Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

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hilink73
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by hilink73 » Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:48 am

Blueskies123 wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 3:07 pm
MSORSA wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 2:22 pm
Home - Glock 17 with light
Carry - Glock 19
3) If you decide on a Glock you have to learn how to clear a stove pipe. Stovepipes are the only Glock weakness. If you do not know what a SP is then google it. If you cannot clear a stovepipe get another gun.
Shot several 1000 rounds with my Glock 17 Gen4 MOS.
Never heard of this problem before.

hilink73
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by hilink73 » Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:58 am

Sconie wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:04 am
I personally don't like the trigger on Glocks and, given the much-heralded Glock "leg syndrome" (shootings) that have happened, am leery of their "safety action system." I would suggest that you consider the following full-size 9mm pistols: Sig Sauer P226, Beretta 92, HK USP, S&W M&P.


I personally like the Glock system very much, because it is so easy to use. No additional fumbling with other safety mechanisms.

The resisance for the first trigger pull is quite high, which is an additional safety measure.
I customized my trigger to even reduce the resistance (other springs + martime spring cups). Now, that's a trigger!

Granted, trigger discipline is important (as with any gun).

CurlyDave
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by CurlyDave » Wed Jan 09, 2019 3:06 am

I am surprised that there has not been more discussion of CZ pistols.

Modestly priced, but very good. Many special forces operators and mercenaries (yes these guys still exist) carry them. 9mm is more or less a standard. Both hammer and striker fired versions are available.

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Taz
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Taz » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:30 am

I'd consider the Smith and Wesson M&P 9 series, particularly the 9c. Solid feel & make, reliable, nice size for carry if you choose but not so small that it feels like something other than a weapon. While some many not like a manual thumb safety, I like that S&W offers the option.

I personally shoot it better than various the Glock, Rugar, and Kimber models I've tried.
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chevca
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by chevca » Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:29 am

hilink73 wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:48 am
Blueskies123 wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 3:07 pm
MSORSA wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 2:22 pm
Home - Glock 17 with light
Carry - Glock 19
3) If you decide on a Glock you have to learn how to clear a stove pipe. Stovepipes are the only Glock weakness. If you do not know what a SP is then google it. If you cannot clear a stovepipe get another gun.
Shot several 1000 rounds with my Glock 17 Gen4 MOS.
Never heard of this problem before.
It's a shooter problem, not a Glock problem. If one limp wrists a Glock, they are known to stove pipe. Don't limp wrist em, no stove pipes.

Side note... as a gun owner, one should practice clearing malfunctions of all sorts anyway.

I'm pretty sure this thread has overwhelmed the OP with what they thought was probably a simple question.

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RootSki
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by RootSki » Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:49 am

CurlyDave wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 3:06 am
I am surprised that there has not been more discussion of CZ pistols.

Modestly priced, but very good. Many special forces operators and mercenaries (yes these guys still exist) carry them. 9mm is more or less a standard. Both hammer and striker fired versions are available.
I love CZ pistols. I own a 9mm CZ-75 SP01 Tactical and I even bought the Kadet Kit to turn it into a .22lr. The best part of the CZ-75 is the lack of recoil. I thought my Berretta 92 and Sig 226 were light. This thing has next to no recoil in 9mm. I prefer metal guns for range shooting, but I also have a few polymers. I'd love to get an all stainless 75B at some point.

A great suggestion for a first timer.

gamboolman
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by gamboolman » Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:27 am

If first handgun, I suggest you consider Smith & Wesson revolver.
Model 642 or 442
If you want pistol then I recommend Glock 26 for concealed carry. Glocks have no manual safety and you need to be comfortable with this.
For pistol with manual safety- there is many excellent choices
I like Sig Sauers, Springfields, Kimbers etc

batpot
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by batpot » Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:16 pm

I hate the Glock trigger because it auto-resets.
There's plenty of DAO/striker pistols on the market that don't flick your finger with every shot.

But I prefer a DA/SA w/a decocking lever; Sig SP2009.
Have a couple 226s as well.

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hdas
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by hdas » Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:27 pm

Albeit most of the posts are just signaling. There's good info here. Thanks. Just bookmarking this thread. :greedy
"whenever there is a randomized way of doing something, then there is a nonrandomized way that delivers better performance but requires more thought" ET Jaynes

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TierArtz
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by TierArtz » Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:48 pm

This may be the longest running post ever with no further clarification from the OP! As stated by others, a proper recommendation would be based on the intended use/need. That said, here are my recommendations/personal handguns for various uses:

Concealed carry: Ruger LCP in .380; Glock 43 in 9mm
Target practice: Ruger Mark IV in .22 (mine is a scoped target model Mark II)
Hunting close range hogs/Alaskan back-packing (bears)/range queen/sock and awe: Ruger Super Redhawk in .44 Mag.

I only have one more on order; perhaps this thread will reveal a previously undiscovered need for additional ones :P

brokenrecord
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by brokenrecord » Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:13 pm

Walther PPS 9mm for conceal carry

batpot
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by batpot » Wed Jan 09, 2019 3:43 pm

DanMahowny wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 4:40 pm
Smith & Wesson M&P R8
A state-of-the-art fighting revolver. Eight round capacity (.357 cartridge). It's big, light, tough, and accurate. Outfitted with a weapon light and a quality red dot sight, makes for an unstoppable nightstand gun.
Neat.
Now Chiappa needs to make a Rhino version.

mc2
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by mc2 » Wed Jan 09, 2019 6:47 pm

Walther PPS M2 and Sig Sauer P229, both in 9mm.

Follow all the above advice. Try out many, shoot all sorts of calibers, almost all will be good for what anyone wants. The rest is personal preference.

For me, I love my Sig-it fits me well and I just love having it. The Walther was super cheap and I wanted a little one-it also fits my hands very well. I want a Glock 19 and keep wanting one but I just can't shoot them very well. My friend, who owns the G19, shoots it dead on every time.

