What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

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Fbone
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Fbone » Tue Aug 07, 2018 12:13 am

The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde.

Loved the world Fforde created and the whimsical comedy that goes with it. The plot was on the light side without a lot of action. Still, this was typical Fforde where his worlds and citizens are the best part.

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Tue Aug 07, 2018 12:20 pm

Space Opera by Catherynne Valente.

See: viewtopic.php?f=11&t=146455&sid=6748df5 ... 0#p4054014
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Jazztonight » Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:59 am

I'm currently half way through Grit https://www.amazon.com/Grit-Passion-Per ... +duckworth by Angela Duckworth. It's terrific, and a real Bogleheads book!

I'm also almost finished with the unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. It's nothing like the movies I've seen or the Classic comics version! https://www.amazon.com/Count-Monte-Cris ... unabridged
"What does not destroy me, makes me stronger." Nietzsche

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Blues » Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:17 am

Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:59 am
I'm also almost finished with the unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. It's nothing like the movies I've seen or the Classic comics version! https://www.amazon.com/Count-Monte-Cris ... unabridged
Along with Les Miserables, one of the truly great epics of that (or any) period.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ResearchMed » Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:25 am

Blues wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:17 am
Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:59 am
I'm also almost finished with the unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. It's nothing like the movies I've seen or the Classic comics version! https://www.amazon.com/Count-Monte-Cris ... unabridged
Along with Les Miserables, one of the truly great epics of that (or any) period.
Ah, you beat me to it!

Those ARE two of the greats, if not "the" two greats.

Again, the originals, not modern adaptations of varying modes.

RM
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Blues » Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:42 am

ResearchMed wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:25 am
Blues wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:17 am
Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:59 am
I'm also almost finished with the unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. It's nothing like the movies I've seen or the Classic comics version! https://www.amazon.com/Count-Monte-Cris ... unabridged
Along with Les Miserables, one of the truly great epics of that (or any) period.
Ah, you beat me to it!

Those ARE two of the greats, if not "the" two greats.

Again, the originals, not modern adaptations of varying modes.

RM
It was worth repeating. :sharebeer
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by MJW » Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:51 am

Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:59 am
I'm also almost finished with the unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. It's nothing like the movies I've seen or the Classic comics version! https://www.amazon.com/Count-Monte-Cris ... unabridged
One of my all time favorites. I read the "illustrated classics" version as a child and the unabridged as a young adult. Haven't read it again in years but it remains one of the best.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by lthenderson » Wed Aug 08, 2018 2:05 pm

Blues wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:42 am
ResearchMed wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:25 am
Blues wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:17 am
Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:59 am
I'm also almost finished with the unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. It's nothing like the movies I've seen or the Classic comics version! https://www.amazon.com/Count-Monte-Cris ... unabridged
Along with Les Miserables, one of the truly great epics of that (or any) period.
Ah, you beat me to it!

Those ARE two of the greats, if not "the" two greats.

Again, the originals, not modern adaptations of varying modes.

RM
It was worth repeating. :sharebeer
I haven't read either in nearly 30 years. Reading this makes me want to dig them out and re-read them.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Artful Dodger » Wed Aug 08, 2018 2:33 pm

MJW wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:51 am
Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:59 am
I'm also almost finished with the unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. It's nothing like the movies I've seen or the Classic comics version! https://www.amazon.com/Count-Monte-Cris ... unabridged
One of my all time favorites. I read the "illustrated classics" version as a child and the unabridged as a young adult. Haven't read it again in years but it remains one of the best.
One of my all time favorites! I last got it on a $5 Audible sale. Fifty-five hours of pure listening delight with a great reader - John Lee.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Thu Aug 09, 2018 11:55 am

Hickory, Dickory, Dock, by Agatha Christie.

A series of petty thefts and practical jokes at a student boarding house obscure a more devious plot.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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Koogie
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Koogie » Fri Aug 10, 2018 1:15 pm

azurekep wrote:
Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:06 pm
I Am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes

An intelligent, well-researched international thriller with vividly written scenes. (Some suspension of disbelief is needed.) Most of the thriller-type action takes place on the Aegean coast of Turkey, in an atmospheric setting with historic ruins and mansions along cliffs. Prior to the action moving to Turkey, there are scattered scenes in other parts of the world and many readers give up, or almost give up on the book, since the multiple threads seem disconnected and the book is extraordinarily long (700 pages). But keep plugging and you likely will feel rewarded.

For those who have already read the book, the scenes that stick in my mind are when The Saracen, now a well-educated medical doctor, poses as a homeless man, setting up camp for weeks outside a Syrian research institute. This demonstrates his patience in his quest for a weapon and it's funny how everyone gets used to seeing him and ignores him — a kind of social engineering. Also, the episode involving the Uffizi Gallery in Florence was pretty amazing. I'm not sure if the whole premise was scientifically accurate, but it sure was an interesting twist.

