipt than they claim I owed. Can't remember when I last heard from them, and it doesn't show up on the free annual credit reports so no idea how, if ever, it affected my credit rating - don't use much credit, but haven't been turned down either.

The police report, the best record you can compile of all your dealings with them (you can bet they will have one), the certified mail/return receipt and a politely worded but strong request that they cease inappropriate dunning of a crime victim - yes to all of these, but don't be surprised if the response isn't rational and conciliatory. Just keep slogging, and don't pay what isn't your debt - they let the crook get through so remind them of that.

My tuppence -

Nowizard
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by Nowizard » Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:11 am

Cynically, it seems that in today's world, the aggrieved is also the one who must take charge of resolving issues not of their own doing. In personal experience, it seems this may even be a business model that appears more frequently when the business benefits financially if the "aggrieved" does nothing. For example, when attending a conference on billing in an effort to make my office more efficient, the leader said if a positive balance existed with a client after a bill was paid, never refund the money unless the client asked for it. This was a seminar for those who file insurance for medically related services provided. In short, the OP has the ball in his court.

Tim

Rupert
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by Rupert » Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:21 am

OP, this same thing happened to me except with Verizon. I only had to speak to someone in their fraud department once. The lady I spoke to asked me to send them a copy of a police report, which I had filed in my jurisdiction (in person -- went down to police headquarters and met with a fraud investigator to do it) and in the jurisdiction in which the fraud occurred (across the country, so I did this telephonically). A couple of days after that one conversation with Verizon, I got an email from them saying the problem was fixed. And it was. I never heard from them again. Did you ever file police reports?

Marylander1
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by Marylander1 » Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:38 am

Nowizard wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:11 am
Cynically, it seems that in today's world, the aggrieved is also the one who must take charge of resolving issues not of their own doing.
This seems to be the idea behind inventing the concept of "identity theft". Before, a business who had given money or goods to a criminal would have the burden of proof that it was you. Now they say it was "identity theft" and everything is on you.

Marylander1

michaeljc70
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by michaeljc70 » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:00 am

What is a credit ID? A credit card? SSN?

InMyDreams
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by InMyDreams » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:10 am

Nowizard wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:11 am
Cynically, it seems that in today's world, the aggrieved is also the one who must take charge of resolving issues not of their own doing.
You might check to see if you have any ID Theft protection buried within a policy. For example, my short term disability policy has an ID theft rider. Not sure that a credit card policy would apply here, but perhaps? What about a credit union account?

From the little that I understand, they won't pay the difference, but they may provide some of the leg work and/or legal advice.

JW-Retired
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by JW-Retired » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:16 am

Rupert wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:21 am
Did you ever file police reports?
That's been advised several times but I don't see that OP has ever hinted that he/she did that. Doing the report may be the key to stopping these ongoing troubles?
JW
Retired at Last

KESP
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by KESP » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:30 am

Depending on where you live, this is not always easy. I do not have any local police, and would have to depend on the State police. This kind of stuff is definitely not a priority for them.

bberris
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by bberris » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:31 am

Marylander1 wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:38 am
Nowizard wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:11 am
Cynically, it seems that in today's world, the aggrieved is also the one who must take charge of resolving issues not of their own doing.
This seems to be the idea behind inventing the concept of "identity theft". Before, a business who had given money or goods to a criminal would have the burden of proof that it was you. Now they say it was "identity theft" and everything is on you.

Marylander1
Well, legally the creditor still has to prove that you owe the debt in order to get a judgment against you. In practice, the threat of damage to your credit file is enough to make the victim responsible for fixing it.

miamivice
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by miamivice » Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:24 pm

I would take a chill pill and relax.

It's not your debt (according to what you posted) and you have no legal obligation to pay it. You can ignore it. Eventually, the debt collector could try to force you to pay via the court system but then you could clear your name. So I would only work on this as your time and convenience allows.

If the debt has been sold to a debt collector, T-Mobile no longer owns it. You will have to deal with the debt collector to find out what their process is to make the debt go away. There will be a form that the debt collector has you fill out and notarize. Maybe they will want a copy of a police report, I don't know for sure.

