Why do we work?

Non-investing personal finance issues including insurance, credit, real estate, taxes, employment and legal issues such as trusts and wills
MathWizard
Posts: 3000
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 1:35 pm

Re: Why do we work?

Post by MathWizard » Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:25 pm

KlangFool wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:24 pm
MathWizard wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:17 pm
Certainly to provide for my family, and to continue to do so in retirement.

I once had a college class where the instructor said "Suppose I
offered to guarantee you a B in the class with the provision that you no longer attend. How many would take me up on the offer?
Quite a few hands went up. (not mine though).

He then said that those who raised their hand were either wanting an A, or just wanted to get through the course, not to learn anything. He suggested that the latter re-examine why they were taking the class. He then went in to start the first lecture.

I think to that this is analagous to your question. Suppose someone guaranteed you the necessities. Would you then work?

I would, to the extent that I could make the world a better place.
When I no longer could do a good job, I would quit.
MathWizard,

Why do you need a job to make the world a better place? There are many other ways to make the world a better place.

KlangFool
Because a job affords me resources that are unavailable otherwise. While I can do some good locally for a short time through volunteering at local non-profits, I can have a large effect providing consulting services to research agencies.

Research into new technologies I'd the one way we can improve conditions for everyone. New ways of feeding people, new treatments for ailments, increased efficiencies in energy, modelling for effects of policy changes in response to changes in climate. I have worked directly with researchers in these areas to increase their productivity.

I can only do that in my current job, or a similar one. Outside of this position, I would have little influence. I never felt that I had the resources to start my own company, so I need to work within the structure that my company provides.
Last edited by MathWizard on Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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aspirit
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Re: Why do we work?

Post by aspirit » Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:33 pm

USA State & Federal .gov will not take bitcoin for taxes. :P
Time & tides wait for no one. A man has to know his limitations.

dziuniek
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Re: Why do we work?

Post by dziuniek » Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:48 pm

whodidntante wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:04 pm
Did I stumble into MMM?

"Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes, working jobs we hate so we can buy [censored] we don’t need."
Oh snap, Fight Club reference?

dziuniek
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Location: Corrupticut

Re: Why do we work?

Post by dziuniek » Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:54 pm

EnjoyIt wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:07 pm
I have a question for those willing to answer: Why do you work?

I can see working for some goals such as making sure you are debt free and the kids get a college education. But then why do you work? Sure make sure we have a roof over our heads and well fed. Okay but after those are covered why do you keep earning money?

What I notice is that there is no limit to how much one can spend. And there is no limit to "more." If someone has a reasonable car to get around, one can always work to buy a nicer car. I wonder though when considering the cost of the nicer car, after taxes over long term this difference can be hundreds of thousands if invested. What about other items. A nicer TV can cost an extra thousand, a nicer coffee pot, nicer plates, nicer watch, it all adds up over the years. It gets even more interesting when we want a slightly bigger home or a slightly nicer location. Some areas will cost 10-20 times as much for a similar home simply because it is in a nicer location. Does all the extra time spent earning money provide the benefit of "better stuff?" I ask especially because there is no end to "better." There is always something better.

For example, I was recently looking at homes in a nicer part of town that will cost about 40% more than our current home. As a reference this home would be 2.5x salary and our current home has 9 years left in a 15 year mortgage. The home is a bit bigger with nicer amenities. I calculate to own this home, pay for the extra property tax, extra maintenance, extra utilities, as well as save up the extra money needed to retire and still be able to live in this home, I will have to work an extra 5333 hours or 664 days or 132 weeks. for me, all that extra time working just seams silly to live in a slightly nicer area but that is just me. Although I enjoy my work it so much more enjoyable when working part time. Plus, my life outside of work is so much more enjoyable when working part time.

I have a friend that works 6 days a week to be able to afford a 8,000 sqft home in an amazing neighborhood. The place is gorgeous. But is it worth the time she is losing away from family, friends, and hobbies?

Please discuss if you are interested.
Everyone's balance is different.

There's people on this board and out there who think your house is excessive even if it 4 times smaller than your friends 8k sq ft gargantuan garage.

Everyone's point of reference is different.

I used to work at PWC(Big 4 accounting) and thought people who worked less than 55/60 hrs per week were just lazy.

I currently work 40 hours per week and think anyone who works more is a sucker.

