Quitting w/o notice

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jadedfalcons
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by jadedfalcons » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:09 pm

One Ping wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:10 pm
jadedfalcons wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:34 pm
As a business owner, it's very poor form to quit with no notice.
Just curious, if in an at will state where employers prefer employees to give 2 weeks notice, do they give employees 2 weeks notice when they are let go?

Just wondering frequently that happens.
It would depend on why the employee was let go. If the employee had a history of making expensive mistakes, or got in a physical altercation with another employee/customer, then they would be let go immediately. If it is a simple parting of ways, then there would be a phase out period.

Otherwise, living in an at will state, severance packages are still not an uncommon item.

Nissanzx1
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by Nissanzx1 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:10 pm

I've done it, I didn't think twice about it. I left my key in a locked mailbox with a simple note. Company and people were awful and I would have starved before I would take a reference from them. Nobody even called me and I was there over 10 years if that tells you anything about the culture.

Current job I've had for 11 years and this company treats me fairly and I would FOR SURE leave notice at my current employer. Mostly out of the fairness and respect they have shown me. I have made them a small fortune and continue to hustle and grind everyday.

remomnyc
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by remomnyc » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:23 pm

I would give two weeks notice and spend the two weeks going to the doctor and taking any PTO you have. If they don't ask you to leave sooner, it should be a relaxing two weeks since you're not going to start anything new and you will hand off or wind down anything you're working on.

multiham
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by multiham » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:36 pm

Sorry if I missed it, but I don't believe the OP said what line of work they are in. I work for a mega-corp and would seriously think about giving 2 weeks notice. The reason I say that is because the job market is really connected these days. Take a look at LinkedIn. There is hardly any companies in my area that do not have workers that are alumni of my current employer. Even if they won't know you when you apply, they will get in touch with their friends at your old company to get some info on you. If you just pack up and leave tomorrow, that reputation may follow you and make it hard to get a job.

Now, if 2 more weeks at the company, under your terms, would cause you emotional harm, than just leave but know the possible consequences. I would do my best to come in for 2 weeks, work my required time, not get stressed out and count down the days.

lostdog
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by lostdog » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:38 pm

Raymond wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:04 pm
OP, whatever you decide to do, start getting your personal stuff out of your office (family pictures, etc.), and clearing any personal information off your computer.

Just in case they walk you out without letting you go back to your desk.
+1

Also find ways for coping with stress. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is an excellent start.

It sounds like you ha e quite a bit of savings. Strive for financial independence. Financial Independence is the best revenge against bad employers and workaholics that bring you down with them.

stan1
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by stan1 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:43 pm

If your current boss and co-workers are likely to help you find your next job and you have mutual respect for each other I'd give the two weeks notice. Use that time to make sure you have their professional and personal contact information. Keep your network intact. If you do decide to go back to work in a few years your network will be one of the best ways to find a new job.

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bengal22
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by bengal22 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:54 pm

I think it is all about how much you value character and how much self respect you have. As a boss, if someone quits without at least 2 weeks notice, I lost all respect for them. You just never know when you may need something from your ex employer.
"Earn All You Can; Give All You Can; Save All You Can." .... John Wesley

nyclon
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by nyclon » Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:18 pm

gpburdell wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:32 pm
So, I don't want to go in alot of detail, but I've made up mind to quit my job. I've been stressed out for the last 4-6 months and having panic attacks, waking up at night, etc. The majority of it is my job and part having to deal with my dad being very sick.

I have emergency funds for almost a year; more if I cut down my monthly discretionary expenses. Worst case I have multiple years of expenses in IRA/401k.

I'm planning to resign this week and I'm trying to decide is if I should give 2 weeks notice or not. I've always given 2 weeks in the past (if not more) and always thought it standard practice.

Things came to ahead last week which pushed me over the edge and now thinking of just quitting immediately as I can't take it anymore.

Is it really that bad to quit w/o notice? I know the usual reasons to give it etc. Just wanting to get some feedback from everyone. thanks
Strictly speaking about the point regarding quitting without notice - I do not see any reason why this is a bad idea. Do it if you have to.

One thing I would note is that when you do resign, if you want to, don't hesitate to objectively and honestly provide feedback or reasons as to why. It may be somewhat cathartic to do so. Else, just walking out is fine, too.

MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by MathIsMyWayr » Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:24 pm

nyclon wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:18 pm
Strictly speaking about the point regarding quitting without notice - I do not see any reason why this is a bad idea. Do it if you have to.

One thing I would note is that when you do resign, if you want to, don't hesitate to objectively and honestly provide feedback or reasons as to why. It may be somewhat cathartic to do so. Else, just walking out is fine, too.
What do you expect to gain by going through the trouble of leaving without notice? Leaving without notice is like running away with your tail between your legs. Why don't you quit with your head held high by giving whatever they want from you? "If you want 2 weeks, ok you will get 2 weeks." This way, you give them what they deserve, respect or the ultimate insult, depending on your relationship with your soon-to-be ex-employer.

If I like my employer, I will give my honest and constructive feedback in a positive way. If not, then I will just repeat "no comment". Any feedback may help them. Why should I help those I have no respect for?

nyclon
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by nyclon » Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:42 pm

nyclon wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:18 pm
Strictly speaking about the point regarding quitting without notice - I do not see any reason why this is a bad idea. Do it if you have to.

One thing I would note is that when you do resign, if you want to, don't hesitate to objectively and honestly provide feedback or reasons as to why. It may be somewhat cathartic to do so. Else, just walking out is fine, too.
MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:24 pm
What do you expect to gain by going through the trouble of leaving without notice? Leaving without notice is like running away with your tail between your legs. Why don't you quit with your head held high by giving whatever they want from you? "If you want 2 weeks, ok you will get 2 weeks." This way, you give them what they deserve, respect or the ultimate insult, depending on your relationship with your soon-to-be ex-employer.
It's more trouble to leave with notice in this case.

What is to be gained is OP's option to simply walk away without further stress. That option is control - control over OP's time. On the employer's side, this same option is called "at-will employment" in this country.

