My favorite Boglehead posters

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Nicolas
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Nicolas » Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:08 pm

TravelforFun wrote:
Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:00 pm
How come no one has mentioned 'Obliviousinvestor (Mike Piper)'? His advice on social security matters is invaluable. And I do miss sscritic.

TravelforFun
He was mentioned, in fact twice previously. Once on Friday and once on Saturday. Use the thread search function.

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dumbbunny
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by dumbbunny » Sun Dec 30, 2018 3:58 pm

Conch55 wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 5:41 pm
sscritic. I'm not privy to the backstory on his departure but I enjoyed his posts. Agree with many of the others posters mentioned.
+1
Plus retiredjg and celia and Meg77
“It’s the curse of old men to realize that in the end we control nothing." "Homeland" episode, "Gerontion"

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Tamarind
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Tamarind » Sun Dec 30, 2018 4:34 pm

Duckie is probably responsible for converting me to the BH way and for saving me hours of work and stress each year by showing how simple my portfolio could be. He takes in long and tangled first posts and kindly points the way for new posters.

TheDDC
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by TheDDC » Sun Dec 30, 2018 4:36 pm

I vote for:

LiterallyIronic - for keeping a sorely needed non-snobbish perspective on managing a five digit family budget with a SAHM, and for complaining about doing it possibly more than me! :sharebeer (though something tells me the most that would need to be in that glass is sparkling apple juice)

That mod "Lady" - for closing useless threads we all knew were going to go downhill fast even before the second post. I don't know how you catch them so fast.

I would say thanks to all here who have helped by replying to a post. Because of the ideas here you have encouraged me to dump an Ameriprise TSA and IRA and move to Vanguard and Fidelity.

-TheDDC

furwut
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by furwut » Sun Dec 30, 2018 4:39 pm

retiredflyboy wrote:
Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:08 am
I find myself agreeing most often with retiredflyboy.
Well I think I can honestly say I’ve never disagreed with retiredflyboy. But there’s time ... :)

Valuethinker
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Dec 30, 2018 4:51 pm

BogleBoogie wrote:
Sun Dec 30, 2018 10:11 am
livesoft
Nisiprius
Nisiprius Investments has the most incredible investment record I have ever seen.

One should study the lessons from its missives very closely ;-).

Island John
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Island John » Sun Dec 30, 2018 9:16 pm

I'd like to add BigFoot48 to the list for developing and making the Retiree Portfolio Model available. Great tool!

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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by pennywise » Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:06 am

galectin wrote:
Sun Dec 30, 2018 11:49 am
Also, kudos to Miriam2 for hosting the Boglehead retirement lists. She puts a lot of effort into keeping the lists up-to-date and engaging with posters when they announce their joining the done working club.
You beat me to it! And offline, Miriam2 is also the godmother and primary organizer/manager of the very active South Florida Bogleheads group which includes the incomparable Taylor Larimore--she makes sure we all get to partake of his insights and good humored wisdom at every meeting. Thanks for all you do Miriam :D

Accrual
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Accrual » Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:30 am

Easily Valuethinker.

SagaciousTraveler
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by SagaciousTraveler » Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:40 am

Earl Lemongrab because his profile picture blends nicely with his user name. Its like a work of art whether intended or not.

Trader Joe
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Trader Joe » Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:44 am

Theseus wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 4:10 pm
I may or may not agree with everything they say, but the following are some my favorite BHs - in no particular order. I enjoy reading their posts. Especially the amount of time and diligence they put in to their response is very much appreciated.

Who are your favorites?

livesoft
Nisiprius
Nedsaid
willthrill81
Bsteiner
Rick Ferri
dm200
sandtrap
My favorite posters are those that really go out of their way to teach and help new investors. This would be:

Taylor Larimore
Laura Dogu
Adrian Nenu
TrevH

Hopefully we will see many more posts from these wonderful posters.

corysold
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by corysold » Mon Dec 31, 2018 9:43 am

All the big ones have been mentioned, but my favorite part is how they all have such a niche of expertise. Just based on thread titles, you can usually know who is going to be coming in with the expert information. That is invaluable.

