Engineering school

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KlangFool
Posts: 11059
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 12:35 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by KlangFool » Sat Nov 03, 2018 5:43 pm

OP,

I did my BSEE and MSEE in a decent in-state university. I worked part-time at the university computing center for 5 years while I was doing my degree. When I graduated, I started working as a person with 5 years of relevant working experience. Nobody even cares to look at my degree and/or my CGPA since I am not a fresh graduate.

So, you could follow a common beaten path. Fight among the fresh graduate for jobs requiring no job experience or bypassing the whole crowd and start working at a job requiring 2 to 5 years of working experience when you graduated.

KlangFool

KlangFool
Posts: 11059
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 12:35 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by KlangFool » Sat Nov 03, 2018 5:49 pm

rocketfast wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 2:03 pm

For e.g., I did electrical engineering at USC with specialization in computer networks. Very good curriculum and I learnt a lot.
rocketfast,

I did my master thesis on computer networking when my university did not have a class in computer networking. I read Andrew S. Tanenbaum's book and installed computer networks throughout the university. I learned computer network through self-study and hands-on implementation. The first computer network that I installed was the Novell S/Net.

There is more than one way to reach the same goal.

KlangFool

KlangFool
Posts: 11059
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 12:35 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by KlangFool » Sat Nov 03, 2018 5:52 pm

OP,

MIT, Princeton, Yale, Harvard and so on classes are freely available online. It is up to the individual to decide whether they want to learn those stuff.

KlangFool

Silverado
Posts: 203
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 6:07 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by Silverado » Sat Nov 03, 2018 7:33 pm

Horsefly wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 12:05 pm
bada bing wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 11:31 am
Horsefly wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:24 pm
ThrustVectoring wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 1:39 pm
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology is an absolutely fantastic school. The biggest downsides are expenses and a heavy workload, but you'll get a best-in-class education there. Oh, also, it's an engineering-only school and has the gender ratio you'd expect (roughly 3 men for every woman), so if you're looking to date women in your class cohort you're going to have a rough time.
+1

When I went there it was all men, so the odds were even worse! :D

My undergraduate degree was from Rose-Hulman (38 years ago). I grew up in Colorado, and I'm not sure exactly what drew me to go to school in far away Indiana. However, I have to say it was a very good choice. I think I got a top notch education there. I can only go off of reputation, but I would assume it is still top notch. I couldn't convince my daughters to go to Indiana to school (they both went to Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo - another very good school), but I'm sure if they would have they would have gotten a great education.
First name Cliff ? 3rd floor BSB for freshman year ?
Ha! Nope. Steve. 3rd floor Speed Hall.
Speed 2 for me, 89-90, just tossed out the tee shirt a couple years ago.

We probably all had Herb Bailey for Diffy Q or Prob and Stat though, regardless of year.

Harvey Mudd is another school that is good undergrad, but a little unknown. Heck, I grew up in California and only heard of Harvey Mudd when I got to Terre Haute.

ThrustVectoring
Posts: 619
Joined: Wed Jul 12, 2017 2:51 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by ThrustVectoring » Sat Nov 03, 2018 8:10 pm

Sheepdog wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 7:39 pm
#1
US News and World report as best undergraduate engineering program https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/ra ... ng-overall

Also see: https://www.commonapp.org/school/rose-h ... technology.
The US News ranking is somewhat rigged - it's a narrower category than it first looks like, since it excludes every engineering school that offers doctorate degrees. Rose-Hulman is still a fantastic school, it's just number 1 out of fewer schools than you'd first think.
Current portfolio: 60% VTI / 40% VXUS

2pedals
Posts: 693
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2014 12:31 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by 2pedals » Sat Nov 03, 2018 8:17 pm

Many excellent Midwest engineering schools to pick from, the following is not an exhaustive list

Northwestern University
University of Notre Dame
Washington University in St. Louis
Case Western Reserve University
Kettering University
Missouri University of Science and Technology
Ohio State University Columbus
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
Saint Louis University
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
University of Wisconsin Madison
Iowa State University
Michigan Technological University
Purdue University
Marquette University
University of Minnesota Twin Cities

schrute
Posts: 251
Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2014 2:27 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by schrute » Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:42 pm

tindel wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:09 am
HomerJ wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:20 pm
Starfish wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 6:51 pm
I don't deny that some of these schools are ok but my company (Bay Area, chip design) would throw in the trash resumes coming from most of them. Name IS important.
That's unfortunate. Engineering was the one of the last places where your skills and abilities mattered more than the name of the school.