If you recall, OP states "Things came to ahead last week which pushed me over the edge and now thinking of just quitting immediately as I can't take it anymore." Calling the OP shameful for leaving on OP's terms is inappropriate, at best.

Finally, "Why don't you quit with your head held high by giving whatever they want from you" - well, you tell us - what does OP have to gain by giving "them" whatever they want? That would just be more of the same for OP.

Walking out on OP's terms would qualify as "quit with your head held high".

If I like my employer, I will give my honest and constructive feedback in a positive way. If not, then I will just repeat "no comment". Any feedback may help them. Why should I help those I have no respect for?
I don't get the feeling that OP has the warm and fuzzies for their employer. The suggestion is was purely selfish - if the OP felt the need to vent - to do it objectively. Resolving conflict can be helpful and liberating and doesn't need to be "no comment" for some folks. We're all different and YMMV.

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Watty
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by Watty » Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:52 pm

gpburdell wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:32 pm
I've been stressed out for the last 4-6 months and having panic attacks, waking up at night, etc.
There are a million details but I would try to give the two weeks notice just so that once that was over with I could leave and be done with it.

If you don't do that then months or years from now you may still be stressed out about if you should have given two weeks notice or not.

When you give your notice you can also make it clear that you would prefer to leave sooner if it is mutually agreeable. It is very likely that they let you leave sooner.

Very small companies are a special case since there are so few people to fill in but I think that many people are not as indispensable as they would like to think. People take vacations, get sick for a week or more, or unexpectedly die all the time and it rarely makes a big difference to the company. When I was working I probably had half a dozen times then there was an unplanned group meeting to announce that someone had unexpectedly died or would be out on medical leave for an unknown period of time.

As others have said you could likely take FMLA time and take time off to help out with your Dad. Before I retired I had to sign up for FMLA twice and people were very understanding about it since most people have gone through similar things. In addition being off work for weeks at a time it is also possible to take intermittent time. For example of you needed to take your dad to chemotherapy every Tuesday you can likely arrange to take Tuesdays off.

ERISA Stone
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by ERISA Stone » Mon Oct 22, 2018 12:38 am

srt7 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:46 pm
OP,

2 weeks (or whatever time period) notices are total B.S., if you're on at-will employment agreement. Recommendations needn't be only from your past employer, they can be from your co-workers or your past to past employers/co-workers etc. Also, don't confuse this with "employment verification" ... which is what your future employer needs from your current one. Employment verification is nothing more than your title, dates of employment, type of employment. That's it. Anything more and you get to sue them. So don't sweat that 2 weeks notice stuff.

BUT ... I would highly recommend that you squeeze it out before you leave. They've made life a living hell for you for 4 to 6 months and you're just going to walk away from a golden opportunity of giving them 2 weeks of hell? That's silly.

Go to work tomorrow but NOT as a pushover (which is what your post implies you've been these past few months ... not judging but that is what I read in your post) but as a confident person. Heck, while you're at it, dress sharp (a suit even - yeah, let them think you're interviewing etc.), grab a cup of coffee and b'fast from the finest place around the office and walk in confidently. Go straight to the guy who's bothered you the most (or second most) and ask him (in a higher tone) how his weekend was. But you don't care about his weekend ... now do ya? So cut him off in the middle saying you need to talk to your manager. Then peek in to the manager's office and affirmatively ask for a couple "quick" minutes of his time (close the door or walk in to his cube as you're saying it) and just tell him that you're giving him 2 weeks notice. Why? "Personal reasons". Simple.

Go back to your office and send out that prepared email (mentioning you've given your 2 weeks notice) you have to your team (cc your boss and your personal email) and watch as the fun unfolds.

If the company wants you gone immediately ... fine! Walk out in style and be done.

They want you around for 2 weeks? Great!

NOW ... the important part is to remember that you've entered a period where you get to practice to let go of being a pushover. That ENDS HERE and that ENDS NOW. Learn to say NO. Practice saying NO when warranted but do say yes when warranted while leaving at 5PM sharp. Remember, the goal is to not lose all that you've built over the last few months. The goal here is to build up your image as a confident guy who does amazing work.

PS: Congrats on saving up! What's the point of having all that [money --admin LadyGeek] if you can't use it like it should be used. :sharebeer
Would you also recommend he sing the entire Johnny Paycheck song while he's at it?

MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by MathIsMyWayr » Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:01 am

nyclon wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:42 pm
nyclon wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:18 pm
Strictly speaking about the point regarding quitting without notice - I do not see any reason why this is a bad idea. Do it if you have to.

One thing I would note is that when you do resign, if you want to, don't hesitate to objectively and honestly provide feedback or reasons as to why. It may be somewhat cathartic to do so. Else, just walking out is fine, too.
MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:24 pm
What do you expect to gain by going through the trouble of leaving without notice? Leaving without notice is like running away with your tail between your legs. Why don't you quit with your head held high by giving whatever they want from you? "If you want 2 weeks, ok you will get 2 weeks." This way, you give them what they deserve, respect or the ultimate insult, depending on your relationship with your soon-to-be ex-employer.
It's more trouble to leave with notice in this case.

What is to be gained is OP's option to simply walk away without further stress. That option is control - control over OP's time. On the employer's side, this same option is called "at-will employment" in this country.

If you recall, OP states "Things came to ahead last week which pushed me over the edge and now thinking of just quitting immediately as I can't take it anymore." Calling the OP shameful for leaving on OP's terms is inappropriate, at best.

Finally, "Why don't you quit with your head held high by giving whatever they want from you" - well, you tell us - what does OP have to gain by giving "them" whatever they want? That would just be more of the same for OP.

Walking out on OP's terms would qualify as "quit with your head held high".