If there is a follow-up book, it would be great if it concentrated on the Pilgrim's skill as a criminal investigator. The terrorist plot is done and over with and we all know Pilgrim is a great operative. But after 700 pages, I personally don't need to see more. :) But a criminal investigation following up on the thread left hanging would be interesting.
Having just read it, I would agree with some of your criticisms. On the positive side, it was well written. The author has a good feel for dialogue, character and motivation (probably true to his screenwriting roots).

The plotting though. The thriller plot works well. Intelligent, well thought out and logical. I take a lot of issue with the "forensic genius" subplot though. Nonsensical. How does an espionage agent end up heralded as also the worlds best forensic and crime scene expert ? That was never adequately explained (perhaps as you say, that is what the sequel is for). And I personally found the Uffizi and the reason for going there pretty laughable as a plot device. Still, if he writes the sequel to the same standard, sign me up.

I also recently read The Imam of Tawi-Tawi by Ian Hamilton. Latest in a series (11th) of thriller/detective novels featuring a young, female Chinese-Canadian forensic accountant who specializes in overseas bad debt recovery. At this point in the series, we are well into formula territory. Still, he writes the protagonist well, the places he sends her are always interesting and well described and the series is still interesting. For how much longer, I am not sure. I kind of feel the same way about it now as when I gave up on the Dave Robicheaux novels that James Lee Burke used to pump out. I like the authors writing, I like the protagonist but the formula is starting to feel worn out.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by gretah » Sat Aug 11, 2018 9:38 pm

"The President is Missing" by James Patterson and Bill Clinton.

A page-turner thriller.

Probably the best of the James Patterson collaborations.

Intelligent, fun read.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by lthenderson » Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:05 am

"The Best Land Under Heaven" by Michael Wallis
In the eerily warm spring of 1846, George Donner placed this advertisement in a local newspaper as he and a restless caravan prepared for what they hoped would be the most rewarding journey of a lifetime. But in eagerly pursuing what would a century later become known as the "American dream," this optimistic-yet-motley crew of emigrants was met with a chilling nightmare; in the following months, their jingoistic excitement would be replaced by desperate cries for help that would fall silent in the deadly snow-covered mountains of the Sierra Nevada.

We know these early pioneers as the Donner Party, a name that has elicited horror since the late 1840s. Now, celebrated historian Michael Wallis―beloved for his myth-busting portraits of legendary American figures―continues his life’s work of parsing fact from fiction to tell the true story of one of the most embroidered sagas in Western history.

Wallis begins the story in 1846, a momentous "year of decision" for the nation, when incredible territorial strides were being made in Texas, New Mexico, and California. Against this dramatic backdrop, an unlikely band of travelers appeared, stratified in age, wealth, education and ethnicity. At the forefront were the Donners: brothers George and Jacob, true sons of the soil determined to tame the wild land of California; and the Reeds, headed by adventurous, business-savvy patriarch James. In total, the Donner-Reed group would reach eighty-seven men, women, and children, and though personal motives varied―bachelors thirsting for adventure, parents wanting greater futures for their children―everyone was linked by the same unwavering belief that California was theirs for the taking.

Skeptical of previous accounts of how the group ended up in peril, Wallis has spent years retracing its ill-fated journey, uncovering hundreds of new documents that illuminate how a combination of greed, backbiting, and recklessness led the group to become hopelessly snowbound at the infamous Donner Pass in present-day California. Climaxing with the grim stories of how the party’s paltry rations soon gave way to unimaginable hunger, Wallis not only details the cannibalism that has in perpetuity haunted their legacy but also the heroic rescue parties that managed to reach the stranded, only to discover that just forty-eight had survived the ordeal.

An unflinching and historically invaluable account of the darkest side of Manifest Destiny, The Best Land Under Heaven offers a brilliant, revisionist examination of one of America's most calamitous and sensationalized catastrophes.
https://www.amazon.com/Best-Land-Under- ... 0871407698

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:30 am

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:05 am
"The Best Land Under Heaven" by Michael Wallis
In the eerily warm spring of 1846, George Donner placed this advertisement in a local newspaper as he and a restless caravan prepared for what they hoped would be the most rewarding journey of a lifetime. But in eagerly pursuing what would a century later become known as the "American dream," this optimistic-yet-motley crew of emigrants was met with a chilling nightmare; in the following months, their jingoistic excitement would be replaced by desperate cries for help that would fall silent in the deadly snow-covered mountains of the Sierra Nevada.

We know these early pioneers as the Donner Party, a name that has elicited horror since the late 1840s. Now, celebrated historian Michael Wallis―beloved for his myth-busting portraits of legendary American figures―continues his life’s work of parsing fact from fiction to tell the true story of one of the most embroidered sagas in Western history.