We owned a 1k sq ft house before and it was fine.

We own a 2k sq ft house and think it's fine.

A 3k sq ft sounds really nice.

ノ( º _ ºノ)

EnjoyIt
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Re: Why do we work?

Post by EnjoyIt » Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:07 pm

knpstr wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 3:48 pm
EnjoyIt wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 10:51 am
Right now I am contemplating purchasing something nicer.

We are currently in need of a new receiver for our entertainment system. I have narrowed it down to two different receivers the Arcam AVR390 or the Arcam AVR550. They cost $2500 and $3400 respectively. Obviously I can buy an even less expensive Japanese unit. We need to buy something since the current Arcam AVR400 is not functioning. So here I am looking at buying something nicer and spending more money on it. Sure we could afford it but is it worth the extra $900 or am I about to purchase $900 of nicer that is noticeable on paper but having one or the other unit would provide no discernible increase in pleasure after a few weeks of use.
And yet there are countless people getting along just fine without an entertainment system.

Why do we work? To pay other people to do things for us.
Ahhh yes...that is why they call it lifestyle creep. Once you experience something, you know it exists and it is hard to remove it from your life. It is kind of like wine I assume. Once you develop a palate for it, it may be hard to drink wine from a box.

Sometimes we pay other people to do thing we can easily do ourselves because we don't have time while sitting at work.
wrongfunds wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:46 pm
We need to buy something since the current Arcam AVR400 is not functioning.
And to take care of this issue, you are buying another Arcam receiver :oops:
Hey, if you have a better solution for a comparable sounding receiver, I'm all ears. I have been spoiled by the AVR400 for many many years. I tried a different receiver and because I experienced "better." It is very hard to go back.
golfCaddy wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:20 pm
This thread seems to be constantly moving around the goal post. The difference in a $6k and a $3k audio system might not discernible for any but the extreme audiophiles. If you want to throw out crazy low numbers, like $7k/year, I spent that much on health insurance alone when I was on COBRA.
The goal posts are different for every person. For some living in a small desolate cabin in the middle of nowhere is bliss while others feel they can't survive unless they have a 2500+ sqft house in the Bay Area. Some are perfectly happy driving a 10 year old Honda while others must have a new Porsche Macan. I think somewhere in the middle is the real value point where increased spending provides very little benefit. As for the $7k per year comment...I think it got taken out of context. It was just an example of one extreme person being happy spending so little. Definitely not my vision of a "good life"
JoeRetire wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 6:58 pm
volgograd wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 6:33 am
Personally I enjoy what I do and wouldn't trade it for any other profession. I make good money and work from home 4 days out of the week and love all my coworkers. Last year I switched job and took a 6 month break in between to travel. At the end of it I started getting bored and itching to go back working!
Good for you!

Financial Independence is all about choices. Some choose not to work at all. Others choose to do work they enjoy. Both are reasonable choices.

After I retired, I consulted for 2 days per week - because I enjoyed it, not because I needed the money.
I choose to be financially independent and work part time until that will bore me and I do something else.

KlangFool
Posts: 10161
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 12:35 pm

Re: Why do we work?

Post by KlangFool » Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:14 pm

MathWizard wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:25 pm
KlangFool wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:24 pm
MathWizard wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:17 pm
Certainly to provide for my family, and to continue to do so in retirement.

I once had a college class where the instructor said "Suppose I
offered to guarantee you a B in the class with the provision that you no longer attend. How many would take me up on the offer?
Quite a few hands went up. (not mine though).

He then said that those who raised their hand were either wanting an A, or just wanted to get through the course, not to learn anything. He suggested that the latter re-examine why they were taking the class. He then went in to start the first lecture.

I think to that this is analagous to your question. Suppose someone guaranteed you the necessities. Would you then work?

I would, to the extent that I could make the world a better place.
When I no longer could do a good job, I would quit.
MathWizard,

Why do you need a job to make the world a better place? There are many other ways to make the world a better place.

KlangFool
Because a job affords me resources that are unavailable otherwise. While I can do some good locally for a short time through volunteering at local non-profits, I can have a large effect providing consulting services to research agencies.

Research into new technologies I'd the one way we can improve conditions for everyone. New ways of feeding people, new treatments for ailments, increased efficiencies in energy, modelling for effects of policy changes in response to changes in climate. I have worked directly with researchers in these areas to increase their productivity.