I tried to mean a notice of the standard 2 weeks. Why doesn't OP offer a 2 week notice with a condition of a change in his working condition for the next 2 weeks and a willingness to leave earlier if his demand is not met? If they do not accept his offer, then he is not quitting without notice, but quitting due to a failure to reach an agreement. Well, the end result may be the same, but there is a subtle difference in my mind.
If I like my employer, I will give my honest and constructive feedback in a positive way. If not, then I will just repeat "no comment". Any feedback may help them. Why should I help those I have no respect for?
I don't get the feeling that OP has the warm and fuzzies for their employer. The suggestion is was purely selfish - if the OP felt the need to vent - to do it objectively. Resolving conflict can be helpful and liberating and doesn't need to be "no comment" for some folks. We're all different and YMMV.
It is very difficult to resolve conflict by venting what is boiling deep in your head. There is a danger of emotion taking over. At certain point, you have to realize that there is nothing to gain and that the best route is to put an end to the whole thing. You may call it selfish, but the bottom line is my interest, i.e., "what do I gain?" Once quitting is final, then there is no point in wasting your time.

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FGal
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by FGal » Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:26 am

If you really can't weather a 2 week notice and this job isn't one you care about for the purposes of career building:

Take a day to do a quick list of where things are that might be important to whomever comes after you. Wipe anything personal from your computer (like browser links or personal docs, etc.). This includes removing anything like saved passwords for sites and such. If you have any company materials/gadgets, clean them of personal stuff too. Clear your office space/desk as discretely as possible and take all the stuff home that day.

Ask your boss the next day if they have a few minutes. I'd likely do this after lunch but that's me. No one wants to deal with that first thing in the morning. Ideally it would be at the end of the week (like prep/clean on Wednesday, take the day off on Thursday to rest, reflect and gird the loins for battle, then drop the hammer on Friday lunchtime).

Print out a formal, short and sweet resignation if that is how it's done in your workplace. Or not. Might be easier to just go in and speak to them.



You tell your boss this:

Boss, I'm really sorry to have to do this, but I am resigning my job effective as of today. I had planned on giving you standard notice, but I have some deeply troubling, long-term family issues that have unfortunately become an emergency situation and impossible to put off dealing with for even another day, so this will be it for me. Here is a list of projects I was doing and where they are located with short summary/status (or whatever). Here is my phone/laptop (remove the password if it has one, or at least write it on a sticky and tape it to the carcass). I have already cleared my desk. Thank you so much for the experience working here with you. HR can contact me at my email address if they have any issues with my final paycheck or paperwork. Good bye.

This should be said with as much sincerity as you can muster. I know you likely hate that person, and the company is filled with poo-flinging morons, but go out classy - and with the idea that it was an unavoidable family emergency, they won't act as poo-flingy as they might (or if they do, that's just going to reflect poorly on them).

Make sure before you leave you drop by HR and fill out any quick paperwork they may need if it is absolutely necessary, and provide them with your address/email for any pay or benefits issues. And then trot out the door in the early afternoon, just in time to beat the rush hour traffic and go home and do something really, really nice and relaxing.

And demands/requests for details if you can't immediately get your tush out the door?

"I really don't want to go into it. It is very distressing as you may imagine."
"I'm sorry, but I don't want to discuss the details."
"I'm just super sorry about this, but it was the only and best way forward for my family."

Basically: leaving suddenly due to family emergency. Expect said emergency situation to be requiring your presence for the near future, and leaving the job was the only real solution. Super duper sorry and all, but that's life sometimes.

Ignore any requests from former boss to do anything regarding the job.

Make sure to look up the standard time period your company has to get your final paycheck to you (there are limits in most states, they can get MAJOR fines for not obeying). Also, check any vesting/bonus or other stuff that may be effected before you leave so you're not screwing yourself out of a nice bonus or a chunk of funds into the 401k if you'd just hung out another week.

TravelGeek
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by TravelGeek » Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:52 am

Jazzysoon wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:42 pm

BUT at my company they were doing layoffs like crazy in 2017 and they did not give those people 2 weeks, just walked them out sameday, so it goes both ways.
My (former) megacorp employer does not give two weeks notice when RIFing people in the US. But they pay severance. Are you suggesting people who quit at that company without notice should pay severance to the employer, since it goes both ways? :oops:
yohac wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:08 pm
Whether it's standard or ethical is less important than whether it's in your best interest. Companies won't give references anymore, but HR people still expect references from recent co-workers. The lack of them is a big red flag. Even a hint that you left without notice will greatly hurt your chances at getting that next job.
Many companies may not give references, but they still expect them (weird, huh?) and coworkers and former managers still offer them, either on LinkedIn or via phone,
BeneIRA wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:49 pm
Recommendations, for the reasons stated above, are wildly overrated in this day and age. The grand majority of corporations use The Work Number (Equifax) or a similar service that has a service verify employment. Recommendations are virtually worthless. Where it does hurt you is getting rehired by the company again, which it seems the OP has zero desire of doing, and word of mouth in the industry, which happens. OP, I am all for taking the long game in these scenarios and you have gotten some great advice above.
Disagree.

References are still needed by many employers. I had to check them any time I hired someone ... and “xyz worked for us from A to B, end of msg” wasn’t considered a good reference.

As a manager I have given many references for former colleagues and employees reporting to me. If someone left me in a lurch without a good reason, I wouldn’t give any reference since I wouldn’t be able to not mention that part. But, no one working for me ever did that. And I am not aware of any other case where this happened.
One Ping wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:10 pm
Just curious, if in an at will state where employers prefer employees to give 2 weeks notice, do they give employees 2 weeks notice when they are let go?
It depends on the company. Severance in lieu of notice is fairly common at least in my industry.

inbox788
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by inbox788 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:07 am

123 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:48 pm
Do you have enough vacation that you can go on vacation and then give notice while you're on "vacation"?

You could give two weeks notice and then just not show up for those two weeks. Some employers might not make any effort to "fire" you in those circumstances because they you're gone just the same (they could just handle it as unauthorized absence/leave without pay). If an employer decides to "fire" you they put themselves at risk for other issues.

Edited to add:
BETTER IDEA: Ask your employer for leave under the federal Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Medical issues with a parent qualifies as well as your own serious condition. While on leave you can resign with the two weeks notice. Note that FMLA only provides for absence from work, it does not provide directly for any continuation of compensation. https://www.dol.gov/general/topic/benefits-leave/fmla
This!

Take time off. Vacation, sick time, FMLA, whatever, and then give your notice and work something out with your boss or HR. You don't have to burn your bridges on your way out. While you might not get a good reference, you should be able to quietly exit without being fired or having them flag all future references negatively. This way, if you ever use them as a reference, they can contact HR and verify that you work there from certain dates and did your job.