Wallis begins the story in 1846, a momentous "year of decision" for the nation, when incredible territorial strides were being made in Texas, New Mexico, and California. Against this dramatic backdrop, an unlikely band of travelers appeared, stratified in age, wealth, education and ethnicity. At the forefront were the Donners: brothers George and Jacob, true sons of the soil determined to tame the wild land of California; and the Reeds, headed by adventurous, business-savvy patriarch James. In total, the Donner-Reed group would reach eighty-seven men, women, and children, and though personal motives varied―bachelors thirsting for adventure, parents wanting greater futures for their children―everyone was linked by the same unwavering belief that California was theirs for the taking.

Skeptical of previous accounts of how the group ended up in peril, Wallis has spent years retracing its ill-fated journey, uncovering hundreds of new documents that illuminate how a combination of greed, backbiting, and recklessness led the group to become hopelessly snowbound at the infamous Donner Pass in present-day California. Climaxing with the grim stories of how the party’s paltry rations soon gave way to unimaginable hunger, Wallis not only details the cannibalism that has in perpetuity haunted their legacy but also the heroic rescue parties that managed to reach the stranded, only to discover that just forty-eight had survived the ordeal.

An unflinching and historically invaluable account of the darkest side of Manifest Destiny, The Best Land Under Heaven offers a brilliant, revisionist examination of one of America's most calamitous and sensationalized catastrophes.
https://www.amazon.com/Best-Land-Under- ... 0871407698
You might as also like The Year of Decision by Bernard DeVoto. It does not focus only on the Donner party, but also on the many other significant events of 1846.
"Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein | Wiki article link:Getting Started

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by lthenderson » Tue Aug 14, 2018 12:15 pm

ruralavalon wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:30 am
You might as also like The Year of Decision by Bernard DeVoto. It does not focus only on the Donner party, but also on the many other significant events of 1846.
Thanks for the recommendation. This is my second book in a row on this time period, the first being about the gold rush three years later, and it does seem like there was a lot happening. I'll add it to my list.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Tue Aug 14, 2018 2:32 pm

The Source, by Martin Doyle.

This book is a history of the Constitution, federalism, property rights, law, regulation and the use of rivers in the U.S.

The book covers early Europen settlement on the Atlantic, early industrialization at the fall line (sawmills, grist mills), powering factories, improving navigation, canals, dams, irrigation, flood control, hydroelectric power, and includes more current dam removal, environmental protection and stream restoration.

I found this very interesting and informative.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Dave55 » Tue Aug 14, 2018 3:22 pm

"The Sinners" by Ace Atkins, this is the 8th book of the Quinn Colson series. Quinn is the sheriff in a fictional rural Mississippi county plagued with its share of crime and characters. His family and personal life add richness. The writing, characters and plots make the entire series of 8 books quite enjoyable. BTW, the series is highly plugged by CJ Box, Lee Child, Michael Connelly and others.


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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius » Sat Aug 18, 2018 3:24 pm

Jennet Conant was being interviewed on NPR and I suddenly realized that I'd just loved two of her books: The Irregulars, which is about the British spies who spied on the United States during World War II--it included the writers Ian Fleming and Roald Dahl; and Tuxedo Park, an incredible story I'd known almost nothing about, about Alfred Loomis, a rich amateur scientist with his private laboratory, like something out of a superhero comic book, who played a key role in the development of radar during World War II, in part by funding the MIT Radiation Laboratory.

So I just started another, 109 East Palace: Robert Oppenheimer and the Secret City of Los Alamos, and it, too is fascinating. Who would have thought there were so many new things about Los Alamos to be written about? It's based heavily on the reminiscences of Dorothy McKibben, who was Oppenheimer's assistant, and ran the small, unimpressive office in Santa Fe that was the gateway to Los Alamos.

Just to pick one point at random: Oppenheimer had difficulty recruiting scientists for the project because a very prevalent view was that radar was a sure thing, that in particular it was going to be ready in time to be used in the war. While the atomic bomb was dubious, both in the sense that nobody was sure it could be done, and that even if it could be, it would probably take too long to develop to have any influence on the war.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by abuss368 » Sun Aug 19, 2018 1:53 pm

Still working on Ronald Reagan's book "An American Life" all 725 pages! Almost there but I have enjoyed it.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by MP173 » Sun Aug 19, 2018 7:25 pm

"My Cross to Bear" by Greg Allman.

One of my "misses" was never seeing the Allman Brothers Band (another was Tom Petty and Heartbreakers). I have always enjoyed the ABB blues based music.

I am about 2/3 thru this and he has quite a bit to tell about his life, wives, addictions, and music.