I haven't seen Krow36 mentioned, he always helpful when 403b topics come up and I learned a lot from him.

ModifiedDuration
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by ModifiedDuration » Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:01 am

ObliviousInvestor (Mike Piper) rocks! It’s really wonderful how he so freely shares his expertise on social security matters.

Valuethinker
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:02 am

Trader Joe wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:44 am
Theseus wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 4:10 pm
I may or may not agree with everything they say, but the following are some my favorite BHs - in no particular order. I enjoy reading their posts. Especially the amount of time and diligence they put in to their response is very much appreciated.

Who are your favorites?

livesoft
Nisiprius
Nedsaid
willthrill81
Bsteiner
Rick Ferri
dm200
sandtrap
My favorite posters are those that really go out of their way to teach and help new investors. This would be:

Taylor Larimore
Laura Dogu
Adrian Nenu
TrevH

Hopefully we will see many more posts from these wonderful posters.
I don't think Laura or Adrian post any more? Doubtless career progress has taken them elsewhere.

I don't think I have seen a post from either in more than 1 year and probably 2+ ?

Valuethinker
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:03 am

Accrual wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:30 am
Easily Valuethinker.
He does tend to ramble though ;-)

SavageAmusement
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by SavageAmusement » Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:06 pm

My favorite poster is:

Garland Whizzer

I appreciate the thoughtfulness, wisdom, and civility of his posts.

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Cycle
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Cycle » Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:14 pm

Market timer

In general I appreciate posts from retired folks who are out of the rat race the most

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nedsaid
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by nedsaid » Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:25 pm

SavageAmusement wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:06 pm
My favorite poster is:

Garland Whizzer

I appreciate the thoughtfulness, wisdom, and civility of his posts.
I would second that. Garland doesn't post too often but when he does, it is always good. I have joked that he should be the Bogleheads' Chief Market Strategist, but there is always a big grain of truth to humor. His posts about asset allocation, factors, strategies, and other such topics are quite good.
A fool and his money are good for business.

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celia
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by celia » Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:47 pm

sscritic (since he knows more about SS than the SS reps)

livesoft (he has so many posts since he keeps them short and makes a point that others often overlook)

ResearchMed (since we have many things in common)

everyone who has ever challenged something I wrote
(since it makes me stop and re-think my ideas, sometimes correcting them, other times forcing me to clarify more)

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abuss368
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by abuss368 » Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:49 pm

Bogleheads -

I have personally learned a wealth of knowledge thanks to this forum and the many fine contributors. I would also like to say "thank you" to Taylor and Mel for their vision many years ago.

Happy New Year!
John C. Bogle: "You simply do not need to put your money into 8 different mutual funds!" | | Disclosure: Three Fund Portfolio + U.S. & International REITs

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nedsaid
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by nedsaid » Mon Dec 31, 2018 4:26 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:03 am
Accrual wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:30 am
Easily Valuethinker.
He does tend to ramble though ;-)
Just so that you know, you Valuethinker are one of my favorite posters here. I always feel like I am in a lecture hall listening to an economics professor whenever I read your posts. Don't know much about you but you were quite exquisitely educated. Wonder if you went to one of those fancy private schools in U.K. Keep rambling on!
A fool and his money are good for business.

Accrual
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Accrual » Tue Jan 01, 2019 8:57 am

Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:03 am
Accrual wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:30 am
Easily Valuethinker.
He does tend to ramble though ;-)
Your contribution to this board cannot be overlooked, Valuethinker. I found an old 'climate change' topic from 2007 where you laid out some very insightful information, and since then I very much look forward to whenever you post.

Thank you for putting effort into your posts. :beer

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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Valuethinker » Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:29 am

nedsaid wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 4:26 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:03 am
Accrual wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:30 am
Easily Valuethinker.
He does tend to ramble though ;-)
Just so that you know, you Valuethinker are one of my favorite posters here. I always feel like I am in a lecture hall listening to an economics professor whenever I read your posts. Don't know much about you but you were quite exquisitely educated. Wonder if you went to one of those fancy private schools in U.K. Keep rambling on!
I am quite flattered, particularly as we don't always agree ;-). Let me say in turn I find your posts thoughtful & well informed and well reasoned, and polite and respectful - in an anonymous public forum on the internets, that's a trick many of us do not always master.