So yeah, go try them and like a true boglehead-ignore the noise from all the Vloggers, etc!

PoppyA
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by PoppyA » Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:52 pm

Revolvers are the Chevy trucks of guns. Dependable & easy to drive.
Semi automatics (ie:glocks) are high performance vehicles. More persnickety.

As for cleaning gun....yeah you should clean and oil your revolver, but it is fairly forgiving if you don't get to it until later. It should still fire. No disassembly needed to clean a revolver.

Semi auto's must be cleaned & oiled. They have a lot of moving parts. Oh, and you need to know how to disassemble the semi auto to clean it.....but more importantly, you need to be able to put it back together correctly. This takes practice!

I recommend to novice shooters a revolver.

For personal defense, I recommend a .38 caliber or above. You never know when your assailant is going to be hopped up on drugs. You need good stopping power.

The recoil of a gun is something to consider as well. A polymer (aka plastic) gun is going to have a lot of "kick" with a .38 or above.

The recoil of a semi automatic handgun can cause jams of you do not use proper shooting form. If you are carrying a semi auto for personal protection, you should learn how to "combat un-jam the weapon." Revolvers do not have this problem.

Just make sure what ever gun you choose fits in your hand, and you have the strength to pull the trigger. Try it out in the store. If you go with a semi auto, make sure you can "rack" the slide. Some people don't have the strength.

I recommend a colt detectives special. It is a metal revolver in the .38 caliber. Very simple and dependable. It is also concealable if you want to carry it on you.

If you are carrying the weapon concealed many states will have Reciprocal carry agreements. For states that don't allow you to carry concealed you can still traverse the state with a weapon in your vehicle. It must be unloaded, and in a locked case stored in the furthest back portion of your vehicle ie: the trunk, or behind the seat of a truck. You must pass through the state, no spending the night!

Some states require you to inform law enforcement if you are pulled over and have a gun in the vehicle. What sates are those? I can't keep track, so as a courtesy to law enforcement if I am ever pulled over, I tell them there is a gun in the vehicle.
“Your labor income makes you rich, not your investments.”

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Pancakes-Eggs-Bacon
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Pancakes-Eggs-Bacon » Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:08 am

EPWorrell wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:33 am
Never owned or used a gun before but thinking about purchasing one. After a little research I am thinking a 9mm might be the best handgun for a beginner like me. Can anyone recommend a particular brand/model?

Thanks
First off, welcome to the Boglehead Forums!

Secondly, I'll echo what others already said:
  1. We need some more information.
    • Do you intend to carry this on your person for day-to-day protection? If so, then buying something compact or subcompact is more ideal than something full size, as I've found many [but not all] people who start carrying something full size will stop carrying consistently due to concerns about comfort, weight, and compatibility with clothing and weather/season. If you only want to purchase one handgun to start, getting a compact or subcompact handgun can serve a dual purpose: both personal protection at home and out in public.
    • If this is only intended for home defense and perhaps training classes but you do NOT intend to carry it, then get the full size handgun. It is more comfortable to shoot due to less perceived recoil compared to smaller, lighter handguns.
    • If this is only for fun, plinking, and practice and NOT self-defense, then get a handgun chambered in .22lr. Popular brands include Ruger, Browning, and Smith & Wesson.
  2. Agree with taking a basic safety and marksmanship course first before purchasing anything. I'll get more specific below.
Training Options for Beginners
I'm a huge proponent of safety, responsibility, and continuing education and training and practice. Marksmanship and the usage of a firearm are perishable skills that require continued practice and training. You'd be surprised at how many people only take one class such as their state's 2, 4, or 10 hour concealed carry course and never take another class. Their skills are very limited, and they develop really poor habits, violate safety rules (which can get innocent people hurt or killed), and have not maximized their chances of survival if a life-threatening situation were to occur.

From a consumer perspective, what worked for me and what offers good bang-for-the-buck is to take the NRA Basic Pistol course from a reputable instructor in your area. This often overlaps many states' concealed carry curricula, but I recommend taking the Basic Pistol course separately because:
  1. It's fairly cheap compared to many other courses from random gun ranges and private academies. $100-150 or so. I'm absolutely not poo-poo-ing other courses, but I recommend the NRA Basic Pistol Course's 8-10 hour course.
  2. The course content is a standardized curriculum from an organization that has been in the education and training business since the 1800s.
  3. The certificate of course completion does not expire and often meets many state legislatures' proof of pistol/handgun competence. In other words, besides the basic safety and marksmanship knowledge gained, you can often use the certificate to get your concealed carry permit/license from MANY states in the USA.
Direct link to search by zip code: NRA Training
Look for "Basics of Pistol Shooting." Blended = Some of the course/lecture is done online on the computer. Instructor-led = The whole course/lecture is done in the instructor's classroom.

Communicate with your prospective instructor (many have websites, phone numbers, e-mails listed), and explain that you are a new/beginner shooter who does not yet own a handgun. Most instructors provide handguns for their basic courses. You may or may not need to provide your own ammunition. Same with eye protection (Z87+ safety glasses) and hearing protection (earplugs and/or earmuffs with preferably 32 dB or higher Noise Reduction Ratings).

After you complete the NRA Basic Pistol course, you should have the knowledge and confidence to go to local gun ranges that offer pistol rentals to try out many different makes and models.

Purchase Options for Beginners
There are many correct answers as to which make and model to purchase, since it's a very personal decision based on how it feels in your hands, features, price, etc. After taking a basic safety and marksmanship course, you'll be equipped to rent many different handguns at a shooting range [that offers rentals] and take notes on what you like. Rent everything under the sun, from Glock to Smith & Wesson to Beretta, CZ, Springfield Armory, Sig Sauer, Colt, Hechler and Koch to Kahr to FN.