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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by FreeAtLast » Sun Aug 19, 2018 8:39 pm

"The Brotherhood Of Spies: The U-2 And the CIA's Secret War" by Monte Reel (Doubleday 2018)

The U-2 spy plane is still in use today, having survived several promised retirements by the Pentagon, because its "ancient" technology can surpass that of drones and satellites in a number of military surveillance scenarios. This book lays out the engineering development and initial uses of the first U-2 and the critical inputs of the driven geniuses who created it. The U-2 gave the US an unprecedented increase in its ability to uncover the military secrets hidden behind the Iron Curtain of Khrushchev's USSR. It also precipitated a political crisis for the Eisenhower administration - the downing of Francis Gary Powers by a Russian SAM - and eventually an utterly terrifying nuclear confrontation between the two superpowers (the Cuban Missile Crisis). Besides its cogent history lesson, the book provides mini-biographies of three extraordinary individuals: Edwin Land of the Polaroid Corporation, Clarence "Kelly" Johnson of the Lockheed Corporation and Richard Bissell of the CIA.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by blacklab » Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:15 am

"The Second World Wars" by Victor Davis Hanson

Had to renew this massive history multiple times at library. Found it fascinating.
"Wars" plural emphasizes the global nature of the conflict, which the author covers in extraordinary detail.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Blues » Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:17 am

Why They Kill: The Discoveries of a Maverick Criminologist by Richard Rhodes.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by bondsr4me » Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:36 am

The 4 Pillars of Investing.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by nisiprius » Mon Aug 20, 2018 8:21 am

blacklab wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:15 am
"The Second World Wars" by Victor Davis Hanson

Had to renew this massive history multiple times at library. Found it fascinating.
"Wars" plural emphasizes the global nature of the conflict, which the author covers in extraordinary detail.
I had been accustomed to thinking of the Second World War as truly global in scope and literally affecting the whole world. One of the things I've learned from people in Latin America is that they don't see it the same way. Certainly, they have heard of the Segunda Guerra Mundial, but just as one of those things you learn in history. It isn't the gigantic mental mile marker it is for people from, well, the U.S., Europe, China, Japan, Indonesia, and Australia. It certainly didn't pass Latin America by, but it's, well... maybe the way we think of the Napoleonic wars? (I can't think of a big twentieth-century conflict that didn't heavily involve the US.)

It might be interesting to ask people from various countries "name five wars" and see how often the list of five does or does not include World War II. What would it be for a US-ian? Revolutionary War, American Civil War, World War I, World War II, Viet Nam?
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by investingdad » Mon Aug 20, 2018 11:22 am

gretah wrote:
Sat Aug 11, 2018 9:38 pm
"The President is Missing" by James Patterson and Bill Clinton.

A page-turner thriller.

Probably the best of the James Patterson collaborations.

Intelligent, fun read.
I read this recently and enjoyed the plot and story. There were segments that felt like I was being preached to by Clinton, which I expected going in, but overall still a good read.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by investingdad » Mon Aug 20, 2018 11:34 am

For Sci-fi / dystopian fans, I recommend the "Wool" trilogy, by Hugh Howey. The sequel is "Shift", followed by "Dust". They're also referred to as the "Silo" series.

I'm in the middle of " Shift".

The writing is well done and the characters and dialogue are believable. The pacing is also pretty tight with solid building of suspense. The second book is a prequel but also takes place in the Wool period. The plot itself is very near future and the suspension of disbelief is quite easy.

The first book was good but the second really hits the mark by slowly filling in the backstory of the first. It allows the reader to figure out the details and gradually confirms the story.

I highly recommend.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by MJW » Mon Aug 20, 2018 1:01 pm

nisiprius wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 8:21 am
It might be interesting to ask people from various countries "name five wars" and see how often the list of five does or does not include World War II. What would it be for a US-ian? Revolutionary War, American Civil War, World War I, World War II, Viet Nam?
Those would be the five I would name. I suspect some younger folks might overlook WWI in favor of the more recent Afghan/Iraq conflicts.

WWI is fascinating to me as I think of all of the entangling alliances that built up throughout Europe during the latter half of the 19th century, coming to a head in such a brutal, disastrous fashion.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by lthenderson » Mon Aug 20, 2018 1:31 pm

MJW wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 1:01 pm
nisiprius wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 8:21 am
It might be interesting to ask people from various countries "name five wars" and see how often the list of five does or does not include World War II. What would it be for a US-ian? Revolutionary War, American Civil War, World War I, World War II, Viet Nam?
Those would be the five I would name. I suspect some younger folks might overlook WWI in favor of the more recent Afghan/Iraq conflicts.
And also wars like the Korean War, Mexican-American War, War of 1812, Spanish-American War, Cold War, American-Philippine War, Barbary Wars I and II and numerous Indian Wars come to mind.

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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ruralavalon » Mon Aug 20, 2018 5:05 pm

Wa-To-Yah and the Taos Trail, by Lewis Garrard.

This is the first person narrative of a 17 year old who travelled from Missouri to New Mexico and back in 1846, at the start of the Mexican War. He describes travel with traders and mountain men, indian camps and life, the Taos Revolt's resulting trials and executions, and trapping and life in New Mexico. Wah-To-Yah refers to the Spanish Peaks in Colorado, just north of Taos.
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Blues » Mon Aug 20, 2018 5:07 pm

ruralavalon wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 5:05 pm
Wa-To-Yah and the Taos Trail, by Lewis Garrard.