Maybe that's changing.
Without question that's changing! 12 years ago when I started in aerospace in the Colorado area, The big megacorp I worked for hired from three main state schools, University of Colorado, Purdue, and University of Texas. They also hired several from Colorado School of Mines. Your chances of getting a job there out of college went down significantly if you weren't from one of those schools. You also weren't getting a job with anything less than a 3.0 GPA. They preferred 3.6-4.0.

Something that has changed since I started my career is that a MS is the new BS. In both aerospace and ic design (the industries I've worked in), you'll be lucky to walk in the front door without an MS. Also realize that most undergrad programs have the same classes. It's not until your senior year and your graduate level classes when you really start to specialize in something. You can do your undergrad pretty much anywhere, and then chose to do your graduate work at a school that is known for getting their students hired into the specialty and industry you're interested in.

My suggestion is this: Decide on a field you think is interesting. Perhaps RF, Power, IC design, Embedded, Controls, etc, etc. Then choose an industry. Contact a few companies in that industry and find out what schools are their top three preferred schools for your area of interest. Go to one of those schools. If you're interested in pursuing a masters, I'd perhaps do this after going to a local state school for your undergrad to save some money* and refine where your interests lie. Some companies will hire a BS and pay for the MS - that's a good strategy too.

What you'll probably also find is that each company location will have their preferred schools. Example: Boeing in Seattle may prefer Washington state schools while Boeing in Florida may prefer different schools near Florida.

Anyway, good luck. EE is an incredibly interesting, demanding, diverse, and rewarding career.

*I'd also suggest going to a community college for your lower level classes (Calculus, history, DiffEQ, English, Tech writing, etc.). You will save gobs of $ living at home and taking boring classes that are the prereq's of the interesting classes you'll take at university. DO NOT list your community college on your resume when you go to get a job.
I'd say don't bother with the degree in engineering (unless it's your diehard passion). Instead get a general business degree somewhere reasonable/accredited and join a software tech company in Silicon Valley. If you get a few years experience and negotiate right the total comp will be >$200K, which is more than you'd ever make in your electrical engineering career (assuming you're on an IC track). Of course, if your non-computer science your upward compensation will be limited.

Valuethinker
Posts: 37009
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Engineering school

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:42 am

schrute wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:42 pm
tindel wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:09 am
HomerJ wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:20 pm
Starfish wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 6:51 pm
I don't deny that some of these schools are ok but my company (Bay Area, chip design) would throw in the trash resumes coming from most of them. Name IS important.
That's unfortunate. Engineering was the one of the last places where your skills and abilities mattered more than the name of the school.

Maybe that's changing.
Without question that's changing! 12 years ago when I started in aerospace in the Colorado area, The big megacorp I worked for hired from three main state schools, University of Colorado, Purdue, and University of Texas. They also hired several from Colorado School of Mines. Your chances of getting a job there out of college went down significantly if you weren't from one of those schools. You also weren't getting a job with anything less than a 3.0 GPA. They preferred 3.6-4.0.

Something that has changed since I started my career is that a MS is the new BS. In both aerospace and ic design (the industries I've worked in), you'll be lucky to walk in the front door without an MS. Also realize that most undergrad programs have the same classes. It's not until your senior year and your graduate level classes when you really start to specialize in something. You can do your undergrad pretty much anywhere, and then chose to do your graduate work at a school that is known for getting their students hired into the specialty and industry you're interested in.

My suggestion is this: Decide on a field you think is interesting. Perhaps RF, Power, IC design, Embedded, Controls, etc, etc. Then choose an industry. Contact a few companies in that industry and find out what schools are their top three preferred schools for your area of interest. Go to one of those schools. If you're interested in pursuing a masters, I'd perhaps do this after going to a local state school for your undergrad to save some money* and refine where your interests lie. Some companies will hire a BS and pay for the MS - that's a good strategy too.