I can only do that in my current job, or a similar one. Outside of this position, I would have little influence. I never felt that I had the resources to start my own company, so I need to work within the structure that my company provides.
MathWizard,

Okay. One of my ex-coworker started his own Intellectual Property Right company and he filed over 300+ patents. I do not know your specific area. So, it may not be possible for you.

KlangFool

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badbreath
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Re: Why do we work?

Post by badbreath » Sun Jun 10, 2018 10:01 pm

JoeRetire » Fri Jun 08, 2018 3:30 pm

EnjoyIt wrote: ↑Fri Jun 08, 2018 3:07 pm
Why do you work?
I worked while it was personally and financially fulfilling. I stopped when it wasn't and when I had enough money to do so.
I have to agree with this.
“While money can’t buy happiness, it certainly lets you choose your own form of misery.” Groucho Marx

DC3509
Posts: 277
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Re: Why do we work?

Post by DC3509 » Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:16 pm

I am surprised that most people who responded to this replied that they work to provide and purchase things. I work because I absolutely love my job and consider myself very fortunate everyday to do the type of work that I do. I grew up in a very blue-collar, economically depressed area, and living there as a kid, I never in a million years thought I would be doing what I do now on a daily basis. I find my job intellectually challenging, and enjoy the relationships that I have with wonderful co-workers. It is a side benefit that they pay me well, but I often think of Tim Russert, the late Meet the Press host who once quipped that he couldn't believe he got paid to do his job -- I feel the same way. I have never thought of work as a means to make money so I could buy bigger and nicer "stuff" -- it is only recently that I have started splurging on some nicer things, but most of these are just convenience items -- nicer car instead of a beater, better clothes instead of old ill-fitting things with noticeable wear, etc. But I have never woke up in the morning and said "I have to go work today so I can afford some nicer clothes" -- I wake up in the morning and say "I am going to work because I love my job" and everything else takes care of itself.

HIinvestor
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Re: Why do we work?

Post by HIinvestor » Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:09 am

H says he worked to pay bills—his and his dad’s— and loved his job and its benefits. After we met and married, it was to pay our bills and he continued to love his job and coworkers.

H finally retired when the major bills had been paid and is enjoying retirement. I have loved my jobs and now am primarily a volunteer who sometimes gets an honorarium from time to time. I do my volunteering because I feel it’s important and I enjoy it. It allows me to meet interesting people and try to make a difference. It also has us traveling to different places.

flyingaway
Posts: 1886
Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2014 10:19 am

Re: Why do we work?

Post by flyingaway » Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:18 am

DC3509 wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:16 pm
I am surprised that most people who responded to this replied that they work to provide and purchase things. I work because I absolutely love my job and consider myself very fortunate everyday to do the type of work that I do. I grew up in a very blue-collar, economically depressed area, and living there as a kid, I never in a million years thought I would be doing what I do now on a daily basis. I find my job intellectually challenging, and enjoy the relationships that I have with wonderful co-workers. It is a side benefit that they pay me well, but I often think of Tim Russert, the late Meet the Press host who once quipped that he couldn't believe he got paid to do his job -- I feel the same way. I have never thought of work as a means to make money so I could buy bigger and nicer "stuff" -- it is only recently that I have started splurging on some nicer things, but most of these are just convenience items -- nicer car instead of a beater, better clothes instead of old ill-fitting things with noticeable wear, etc. But I have never woke up in the morning and said "I have to go work today so I can afford some nicer clothes" -- I wake up in the morning and say "I am going to work because I love my job" and everything else takes care of itself.
I feel sorry for you. (I used to have the same feeling, but not anymore).

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JoMoney
Posts: 5844
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Re: Why do we work?