There are several brands, however, that are considered "Saturday Night Specials" and should be avoided due to cheap quality and reliability: Jennings, Bryco, Lorcin, Jimenez, Raven, and some others. These are poor consumer options. In my opinion, also avoid Hi-Point, but they're slightly higher quality than the usual suspects, and many people love their cheapo Hi-Point pistols.

Additional Training and Continuing Education After You Purchase
The basic course only covers safety rules and basic marksmanship, but if you have any intent on using your pistol for home defense or self-defense out and about in public, you absolutely owe it to yourself to seek out additional training, since there are many more skills to learn and master that have nothing to do with standing still at a square range with no stress and perfect lighting and posture.

From a consumer perspective, what worked for me a decade ago was to take NRA Personal Protection in the Home (typically a 1-day, 9 hour course), then NRA Personal Protection Outside the Home (typically a 2-day class on a weekend). I recommend these because they are fairly affordable ($150, $200, $250 range or so) and are welcoming to beginners without the machismo and pressure and stress that comes with more advanced classes and private schools.

I do recommend seeking out intermediate and advanced courses from reputable local, regional, and national schools, but these can cost $1000 or more per course + travel expenses. This is for another thread.

In Summary
  • Take a reputable beginner's course first that covers safety rules, safe storage, basic anatomy and function of the pistol, and basic marksmanship skills such as posture, stance, grip, sight picture, and firing. This will build good, safe habits and fundamental skills.
  • Seek out a shooting range that offers firearm rentals. And/or find friends who are pistol owners who can let you borrow/shoot their pistols at the range for free!
  • Make the purchase decision for your first handgun based on your personal preference. Avoid the uber-cheap, unreliable brands.
  • Continue practicing and training and reinforcing fundamentals and good habits.
Edited to Add - Some consumer things I didn't know at first:
  • Renting firearms and range fees can quickly add up. Many public ranges -- if you are not a member -- will charge by the day or by the hour. If you wish to rent firearms, that's an additional fee. Some ranges it's a flat fee per hour for unlimited pistols (you can go back and forth and change guns); at other ranges it could be $10/rental, so trying out 3 pistols = $30. Often times ranges will require that you purchase a box of 50 or 100 rounds of ammunition from them if using in their rentals. 2-3 hours at the range as a non-member while renting firearms + buying ammunition can easily be $100-200. But worth it if you use your time wisely and go in having completed a basic course.
  • Most all firearm and ammunition purchases from retail firearms dealers are non-refundable, so it's wise to research your purchase decision in-depth before buying.

sid hartha
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by sid hartha » Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:19 am

Lots of good advice. Personally I like the Springfield Armory XDM

spitty
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by spitty » Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:36 am

Lots of good advice here, but my two cents is-it depends on what kind of shooter you'll be. If you'll rarely/never shoot and leave it untouched at bedside for two years, get a revolver. Jams are rare and it'll work if ever needed. They come triggerless so convenient to carry in pants pocket or purse (DW has a Ruger triggerless .38--she hasn't shot it in 5 years). My "bedside special" is a M&P 9mm with mounted Surefire light (get a light!); it's well balanced and shoots great. Also have a Sig .226 which is excellent, I just prefer the S&W. I worry that leaving clips loaded and untouched for too long will weaken the springs so try to shoot regularly and only leave them half loaded when idle. You must practice! Quick target acquisition isn't always easy especially if it's moving.
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Strayshot
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Strayshot » Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:20 am

From a fiscal standpoint, there are several well made polymer semi-auto pistols from Sig, S&W, and Glock that all are good guns. You should be paying under 700 or so. HK are nice but more expensive. Ruger makes some great revolvers as does S&W also under 700.

S&W just came out with the Shield 380 EZ. I haven’t played with one yet, but depending on your age and comfort level with guns it may be a good choice. My friends 76 year old father has trouble racking the slide on lots of semi autos due to arthritis, so we are hoping this pistol fits the bill.

Each gun has pros and cons, I have a whole stable full for that reason because each can be fun to shoot for different reasons. The midsize glock frames fit my hands very well, but I have a “long palm”. I am most accurate with the 1911 platform in .45 but for most scenarios prefer a glock 23 in .40.

Everyone is correct about holding and shooting different guns to see what fits you. Find an indoor range with helpful staff, bring $200 and start shooting stuff. It is the best money you will spend before a purchase.

Once you have the gun, go back to that range and put at minimum 500 rounds through it. Kill a tree worth of targets. Go back and put another couple hundred rounds through it at least 2 times a year to remember what shooting feels like. Muscle memory and such.

Good luck!

Spirit Rider
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Spirit Rider » Thu Jan 10, 2019 10:48 am

spitty wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:36 am
I worry that leaving clips loaded and untouched for too long will weaken the springs so try to shoot regularly and only leave them half loaded when idle. You must practice! Quick target acquisition isn't always easy especially if it's moving.
Basic terminology: Modern pistols have removal magazines. Only fixed magazine firearms use clips, i.e. C96 Mauser pistol and M1 Garand rifle

This is a persistent myth that refuses to die and flies in the face of basic Metallurgy and Mechanical Engineering.

Set is a permanent deformation of the spring after it has been compressed and occurs after only a few cycles and then the full amount of set has been reached. Creep happens with a constant load over time. A properly designed magazine will exhibit no set and quality magazine springs will exhibit no creep no matter how long the magazine remains loaded.

Failure to feed is almost always due to operator failure (limp wristing, etc...) , ammunition and/or feedlip design and/or deformation.

As long as they are not over compressed, magazines can be stored fully loaded for an indeterminate amount of time. However, there is a phenomenon if they are carried daily long enough. The cartridges rotate in the magazine building up indiscernible ridges on the cases. These can cause a failure to feed. Anyone who carries a pistol should be practicing a few times a year. They should fire their current and all spare magazines through the pistol and after practicing, load new cartridges.