Don't unnecessarily make a stink. You don't want to be remembered for this:
JetBlue flight attendant Steven Slater flips out, grabs beer, quits job & gets arrested
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FynRYzioJHE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JetBlue_f ... #Aftermath

Find outlets to reduce your stress, talk to people (family, friends, doctors, nurses, counselors, clergy, etc.) and get some help! Take care of the your priorities and find ways to cope with your difficult situation.
TravelGeek wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:52 am
References are still needed by many employers. I had to check them any time I hired someone ... and “xyz worked for us from A to B, end of msg” wasn’t considered a good reference.
Better than "so and so was fired for xyz" or "Harvey left because of sexual harassment issues". Most companies won't want to give out any information for fear of legal liabilities, so don't give them any additional things to red flag.

Murgatroyd
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by Murgatroyd » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:08 am

Here’s why you should give notice. Because it’s an uneven playing field. While it’s true most companies will not give references and most HR or senior managers will stick to the work dates facts there is another consideration. The potential new company may ask if there’s anything else or it may be offered that “we were surprised “x” didn’t give notice” This statement violates no law and is simply stating a fact. And it could come back to haunt you.

All the best to you.

BrooklynInvest
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by BrooklynInvest » Mon Oct 22, 2018 7:05 am

Sorry for your troubles OP. Suggest:

1. Clean desk out
2. Give 2 weeks notice because it's in YOUR best interest
3. If they don't send you home, come in late and leave early for 10 days that will pass very quickly

Best of luck,

bondsr4me
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by bondsr4me » Mon Oct 22, 2018 7:15 am

OP

Sorry about your troubles...truly.

But, do the right thing; do the honorable thing; give 2 weeks notice...it's the right thing to do.

I would be sure to clear out any personal stuff before you give notice, just in case.

Character counts, so do the right thing and give notice.

Good Luck with your future.

Don

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jharkin
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by jharkin » Mon Oct 22, 2018 7:18 am

Not a lot of advice other than to say all the doom and gloom postings here about people being walked out when they resign and withheld recommendations is not universally true. I work in high tech, and when I changed jobs this year I gave notice and they actually begged me to stay longer. I worked out my notice period and my manager took me and the whole team out for a nice going away lunch.

My department head was an %(*$#)#... but that's a different story. Still they didn't do anything to burn me. A couple of current coworkers even gave me professional references for the new job. Its only direct management who cant (and I wouldn't have dared to ask anyway).

BTW, having been on the other side (hiring manager) I know that when somebody leaves HR collects a bunch of info and there is an "eligible for rehire" field in the employee database. Anybody who doesn't go out gracefully will end up with that black mark. You may think who cares, but we are in a specialized niche of the high tech industry and people jump back and forth between a few companies a lot. I knew multiple people over the years who left for greener pastures, found that it wasn't greener, and came back.

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oldcomputerguy
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by oldcomputerguy » Mon Oct 22, 2018 7:40 am

unclescrooge wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:05 pm
I depends on the sort of work. Some jobs are hard to fill even with 6 months notice, while some just require a warm body.
I finally made the decision back in mid-2016 that I had had enough (stress, unloading work frustration on wife, bad nerves, lack of sleep, what have you) and submitted my resignation. I gave them six months notice. That very day the stress lessened, and I spent the next six months feeling much better, knowing that relief was on the way.

OP, I can't put myself in your shoes, but I would suggest you give two weeks notice. You'll feel at least some better immediately. And if they decide to cut you loose before two weeks are over, at least you took the high road and didn't cause yourself problems down the road.
It’s taken me a lot of years, but I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people. And if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by oldcomputerguy » Mon Oct 22, 2018 7:51 am

FGal wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:26 am
Also, check any vesting/bonus or other stuff that may be effected before you leave so you're not screwing yourself out of a nice bonus or a chunk of funds into the 401k if you'd just hung out another week.
FGal makes a very good point here. I was fortunate when I punched out. My initial departure date was planned for December 16 (a Friday). A month or two before that, the GM came by and informed me that, if I was "on staff" in the following year, I would be eligible for the department head bonus (which was about another month's pay). I'm grateful that he informed me of this, he didn't have to. So I postponed my official departure a couple of weeks, took the holidays, came back in on Tuesday January 3, and signed the separation paperwork. The bonus showed up about a month later.
It’s taken me a lot of years, but I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people. And if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you.

fiverus
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by fiverus » Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:38 am

Recently, I quit my job for the same reason, very heavy workload, stressful. You had to report to one key person in the office and she micro managed everyone in the office. Fortunately, I was interviewing for the last 4 months and landed a new job. I gave my 2 weeks and took 1 week off before starting new job. It seems easier to get a job when you have a job.

fiverus

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rob
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by rob » Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:48 am

EddyB wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:51 pm
David Jay wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:35 pm
It is very poor form if you expect to return to the job market.

My company has a policy that says “no recommendation” for someone who leaves without proper notice and an exit interview. So it can impact you down the road.
I’m so glad my company has a policy of “no recommendation” in any case!
Maybe it's the market I'm in but this is what I know of the norm... Former directors cannot give recs to past employees, employer will confirm dates & roles held only.
| Rob | Its a dangerous business going out your front door. - J.R.R.Tolkien

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by LarryAllen » Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:49 am

Never burn a bridge if you can avoid it. Always give at least two weeks notice.

Afty
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by Afty » Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:54 am

I would strongly +1 the suggestion to take FMLA instead of immediately resigning. From https://www.dol.gov/whd/fmla/:
The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave. Eligible employees are entitled to:
  • Twelve workweeks of leave in a 12-month period for:
    • the birth of a child and to care for the newborn child within one year of birth;
    • the placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care and to care for the newly placed child within one year of placement;
    • to care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition;
    • a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job;
    • any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is a covered military member on “covered active duty;"
I believe any reasonable boss would accept your parent being seriously ill as a legitimate reason for you to take leave from work, and it's federally protected anyway. Whereas just resigning might be viewed more negatively.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by dm200 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:50 am

LarryAllen wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:49 am
Never burn a bridge if you can avoid it.
Yes. I have not always done this. :(

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by barnaclebob » Mon Oct 22, 2018 10:15 am

See if you qualify for FMLA or some other kind of leave before quitting. If you are having panic attacks and work at a large company I'd bet you have a very good chance at success.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by juliewongferra » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:02 am

AlphaLess wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:33 pm
There are some recommendations here that are correctly advising to milk any possible short-term and long-term disability programs.