I have worked with the products of many such (but I am not the product of an English public school):

-the best are good, very good

But they are also sometimes a bit shallow in their thinking. That progression to Politics, Philosophy & Economics (PPE) at Oxford can lead to a glibness (PM David Cameron read PPE, so did some of his cabinet although Boris Johnson may have read History) - as a friend of mine (who is very sharp, ex McKinsey etc.) put it "I can write you an essay about absolutely anything in 12 hours".

I've seen a lot of the products of the English "public" school system (actually private, they are called public schools because they were the first schools, way back in the 1400s/ 1500s that anyone (with money) could send their kids to; a public school in North American terms is a "State School") who are frustratingly shallow and with a self confidence that vastly exceeds their actual knowledge.

What it does give them is a sense of entitlement - they are entitled to be at the top employers and thus they have that self confidence way ahead of their years. Whether the maturity comes with it is a different matter.*

In my generation, the Grammar School kids are actually better, intellectually (or comparable). A grammar school was a selective entry state school (Boston Latin?) -- then, complicated story, they were abolished but they remain in some educational jurisdictions. But you have to pass a (very) competitive exam to get into one at age 11.

Some Grammar Schools are now private ("fee paying" or "independent") schools - but the English Public Schools are a very socially elite bunch (Eton, Harrow, Winchester, Westminster are the big 4 but I would add St. Paul's in London and a few others*** and there are a whole raft out in the countryside that survive increasingly on foreign students-- Chinese, Russian etc.) but whilst the top ones (as mentioned) are academically elite lots of English boarding schools are less academically elite than the Grammar Schools.

- my economics was only undergraduate as part of a Commerce & Computer Science degree at a North American university (public university). It was academically a tough university. I have picked up the rest via CFA (a looonnng time ago, now) and general reading.


* I am constantly reminded of that recent book in the US about recruiting elites. Things like going to a top 20 liberal arts colleges**, playing rugby or lacrosse, rowing - these are the things that get you hired by Goldman Sachs or McKinsey out of undergrad. Which in turn feeds you into the top law schools and business schools, then back into the elite employers-- investment banks, consultancies (Bain BCG McKinsey especially), Private Equity & Venture Capital firms. Places like Google eventually become colonized by people with those sorts of backgrounds (plus an equivalent body of top engineers and computer science grads, who particularly graduate from Stanford but also some other schools).

https://press.princeton.edu/titles/10457.html


** the key ones would be the undergrad colleges of Harvard Stanford Yale Princeton. You'd also find places like Williams and Swarthmore. To an extent a Bachelors of Business from Wharton (U Penn) substitutes - so UVA, Wharton and a couple of others.

Of the military colleges, West Point and Annapolis definitely fill the bill - Harvard B School big 3 on admits are "Military, McKinsey & Mormons". There's no correlation between your class ranking at West Point and your success as a general on the battlefield (McClelland and Westmoreland both ranked highly in their classes, Ulysses Grant did not) but there is with your career success in or outside the military. Air Force Academy (Colorado Springs) appears not to, at least not to the same extent. VMI? Not sure - if you want to command the USMC some day though, VMI is the way to do it.

A working class kid (and I can think of an immigrant kid I know who graduated from Harvard in the early 1980s, very successful career at JP Morgan) struggles in that recruiting environment because they don't "get" the signals, and they don't have the spare time and capital to necessarily participate in one of the sports and activities that are favoured by that elite****.

There's ways to jump this. On the trading floor, whatever gets you hired, it's how you do on the floor. I have heard at least one recruiter quoted that his best recruits were Applied Math majors from big Midwestern schools who had also played ice hockey or rugby or some other sport.