What you'll probably also find is that each company location will have their preferred schools. Example: Boeing in Seattle may prefer Washington state schools while Boeing in Florida may prefer different schools near Florida.

Anyway, good luck. EE is an incredibly interesting, demanding, diverse, and rewarding career.

*I'd also suggest going to a community college for your lower level classes (Calculus, history, DiffEQ, English, Tech writing, etc.). You will save gobs of $ living at home and taking boring classes that are the prereq's of the interesting classes you'll take at university. DO NOT list your community college on your resume when you go to get a job.
I'd say don't bother with the degree in engineering (unless it's your diehard passion). Instead get a general business degree somewhere reasonable/accredited and join a software tech company in Silicon Valley. If you get a few years experience and negotiate right the total comp will be >$200K, which is more than you'd ever make in your electrical engineering career (assuming you're on an IC track). Of course, if your non-computer science your upward compensation will be limited.
An engineer can do an mba and go into business.

A business student cannot practice engineering.

There is a strong mental discipline around software engineering.

It's hard to learn that if you do not have a science degree in undergrad.

Plenty of code hacks out there what really commands a premium is good software engineering skills.

LMBFlorida
Posts: 53
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2018 6:57 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by LMBFlorida » Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:45 pm

Purdue

Boiler Up!

davetopia
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2011 11:01 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by davetopia » Sun Nov 04, 2018 4:19 pm

Starfish wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 12:17 pm
HomerJ wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:20 pm
Starfish wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 6:51 pm
I don't deny that some of these schools are ok but my company (Bay Area, chip design) would throw in the trash resumes coming from most of them. Name IS important.
That's unfortunate. Engineering was the one of the last places where your skills and abilities mattered more than the name of the school.

Maybe that's changing.

The issue with my company, bay area generally is that people like me (foreigners, 50-80% of hiring managers) know absolutely nothing about schools without PhD degrees. I friend of mine mentioned the other day Harvey Mudd (supposedly one of the top undergrad engineering programs). I told him he is crazy to send his kid to a school I have to search on Google. In EE people like me are the norm, not the exception. His plan is to send him for Masters to Stanford etc otherwise the kid will have some majors issues accessing the wider job market.
I think you are confused about what "the norm" is outside of the valley. I interview engineering students from a lot of the Big 10 schools mentioned every year. These are all schools with nationally ranked undergrad and graduate engineering programs. Some of the most well known companies in the world are always present at their career fairs. Frankly, if you are throwing out resumes of students graduating from schools based on the fact they are from a part of the country you aren't personally familiar with, you have no business being a hiring manager.

To the OP, I would consider most of the schools mentioned, particularly UIUC, Purdue, Michigan, and UW to all be pretty equal and would go to whichever made the most since financially and culturally.

schrute
Posts: 251
Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2014 2:27 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by schrute » Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:04 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:42 am
schrute wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:42 pm
tindel wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:09 am
HomerJ wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:20 pm
Starfish wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 6:51 pm
I don't deny that some of these schools are ok but my company (Bay Area, chip design) would throw in the trash resumes coming from most of them. Name IS important.
That's unfortunate. Engineering was the one of the last places where your skills and abilities mattered more than the name of the school.

Maybe that's changing.
Without question that's changing! 12 years ago when I started in aerospace in the Colorado area, The big megacorp I worked for hired from three main state schools, University of Colorado, Purdue, and University of Texas. They also hired several from Colorado School of Mines. Your chances of getting a job there out of college went down significantly if you weren't from one of those schools. You also weren't getting a job with anything less than a 3.0 GPA. They preferred 3.6-4.0.

Something that has changed since I started my career is that a MS is the new BS. In both aerospace and ic design (the industries I've worked in), you'll be lucky to walk in the front door without an MS. Also realize that most undergrad programs have the same classes. It's not until your senior year and your graduate level classes when you really start to specialize in something. You can do your undergrad pretty much anywhere, and then chose to do your graduate work at a school that is known for getting their students hired into the specialty and industry you're interested in.