However, I have seen many "frugal" (dumb) people at the range unload their carry cartridges from the magazines and after practicing with less expensive loads, put the same cartridges back in the magazines. Not to mention they remove the magazine and chambered cartridge at least once a day to unload the pistol when they go home. Then before they go out; insert the magazine, cycle the slide to chamber a cartridge and load the previously removed cartridge into the magazine. They may go weeks or months with the same two cartridges being slammed home into the chamber by the slide. This means the second cartridge is almost always deformed. This is a failure to feed waiting to happen

Many pistol owners have an annoying habit of slamming magazines into the well to "fully seat" the magazine. When the◙ reality is that the magazine drops back to the latch anyway. Magazines should be inserted in a firm smooth manner. When you slam the magazine home, The top cartridge typically contacts the bottom of the slide and over compresses the magazine spring possibly applying a "set". Also, the feed lips may get deformed over time.

Then the failure to feeds from all of these circumstances are falsely attributed to magazine spring set or fatigue.

Competitive and other frequent shooters swear by proactively replacing magazine springs. However, it is not clear that any fatigue has occurred, because they typically clean the magazines and and check and maybe adjust the feed lips. Personally, I have never replaced a magazine spring except as a customization step in more that four decades and some I have had for that long.

ebrasmus21
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by ebrasmus21 » Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:22 am

Strayshot wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:20 am
From a fiscal standpoint, there are several well made polymer semi-auto pistols from Sig, S&W, and Glock that all are good guns. You should be paying under 700 or so. HK are nice but more expensive. Ruger makes some great revolvers as does S&W also under 700.

S&W just came out with the Shield 380 EZ. I haven’t played with one yet, but depending on your age and comfort level with guns it may be a good choice. My friends 76 year old father has trouble racking the slide on lots of semi autos due to arthritis, so we are hoping this pistol fits the bill.

Each gun has pros and cons, I have a whole stable full for that reason because each can be fun to shoot for different reasons. The midsize glock frames fit my hands very well, but I have a “long palm”. I am most accurate with the 1911 platform in .45 but for most scenarios prefer a glock 23 in .40.

Everyone is correct about holding and shooting different guns to see what fits you. Find an indoor range with helpful staff, bring $200 and start shooting stuff. It is the best money you will spend before a purchase.

Once you have the gun, go back to that range and put at minimum 500 rounds through it. Kill a tree worth of targets. Go back and put another couple hundred rounds through it at least 2 times a year to remember what shooting feels like. Muscle memory and such.

Good luck!
I couldn't be happier with my HK. It's high quality and very easy to operate; the trigger is especially nice which makes for fun shooting. Some guns, IMO, are not fun, at all, because of the trigger. I think that is a large part as to why I enjoy my HK so much.

All that being said, there are numerous good/very good options at or below the price of HK.

ebrasmus21
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by ebrasmus21 » Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:25 am

Spirit Rider wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 10:48 am
spitty wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:36 am
I worry that leaving clips loaded and untouched for too long will weaken the springs so try to shoot regularly and only leave them half loaded when idle. You must practice! Quick target acquisition isn't always easy especially if it's moving.
Basic terminology: Modern pistols have removal magazines. Only fixed magazine firearms use clips, i.e. C96 Mauser pistol and M1 Garand rifle

This is a persistent myth that refuses to die and flies in the face of basic Metallurgy and Mechanical Engineering.

Set is a permanent deformation of the spring after it has been compressed and occurs after only a few cycles and then the full amount of set has been reached. Creep happens with a constant load over time. A properly designed magazine will exhibit no set and quality magazine springs will exhibit no creep no matter how long the magazine remains loaded.

Failure to feed is almost always due to operator failure (limp wristing, etc...) , ammunition and/or feedlip design and/or deformation.

As long as they are not over compressed, magazines can be stored fully loaded for an indeterminate amount of time. However, there is a phenomenon if they are carried daily long enough. The cartridges rotate in the magazine building up indiscernible ridges on the cases. These can cause a failure to feed. Anyone who carries a pistol should be practicing a few times a year. They should fire their current and all spare magazines through the pistol and after practicing, load new cartridges.

However, I have seen many "frugal" (dumb) people at the range unload their carry cartridges from the magazines and after practicing with less expensive loads, put the same cartridges back in the magazines. Not to mention they remove the magazine and chambered cartridge at least once a day to unload the pistol when they go home. Then before they go out; insert the magazine, cycle the slide to chamber a cartridge and load the previously removed cartridge into the magazine. They may go weeks or months with the same two cartridges being slammed home into the chamber by the slide. This means the second cartridge is almost always deformed. This is a failure to feed waiting to happen

Many pistol owners have an annoying habit of slamming magazines into the well to "fully seat" the magazine. When the◙ reality is that the magazine drops back to the latch anyway. Magazines should be inserted in a firm smooth manner. When you slam the magazine home, The top cartridge typically contacts the bottom of the slide and over compresses the magazine spring possibly applying a "set". Also, the feed lips may get deformed over time.

Then the failure to feeds from all of these circumstances are falsely attributed to magazine spring set or fatigue.

Competitive and other frequent shooters swear by proactively replacing magazine springs. However, it is not clear that any fatigue has occurred, because they typically clean the magazines and and check and maybe adjust the feed lips. Personally, I have never replaced a magazine spring except as a customization step in more that four decades and some I have had for that long.
Excellent post, thank you for sharing. I'm guilty of this as well. I periodically have changed which mag I'm using because in my mind I didn't want to wear them out....