This is the first person narrative of a 17 year old who travelled from Missouri to New Mexico and back in 1846, at the start of the Mexican War. He describes travel with traders and mountain men, indian camps and life, the Taos Revolt's resulting trials and executions, and trapping and life in New Mexico. Wah-To-Yah refers to the Spanish Peaks in Colorado, just north of Taos.
I have a copy of that book I read several years ago. One of a number of books I have in my library on the subject of mountain men and fur traders. :sharebeer
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Calygos » Mon Aug 20, 2018 6:49 pm

Calli114 wrote:
Fri Jul 20, 2018 9:36 pm
It's not new, but I had never heard of it - Crucial Conversations.
Subtitle, "Tools for talking when stakes are high." A friend in the healthcare field gave it to me.

I would describe it as communication tools that can be used for either business or personal matters. I am 40 pages in. If I run into paragraphs that seem like too much psycho babble, I just move on. Generally, it's an easy read.
My team (the whole IT dept, all 9 of us) have been reading this for several months now, meeting for an hour a week (at best, some recent weeks have been canceled for time prioritization) to discuss each chapter and questions that our wonderful IT manager have come up with. It's really created some engaging discussions! We're only on chapter 6 since 5 and 6 are fairly meaty so far and have taken multiple weeks since we get really into some of the questions very deeply.

Coincidentally, I'm starting a new job in 2 weeks and I happened to mention all of this during my video call interview with their Sr. Dir. of Engineering and she was surprised and very pleased and we had our own brief conversation about it. I wouldn't be surprised if this part of the interview led to an even more favorable opinion of me. :sharebeer

Calygos
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Calygos » Mon Aug 20, 2018 6:52 pm

Aside from Crucial Conversations per my previous reply, I've recently started reading a couple of others:

Thinking, Fast and Slow. I'm just getting started but eagerly excited to see where it goes. After that is another I bought at the same time, a brand new one titled The Book of Why: The New Science of Cause and Effect. Seemed like a good pairing.

Site Reliability Engineering. For my new job as this is my role there.

Prometheus: Up & Running. Also for the new job.

Wilderness Librarian
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Wilderness Librarian » Mon Aug 20, 2018 8:03 pm

3 since last posting

The promise of the Grand Canyon: John Wesley Powell's perilous journey and his vision of the American west / by John F. Ross - wanted to read more for his post canyon ethnographic work and advocacy of sustainable agricultural practices but the rendition of the original canyon excursion was pretty exciting too.

Northland: a 4,000 mile journey along America's forgotten Border / by Porter Fox - a journalistic style account of the author's transit of the US/Canadian border from Maine to Washington. OK especially the parts discussing historical explorations and boundary surveys. However a bit shortsighted in his featuring of contemporary life & events in the border areas - too many cliches (sp?) such as the fishing lodges on the decline, native rights protest movements and survivalist fringe groups. I would have preferred better representation of the borderlands cultures

Eager: the surprising secret life of beavers and why they matter / by Ben Goldfarb - very well written not only arguing for beavers underrated role in woodland and riparian ecology but how instrumental they were in forming historical landscapes. And as you can imagine he is a strong advocate for their proliferation and incorporation in complex conservation and restoration activities. This one will probably make several best of the year lists.

CarpeDiem22
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by CarpeDiem22 » Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:14 am

Why Smart People Make Big Money Mistakes And How To Correct Them

Just started my first behavioral finance book thanks to the recommendations on this forum.

asif408
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by asif408 » Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:08 pm

Global Investing: The Professional's Guide to the World Capital Markets by Ibbotson and Brinson. Has some pretty interesting statistics about international investing. For instance, I didn't know before reading that the Japanese stock market had spectacular returns in the 1970s and 1980s relative to the rest of the world. I knew about the 1980s performance but didn't realize it also went back another decade. Seeing that put the poor performance of Japan since 1990 in perspective.

It was also interesting to note that the UK, while having a bear market during the 1929-1932 stock market crash like the US, had a much less severe one, probably somewhat mitigated by the fact that its performance leading up to the crash was less than the US. OTOH, the UK had its worst stock market crash in the 1973-1974 bear market, much worse than the US, but then returned over 130% in 1975, its largest one year return ever.

So some interesting anecdotes about how other countries have sometimes fared better or worse during bear markets gives hope that international diversification, while not always going to benefit, at least has the potential at some point to provide benefit in the future. It reiterated some patterns I see in investing, mainly that:

1) Periods of high returns tend to be followed by periods of low returns
2) The markets that crash the hardest during a crisis tend to be ones that have performed the best in the years leading up to it
3) The bigger the fall in a stock market, in general, the bigger the returns when things turn around

Calli114
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Calli114 » Tue Aug 21, 2018 7:15 pm

A spiritually-oriented book by Rachel Shelton called "A Place To Close My Eyes" (it's actually titled in all lower case).
It's about a little girl in the Deep South who grows up enduring every kind of abuse and various traumatic events. Her only relief and mentor was a wise old black guy called Joes.