It is very hard for mentally vulnerable people to play the disability cat-and-mouse tricks.
But if OP is in a position to do so (short and long term disability plans exists, he is subscribed, and can successfully navigate), then those are good recommendations.

Considerations include:
- short-term disability includes waiting period (could be days, could be a couple of weeks),
- long-term disability includes waiting period (can be in short-term during that time),
- pay is percentage of your salary (50,60,80),
- would be easy to get a couple of weeks, maybe 4 weeks. After that (dead-beat) insurance company will fight tooth and nail for reducing or eliminating the benefit, arguing that no disability exists,
- and if you wanted to twist the knife a bit hard, while it is sticking in your corporate employer, sign-up for 1-year FMLA, which, even unpaid, will ensure that your position is available to you for 1 entire year. Let them sweat a bit.
Well, this is just mean-spirited. I am in favor of employees getting everything due to them, but to "milk" programs and make an employer "sweat" by going on FMLA? Rude.

First, I don't care how bad an employer has been to an employee. If an employee is taking disingenuous advantage of programs, that says more about the employee than anything. Second, think about the coworkers who are left who may genuinely need these benefits in the future. The employer, having been burned by this disingenuous experience, may be even more skeptical in the future, and make it tougher on them. (Not that they directly can do anything about it, if the paperwork is lined up, but still.)

Good luck, OP. I hope that you make good decisions for yourself--no matter whether you quit ASAP or give 2 weeks. Remember that we can only control the good we put out in the world, and we all should try to make the world a better place, even if it seems impossible, even in the worse situations.

cheers!
jwf

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by dcabler » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:13 am

I was in a very similar situation just a few years ago. After only a few months at a new job, I was having panic attacks, trouble sleeping, the works. Then my mom passed away in the middle of all of that. I put a notification on my calendar for a 1:1 with my boss who was in another location and told him I was quitting. My plan was to give 2 weeks notice, but he told me to hold off for a few days. I did, then he found another project for me to work on. Stress went way down, but project was cancelled a couple of months later. I then transferred to another department and spent several years in a much happier place.

Advice: call boss, give notice. You never know what might happen (in a good way)... Or the result might still be the same and they choose to walk you out the door then and there, with 2 weeks pay. Any way, I don't see a downside here to giving notice and lots of downside if you don't give notice.
Last edited by dcabler on Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:14 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by lostdog » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:14 am

Did the corporate thing for 20 years and reached independence. I met a lot of good people and made friends but at the same time I worked with bad people with awful personalities who didn't have your best interest. The worst thing is you're forced to be around these toxic bad people. If you love this kind of stuff(corporate american environment) good for you. Materialism, having too many kids, debt, bad choices and ego bring constant discontent and keeps you handcuffed at your job. Health, family, friends and your time is the most important. You will always be a slave to your employers and lenders if you continue the american culture of workaholicism and debt.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by badger42 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:18 am

Everybody talks. Let me repeat, EVERYBODY talks. Industry communities are a lot like a small town. At the same time, don't make this harder on yourself than you have to. I've been on both sides of this, as well as downstream of picking up the slack when somebody else leaves.

- Give your two weeks notice. It's only polite and professional. 50/50 shot of getting walked (in which case you did the right thing anyway).
- Take it easy for those two weeks. In at 10, out at 4, long lunches, etc. What are they going to do, fire you for slacking? (don't do anything illegal / unethical of course)
- Visibly focus on handing things off, helping whoever is taking over your work be successful. It will pay back later. If there are things you can easily close out, close them out.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by fposte » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:21 am

barnaclebob wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 10:15 am
See if you qualify for FMLA or some other kind of leave before quitting. If you are having panic attacks and work at a large company I'd bet you have a very good chance at success.
Totally agree. Also check for an EAP if you're not already seeing a therapist.

As of a few months ago, the OP was reasonably happy with his job, so I think taking a little time to regroup and figure out if changing the job is the solution would be a good move; you don't want to walk away and find out you've brought all your problems with you, and job-hunting is pretty high pressure too.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by J295 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:22 am

Number one priority for me would be your health and well-being.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by Dave55 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:35 am

badger42 wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:18 am
Everybody talks. Let me repeat, EVERYBODY talks. Industry communities are a lot like a small town. At the same time, don't make this harder on yourself than you have to. I've been on both sides of this, as well as downstream of picking up the slack when somebody else leaves.

- Give your two weeks notice. It's only polite and professional. 50/50 shot of getting walked (in which case you did the right thing anyway).
- Take it easy for those two weeks. In at 10, out at 4, long lunches, etc. What are they going to do, fire you for slacking? (don't do anything illegal / unethical of course)
- Visibly focus on handing things off, helping whoever is taking over your work be successful. It will pay back later. If there are things you can easily close out, close them out.
Excellent Advice. +1

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by researcher » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:45 am

srt7 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:46 pm
BUT ... I would highly recommend that you squeeze it out before you leave. They've made life a living hell for you for 4 to 6 months and you're just going to walk away from a golden opportunity of giving them 2 weeks of hell? That's silly...

PS: Congrats on saving up! What's the point of having all that [money --admin LadyGeek] if you can't use it like it should be used. :sharebeer
Best post so far.

End of thread.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Mon Oct 22, 2018 12:38 pm

I guess the way I'd think of it is that once you give two-week's notice, what can they do to you? Send you out early, which you're thinking of, is about it.