Crow Hunter
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Crow Hunter » Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:07 pm

Spirit Rider wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 10:48 am
spitty wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:36 am
I worry that leaving clips loaded and untouched for too long will weaken the springs so try to shoot regularly and only leave them half loaded when idle. You must practice! Quick target acquisition isn't always easy especially if it's moving.
SNIP

However, I have seen many "frugal" (dumb) people at the range unload their carry cartridges from the magazines and after practicing with less expensive loads, put the same cartridges back in the magazines. Not to mention they remove the magazine and chambered cartridge at least once a day to unload the pistol when they go home. Then before they go out; insert the magazine, cycle the slide to chamber a cartridge and load the previously removed cartridge into the magazine. They may go weeks or months with the same two cartridges being slammed home into the chamber by the slide. This means the second cartridge is almost always deformed. This is a failure to feed waiting to happen

Another thing to add, repeatedly re-chambering the same round can result in bullet setback in the case. On high pressure rounds like the .40 S&W or 9mm +P, it may result in a pressure spike which can result in a case blowout.

I avoid re-chambering rounds for this reason.

To your other point, I had a Glock 19 magazine that was in my pickup truck loaded for over a decade when I found it while cleaning out the truck to sell. It apparently had fallen out of my range bag and got down between the seats.

Two of the 15 rounds in the magazine had dead primers, most likely from heat cycling, but the magazine fed all the rounds fine and I still use it today.

spitty
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by spitty » Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:43 pm

Spirit Rider wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 10:48 am
spitty wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:36 am
I worry that leaving clips loaded and untouched for too long will weaken the springs so try to shoot regularly and only leave them half loaded when idle. You must practice! Quick target acquisition isn't always easy especially if it's moving.
Basic terminology: Modern pistols have removal magazines. Only fixed magazine firearms use clips, i.e. C96 Mauser pistol and M1 Garand rifle

This is a persistent myth that refuses to die and flies in the face of basic Metallurgy and Mechanical Engineering.

Set is a permanent deformation of the spring after it has been compressed and occurs after only a few cycles and then the full amount of set has been reached. Creep happens with a constant load over time. A properly designed magazine will exhibit no set and quality magazine springs will exhibit no creep no matter how long the magazine remains loaded.

Failure to feed is almost always due to operator failure (limp wristing, etc...) , ammunition and/or feedlip design and/or deformation.

As long as they are not over compressed, magazines can be stored fully loaded for an indeterminate amount of time. However, there is a phenomenon if they are carried daily long enough. The cartridges rotate in the magazine building up indiscernible ridges on the cases. These can cause a failure to feed. Anyone who carries a pistol should be practicing a few times a year. They should fire their current and all spare magazines through the pistol and after practicing, load new cartridges.

However, I have seen many "frugal" (dumb) people at the range unload their carry cartridges from the magazines and after practicing with less expensive loads, put the same cartridges back in the magazines. Not to mention they remove the magazine and chambered cartridge at least once a day to unload the pistol when they go home. Then before they go out; insert the magazine, cycle the slide to chamber a cartridge and load the previously removed cartridge into the magazine. They may go weeks or months with the same two cartridges being slammed home into the chamber by the slide. This means the second cartridge is almost always deformed. This is a failure to feed waiting to happen

Many pistol owners have an annoying habit of slamming magazines into the well to "fully seat" the magazine. When the◙ reality is that the magazine drops back to the latch anyway. Magazines should be inserted in a firm smooth manner. When you slam the magazine home, The top cartridge typically contacts the bottom of the slide and over compresses the magazine spring possibly applying a "set". Also, the feed lips may get deformed over time.

Then the failure to feeds from all of these circumstances are falsely attributed to magazine spring set or fatigue.

Competitive and other frequent shooters swear by proactively replacing magazine springs. However, it is not clear that any fatigue has occurred, because they typically clean the magazines and and check and maybe adjust the feed lips. Personally, I have never replaced a magazine spring except as a customization step in more that four decades and some I have had for that long.
Thanks for the very nice write-up, Spirit Rider..lots of great info!
@HelpingRhinos...1 rhino poached every 8 hours last year...501(c)(3)

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by lazydavid » Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:47 pm

spitty wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:36 am
Lots of good advice here, but my two cents is-it depends on what kind of shooter you'll be. If you'll rarely/never shoot and leave it untouched at bedside for two years, get a revolver. Jams are rare and it'll work if ever needed. They come triggerless so convenient to carry in pants pocket or purse (DW has a Ruger triggerless .38--she hasn't shot it in 5 years).
I hope you mean hammerless. A triggerless revolver wouldn't be terribly useful. :P

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by SrGrumpy » Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:13 pm

lazydavid wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:47 pm
spitty wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:36 am
Lots of good advice here, but my two cents is-it depends on what kind of shooter you'll be. If you'll rarely/never shoot and leave it untouched at bedside for two years, get a revolver. Jams are rare and it'll work if ever needed. They come triggerless so convenient to carry in pants pocket or purse (DW has a Ruger triggerless .38--she hasn't shot it in 5 years).
I hope you mean hammerless. A triggerless revolver wouldn't be terribly useful. :P
I saw that, too. Cool, they make Alexa-like guns that will shoot on command?

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by spitty » Thu Jan 10, 2019 3:42 pm

I did mean hammerless--thanks!
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Strayshot
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Strayshot » Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:11 pm

ebrasmus21 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:22 am
Strayshot wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:20 am
From a fiscal standpoint, there are several well made polymer semi-auto pistols from Sig, S&W, and Glock that all are good guns. You should be paying under 700 or so. HK are nice but more expensive. Ruger makes some great revolvers as does S&W also under 700.

S&W just came out with the Shield 380 EZ. I haven’t played with one yet, but depending on your age and comfort level with guns it may be a good choice. My friends 76 year old father has trouble racking the slide on lots of semi autos due to arthritis, so we are hoping this pistol fits the bill.

Each gun has pros and cons, I have a whole stable full for that reason because each can be fun to shoot for different reasons. The midsize glock frames fit my hands very well, but I have a “long palm”. I am most accurate with the 1911 platform in .45 but for most scenarios prefer a glock 23 in .40.

Everyone is correct about holding and shooting different guns to see what fits you. Find an indoor range with helpful staff, bring $200 and start shooting stuff. It is the best money you will spend before a purchase.