My suggestion is this: Decide on a field you think is interesting. Perhaps RF, Power, IC design, Embedded, Controls, etc, etc. Then choose an industry. Contact a few companies in that industry and find out what schools are their top three preferred schools for your area of interest. Go to one of those schools. If you're interested in pursuing a masters, I'd perhaps do this after going to a local state school for your undergrad to save some money* and refine where your interests lie. Some companies will hire a BS and pay for the MS - that's a good strategy too.

What you'll probably also find is that each company location will have their preferred schools. Example: Boeing in Seattle may prefer Washington state schools while Boeing in Florida may prefer different schools near Florida.

Anyway, good luck. EE is an incredibly interesting, demanding, diverse, and rewarding career.

*I'd also suggest going to a community college for your lower level classes (Calculus, history, DiffEQ, English, Tech writing, etc.). You will save gobs of $ living at home and taking boring classes that are the prereq's of the interesting classes you'll take at university. DO NOT list your community college on your resume when you go to get a job.
I'd say don't bother with the degree in engineering (unless it's your diehard passion). Instead get a general business degree somewhere reasonable/accredited and join a software tech company in Silicon Valley. If you get a few years experience and negotiate right the total comp will be >$200K, which is more than you'd ever make in your electrical engineering career (assuming you're on an IC track). Of course, if your non-computer science your upward compensation will be limited.
An engineer can do an mba and go into business.

A business student cannot practice engineering.

There is a strong mental discipline around software engineering.

It's hard to learn that if you do not have a science degree in undergrad.

Plenty of code hacks out there what really commands a premium is good software engineering skills.
I'd say skip the CS bootcamps and just go straight into operations or sales, pure business role. Ignore engineering (software that is) unless it's your passion. Or if electrical, chemical, mechanical, civil are your thing.

RobertD
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 1:25 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by RobertD » Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:05 pm

As an electrical engineer with experience recruiting, I'd suggest that you look at which school you can get the best funding from in the specialty you want to work or accept the specialty with the funding. There are a number of EE specialties that have industry-funded scholarship / fellowship options which can cover all costs and even provide a salary. The funding usual requires a good faith agreement that you will take a job in the specialty but it is not actually contractual. This is a way certain specialties have tried to recruit more U.S. talent into their EE specialty in order to get good graduates out in the industry. Programs that have this type of funding will require research participation even at the undergraduate level.

You should want to do this as in my opinion, one of the best paths to a good career in EE is finding the right employment fit. Professors who have good industry relationships will help provide the industry contacts so that instead of applying for jobs, you will be recruited and get something in place 1/2 to 1 year before graduation. From my industry perspective I rely on contacting a wide network of professors to find talented students long before graduation to get them in for an internship / trial before we full-on recruit them. I really don't care what school a candidate is going to / has gone too but more about references, accomplishments, communication skills and ability to perform on a team.

Specializing and becoming the resource that can handle technical depth as well as good communication skills and ability to explain concepts to non-technical folks will really help with this. Personally I ended up going into a EE specialty I had never envisioned but that funding opportunities guided me into. I've enjoyed being an expert in this particular field and 25 years later still enjoy waking up every day to work on problems that impact society in significant ways.

Starfish
Posts: 589
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:33 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by Starfish » Mon Nov 05, 2018 2:47 am

davetopia wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 4:19 pm
Starfish wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 12:17 pm
HomerJ wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:20 pm
Starfish wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 6:51 pm
I don't deny that some of these schools are ok but my company (Bay Area, chip design) would throw in the trash resumes coming from most of them. Name IS important.
That's unfortunate. Engineering was the one of the last places where your skills and abilities mattered more than the name of the school.

Maybe that's changing.