Once you do, then anyone who tries to "stress" you, you just give a smile and say, "I'm only here X more days. Let's try to make it easy on everyone." Just keep saying that.
This week's fortune cookie: "Your financial life will be secure and beneficial." So I got that going for me, which is nice.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by wrongfunds » Mon Oct 22, 2018 12:55 pm

srt7 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:46 pm
OP,

2 weeks (or whatever time period) notices are total B.S., if you're on at-will employment agreement. Recommendations needn't be only from your past employer, they can be from your co-workers or your past to past employers/co-workers etc. Also, don't confuse this with "employment verification" ... which is what your future employer needs from your current one. Employment verification is nothing more than your title, dates of employment, type of employment. That's it. Anything more and you get to sue them. So don't sweat that 2 weeks notice stuff.

BUT ... I would highly recommend that you squeeze it out before you leave. They've made life a living hell for you for 4 to 6 months and you're just going to walk away from a golden opportunity of giving them 2 weeks of hell? That's silly.

Go to work tomorrow but NOT as a pushover (which is what your post implies you've been these past few months ... not judging but that is what I read in your post) but as a confident person. Heck, while you're at it, dress sharp (a suit even - yeah, let them think you're interviewing etc.), grab a cup of coffee and b'fast from the finest place around the office and walk in confidently. Go straight to the guy who's bothered you the most (or second most) and ask him (in a higher tone) how his weekend was. But you don't care about his weekend ... now do ya? So cut him off in the middle saying you need to talk to your manager. Then peek in to the manager's office and affirmatively ask for a couple "quick" minutes of his time (close the door or walk in to his cube as you're saying it) and just tell him that you're giving him 2 weeks notice. Why? "Personal reasons". Simple.

Go back to your office and send out that prepared email (mentioning you've given your 2 weeks notice) you have to your team (cc your boss and your personal email) and watch as the fun unfolds.

If the company wants you gone immediately ... fine! Walk out in style and be done.

They want you around for 2 weeks? Great!

NOW ... the important part is to remember that you've entered a period where you get to practice to let go of being a pushover. That ENDS HERE and that ENDS NOW. Learn to say NO. Practice saying NO when warranted but do say yes when warranted while leaving at 5PM sharp. Remember, the goal is to not lose all that you've built over the last few months. The goal here is to build up your image as a confident guy who does amazing work.

PS: Congrats on saving up! What's the point of having all that [money --admin LadyGeek] if you can't use it like it should be used. :sharebeer
Wish there was a "LIKED VERY MUCH" button :-)

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by LarryAllen » Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:09 pm

srt7 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:46 pm
OP,

2 weeks (or whatever time period) notices are total B.S., if you're on at-will employment agreement. Recommendations needn't be only from your past employer, they can be from your co-workers or your past to past employers/co-workers etc. Also, don't confuse this with "employment verification" ... which is what your future employer needs from your current one. Employment verification is nothing more than your title, dates of employment, type of employment. That's it. Anything more and you get to sue them. So don't sweat that 2 weeks notice stuff.

BUT ... I would highly recommend that you squeeze it out before you leave. They've made life a living hell for you for 4 to 6 months and you're just going to walk away from a golden opportunity of giving them 2 weeks of hell? That's silly.

Go to work tomorrow but NOT as a pushover (which is what your post implies you've been these past few months ... not judging but that is what I read in your post) but as a confident person. Heck, while you're at it, dress sharp (a suit even - yeah, let them think you're interviewing etc.), grab a cup of coffee and b'fast from the finest place around the office and walk in confidently. Go straight to the guy who's bothered you the most (or second most) and ask him (in a higher tone) how his weekend was. But you don't care about his weekend ... now do ya? So cut him off in the middle saying you need to talk to your manager. Then peek in to the manager's office and affirmatively ask for a couple "quick" minutes of his time (close the door or walk in to his cube as you're saying it) and just tell him that you're giving him 2 weeks notice. Why? "Personal reasons". Simple.

Go back to your office and send out that prepared email (mentioning you've given your 2 weeks notice) you have to your team (cc your boss and your personal email) and watch as the fun unfolds.

If the company wants you gone immediately ... fine! Walk out in style and be done.

They want you around for 2 weeks? Great!

NOW ... the important part is to remember that you've entered a period where you get to practice to let go of being a pushover. That ENDS HERE and that ENDS NOW. Learn to say NO. Practice saying NO when warranted but do say yes when warranted while leaving at 5PM sharp. Remember, the goal is to not lose all that you've built over the last few months. The goal here is to build up your image as a confident guy who does amazing work.

PS: Congrats on saving up! What's the point of having all that [money --admin LadyGeek] if you can't use it like it should be used. :sharebeer
A lot of good advice here but I wouldn't rely on this part: "Anything more and you get to sue them. So don't sweat that 2 weeks notice stuff." The problem is you never know what's being said so the odds of being able to successfully sue a former employer are probably pretty slim. I am not an employment lawyer but common sense tells me that stuff gets said about former employees that should not be said so I would always recommend leaving on the best terms possible. Plus, it goes back to my other post which is do not burn bridges. You never know who might be able to help you later on in life. Never burn a bridge. Even someone you absolutely despise. Don't do it. It's very short sighted. Otherwise, I like the above post and agree with their thoughts.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by maniminto » Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:18 pm

If you are an "at will" employee, your employer can release you without any notification.
My take on this subject is that you should evaluate the culture of your employer. If they let go of their employees with care and customary notification, you should do the same. If they let go of their employees without notification, you can do the same. There should be no repercussions as that is how the company conducts its business.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by Ged » Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:39 pm

EddyB wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:51 pm
David Jay wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:35 pm
It is very poor form if you expect to return to the job market.

My company has a policy that says “no recommendation” for someone who leaves without proper notice and an exit interview. So it can impact you down the road.
I’m so glad my company has a policy of “no recommendation” in any case!
Most companies have a policy of no recommendations. What they normally will do is verify previous employment and job title. Yes Ms. Blah-Blah worked here from 1066 to 2001 and his title in 2001 was 2nd assistant Pooh-Bah.

Some companies have policies not to rehire employees who do not give notice. Others will do things like forfeit accrued vacation. And of course in some situations word gets out. And of course you might end up in a situation where you have to work for a former supervisor at a different company.

Burning bridges is a bad idea.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by GT99 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:45 pm

EddyB wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:51 pm
David Jay wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:35 pm
It is very poor form if you expect to return to the job market.