Once you have the gun, go back to that range and put at minimum 500 rounds through it. Kill a tree worth of targets. Go back and put another couple hundred rounds through it at least 2 times a year to remember what shooting feels like. Muscle memory and such.

Good luck!
I couldn't be happier with my HK. It's high quality and very easy to operate; the trigger is especially nice which makes for fun shooting. Some guns, IMO, are not fun, at all, because of the trigger. I think that is a large part as to why I enjoy my HK so much.

All that being said, there are numerous good/very good options at or below the price of HK.
I love my USP40 as well (mine is a variant 1), just not sure I would recommend it as a first pistol because of the cost (about 300 more than a glock/M&P). It does bring up a good subject though, which is that the ability to decock the HK is a really nice feature for folks worried about carrying a glock and relying on “just” the trigger safety. You get a double action-ish first pull and then normal single action pulls after that, and one could argue that the reliability claims made by revolver folks because every shot is double action would apply to the first shot from a decocked HK......

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Longruninvestor » Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:50 pm

EPWorrell wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:33 am
Never owned or used a gun before but thinking about purchasing one. After a little research I am thinking a 9mm might be the best handgun for a beginner like me. Can anyone recommend a particular brand/model?

Thanks
You describe yourself as a beginner; recognizing your own lack of experience and reaching out for help is FANTASTIC. Thank you for setting such a great example. Please don’t step into a gun shop anytime soon and buy a Glock 17 as others on this board have suggested. I really can’t think of a worse choice for the 1st gun you purchase. It’s always best to walk before we try to run especially when it comes to firearms.

Rifles and shotguns have to be shouldered and it’s harder for a new shooter to get in trouble with one. Join a beginner trap or rifle league; gun clubs have rentals and they will teach you how to be safe. If a handgun is a must for you then spend some time getting to know a revolver next. A revolver with the cylinder open is a safe weapon that will not fire. There have been untold numbers of deaths and injuries with semiauto pistols where an inexperienced person thought a ejected magazine meant the gun was unloaded and safe. It does not. Guns are nothing to fool around with. The internet is filled with bad advice for beginning investors but the worst thing that can happen from following that bad advice is you go broke. Guns are a different matter; people die when mistakes are made. Please take it slow.

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by GCD » Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:56 pm

Crow Hunter wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:24 am
This isn't the best place to get recommendations for this type of question.

I suggest Pistol-forum.com.
Wow. Surprised to see Pistol-forum.com recommended here. That's a fairly obscure site. IMO, it's to guns what BH is to finance. Pretty solid website.

But I would still lean toward real life experience and training in this matter.

I agree with not following advice given on this website regarding guns. There's good advice in this thread and there have been inaccurate and misleading statements made as well. The OP lacks the experience to identify which is which. You need to talk to some people in real life who you can vet as to their competency.

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Gort
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Gort » Thu Jan 10, 2019 10:09 pm

JoMoney wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 4:14 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 4:10 pm
Gort wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 3:58 pm
Odd discussion for a financial forum.
More or less odd than "what's the best type of men's underwear"? :)
We have lots of consumer product/purchase discussions.
Big difference in taking anonymous advice from the internet between guns and underwear.

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by CarlZ993 » Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:13 pm

Retired LE officer here. Carried a Glock for a significant portion of my career: 17 (9mm), 19 (9mm), 26 (9mm; backup), 22 (.40 cal), & 27 (.40 cal; backup). If I could only have one, I'd go w/ the 19 with night-sights. Smaller than the model 17 but larger than the small backup pistols (26 or 27). I started w/ the 17 but later went to the 19 for both on-duty & off-duty carry.

In the middle 80s, our dept allowed semi-auto pistols (required individual purchase) to take the place of the issued S&W .357 revolvers. Glocks was one of the 'approved' pistols on the list. One of our civilian range instructors loaned his Glock 17 for officers going through the conversion course who hadn't bought their own pistol yet. He purposely did not clean the weapon or do any maintenance on the gun. Tens of thousands of rounds went through that pistol. It kept ticking like a Timex. Great, reliable pistol.
Carl Z

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by monkey_business » Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:48 pm

Longruninvestor wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:50 pm
EPWorrell wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:33 am
Never owned or used a gun before but thinking about purchasing one. After a little research I am thinking a 9mm might be the best handgun for a beginner like me. Can anyone recommend a particular brand/model?

Thanks
You describe yourself as a beginner; recognizing your own lack of experience and reaching out for help is FANTASTIC. Thank you for setting such a great example. Please don’t step into a gun shop anytime soon and buy a Glock 17 as others on this board have suggested. I really can’t think of a worse choice for the 1st gun you purchase. It’s always best to walk before we try to run especially when it comes to firearms.

Rifles and shotguns have to be shouldered and it’s harder for a new shooter to get in trouble with one. Join a beginner trap or rifle league; gun clubs have rentals and they will teach you how to be safe. If a handgun is a must for you then spend some time getting to know a revolver next. A revolver with the cylinder open is a safe weapon that will not fire. There have been untold numbers of deaths and injuries with semiauto pistols where an inexperienced person thought a ejected magazine meant the gun was unloaded and safe. It does not. Guns are nothing to fool around with. The internet is filled with bad advice for beginning investors but the worst thing that can happen from following that bad advice is you go broke. Guns are a different matter; people die when mistakes are made. Please take it slow.
There is no need to scare away a new shooter from handguns. The fear is completely unjustified. A 9mm Glock is one of the best guns for a beginner. Inexpensive, super reliable, easy to maintain, good caliber from a ballistics standpoint, good caliber from a financial standpoint, good for carry, good for home defense.