I dealt with this a while back, when my house was robbed. My ID was stolen and fake checks were printed in my name and used all over town. Some places waived the debt readily. One place played hardball and sent it to a debt collector. The debt collector, who are not college educated folks, wanted me to have the bank whose name appeared on the fake check send a letter saying it was a fake check. This was problematic, because the bank (Bank of America) is one that I do not have a business relationship with. I sent in some nortarized forms which they laughed at. Finally, I was able to have Bank of America draft a letter stating that the account number on the check was an invalid account. That, along with a police report that referenced my checks being stolen, was enough to make the debt go away.

It took me about a year and I dealt with it only when I felt like it. A phone call here or a letter there. I tried not to dwell on it or let myself get worked up about it. Would recommend the same for you as well.

Topic Author
squirm
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by squirm » Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:52 pm

Folks,
A T-Mobile executive reached out to me this mornings (coincidentally just as I was looking up the number for the Sheriffs) and is personally involved in seeing this gets resolved. I feel much better now! I did file a police report today an hour ago, in our jurisdiction to hopefully put an end to this and satisfy T-Mobile needs. I was just advised yesterday from T-Mobile this needs to take place.

I just really really hope my credit isn't dinged...

criticalmass
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by criticalmass » Sun Feb 10, 2019 12:28 am

squirm wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:52 pm
I just really really hope my credit isn't dinged...
Have you looked at your credit reports recently? I check them throughout the year. And you can do it for free (in addition to your annual credit report) as a fraud victim. Check all 4 bureaus, and Chex too. That will tell you what (any) dings there are, and you can then dispute them.

Trism
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by Trism » Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:35 am

miamivice wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:24 pm
I would take a chill pill and relax.

It's not your debt (according to what you posted) and you have no legal obligation to pay it. You can ignore it. Eventually, the debt collector could try to force you to pay via the court system but then you could clear your name. So I would only work on this as your time and convenience allows.

If the debt has been sold to a debt collector, T-Mobile no longer owns it. You will have to deal with the debt collector to find out what their process is to make the debt go away. There will be a form that the debt collector has you fill out and notarize. Maybe they will want a copy of a police report, I don't know for sure.
Sorry, but this is terrible advice.

Charge-offs and collections absolutely destroy people's credit, making insurance more expensive and inviting adverse action from existing, legitimate credit issuers (like credit card companies).

Xrayman69
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by Xrayman69 » Sun Feb 10, 2019 8:29 am

Trism wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:35 am
miamivice wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:24 pm
I would take a chill pill and relax.

It's not your debt (according to what you posted) and you have no legal obligation to pay it. You can ignore it. Eventually, the debt collector could try to force you to pay via the court system but then you could clear your name. So I would only work on this as your time and convenience allows.

If the debt has been sold to a debt collector, T-Mobile no longer owns it. You will have to deal with the debt collector to find out what their process is to make the debt go away. There will be a form that the debt collector has you fill out and notarize. Maybe they will want a copy of a police report, I don't know for sure.
Sorry, but this is terrible advice.

Charge-offs and collections absolutely destroy people's credit, making insurance more expensive and inviting adverse action from existing, legitimate credit issuers (like credit card companies).

Agree. It’s the unseen consequences that the victim doesn’t think about as a direct consequence such as higher insurance rates. Sure he/she may not be in process of buying home or applying for credit card, but likely has some form of insurance for home, property, car, etc.

It’s a PITA (pain in the ...) but need to have this cleared up and sooner is better than later.

What do people think about those credit or ID protection nationally advertised companies? Do they do much more for the cost in the beginning than lock your credit? What are steps others have started or have done to protect against ID theft or is this topic needed to be started on a seperate post?

Trism
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by Trism » Sun Feb 10, 2019 8:47 am

Xrayman69 wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 8:29 am
Trism wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:35 am
miamivice wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:24 pm
I would take a chill pill and relax.