Conversely on the other side of the Chinese Wall, in investment banking, doing the Mergers & Acquisitions and the corporate fund raisings, IPOs etc. the social cachet as above seems to matter a lot more.

Attending an elite post grad school - a top 10 business school (there are in fact more than 10 "top 10" ;-) Go figure ). I think we could identify the creme de la creme as Harvard Stanford (actually harder to get into than HBS) Northwestern Wharton; but a hedge fund might hire from Chicago or Wharton if they hire MBAs at all (these days I think it's all pretty much MBAs).

Similarly your LSAT score, your law school, and your rank in that law school class, seem to affect your legal career for ever after. Oddly, if you want to be a senior court judge or a top legal scholar, having gone to Yale-Harvard-Stanford-Chicago seems to matter more than to be a successful commercial lawyer (like being an MD among bankers or a partner in a consulting firm, being a partner in a law firm is more about how you bring in business and "fit" the firm's partnership culture, than about how much you know about law - exceptions being Intellectual Property (a previous background in science is pretty important) or Tax).


*** You will note how genderized the above seems - my experience has largely been of the male graduates of same. The very successful professional women I know have similar sorts of backgrounds.

**** fascinating piece in New York Times a few years back re Harvard BS. Apparently there's quite a strong social divide. The foreign students often come from very affluent (rich) families overseas and so "ski club weekend in Aspen" is perfectly possible -- these kids grew up on the slopes at Verbier and Gstaad. The American kids? Often huge student loans from undergrad, drive beat up old Toyotas, etc.

HBS' recruiting strategy is to get people who will be successful in life: the Marshall Scholar who attended West Point and led the fencing team, etc. Also the kid whose parents run a major company in an Emerging Market, etc. They don't really care what you did pre HBS, what field, just that you were top in it.

Valuethinker
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Valuethinker » Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:33 am

Accrual wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 8:57 am
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:03 am
Accrual wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:30 am
Easily Valuethinker.
He does tend to ramble though ;-)
Your contribution to this board cannot be overlooked, Valuethinker. I found an old 'climate change' topic from 2007 where you laid out some very insightful information, and since then I very much look forward to whenever you post.

Thank you for putting effort into your posts. :beer
That is flattering. Thank you. Because I undertook some academic work on the subject since then, so if I reread that post I'd probably wince at what I got wrong ;-).

It is, quite literally, a hot topic here under (Forum Rules) so I do have to restrain myself ;-).

I am most proud of a post I made in the middle of the Crisis, September-October 2008 I think, about what to do/ not to do. Stressing the gravity of the situation, and the danger the financial system was in. However I also advocated staying the course, and making only modest adjustments if unemployment was a threat (increasing cash reserves for a longer period of unemployment).

That post stood the test of time when I looked at it again 3-4 years ago.

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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by brookwright » Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:36 am

I always enjoyed when wbern posted.

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Theseus
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Theseus » Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:53 am

Thank you everyone for providing your favorites. I have updated the original post with all the names mentioned so far.

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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by hoppy08520 » Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:00 am

fortfun wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 6:41 pm
Duckie is very helpful with the very long "help me with my Investment" questions. I think he spends hours helping people figure out the most cost effective choices to get their AA just right.

Retiredjg has spent a lot of time helping me out.
+1 on both of these contributors. Both of them provide sensible and pragmatic advice to newbies trying to put their portfolios together. Including me -- they both chimed in on my first real "Help with Personal Investments" post almost 7 years ago when I first saw the Bogleheads light.

A lot of Bogleheads can get a little extreme with trying to optimize certain aspects of their portfolios, which can result in portfolios that might be overly complex and intimidating for a "normal" investor, and I like how Duckie and retiredjg avoid doing that in order to compose a workable plan for people that they can easily implement.

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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by LadyGeek » Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:14 am

brookwright wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:36 am
I always enjoyed when wbern posted.
He's in the forum as Bill Bernstein now. You'll find his posts by searching for the updated name.

For reference: William Bernstein
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.