All this talk of revolvers being more reliable is silly. First, they can malfunction just like any other gun. Second, no armed forces or law enforcement use revolvers these days. Semi-automatics like the Glock provide superior capacity, reload ease, and are reliable enough to be used in actual life and death combat situations. Third, most beginners I've seen shooting a revolver do a terrible job. Revolvers typically have long heavy trigger pulls and most beginners really struggle with them, especially women. I've also never seen a beginner stuggle to shoot a Glock.

To the OP: don't let folks scare you. Get a Glock. Take classes. Train with it. Spend more money on training and ammo than on the gun. You will be just fine.

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tc101
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by tc101 » Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:52 pm

Protect your hearing.
. | The most important thing you should know about me is that I am not an expert.

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Dead Man Walking » Fri Jan 11, 2019 2:33 am

The posts that recommended going to the range and renting several different pistols and choosing the one that fits your hand and is easy for you to handle are prudent advice. However, I would recommend choosing a gun that has excellent sights. Being able to acquire the target and shoot a tight pattern are usually a function of excellent sights. You may want to check out different sights as well as different guns. A gun is only as good as your ability to hit what you are shooting at! For home defense I recommend a laser sight.

DMW

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by bloom2708 » Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:20 am

tc101 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:52 pm
Protect your hearing.
+1

Almost every volunteer at the range I go to wears Howard Leight muffs. Impact Pro is the model I have.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007B ... UTF8&psc=1

My first pair was not nearly as good. You don't have to pay $300, but don't scrimp either.
"We are not here to please, but to provoke thoughtfulness." --Unknown Boglehead

21&lewis
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by 21&lewis » Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:21 am

Great advice on this thread! My favorite is the HK VP9

ebrasmus21
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by ebrasmus21 » Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:58 am

21&lewis wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:21 am
Great advice on this thread! My favorite is the HK VP9
Same for me. Great firearm and it's actually a fun time at the range.

The Outsider
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by The Outsider » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:11 am

hdas wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:27 pm
Albeit most of the posts are just signaling. :greedy
Deliberately ironic? 8-)

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ThereAreNoGurus
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by ThereAreNoGurus » Fri Jan 11, 2019 12:13 pm

ebrasmus21 wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:58 am
21&lewis wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:21 am
Great advice on this thread! My favorite is the HK VP9
Same for me. Great firearm and it's actually a fun time at the range.
Off topic, but same here.

ddurrett896
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by ddurrett896 » Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:21 pm

tc101 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:52 pm
Protect your hearing.
This

http://www.fightthenoise.org/take-action/#take-action

TN_Boy
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by TN_Boy » Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:47 pm

bloom2708 wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:20 am
tc101 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:52 pm
Protect your hearing.
+1

Almost every volunteer at the range I go to wears Howard Leight muffs. Impact Pro is the model I have.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007B ... UTF8&psc=1

My first pair was not nearly as good. You don't have to pay $300, but don't scrimp either.
I always use plugs AND muffs (the later amplifed headphones generally like the ones in the link above). Especially indoors, but I would use both even outdoors.

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by wfrobinette » Fri Jan 11, 2019 4:14 pm

I love my HK 45 (its a 45 cal) and my Walther PPQ 9mm. SMall had and both of these fit like a glove.

ebrasmus21
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by ebrasmus21 » Fri Jan 11, 2019 4:17 pm

TN_Boy wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:47 pm
bloom2708 wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:20 am
tc101 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:52 pm
Protect your hearing.
+1

Almost every volunteer at the range I go to wears Howard Leight muffs. Impact Pro is the model I have.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007B ... UTF8&psc=1

My first pair was not nearly as good. You don't have to pay $300, but don't scrimp either.
I always use plugs AND muffs (the later amplifed headphones generally like the ones in the link above). Especially indoors, but I would use both even outdoors.
I don't have any expertise in this matter but I also use plugs + muffs.

Longruninvestor
Posts: 27
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by Longruninvestor » Fri Jan 11, 2019 6:57 pm

monkey_business wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:48 pm
Longruninvestor wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:50 pm
EPWorrell wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:33 am
Never owned or used a gun before but thinking about purchasing one. After a little research I am thinking a 9mm might be the best handgun for a beginner like me. Can anyone recommend a particular brand/model?

Thanks
You describe yourself as a beginner; recognizing your own lack of experience and reaching out for help is FANTASTIC. Thank you for setting such a great example. Please don’t step into a gun shop anytime soon and buy a Glock 17 as others on this board have suggested. I really can’t think of a worse choice for the 1st gun you purchase. It’s always best to walk before we try to run especially when it comes to firearms.

Rifles and shotguns have to be shouldered and it’s harder for a new shooter to get in trouble with one. Join a beginner trap or rifle league; gun clubs have rentals and they will teach you how to be safe. If a handgun is a must for you then spend some time getting to know a revolver next. A revolver with the cylinder open is a safe weapon that will not fire. There have been untold numbers of deaths and injuries with semiauto pistols where an inexperienced person thought a ejected magazine meant the gun was unloaded and safe. It does not. Guns are nothing to fool around with. The internet is filled with bad advice for beginning investors but the worst thing that can happen from following that bad advice is you go broke. Guns are a different matter; people die when mistakes are made. Please take it slow.
There is no need to scare away a new shooter from handguns. The fear is completely unjustified. A 9mm Glock is one of the best guns for a beginner. Inexpensive, super reliable, easy to maintain, good caliber from a ballistics standpoint, good caliber from a financial standpoint, good for carry, good for home defense.

All this talk of revolvers being more reliable is silly. First, they can malfunction just like any other gun. Second, no armed forces or law enforcement use revolvers these days. Semi-automatics like the Glock provide superior capacity, reload ease, and are reliable enough to be used in actual life and death combat situations. Third, most beginners I've seen shooting a revolver do a terrible job. Revolvers typically have long heavy trigger pulls and most beginners really struggle with them, especially women. I've also never seen a beginner stuggle to shoot a Glock.