It's not your debt (according to what you posted) and you have no legal obligation to pay it. You can ignore it. Eventually, the debt collector could try to force you to pay via the court system but then you could clear your name. So I would only work on this as your time and convenience allows.

If the debt has been sold to a debt collector, T-Mobile no longer owns it. You will have to deal with the debt collector to find out what their process is to make the debt go away. There will be a form that the debt collector has you fill out and notarize. Maybe they will want a copy of a police report, I don't know for sure.
Sorry, but this is terrible advice.

Charge-offs and collections absolutely destroy people's credit, making insurance more expensive and inviting adverse action from existing, legitimate credit issuers (like credit card companies).

Agree. It’s the unseen consequences that the victim doesn’t think about as a direct consequence such as higher insurance rates. Sure he/she may not be in process of buying home or applying for credit card, but likely has some form of insurance for home, property, car, etc.

It’s a PITA (pain in the ...) but need to have this cleared up and sooner is better than later.

What do people think about those credit or ID protection nationally advertised companies? Do they do much more for the cost in the beginning than lock your credit? What are steps others have started or have done to protect against ID theft or is this topic needed to be started on a seperate post?
I use a number of free credit monitoring services.

Whenever there is a new inquiry I get immediate alerts from - depending on the bureau pulled - Credit Karma, Credit Sesame, WalletHub, Credit Journey, and others. I'd have to be in a coma to miss the alerts.

Others prefer to lock their credit files.

Safest is to do both (overkill for me, others are more cautious).

miamivice
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by miamivice » Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:35 pm

Trism wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:35 am
miamivice wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:24 pm
I would take a chill pill and relax.

It's not your debt (according to what you posted) and you have no legal obligation to pay it. You can ignore it. Eventually, the debt collector could try to force you to pay via the court system but then you could clear your name. So I would only work on this as your time and convenience allows.

If the debt has been sold to a debt collector, T-Mobile no longer owns it. You will have to deal with the debt collector to find out what their process is to make the debt go away. There will be a form that the debt collector has you fill out and notarize. Maybe they will want a copy of a police report, I don't know for sure.
Sorry, but this is terrible advice.

Charge-offs and collections absolutely destroy people's credit, making insurance more expensive and inviting adverse action from existing, legitimate credit issuers (like credit card companies).
Actually, it's pretty good advice from someone who was in his shoes. I am not saying ignore it but he doesn't have to take care of it right now. And he doesn't need to risk high blood pressure over this issue.

I am of the domain of people that believe that a fraudulent account opened in my name and appearing on my credit report isn't my issue. Yes, there are steps I can take to clear my name, but ultimately the issue belongs to T-Mobile who actually was the entity that opened the fradulent account.

I had a "ding" on my credit report for a year until I got around to fixing it. I don't think it affected my score or insurance rates. Fixing it was a royal pain, but eventually I made it go away. And I got a $50 gift card to the grocery store who caused the mess, so that was a nice bonus.

madbrain
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by madbrain » Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:15 pm

Stop wasting your time with the phone calls.

For any letter from a collection agency you received in this matter, you should write a letter disputing the debt. You must do this within 30 days in order to preserve your rights under FDCPA.

Trism
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by Trism » Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:02 pm

miamivice wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:35 pm
Trism wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:35 am
miamivice wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:24 pm
I would take a chill pill and relax.

It's not your debt (according to what you posted) and you have no legal obligation to pay it. You can ignore it. Eventually, the debt collector could try to force you to pay via the court system but then you could clear your name. So I would only work on this as your time and convenience allows.

If the debt has been sold to a debt collector, T-Mobile no longer owns it. You will have to deal with the debt collector to find out what their process is to make the debt go away. There will be a form that the debt collector has you fill out and notarize. Maybe they will want a copy of a police report, I don't know for sure.
Sorry, but this is terrible advice.