The chapters vary between the little girl and the woman that she eventually became with prayer and faith. And somewhat of a surprise ending to see how her life turned out.

jdb
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jdb » Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:05 pm

The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin, published in London in 1839. Found at my favorite Chicago used bookstore, Myopic in Wicker Park. When I go to used bookstores like to buy the old books with heavy leather covers and large fonts and period illustrations, this one hit all the keys, published about 30 years ago. Even has period illustrations drawn during the voyage. Never would be reading the current paperback version with small font. Anyway, very much enjoy the book, one of all time greatest voyages of exploration of geology, flora and fauna, not to mention the interesting homo sapiens encountered. And of course led directly to an even more famous book by same author. Highly recommend but only if locate one of the old leather bound illustrated editions published back when people really did spend time reading quality books. Good luck.

ResearchMed
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ResearchMed » Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:14 pm

jdb wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:05 pm
The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin, published in London in 1839. Found at my favorite Chicago used bookstore, Myopic in Wicker Park. When I go to used bookstores like to buy the old books with heavy leather covers and large fonts and period illustrations, this one hit all the keys, published about 30 years ago. Even has period illustrations drawn during the voyage. Never would be reading the current paperback version with small font. Anyway, very much enjoy the book, one of all time greatest voyages of exploration of plants, animals and fauna, not to mention the interesting homo sapiens encountered. And of course led directly to an even more famous book by same author. Highly recommend but only if locate one of the old leather bound illustrated editions published back when people really did spend time reading quality books. Good luck.
It IS nicer to read a book when it is bound and printed nicely!

I've got a nice collection of boxed sets or just "full sets" of classical authors, and many fond memories of curling up with the books, from young childhood through well into adulthood.

Unfortunately, that background makes it really difficult to enjoy e-versions of books.
It makes it worse than that. I very much dislike the e-versions.

Your "Voyage of the Beagle" sounds like an especially nice "find". :happy

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

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DanMahowny
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by DanMahowny » Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:15 pm

The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August
Funding secured

Valuethinker
Posts: 35999
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Valuethinker » Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:23 pm

asif408 wrote:
Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:08 pm
Global Investing: The Professional's Guide to the World Capital Markets by Ibbotson and Brinson. Has some pretty interesting statistics about international investing. For instance, I didn't know before reading that the Japanese stock market had spectacular returns in the 1970s and 1980s relative to the rest of the world. I knew about the 1980s performance but didn't realize it also went back another decade. Seeing that put the poor performance of Japan since 1990 in perspective.

It was also interesting to note that the UK, while having a bear market during the 1929-1932 stock market crash like the US, had a much less severe one, probably somewhat mitigated by the fact that its performance leading up to the crash was less than the US. OTOH, the UK had its worst stock market crash in the 1973-1974 bear market, much worse than the US, but then returned over 130% in 1975, its largest one year return ever.
Related to this, the UK had:

- a torid 1920s, related to the effects of WW1 and basically spending all their capital winning it. Also to the disastrous decision (by Winston Churchill, as Chancellor of the Exchequer) to put Britain back on the Gold Standard at $4.85 per 1 GBP. Thus leading to the demand by the coal mine owners for wage cuts and working hours increases, that led to the General Strike

- a much better 1930s than most nations (Nazi Germany did well, but that was by in effect moving to a war economy, banning all but essential imports, etc.). This was propelled by a housebuilding boom (in only one decade since has Britain built more homes than it did in the 1930s) and the revolution in consumer industries that was associated with that

So some interesting anecdotes about how other countries have sometimes fared better or worse during bear markets gives hope that international diversification, while not always going to benefit, at least has the potential at some point to provide benefit in the future. It reiterated some patterns I see in investing, mainly that:

1) Periods of high returns tend to be followed by periods of low returns
2) The markets that crash the hardest during a crisis tend to be ones that have performed the best in the years leading up to it
3) The bigger the fall in a stock market, in general, the bigger the returns when things turn around
3 survivor bias in the data? The markets that did not recover, aren't in the data?

Some markets have just had mediocre returns.

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black jack
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by black jack » Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:26 pm

Artful Dodger wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 2:33 pm
MJW wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 11:51 am
Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 10:59 am
I'm also almost finished with the unabridged version of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. It's nothing like the movies I've seen or the Classic comics version! https://www.amazon.com/Count-Monte-Cris ... unabridged
One of my all time favorites. I read the "illustrated classics" version as a child and the unabridged as a young adult. Haven't read it again in years but it remains one of the best.
One of my all time favorites! I last got it on a $5 Audible sale. Fifty-five hours of pure listening delight with a great reader - John Lee.
Happened to read this just before a long car trip, so got the audiobook. However, the trip was only 24 hours (round-trip), so didn't even get me halfway through the novel! Either I'll have to do another couple of long car-trips, or walk the dog 100 miles.