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nedsaid
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by nedsaid » Tue Jan 01, 2019 1:50 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:29 am
nedsaid wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 4:26 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:03 am
Accrual wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:30 am
Easily Valuethinker.
He does tend to ramble though ;-)
Just so that you know, you Valuethinker are one of my favorite posters here. I always feel like I am in a lecture hall listening to an economics professor whenever I read your posts. Don't know much about you but you were quite exquisitely educated. Wonder if you went to one of those fancy private schools in U.K. Keep rambling on!
I am quite flattered, particularly as we don't always agree ;-). Let me say in turn I find your posts thoughtful & well informed and well reasoned, and polite and respectful - in an anonymous public forum on the internets, that's a trick many of us do not always master.

Nedsaid: I certainly try to be a good contributor here. All I have is a Bachelors' Degree. My career has been varied but I can summarize it in three parts: an area representative for a non-profit youth organization, an accountant, and also tax preparation. I have been interested in economics, business, and the economy since high school. My only experience in the industry was working in the back office for the brokerage arm for a regional bank for about 2 1/2 years. Reconciling mutual fund trades made in branch offices, reconciling the master bank account for the brokerage operations, preparing journal entries, stuff like that.

I have worked with the products of many such (but I am not the product of an English public school):

-the best are good, very good

But they are also sometimes a bit shallow in their thinking. That progression to Politics, Philosophy & Economics (PPE) at Oxford can lead to a glibness (PM David Cameron read PPE, so did some of his cabinet although Boris Johnson may have read History) - as a friend of mine (who is very sharp, ex McKinsey etc.) put it "I can write you an essay about absolutely anything in 12 hours".

Nedsaid: I have read a couple of articles about the decline in I.Q. scores in Western Countries in recent years. My suspicion is that some schools are not as rigorous as they should be and critical thinking doesn't seem to be taught or valued. That said, there are still many excellent schools around here in the United States.

You comments on glibness are right on the mark. I will leave it at that.


I've seen a lot of the products of the English "public" school system (actually private, they are called public schools because they were the first schools, way back in the 1400s/ 1500s that anyone (with money) could send their kids to; a public school in North American terms is a "State School") who are frustratingly shallow and with a self confidence that vastly exceeds their actual knowledge.

Nedsaid: There are some folks out there that look impressive on paper with the right schools, credentials and such that literally can't think their way out of a wet paper bag on a rainy day. It seems we are so focused now on credentials that sometimes we forget about actual competence. I am all for education, all for prestigious schools, all for credentials but just saying there is more to success in life than that. In the final analysis, one has to perform and hopefully be a decent human being in the process.

What it does give them is a sense of entitlement - they are entitled to be at the top employers and thus they have that self confidence way ahead of their years. Whether the maturity comes with it is a different matter.*

Nedsaid: There does seem to be sort of a class system here in the United States. There is a lot of checking the right boxes and having the right things on the resume. Going to the right schools and that kind of thing. It is probably much less here than the United Kingdom but exists here. The thing is, I remember a well known public figure that scraped together enough credits from five different schools to get a Bachelors' Degree and that person got a lot of criticism and was looked down on for that, but that is what you do when you have limited financial resources. There are many of us that came from relatively modest backgrounds.


In my generation, the Grammar School kids are actually better, intellectually (or comparable). A grammar school was a selective entry state school (Boston Latin?) -- then, complicated story, they were abolished but they remain in some educational jurisdictions. But you have to pass a (very) competitive exam to get into one at age 11.

Some Grammar Schools are now private ("fee paying" or "independent") schools - but the English Public Schools are a very socially elite bunch (Eton, Harrow, Winchester, Westminster are the big 4 but I would add St. Paul's in London and a few others*** and there are a whole raft out in the countryside that survive increasingly on foreign students-- Chinese, Russian etc.) but whilst the top ones (as mentioned) are academically elite lots of English boarding schools are less academically elite than the Grammar Schools.

- my economics was only undergraduate as part of a Commerce & Computer Science degree at a North American university (public university). It was academically a tough university. I have picked up the rest via CFA (a looonnng time ago, now) and general reading.