Charge-offs and collections absolutely destroy people's credit, making insurance more expensive and inviting adverse action from existing, legitimate credit issuers (like credit card companies).
Actually, it's pretty good advice from someone who was in his shoes. I am not saying ignore it but he doesn't have to take care of it right now. And he doesn't need to risk high blood pressure over this issue.

I am of the domain of people that believe that a fraudulent account opened in my name and appearing on my credit report isn't my issue. Yes, there are steps I can take to clear my name, but ultimately the issue belongs to T-Mobile who actually was the entity that opened the fradulent account.

I had a "ding" on my credit report for a year until I got around to fixing it. I don't think it affected my score or insurance rates. Fixing it was a royal pain, but eventually I made it go away. And I got a $50 gift card to the grocery store who caused the mess, so that was a nice bonus.
The only way adding a charge off and/or a collection to your credit reports wouldn't have a serious negative impact on your scores is if your credit was already horrendous.

athan
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Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by athan » Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:08 pm

Rupert wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:21 am
OP, this same thing happened to me except with Verizon. I only had to speak to someone in their fraud department once. The lady I spoke to asked me to send them a copy of a police report, which I had filed in my jurisdiction (in person -- went down to police headquarters and met with a fraud investigator to do it) and in the jurisdiction in which the fraud occurred (across the country, so I did this telephonically). A couple of days after that one conversation with Verizon, I got an email from them saying the problem was fixed. And it was. I never heard from them again. Did you ever file police reports?
And this is why I use Verizon. Something about T-Mobile I just don't trust.

IMO
Posts: 650
Joined: Fri May 05, 2017 6:01 pm

Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by IMO » Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:37 pm

Marylander1 wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:38 am
Nowizard wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:11 am
Cynically, it seems that in today's world, the aggrieved is also the one who must take charge of resolving issues not of their own doing.
This seems to be the idea behind inventing the concept of "identity theft". Before, a business who had given money or goods to a criminal would have the burden of proof that it was you. Now they say it was "identity theft" and everything is on you.

Marylander1
Yes, its' YOUR problem to deal with. Nobody cares except you. Identify theft for all practical purposes isn't a crime

miamivice
Posts: 2196
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 11:46 am

Re: Credit ID hacked, got $4900 T-Mobile bill

Post by miamivice » Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:24 pm

Trism wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:02 pm
miamivice wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:35 pm
Trism wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:35 am
miamivice wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:24 pm
I would take a chill pill and relax.

It's not your debt (according to what you posted) and you have no legal obligation to pay it. You can ignore it. Eventually, the debt collector could try to force you to pay via the court system but then you could clear your name. So I would only work on this as your time and convenience allows.

If the debt has been sold to a debt collector, T-Mobile no longer owns it. You will have to deal with the debt collector to find out what their process is to make the debt go away. There will be a form that the debt collector has you fill out and notarize. Maybe they will want a copy of a police report, I don't know for sure.
Sorry, but this is terrible advice.

Charge-offs and collections absolutely destroy people's credit, making insurance more expensive and inviting adverse action from existing, legitimate credit issuers (like credit card companies).
Actually, it's pretty good advice from someone who was in his shoes. I am not saying ignore it but he doesn't have to take care of it right now. And he doesn't need to risk high blood pressure over this issue.

I am of the domain of people that believe that a fraudulent account opened in my name and appearing on my credit report isn't my issue. Yes, there are steps I can take to clear my name, but ultimately the issue belongs to T-Mobile who actually was the entity that opened the fradulent account.

I had a "ding" on my credit report for a year until I got around to fixing it. I don't think it affected my score or insurance rates. Fixing it was a royal pain, but eventually I made it go away. And I got a $50 gift card to the grocery store who caused the mess, so that was a nice bonus.
The only way adding a charge off and/or a collection to your credit reports wouldn't have a serious negative impact on your scores is if your credit was already horrendous.
Probably you are correct. My credit score is 838 out of 850. This is pretty horrendous becuase a few months ago it was 843 out of 850.

More seriously, I never noticed an impact to my credit score when I had the fradulent unpaid bill on my credit report. I have no idea why it didn't affect me, but it sure didn't.

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