The issue with my company, bay area generally is that people like me (foreigners, 50-80% of hiring managers) know absolutely nothing about schools without PhD degrees. I friend of mine mentioned the other day Harvey Mudd (supposedly one of the top undergrad engineering programs). I told him he is crazy to send his kid to a school I have to search on Google. In EE people like me are the norm, not the exception. His plan is to send him for Masters to Stanford etc otherwise the kid will have some majors issues accessing the wider job market.
I think you are confused about what "the norm" is outside of the valley. I interview engineering students from a lot of the Big 10 schools mentioned every year. These are all schools with nationally ranked undergrad and graduate engineering programs. Some of the most well known companies in the world are always present at their career fairs. Frankly, if you are throwing out resumes of students graduating from schools based on the fact they are from a part of the country you aren't personally familiar with, you have no business being a hiring manager.
It iss not about "part of the country", it's about name. For example UIUC is a very competitive name.
First thing I want to make clear is that I did my all my studies in places nobody heard of in SV. Europe and East Coast, not the big names. So I know exactly how it is when somebody asks you where you graduated and asks you to repeat or continues to "where is that?". It is not me who throws away resumes, they don't even get to me. Some years ago worked for a multibillion company were the offers where signed by the CEO who wouldn't sign anything he did not hear of (= top 10-15).
I should specify that I do not hire people without graduate studies and it's actually not relevant for me where they went for undergrad.
I worked also for GE upstate NY (my manager was Indian), I interviewed multiple times in Austin (almost the same percentage of foreigners as in SV).
If you want to go for EE why would you cut your chances in for the biggest employing area/highest income? In good companies you have to compete with candidates coming from names like MIT, Stanford or Caltech.
To the OP, I would consider most of the schools mentioned, particularly UIUC, Purdue, Michigan, and UW to all be pretty equal and would go to whichever made the most since financially and culturally.
Which exactly my opinion too, except I would rank them in a different order.

sfchris
Posts: 202
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 1:41 am

Re: Engineering school

Post by sfchris » Mon Nov 05, 2018 4:29 am

Having been through it, the primary advice I would give is to only attend a competitive state engineering school if you think you will be in the upper 25% of your class.

Many of these schools oversubscribe and have no incentive to keep students around. They can and will use harsh grading curves to remove the bottom 40-50%. Then you've totally wasted your time, your GPA is obliterated and you can't easily transfer.

Bacchus01
Posts: 2219
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:35 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by Bacchus01 » Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:52 am

sfchris wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 4:29 am
Having been through it, the primary advice I would give is to only attend a competitive state engineering school if you think you will be in the upper 25% of your class.

Many of these schools oversubscribe and have no incentive to keep students around. They can and will use harsh grading curves to remove the bottom 40-50%. Then you've totally wasted your time, your GPA is obliterated and you can't easily transfer.
I know most engineering degrees at Wisconsin require you to get a 3.0+, some are 3.4+, to stay in the school your first year or two. After that, I was told “just pass.”

Valuethinker
Posts: 37009
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Engineering school

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Nov 05, 2018 7:45 am

schrute wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:04 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:42 am


An engineer can do an mba and go into business.

A business student cannot practice engineering.

There is a strong mental discipline around software engineering.

It's hard to learn that if you do not have a science degree in undergrad.

Plenty of code hacks out there what really commands a premium is good software engineering skills.
I'd say skip the CS bootcamps and just go straight into operations or sales, pure business role. Ignore engineering (software that is) unless it's your passion. Or if electrical, chemical, mechanical, civil are your thing.
A guess is that in engineering related companies, most of the sales and operations people have engineering degrees? They will not have practiced (for long) as engineers but they will need to have that background.

If one only wants to code, there's a case for Comp Sci vs. EE. Although for more hardware oriented roles, I think the EE would still be better (or essential).

If one knows one does not want to practice engineering, then probably an undergrad business major is better. But I am assuming, from the original question, that there's a genuine interest in engineering as a discipline.

Knowing the washout rates for undergrads in that EE programme, though, is probably pretty important.

sfchris
Posts: 202
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 1:41 am

Re: Engineering school

Post by sfchris » Mon Nov 05, 2018 4:07 pm

Bacchus01 wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:52 am
sfchris wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 4:29 am
Having been through it, the primary advice I would give is to only attend a competitive state engineering school if you think you will be in the upper 25% of your class.