I am enjoying it.
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

asif408
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Location: Florida

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by asif408 » Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:30 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:23 pm
asif408 wrote:
Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:08 pm
Global Investing: The Professional's Guide to the World Capital Markets by Ibbotson and Brinson. Has some pretty interesting statistics about international investing. For instance, I didn't know before reading that the Japanese stock market had spectacular returns in the 1970s and 1980s relative to the rest of the world. I knew about the 1980s performance but didn't realize it also went back another decade. Seeing that put the poor performance of Japan since 1990 in perspective.

It was also interesting to note that the UK, while having a bear market during the 1929-1932 stock market crash like the US, had a much less severe one, probably somewhat mitigated by the fact that its performance leading up to the crash was less than the US. OTOH, the UK had its worst stock market crash in the 1973-1974 bear market, much worse than the US, but then returned over 130% in 1975, its largest one year return ever.
Related to this, the UK had:

- a torid 1920s, related to the effects of WW1 and basically spending all their capital winning it. Also to the disastrous decision (by Winston Churchill, as Chancellor of the Exchequer) to put Britain back on the Gold Standard at $4.85 per 1 GBP. Thus leading to the demand by the coal mine owners for wage cuts and working hours increases, that led to the General Strike

- a much better 1930s than most nations (Nazi Germany did well, but that was by in effect moving to a war economy, banning all but essential imports, etc.). This was propelled by a housebuilding boom (in only one decade since has Britain built more homes than it did in the 1930s) and the revolution in consumer industries that was associated with that

So some interesting anecdotes about how other countries have sometimes fared better or worse during bear markets gives hope that international diversification, while not always going to benefit, at least has the potential at some point to provide benefit in the future. It reiterated some patterns I see in investing, mainly that:

1) Periods of high returns tend to be followed by periods of low returns
2) The markets that crash the hardest during a crisis tend to be ones that have performed the best in the years leading up to it
3) The bigger the fall in a stock market, in general, the bigger the returns when things turn around
3 survivor bias in the data? The markets that did not recover, aren't in the data?

Some markets have just had mediocre returns.
Very true, just got to that part in the book recently. Brazil And South Africa I believe had 0 and negative returns over a 15-20 year period during the 1970s and 1980s. And as you say those are the survivors. And IIRC South Africa was either the best performing or 2nd best performing stock market in the world in the Credit Suisse yearbook from 1900-2014, so I guess they did better in other decades.

Interesting info about the UK thanks for sharing.

Valuethinker
Posts: 35999
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Valuethinker » Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:53 pm

jdb wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:05 pm
The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin, published in London in 1839. Found at my favorite Chicago used bookstore, Myopic in Wicker Park. When I go to used bookstores like to buy the old books with heavy leather covers and large fonts and period illustrations, this one hit all the keys, published about 30 years ago. Even has period illustrations drawn during the voyage. Never would be reading the current paperback version with small font. Anyway, very much enjoy the book, one of all time greatest voyages of exploration of geology, flora and fauna, not to mention the interesting homo sapiens encountered. And of course led directly to an even more famous book by same author. Highly recommend but only if locate one of the old leather bound illustrated editions published back when people really did spend time reading quality books. Good luck.
http://www.foliosociety.com/shop

You may well have a Folio Society Edition?

They specialize in high quality bound and illustrated books - usually re issues of classics.

https://www.foliosociety.com/region/select they do sell in USA.

jdb
Posts: 1471
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 8:21 pm

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by jdb » Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:04 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:53 pm
jdb wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:05 pm
The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin, published in London in 1839. Found at my favorite Chicago used bookstore, Myopic in Wicker Park. When I go to used bookstores like to buy the old books with heavy leather covers and large fonts and period illustrations, this one hit all the keys, published about 30 years ago. Even has period illustrations drawn during the voyage. Never would be reading the current paperback version with small font. Anyway, very much enjoy the book, one of all time greatest voyages of exploration of geology, flora and fauna, not to mention the interesting homo sapiens encountered. And of course led directly to an even more famous book by same author. Highly recommend but only if locate one of the old leather bound illustrated editions published back when people really did spend time reading quality books. Good luck.
http://www.foliosociety.com/shop

You may well have a Folio Society Edition?

They specialize in high quality bound and illustrated books - usually re issues of classics.

https://www.foliosociety.com/region/select they do sell in USA.
Yes, it is a Folio Society edition published in London in a type of box. And in amost new condition, wonder if it was ever even opened. Want to find more Folio Society editions of classics. Thanks.