My company has a policy that says “no recommendation” for someone who leaves without proper notice and an exit interview. So it can impact you down the road.
I’m so glad my company has a policy of “no recommendation” in any case!
I wouldn't assume that means a whole lot - that generally only applies in "formal" recommendations. LinkedIn (and other sources) makes it very easy to find out if you have mutual connections with someone. I check that for everyone I'm interested in hiring, and if I know someone in common, I ping them to see if they have any thoughts on the person. I've similarly had folks reach out to me many times for my thoughts on people I've worked with - coincidentally one was for a woman who had just stopped showing up for work one day (later found out she had run off to the Caribbean with a sugar daddy - apparently that didn't work out long term).

Even if you want to look at this from a purely selfish perspective, quitting with no notice is probably a bad decision IF you're intending to continue in a similar career (potentially even if you're making a career change) - but there are definitely exceptions.

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GoldStar
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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by GoldStar » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:07 pm

OP,
I'm surprised at how many folks are advising you to quit without 2 weeks notice.
It's considered a professional courtesy in most industries even though not required in most.
I'ts considered unprofessional to leave suddenly - doing so can impact your career for many years to come.

Someone did it to me when I was a manager once - left me suddenly and without a hand-off. I never forgot it - didn't matter how good he was - I just remembered him as the guy that suddenly quit without reason. I've seen the guys resume at 3 different jobs I've worked at since and blocked him from being hired at all three. At one of the jobs he tried to get in 3 times over 5 years - all three times I had him blocked (actually explained the situation to the hiring manager - no one wants to hire someone that might up and quit with no notice).

Someone said you can get references from elsewhere but most intelligent hiring managers look at where you've worked and will check with references you do NOT provide - those that you worked for or with in the past. So if you don't want to potentially be blocked from being hired at everywhere folks in the management chain or HR chain might end up working (In addition to the current place) - give the 2-weeks notice.

If you do decide to forgo the notice - I would recommend calling your manager and explaining the situation to him (would like to stay on for 2 more weeks but serious family issues prevent you from doing so.... or some such thing).

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by TravelGeek » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:12 pm

rob wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:48 am
Maybe it's the market I'm in but this is what I know of the norm... Former directors cannot give recs to past employees, employer will confirm dates & roles held only.
My former employer’s policy was:

1. Employer will only give employment dates as “reference”

2. Managers are not allowed to provide references. I verified with HR that this includes LinkedIn recommendations.

3. Hiring managers are required to check references before making a job offer. Real references. This is in addition to an outsourced background check that presumably uses The Work Number etc. to verify resume entries.

As a manager, I frequently violated rule #2 because of its inconsistency with rule #3. When former employees asked me if I would be willing to provide a reference, I obliged assuming I would be able to say good things about them. Most references I provided were over the phone. I generally declined requests for LinkedIn recommendations until I left the company because of rule #2 and because they are publicly visible. A few were in writing when the former/current employee applied to graduate school. I know a lot of my peers that I considered good managers handled it the same way.

When I quit my job recently, I told my boss that I was not in a hurry and wanted to ensure an orderly transition. I had already created a to-do list, groomed a successor, etc. I did that not just because I was concerned about burning bridges, but also because I cared about my team and their future. I consider many of them to be my friends. Looking back now, while I didn’t particularly enjoy my last few years because of upper management decisions (my immediate team was fine), I feel good about the way I left. Doing a JetBlue exit (which, I admit, at times crossed my mind) would have been less satisfying in the long term.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by mortfree » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:20 pm

GoldStar wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:07 pm

Someone did it to me when I was a manager once - left me suddenly and without a hand-off. I never forgot it - didn't matter how good he was - I just remembered him as the guy that suddenly quit without reason. I've seen the guys resume at 3 different jobs I've worked at since and blocked him from being hired at all three. At one of the jobs he tried to get in 3 times over 5 years - all three times I had him blocked (actually explained the situation to the hiring manager - no one wants to hire someone that might up and quit with no notice).
Most people quit their boss, not the job.

For you to go out of your way 3 times to block him. I dunno.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by iamlucky13 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:24 pm

Your own health should be your first priority in this decision, and your family should also be more important than work. If you can remain the 2 weeks without risking your long term health, and spend the time with your father than you need to, I'm in favor of offering to stay for 2 weeks.

Regarding recommendations - although it seems few employers will give them anymore due to concerns about defamation lawsuits, those same companies often still request references when hiring. Some employers, including my previous employer, will respond to requests by verifying dates of employment and reason for leaving. Presumably that's going to be something neutral like "voluntary resignation," but I'm not sure I'd rule out the possibility of them tagging "without giving notice" on at the end.

I re-emphasize though, I'd treat that as a secondary concern to health and family. Leaving without notice really should not sink your career, especially if you have a clear reason for doing so, but I could see some potential for it to extend your next job search.
One Ping wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:10 pm
Just curious, if in an at will state where employers prefer employees to give 2 weeks notice, do they give employees 2 weeks notice when they are let go?

Just wondering frequently that happens.
It depends on the employer and the situation. I've been laid off twice in my career, both times in at-will states. The first time I got 2 weeks notice. The second time I got severance pay instead. Neither of these were standard policies, although they are not uncommon in my field, and severance pay is standard policy for layoffs at my current employer.

I want to say something about my experience in the first case that I think relevant to the original question, including as a response to suggestions that were more about how best to punish the employer than how best to protect one's own interests when leaving.

I spent those two weeks focusing on completing ongoing work or documenting it for an easier transition for whoever would ultimately continue it. When the company's business picked up again after their downturn was over, they called me up to try to recruit me again. Making an effort to leave on good terms had a positive outcome in that case.

I actually had another job at that point, but in addition to having that opportunity as a fallback and not wanting to risk clean references, in my industry, employees often move between competitors or back and forth between suppliers and customers. I don't know who at future workplaces may know about me from former workplaces: one of my interviewers for my current job did turn out to be familiar with my work from my previous job, and for all I know, may very well have informally asked contacts we had in common about me. I also now indirectly oversee the work of a former coworker from my previous job.