* I am constantly reminded of that recent book in the US about recruiting elites. Things like going to a top 20 liberal arts colleges**, playing rugby or lacrosse, rowing - these are the things that get you hired by Goldman Sachs or McKinsey out of undergrad. Which in turn feeds you into the top law schools and business schools, then back into the elite employers-- investment banks, consultancies (Bain BCG McKinsey especially), Private Equity & Venture Capital firms. Places like Google eventually become colonized by people with those sorts of backgrounds (plus an equivalent body of top engineers and computer science grads, who particularly graduate from Stanford but also some other schools).

https://press.princeton.edu/titles/10457.html


** the key ones would be the undergrad colleges of Harvard Stanford Yale Princeton. You'd also find places like Williams and Swarthmore. To an extent a Bachelors of Business from Wharton (U Penn) substitutes - so UVA, Wharton and a couple of others.

Of the military colleges, West Point and Annapolis definitely fill the bill - Harvard B School big 3 on admits are "Military, McKinsey & Mormons". There's no correlation between your class ranking at West Point and your success as a general on the battlefield (McClelland and Westmoreland both ranked highly in their classes, Ulysses Grant did not) but there is with your career success in or outside the military. Air Force Academy (Colorado Springs) appears not to, at least not to the same extent. VMI? Not sure - if you want to command the USMC some day though, VMI is the way to do it.

A working class kid (and I can think of an immigrant kid I know who graduated from Harvard in the early 1980s, very successful career at JP Morgan) struggles in that recruiting environment because they don't "get" the signals, and they don't have the spare time and capital to necessarily participate in one of the sports and activities that are favoured by that elite****.

Nedsaid: Yep. And that is what gives rise to class resentment. I have been finding this as I have interviewed for jobs, expectations have changed a lot in 20 years. In theory, you are supposed to be able to reinvent yourself every decade or so but in reality it takes a long time to build knowledge and expertise. Hard to just chuck all of that every decade.

There's ways to jump this. On the trading floor, whatever gets you hired, it's how you do on the floor. I have heard at least one recruiter quoted that his best recruits were Applied Math majors from big Midwestern schools who had also played ice hockey or rugby or some other sport.

Conversely on the other side of the Chinese Wall, in investment banking, doing the Mergers & Acquisitions and the corporate fund raisings, IPOs etc. the social cachet as above seems to matter a lot more.

Attending an elite post grad school - a top 10 business school (there are in fact more than 10 "top 10" ;-) Go figure ). I think we could identify the creme de la creme as Harvard Stanford (actually harder to get into than HBS) Northwestern Wharton; but a hedge fund might hire from Chicago or Wharton if they hire MBAs at all (these days I think it's all pretty much MBAs).

Similarly your LSAT score, your law school, and your rank in that law school class, seem to affect your legal career for ever after. Oddly, if you want to be a senior court judge or a top legal scholar, having gone to Yale-Harvard-Stanford-Chicago seems to matter more than to be a successful commercial lawyer (like being an MD among bankers or a partner in a consulting firm, being a partner in a law firm is more about how you bring in business and "fit" the firm's partnership culture, than about how much you know about law - exceptions being Intellectual Property (a previous background in science is pretty important) or Tax).


*** You will note how genderized the above seems - my experience has largely been of the male graduates of same. The very successful professional women I know have similar sorts of backgrounds.

**** fascinating piece in New York Times a few years back re Harvard BS. Apparently there's quite a strong social divide. The foreign students often come from very affluent (rich) families overseas and so "ski club weekend in Aspen" is perfectly possible -- these kids grew up on the slopes at Verbier and Gstaad. The American kids? Often huge student loans from undergrad, drive beat up old Toyotas, etc.

HBS' recruiting strategy is to get people who will be successful in life: the Marshall Scholar who attended West Point and led the fencing team, etc. Also the kid whose parents run a major company in an Emerging Market, etc. They don't really care what you did pre HBS, what field, just that you were top in it.
A fool and his money are good for business.