Many of these schools oversubscribe and have no incentive to keep students around. They can and will use harsh grading curves to remove the bottom 40-50%. Then you've totally wasted your time, your GPA is obliterated and you can't easily transfer.
I know most engineering degrees at Wisconsin require you to get a 3.0+, some are 3.4+, to stay in the school your first year or two. After that, I was told “just pass.”
The trick is that some schools tell the profs to use a extremely rough curve the first two years (eg 60% of the class get C or below). This in combination with GPA requirements effectively "weeds out" a large part of the class. I am not debating the validity of their approach, I am just warning those who may not be aware of this.

In most private schools, Cs are a rarity, minimum GPAs are non existant or lower, and classes can be retaken to preserve a GPA. Those schools have a financial incentive to keep the students enrolled. No so with competitive public schools who have people beating down their door to enroll due to the low tuition.

leftcoaster
Posts: 354
Joined: Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:04 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by leftcoaster » Sun Jan 06, 2019 7:00 am

Starfish wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 12:17 pm
HomerJ wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:20 pm
Starfish wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 6:51 pm
I don't deny that some of these schools are ok but my company (Bay Area, chip design) would throw in the trash resumes coming from most of them. Name IS important.
That's unfortunate. Engineering was the one of the last places where your skills and abilities mattered more than the name of the school.

Maybe that's changing.

The issue with my company, bay area generally is that people like me (foreigners, 50-80% of hiring managers) know absolutely nothing about schools without PhD degrees. I friend of mine mentioned the other day Harvey Mudd (supposedly one of the top undergrad engineering programs). I told him he is crazy to send his kid to a school I have to search on Google. In EE people like me are the norm, not the exception. His plan is to send him for Masters to Stanford etc otherwise the kid will have some majors issues accessing the wider job market.
If you’re a hiring manager and can’t be bothered to learn about the schools in the country where you’re hiring... well, that’s more talent for me!

Seriously, Bay Area tech firms are all fishing in the same crowded ponds. I have found incredible hires from other schools.

I’ve also logged the hours to learn about foreign institutions. If you’re in management, recruiting, developing, and retaining staff is a big part of the job. Might want to rethink your stance here. Treat it like a research project.

malabargold
Posts: 507
Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2014 8:16 am

Re: Engineering school

Post by malabargold » Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:40 am

Can’t imagine a hiring manager in STEM not knowing
Harvey Mudd

leftcoaster
Posts: 354
Joined: Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:04 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by leftcoaster » Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:30 am

malabargold wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:40 am
Can’t imagine a hiring manager in STEM not knowing
Harvey Mudd
And if they didn't, the correct response to learning about it is not to dig in one's heels and beat the MIT/Stanford drum.

DrGoogle2017
Posts: 1763
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:31 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:59 am

malabargold wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:40 am
Can’t imagine a hiring manager in STEM not knowing
Harvey Mudd
From my experience, a lot of Harvey Mudd graduates end up in San Diego. I interviewed at Qualcomm in the 80s and met many there. I think even the current CEO was from there.
Only one famous Mudd alumina I’m aware off who was in computer networks, one of a few key engineers at Juniper networks in the early days. But he also had a Ph from USC. I think he was legendary among the CISCO crowd.

Same with a lot of graduates from Caltech, they tend to stay down south. While in the Bay Area are mostly people from UCBerkeley and SanJose state.

Btw, EECS from UC Berkeley don’t do as well as BA CS from Berkeley in terms of salary wise. One kid from a college website compiled information on this, I think the shift to software in most companies is the reason.

A few anecdotes here, the tenant from my Bay Area house graduated from Berkeley and doing hardware, I assume he is EECS, older guy, but his salary was not competitive, less than 6-figure when I last saw it. My daughter’s physics lab partner in high school graduated from Berkeley recently with EECS degree, she didn’t fare as well as my daughter who’s purely software.

bowtieman81
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2014 4:44 pm
Location: TX

Re: Engineering school

Post by bowtieman81 » Sun Jan 06, 2019 4:37 pm

There have been some good recommendations in this thread, and I tend to agree the big 10 schools are great for engineering in general. I recommend University of Illinois if that is your in-state school, but I am biased as I went there in the early 2000's.