User avatar
bertilak
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by bertilak » Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:10 pm

jdb wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:04 pm
Yes, it is a Folio Society edition published in London in a type of box. And in amost new condition, wonder if it was ever even opened. Want to find more Folio Society editions of classics. Thanks.
Folio Society is one of my favorite eBay searches.
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard. -- Squire Omar Barker, the Cowboy Poet

Valuethinker
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Valuethinker » Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:38 pm

ResearchMed wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:14 pm
jdb wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:05 pm
The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin, published in London in 1839. Found at my favorite Chicago used bookstore, Myopic in Wicker Park. When I go to used bookstores like to buy the old books with heavy leather covers and large fonts and period illustrations, this one hit all the keys, published about 30 years ago. Even has period illustrations drawn during the voyage. Never would be reading the current paperback version with small font. Anyway, very much enjoy the book, one of all time greatest voyages of exploration of plants, animals and fauna, not to mention the interesting homo sapiens encountered. And of course led directly to an even more famous book by same author. Highly recommend but only if locate one of the old leather bound illustrated editions published back when people really did spend time reading quality books. Good luck.
It IS nicer to read a book when it is bound and printed nicely!

I've got a nice collection of boxed sets or just "full sets" of classical authors, and many fond memories of curling up with the books, from young childhood through well into adulthood.

Unfortunately, that background makes it really difficult to enjoy e-versions of books.
It makes it worse than that. I very much dislike the e-versions.

Your "Voyage of the Beagle" sounds like an especially nice "find". :happy

RM
https://www.foliosociety.com/region/select

specialize in finely bound and illustrated books.

Valuethinker
Posts: 35999
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by Valuethinker » Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:40 pm

jdb wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:04 pm
Valuethinker wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:53 pm
jdb wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:05 pm
The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin, published in London in 1839. Found at my favorite Chicago used bookstore, Myopic in Wicker Park. When I go to used bookstores like to buy the old books with heavy leather covers and large fonts and period illustrations, this one hit all the keys, published about 30 years ago. Even has period illustrations drawn during the voyage. Never would be reading the current paperback version with small font. Anyway, very much enjoy the book, one of all time greatest voyages of exploration of geology, flora and fauna, not to mention the interesting homo sapiens encountered. And of course led directly to an even more famous book by same author. Highly recommend but only if locate one of the old leather bound illustrated editions published back when people really did spend time reading quality books. Good luck.
http://www.foliosociety.com/shop

You may well have a Folio Society Edition?

They specialize in high quality bound and illustrated books - usually re issues of classics.

https://www.foliosociety.com/region/select they do sell in USA.
Yes, it is a Folio Society edition published in London in a type of box. And in amost new condition, wonder if it was ever even opened. Want to find more Folio Society editions of classics. Thanks.
https://www.abebooks.co.uk/black-gull-b ... 3247111/sf

Black Gull Books in London does quite a few Folio Books, often in very good condition. You might check with them.

ResearchMed
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by ResearchMed » Fri Aug 24, 2018 6:26 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:38 pm
ResearchMed wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:14 pm
jdb wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:05 pm
The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin, published in London in 1839. Found at my favorite Chicago used bookstore, Myopic in Wicker Park. When I go to used bookstores like to buy the old books with heavy leather covers and large fonts and period illustrations, this one hit all the keys, published about 30 years ago. Even has period illustrations drawn during the voyage. Never would be reading the current paperback version with small font. Anyway, very much enjoy the book, one of all time greatest voyages of exploration of plants, animals and fauna, not to mention the interesting homo sapiens encountered. And of course led directly to an even more famous book by same author. Highly recommend but only if locate one of the old leather bound illustrated editions published back when people really did spend time reading quality books. Good luck.
It IS nicer to read a book when it is bound and printed nicely!

I've got a nice collection of boxed sets or just "full sets" of classical authors, and many fond memories of curling up with the books, from young childhood through well into adulthood.

Unfortunately, that background makes it really difficult to enjoy e-versions of books.
It makes it worse than that. I very much dislike the e-versions.

Your "Voyage of the Beagle" sounds like an especially nice "find". :happy

RM
https://www.foliosociety.com/region/select

specialize in finely bound and illustrated books.
I have a wonderful collection of those, started when I lived in the UK back in the '70's. Then I continued to purchase some more when back in the States.

I've also got some wonderful truly *old* books, from when they really bound books lovingly, that I picked up in bookshops in NYC, including from one wonderful dusty basement place on the Upper East Side, from before I discovered Folio Society. I used to get there every couple of years and browse for a few special books.

When we "downsize", these are not going to be among the first to go.
It will be difficult when we get to that stage... Those, and my collection of classical music LP's.
:(

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

bearcub
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Re: What Book Are You Currently Reading? Part VI

Post by bearcub » Fri Aug 24, 2018 7:34 pm

The Dawn-Breakers--Nabil"s Narrative by Shoogi Effendi. It is about the early days of The Baha"i Faith.

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