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Munir
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Munir » Tue Jan 01, 2019 3:59 pm

HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 6:40 pm
JohnDindex wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 6:37 pm
Nisiprius - he is very good at challenging ideas such as international investing and small value etc. I wonder if he drives a Prius? Never thought about it until I just typed his name.



And all the others mentioned
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nisi_prius
The legal description of nisi prius is an obfuscating statement (? the day before). That does not describe our BH nisi who is as clear as a bell. I prefer him to have a Japanese connection. He is my favorite poster. I guess we have to just keep wondering- shucks :oops: .

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tarnation
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by tarnation » Tue Jan 01, 2019 4:16 pm

Munir wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 3:59 pm
HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 6:40 pm
JohnDindex wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 6:37 pm
Nisiprius - he is very good at challenging ideas such as international investing and small value etc. I wonder if he drives a Prius? Never thought about it until I just typed his name.



And all the others mentioned
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nisi_prius
The legal description of nisi prius is an obfuscating statement (? the day before). That does not describe our BH nisi who is as clear as a bell. I prefer him to have a Japanese connection. He is my favorite poster. I guess we have to just keep wondering- shucks :oops: .
viewtopic.php?t=60261#p824803
Image

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by TomatoTomahto » Tue Jan 01, 2019 4:57 pm

I won’t mention many of the analytical posters who add much to the forum, but I want to give (another) shoutout to
ValueThinker
and
SoAnyway
for their ability to write well and who often give an angle/facts I wasn’t aware of.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

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Munir
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Location: Oregon

Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Munir » Tue Jan 01, 2019 6:53 pm

tarnation wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 4:16 pm
Munir wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 3:59 pm
HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 6:40 pm
JohnDindex wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 6:37 pm
Nisiprius - he is very good at challenging ideas such as international investing and small value etc. I wonder if he drives a Prius? Never thought about it until I just typed his name.



And all the others mentioned
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nisi_prius
The legal description of nisi prius is an obfuscating statement (? the day before). That does not describe our BH nisi who is as clear as a bell. I prefer him to have a Japanese connection. He is my favorite poster. I guess we have to just keep wondering- shucks :oops: .
viewtopic.php?t=60261#p824803
Thank you, tarnation. I like Gilbert & Sullivan and even was one of the soldiers in "Patience" when in college. Now that I know, I will rest.

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aspirit
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by aspirit » Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:17 pm

:oops: I did not see any mention of a few of my favorite posters from days gone bye.
Adrian Neu, imbroglio, and chaz. (I'd suspect both imbro & chaz still visit.)
Thx Admin, & mods for all you do.

Overlooking the oodles and oodles of investing & financial info and life's minutia & insights many, many, here put out there on a daily basis of course.

I forgot, ...(Adrian, chaz, imbro)...what have you guys done for us lately? :P
hmmm.......... :P

Nis, VT, LSoft, sscritic, & many others my hats off to you guys continued or past participation.
Me, i'm just lucky i'm here, ...alive. :oops:

P.S./ I've missed noting many I'm sure others & myself appreciate. I'm getting old, memory* issues, etc. and all that entails. That "sandtrap'''is quite the contemporarily knowledgeable participant also!
Last edited by aspirit on Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Time & tides wait for no one. A man has to know his limitations. | "Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes it's laws" | — Mayer Amschel Bauer Rothschild ~

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Cosmo
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Cosmo » Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:38 pm

aspirit wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:17 pm
:oops: I did not see any mention of a few of my favorite posters from days gone bye.
Adrian Neu, imbroglio, and chaz. (I'd suspect both imbro & chaz still visit.)
Thx Admin, & mods for all you do.

Overlooking the oodles and oodles of investing & financial info and life's minutia & insights many, many, here put out there on a daily basis of course.