To the OP, depending on where you are in your education path you might consider going to 2 year community college then transferring to a big school to finish up. I did that myself; went 2 years at a community college in Illinois and then transferred to University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign to finish my engineering degree. I encountered a very minor amount of flack from other students for not attending UIUC the whole time, but I graduated with the same degree and had less than half the debt my peers did. After graduating nobody gives a crap I went to a 2 year college first. Just food for thought.

I don't think you will have much trouble with internships at the big 10 schools. I landed 2 summer internships, with the second one leading to a job offer before I graduated.

Starfish
Posts: 589
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:33 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by Starfish » Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:48 am

malabargold wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:40 am
Can’t imagine a hiring manager in STEM not knowing
Harvey Mudd
I have never heard of it until 3 months ago and I don't know anybody who has heard of it except couple of american friends who are a tiny minority in this field.
Instead of taking this against me, you might want to use this information rationally: you have a high chance of having a "branding" issue. YOU are the ones who have to adapt to the reality, and the reality is that in some fields of engineering Americans are very few, so you have to cater to foreigners.
However, most of these places hire people after grad school. You can go to a well known grad school and solve the problem.

Starfish
Posts: 589
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:33 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by Starfish » Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:51 am

DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:59 am
malabargold wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:40 am
Can’t imagine a hiring manager in STEM not knowing
Harvey Mudd
From my experience, a lot of Harvey Mudd graduates end up in San Diego. I interviewed at Qualcomm in the 80s and met many there. I think even the current CEO was from there.
Only one famous Mudd alumina I’m aware off who was in computer networks, one of a few key engineers at Juniper networks in the early days. But he also had a Ph from USC. I think he was legendary among the CISCO crowd.

Same with a lot of graduates from Caltech, they tend to stay down south. While in the Bay Area are mostly people from UCBerkeley and SanJose state.
People around me come mostly from Berkeley, Stanford, UCLA (which is very highly regraded in my specialty), USC, MIT.

Bacchus01
Posts: 2219
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:35 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by Bacchus01 » Mon Jan 07, 2019 8:56 am

My son was recently direct admitted to the UW Madison School of Engineering for Fall 2019. Just thought I’d share a proud Dad moment. He’s declared mechanical but may switch to electrical.

malabargold
Posts: 507
Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2014 8:16 am

Re: Engineering school

Post by malabargold » Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:06 pm

Nice!

gpburdell
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 9:01 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by gpburdell » Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:27 am

Bacchus01 wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:52 am
I know most engineering degrees at Wisconsin require you to get a 3.0+, some are 3.4+, to stay in the school your first year or two. After that, I was told “just pass.”
I went to Georgia Tech and got my undergrad in Computer Science (started off CmpE). At GT, graduation is referred to as "getting out" as it can be a struggle as it takes an average 5 years to graduate. My 5th year, I was happy to get Ds in a few classes as a D = degree.

Whakamole
Posts: 855
Joined: Wed Jan 13, 2016 9:59 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by Whakamole » Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:46 pm

I work in software, but know a lot of people (either co-workers or ex-co-workers) with EE/CE degrees from UIUC. I'm not a hiring manager by any means, but I get the impression that they are the "gold standard." These were mostly new graduates. After a few years and some experience under your belt, your school matters a lot less.

I will, however, strongly disagree that Thermodynamics is Thermodynamics. At my undergraduate school, my professor wasn't very good. Once I sought help from a professor who taught another session, and ended up going to his class a few times; he was fantastic.

snackontransite
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:55 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by snackontransite » Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:26 pm

KlangFool wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 5:43 pm
I worked part-time at the university computing center for 5 years while I was doing my degree. When I graduated, I started working as a person with 5 years of relevant working experience. Nobody even cares to look at my degree and/or my CGPA since I am not a fresh graduate.

So, you could follow a common beaten path. Fight among the fresh graduate for jobs requiring no job experience or bypassing the whole crowd and start working at a job requiring 2 to 5 years of working experience when you graduated.

KlangFool
Strongly agree that relevant work experience is extremely important. I would say it is more important than ANYTHING else, aside from the degree itself. However, I have found it is very difficult to get internships that are actually professionally relevant (at the caliber of entry-level work in your profession) . The internships I had were a little under that extremely high standard, but I thought they would still be useful to have. I thought wrong.