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by 8foot7 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:33 pm

GoldStar wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:07 pm
I just remembered him as the guy that suddenly quit without reason. I've seen the guys resume at 3 different jobs I've worked at since and blocked him from being hired at all three. At one of the jobs he tried to get in 3 times over 5 years - all three times I had him blocked (actually explained the situation to the hiring manager - no one wants to hire someone that might up and quit with no notice).
Is it really professional to hold that much of a grudge?

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Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by Morgan Dollar 1921 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:40 pm

Wow, flashback time, as I have said in this forum before, I worked for a lot of New Car dealers. The reason I capitalized those two words is some of the former dealers I worked for deserve my respect.

Others not so much. This post will be harsh to many, but life is tough.

To this response: " I have a saying - when someone tells you (shows you) who they are, believe them.", OP's employer is obviously showing what they are with the workplace they are providing.

I worked in a store where the service manager walked around talking to his side gal out on the used car lot. I worked on the front line retail, greeting clients and writing up work orders. Two co-workers were boss buddies, rude manipulative prima donna's that worked the system to game their bonus checks, I will spare the details, I told boss I am giving you not two weeks, not four weeks but SIX weeks notice to my resignation IF this situation stays the same, I am gone at the end of six weeks. I had many years experience at that point, confident of my ability to find work. Nothing changed, there was an ugly scene in front of a customer during the 5th week, I told him your time is up you have done nothing to change things in five weeks. He left about two months later, so he didn't care either.

I agree with this quote: "Bail. Be done. Leave for your health, And do not look back."
IF the owner/supervisor/manager is not aware of the stress you are under there are greater problems in this than you can correct with 10 days more on the job.

To the business owners who are worried about "very poor form to quit with no notice" I ask, do you have other employees cross trained to pick up the work when someone dies? You should have,... read the obits, it happens every day. Maybe you are running short staff to fatten the bottom line, welcome to the new world. You want a 401k with no pension, yeah that 401k is portable, reap what you sow.
It is employment at will these days in most localities. Do you give one or two week notice, before you fire or lay off due to your biz slow downs. Maybe some do, but not the majority.

I have seen dozens of employees give a two week notice who unfortunately were living paycheck to paycheck and have the boss say the same day or the next day, collect your tools and roll your box, you are done here. The last store I worked for that happened three times in less than 7 months. Not hard to figure out what to do in this case for this employer. I gave him notice but only one week, when I retired. My manager said "I can't believe you are going, you know so much about the catalogs and the parts biz and your health is good. I said yes, and I am going to enjoy my good health in retirement, I consider it my most valuable asset. He said I wish you would have given a little more notice, I have a convention out of state next week. My reply was, yeah Greg, I noticed what they do around here when you give two or three weeks, he shook his head, you are so right, good luck.

I have never heard of an employer giving two weeks pay for you to depart early in the notice, but that is honorable.

Some employers are like the guard on ShawShank, "don't make me come down there, I'll thump your skull for you",.. you can pop it on youtube if you need a good laugh.

Olds dealer, closed the week before Christmas, no notice of a buy out by the Pontiac store down the road. "Happy New Year! At least the employees got to spend the holiday with the kids. Yeah she may have done them a favor,too,..as both car lines are gone now. That's how life works.

I got dropped due to a buy-sell a few years later, the gentleman, and he is a gentleman, who owned the biz, told us with a one week notice and handed out check's for next years vacation earned two weeks for every one, plus this weeks pay and next weeks, we were welcome to come back next week to help wrap up his biz sale or move on to interviews, all but one came back to help finish the work scheduled. I had advance notice without him telling anyone, as he told me no more parts orders for stock two weeks before inventory which was about six weeks before the closing. My year end bonus was only twenty percent of the previous years, but I was thankful to get it in addition to the PTO check just the same.

I know this is too long already, but an abusive owner whose store is gone also, thanks to the death of Oldsmobile, had a new car salesman, come in one morning when service opened, remove all the photos of his family in his office, grab everything that was his, nothing that belonged to the owner, and left. The sales staff showed up an hour later for the morning sales meeting, and one of my co-workers said E.A. will slam him in the meeting, you watch and see. Another said well he should have give notice, the first co-worker said nope not really he just fired his boss, because he deserved to be fired! The week before we were told to frack the deposits, sell the gee dee car. He slammed his clipboard on the table and hit this guy on the rebound.
I have seen general managers hang up on customers, in our dept when the phones were overloaded, picking up the phone telling the caller to call XYZ Pontiac on the other side of town, then slam it down and walk out.
Jump up on the meeting table walk around stomping in rage. Another one, bellowed like a bull when something went wrong, saying he wanted to know if a mouse let a fxrt in the wash bay, while three customers waited for write up at the sevice desk. I got more, but I am sure few made it this far :happy

One of the best, most proactive dealers I ever worked for told me as his manager, "IF we don't take care of our employees, they will fire themselves." This dealer is still in business, all but one of the rest I mentioned are gone like the steam locomotive.

I hope you find peace and position that enhances your skills. Best of luck!

wfrobinette
Posts: 728
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:14 pm

Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by wfrobinette » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:41 pm

EddyB wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:51 pm
David Jay wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:35 pm
It is very poor form if you expect to return to the job market.

My company has a policy that says “no recommendation” for someone who leaves without proper notice and an exit interview. So it can impact you down the road.
I’m so glad my company has a policy of “no recommendation” in any case!
Most companies only validate employment dates these days.

wfrobinette
Posts: 728
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:14 pm

Re: Quitting w/o notice

Post by wfrobinette » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:43 pm

Afty wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:54 am
I would strongly +1 the suggestion to take FMLA instead of immediately resigning. From https://www.dol.gov/whd/fmla/:
The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave. Eligible employees are entitled to:
  • Twelve workweeks of leave in a 12-month period for:
    • the birth of a child and to care for the newborn child within one year of birth;
    • the placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care and to care for the newly placed child within one year of placement;
    • to care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition;
    • a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job;
    • any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is a covered military member on “covered active duty;"
I believe any reasonable boss would accept your parent being seriously ill as a legitimate reason for you to take leave from work, and it's federally protected anyway. Whereas just resigning might be viewed more negatively.
I was going to suggest the exact same thing.

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