I forgot, ...(Adrian, chaz, imbro)...what have you guys done for us lately? :P
hmmm.......... :P

Nis, VT, LSoft, sscritic, & many others my hats off to you guys continued or past participation.
Me, i'm just lucky i'm here, ...alive. :oops:

P.S./ That "sandtrap'''is quite the contemporarily knowledgeable participant also!
Agree with Chaz as being in there as well. Quite possibly, the most succinct poster here. :happy

Cosmo

lostdog
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by lostdog » Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:18 am

vineviz

I enjoy this forum but there is a lot of misinformation, personal bias and old wives tales going on and vineviz steps in to put another spin on it and set the record straight with logic.
Current portfolio: 54% ITOT, VTSAX / 46% VTIAX

anhonymous
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by anhonymous » Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:44 am

Klangfool -- doesn't mince words..

Miriam2
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Miriam2 » Sat Jan 05, 2019 2:04 pm

Valuethinker wrote: I am most proud of a post I made in the middle of the Crisis, September-October 2008 I think, about what to do/ not to do. Stressing the gravity of the situation, and the danger the financial system was in. However I also advocated staying the course, and making only modest adjustments if unemployment was a threat (increasing cash reserves for a longer period of unemployment).

That post stood the test of time when I looked at it again 3-4 years ago.
Dear Valuethinker, do you have the link to your "most proud post" that has "withstood the test of time?" :D I'm sure it is even more timely and fabulous than you are willing to acknowledge :wink:

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DDubya
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by DDubya » Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:45 am

I don’t always read Bogleheads, but when I do I read Livesoft.
"The intensity of the conviction that a hypothesis is true has no bearing on whether it is true or not." | "No matter how cynical you get, it is impossible to keep up."

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Abe
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Abe » Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:41 am

I like HomerJ and Sheepdog
Slow and steady wins the race.

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abuss368
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Location: Where the water is warm, the drinks are cold, and I don't know the names of the players!

Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by abuss368 » Sat Jan 12, 2019 10:26 pm

Where is YDNAL?
John C. Bogle: "You simply do not need to put your money into 8 different mutual funds!" | | Disclosure: Three Fund Portfolio + U.S. & International REITs

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abuss368
Posts: 13126
Joined: Mon Aug 03, 2009 2:33 pm
Location: Where the water is warm, the drinks are cold, and I don't know the names of the players!

Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by abuss368 » Sat Jan 12, 2019 10:28 pm

aspirit wrote:
Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:17 pm
:oops: I did not see any mention of a few of my favorite posters from days gone bye.
Adrian Neu, imbroglio, and chaz. (I'd suspect both imbro & chaz still visit.)
Thx Admin, & mods for all you do.

Overlooking the oodles and oodles of investing & financial info and life's minutia & insights many, many, here put out there on a daily basis of course.

I forgot, ...(Adrian, chaz, imbro)...what have you guys done for us lately? :P
hmmm.......... :P

Nis, VT, LSoft, sscritic, & many others my hats off to you guys continued or past participation.
Me, i'm just lucky i'm here, ...alive. :oops:

P.S./ I've missed noting many I'm sure others & myself appreciate. I'm getting old, memory* issues, etc. and all that entails. That "sandtrap'''is quite the contemporarily knowledgeable participant also!
Adrian is/was on one of the Morningstar forums.
John C. Bogle: "You simply do not need to put your money into 8 different mutual funds!" | | Disclosure: Three Fund Portfolio + U.S. & International REITs

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Slick8503
Posts: 201
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Re: My favorite Boglehead posters

Post by Slick8503 » Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:38 am

Certainly not my complete list and did not read full thread but noticed one of my favs (Robert T)was absent on first pg.

Robert T - does not post often, but his “info per post” metric is off the charts.

Nisi - I believe I’ve said before that he is my favorite discussion forum poster of all time across many different forums. Just Full of wisdom and excellent at conveying that wisdom.

Larry Swedroe - wish he still posted. Huge loss to the forum.

Random Walker - For taking time to help people too lazy(me) to easily access Larry’s advice since he no longer participates. Also for his candidness in discussing why he has chosen to implement the portfolio he has.

Valuethinker - For giving us a global perspective on many issues. Also full of wisdom in many topics.

Livesoft - For being so prolific, and I have to say, I have grown to enjoy the snark and his thought provoking way.

That’s it due to time. Apologies for leaving several out. There are many terrific posters here.

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