As for what school you go to, nobody seems to know or care about the "top tier" university I went to. A "lower tier" university nearby where I went is apparently more well known, and half the people I talk to(including potential employers) mistake my university for that one, or know nothing about my university. You could call the lack of research a sign of poor hiring practices, but that doesn't mean anything when these are the people you need to impress in order to land a job.

I can also say that I felt my "top tier" university provided nothing that a "lower tier" university would not have. I would say to go to the university that is the most affordable you can go to, so long as there is not anything significant you dislike about it. If it is not the most "academically rigorous", than that just means you should have plenty of extra time to do things that actually matter, like hunting down those relevant internships.

Edit: I would apply to as many of the schools people have been posting here that would fit what you are looking for, and see what kind of scholarships etc. you get. Hopefully one of them will really like your application, offer some nice scholarship money, and make your decision a little easier :D
Last edited by snackontransite on Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

KlangFool
Posts: 11059
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 12:35 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by KlangFool » Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:34 pm

snackontransite wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:26 pm
KlangFool wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 5:43 pm
I worked part-time at the university computing center for 5 years while I was doing my degree. When I graduated, I started working as a person with 5 years of relevant working experience. Nobody even cares to look at my degree and/or my CGPA since I am not a fresh graduate.

So, you could follow a common beaten path. Fight among the fresh graduate for jobs requiring no job experience or bypassing the whole crowd and start working at a job requiring 2 to 5 years of working experience when you graduated.

KlangFool
Strongly agree that relevant work experience is extremely important. I would say it is more important than ANYTHING else, aside from the degree itself. However, I have found it is very difficult to get internships that are actually professionally relevant (at the caliber of entry-level work in your profession) . The internships I had were a little under that extremely high standard, but I thought they would still be useful to have. I thought wrong.
snackontransite,

An internship is a beaten path too. Someone could find a part-time job to gain the relevant experience if they so inclined. Every university has at least one computing center and multiple labs. They could always use some part-time help. It might even be worthwhile to work for free sometime.

If there is a will, there is a way.

KlangFool

snackontransite
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:55 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by snackontransite » Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:42 pm

KlangFool wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:34 pm
An internship is a beaten path too. Someone could find a part-time job to gain the relevant experience if they so inclined.
KlangFool
Very true. Perhaps this is why I never found the experience I was looking for. It might be better to have a part-time "real" job than an internship. I expect less time is devoted to interns because they do not expect you to be sticking around for a long time. All my "engineering internships" were seasonal(summer months). I did work full time in my last year of university, which was worthwhile for the financial head-start if your able to do it.

If I were to travel back in time a few years and do it again, I would not necessarily put "intern" in my job searches.

stoptothink
Posts: 4662
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 9:53 am

Re: Engineering school

Post by stoptothink » Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:48 pm

Starfish wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:48 am
malabargold wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:40 am
Can’t imagine a hiring manager in STEM not knowing
Harvey Mudd
I have never heard of it until 3 months ago and I don't know anybody who has heard of it except couple of american friends who are a tiny minority in this field.
How exactly would you know if people you know are familiar with Harvey Mudd or not?

Starfish
Posts: 589
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:33 pm

Re: Engineering school

Post by Starfish » Thu Jan 10, 2019 4:08 pm

stoptothink wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:48 pm
Starfish wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:48 am
malabargold wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:40 am
Can’t imagine a hiring manager in STEM not knowing
Harvey Mudd
I have never heard of it until 3 months ago and I don't know anybody who has heard of it except couple of american friends who are a tiny minority in this field.
How exactly would you know if people you know are familiar with Harvey Mudd or not?

I was in a conversation with several when the subject was discussed. I did not ask all of them - but from that sample I realized is a frequent issue.

jimbok_mb
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:16 am

Re: Engineering school

Post by jimbok_mb » Thu Jan 10, 2019 4:21 pm

I attended Purdue (MSEE) and Ohio Northern University (BSEE) and would recommend both of them. ONU was a very personalized education and a good experience. It's out in the middle of farm land so not much night life, but good for studying.

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