To the OP: don't let folks scare you. Get a Glock. Take classes. Train with it. Spend more money on training and ammo than on the gun. You will be just fine.
I was taught from an early age to fear and respect all firearms and have logged enough hours on the range and in the field to know that there is no substitute for experience. I recommended that the OP start building that experience with something other than a semiauto handgun —and I’m sticking with that advice. With respect to which handgun is better, I would take a 1911 over a plastic Glock any day, but I have both in my safe and would probably grab my 66 Smith and Wesson if I was forced to choose between the 3.

One of the first responders to this thread said the OP should seek opinions from other places. I think there was a lot of wisdom in that sentiment.

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by LadyGeek » Fri Jan 11, 2019 7:09 pm

^^^ Let me emphasize the importance of learning fear and respect. A cardinal principal "the gun is always loaded" has been taught to me since I was a kid.

A few years ago, a friend of mine wanted to show me her H&K 9 mm. She handed it to me to get a feel for it. This was inside a home. Assuming the gun was loaded, I pointed it in a safe direction. The gun fired. :shock:

What happened? She cycled the slide, then dropped the clip. A simple brain lapse created a dangerous situation.

That's why you need real experience, in a real range, with real instructors. My experience saved this from becoming a bad situation.

(Gun owners should recognize what went wrong...)
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.

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ThereAreNoGurus
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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by ThereAreNoGurus » Fri Jan 11, 2019 7:33 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 7:09 pm
^^^ Let me emphasize the importance of learning fear and respect. A cardinal principal "the gun is always loaded" has been taught to me since I was a kid.

A few years ago, a friend of mine wanted to show me her H&K 9 mm. She handed it to me to get a feel for it. This was inside a home. Assuming the gun was loaded, I pointed it in a safe direction. The gun fired. :shock:

What happened? She cycled the slide, then dropped the clip. A simple brain lapse created a dangerous situation.

That's why you need real experience, in a real range, with real instructors. My experience saved this from becoming a bad situation.

(Gun owners should recognize what went wrong...)
A similar experience happened to one of my kids. His friend's father handed him a pistol with the mag removed (inside the home).

I had taught my kids that when you are handed a firearm, to ***ALWAYS*** check to see whether a round is chambered, even if you just saw somebody else check. This time there was a round in the chamber. My kid pointed that out to the dad, who obviously was unaware... really dumb, but fortunately my kids listened (at least when it comes to gun safety!).

If you always check (no exceptions), it becomes second nature.
Last edited by ThereAreNoGurus on Fri Jan 11, 2019 7:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by jabberwockOG » Fri Jan 11, 2019 7:40 pm

Read all the responses, nice to see lots of great and varied advice. Based on the reading I'm changing my recommendation for a first gun for a new shooter from a Glock semi-auto pistol to instead suggest purchasing and learning on a high quality 6 shot .38 caliber revolver.

Having owned and trained with various revolvers and pistols for 40+ years it is hard for me to remember how much easier (and safer) it was to start learning firearms skills with a revolver rather than a semi-auto. Any semi-auto pistol (like a Glock) introduce a level of complexity that is best taken on after a new shooter has learned and mastered the basics of using a firearm with a revolver. A revolver can most certainly bite you if used carelessly but I would bet that the rate of unintentional/negligent discharge on pistols is way higher than that of revolvers.

I also think revolvers as a class are in most cases easier to safely and effectively use for close quarters self defense. Also loaded revolver can sit in a bedside drawer for 20+ years and still be counted on to instantly be usable and operate perfectly (go bang) with minimal fuss.
Last edited by jabberwockOG on Fri Jan 11, 2019 7:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by KJVanguard » Fri Jan 11, 2019 7:52 pm

monkey_business wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 10:35 am
Glock 19.

As reliable as they get. Easy to maintain. Easy to shoot. Not expensive. It's the Corolla of pistols.
Yeah, it's a reasonable choice if you want something small enough to conceal. If you are looking for home defense, well, then handgun size doesn't really matter, so you don't need a compact Glock that was made for concealed/open carry.

A Beretta 92 A1 is one of the pistols I keep loaded for home defense. The A1 version has a rail for my green laser (light too if you wish); the G19 of course has a rail just the same. People with small hands complain about the large grip size of the Beretta 92/96, though not a problem for my 2XL paws. VERY easy to strip/reassemble. Even easier than Glock, which is itself is easy.

The low cost of 9mm may prompt one to practice more, which is always good. Of course, I have seen 12-year-olds effectively handle a .45, so you hardly need to be large & intimidating to handle a .45.

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by AllieTB1323 » Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:18 pm

jabberwockOG wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 7:40 pm
Read all the responses, nice to see lots of great and varied advice. Based on the reading I'm changing my recommendation for a first gun for a new shooter from a Glock semi-auto pistol to instead suggest purchasing and learning on a high quality 6 shot .38 caliber revolver.

Having owned and trained with various revolvers and pistols for 40+ years it is hard for me to remember how much easier (and safer) it was to start learning firearms skills with a revolver rather than a semi-auto. Any semi-auto pistol (like a Glock) introduce a level of complexity that is best taken on after a new shooter has learned and mastered the basics of using a firearm with a revolver. A revolver can most certainly bite you if used carelessly but I would bet that the rate of unintentional/negligent discharge on pistols is way higher than that of revolvers.

I also think revolvers as a class are in most cases easier to safely and effectively use for close quarters self defense. Also loaded revolver can sit in a bedside drawer for 20+ years and still be counted on to instantly be usable and operate perfectly (go bang) with minimal fuss.
Thanks, this has been fun. As a Range Safety Officer at a local club i have noticed many woman and some older men have trouble racking the slides of their compact semi-auto pistols. A case in point, my DW has trouble with racking the slides on our semi-autos so her goto is a S&W J Frame while on my side of the bed there's is a Sig.

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Re: Recommendations for a 9mm handgun

Post by rockonhumblepie » Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:50 pm

Older Ruger Stainless

Locked