Post by JoMoney » Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:35 am

flyingaway wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:18 am
DC3509 wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:16 pm
I am surprised that most people who responded to this replied that they work to provide and purchase things. I work because I absolutely love my job and consider myself very fortunate everyday to do the type of work that I do. I grew up in a very blue-collar, economically depressed area, and living there as a kid, I never in a million years thought I would be doing what I do now on a daily basis. I find my job intellectually challenging, and enjoy the relationships that I have with wonderful co-workers. It is a side benefit that they pay me well, but I often think of Tim Russert, the late Meet the Press host who once quipped that he couldn't believe he got paid to do his job -- I feel the same way. I have never thought of work as a means to make money so I could buy bigger and nicer "stuff" -- it is only recently that I have started splurging on some nicer things, but most of these are just convenience items -- nicer car instead of a beater, better clothes instead of old ill-fitting things with noticeable wear, etc. But I have never woke up in the morning and said "I have to go work today so I can afford some nicer clothes" -- I wake up in the morning and say "I am going to work because I love my job" and everything else takes care of itself.
I feel sorry for you. (I used to have the same feeling, but not anymore).
You "feel sorry" for someone who's contributing socially and enjoys what they're doing with their time?
I feel sorry for you.
"To achieve satisfactory investment results is easier than most people realize; to achieve superior results is harder than it looks." - Benjamin Graham

flyingaway
Posts: 1886
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Re: Why do we work?

Post by flyingaway » Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:38 am

JoMoney wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:35 am
flyingaway wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:18 am
DC3509 wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:16 pm
I am surprised that most people who responded to this replied that they work to provide and purchase things. I work because I absolutely love my job and consider myself very fortunate everyday to do the type of work that I do. I grew up in a very blue-collar, economically depressed area, and living there as a kid, I never in a million years thought I would be doing what I do now on a daily basis. I find my job intellectually challenging, and enjoy the relationships that I have with wonderful co-workers. It is a side benefit that they pay me well, but I often think of Tim Russert, the late Meet the Press host who once quipped that he couldn't believe he got paid to do his job -- I feel the same way. I have never thought of work as a means to make money so I could buy bigger and nicer "stuff" -- it is only recently that I have started splurging on some nicer things, but most of these are just convenience items -- nicer car instead of a beater, better clothes instead of old ill-fitting things with noticeable wear, etc. But I have never woke up in the morning and said "I have to go work today so I can afford some nicer clothes" -- I wake up in the morning and say "I am going to work because I love my job" and everything else takes care of itself.
I feel sorry for you. (I used to have the same feeling, but not anymore).
You "feel sorry" for someone who's contributing socially and enjoys what they're doing with their time?
I feel sorry for you.
One may "like" his/her job. But "loving" his/her job is too much in my opinion.

DC3509
Posts: 277
Joined: Wed Jul 12, 2017 7:25 am

Re: Why do we work?

Post by DC3509 » Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:59 am

flyingaway wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:38 am
JoMoney wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:35 am
flyingaway wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:18 am
DC3509 wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:16 pm
I am surprised that most people who responded to this replied that they work to provide and purchase things. I work because I absolutely love my job and consider myself very fortunate everyday to do the type of work that I do. I grew up in a very blue-collar, economically depressed area, and living there as a kid, I never in a million years thought I would be doing what I do now on a daily basis. I find my job intellectually challenging, and enjoy the relationships that I have with wonderful co-workers. It is a side benefit that they pay me well, but I often think of Tim Russert, the late Meet the Press host who once quipped that he couldn't believe he got paid to do his job -- I feel the same way. I have never thought of work as a means to make money so I could buy bigger and nicer "stuff" -- it is only recently that I have started splurging on some nicer things, but most of these are just convenience items -- nicer car instead of a beater, better clothes instead of old ill-fitting things with noticeable wear, etc. But I have never woke up in the morning and said "I have to go work today so I can afford some nicer clothes" -- I wake up in the morning and say "I am going to work because I love my job" and everything else takes care of itself.
I feel sorry for you. (I used to have the same feeling, but not anymore).
You "feel sorry" for someone who's contributing socially and enjoys what they're doing with their time?
I feel sorry for you.
One may "like" his/her job. But "loving" his/her job is too much in my opinion.
The response doesn't make much sense to what was intended to be a serious reply in a thread that I found very interesting to read. But, do you feel sorry for Tom Brady? Steve Jobs? The Pope? The people who are the best at what they do, the most successful, and who change the world also love their jobs (usually).

mak1277
Posts: 781
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: Why do we work?

Post by mak1277 » Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:01 am

DC3509 wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:59 am
flyingaway wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:38 am
JoMoney wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:35 am
flyingaway wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:18 am
DC3509 wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:16 pm
I am surprised that most people who responded to this replied that they work to provide and purchase things. I work because I absolutely love my job and consider myself very fortunate everyday to do the type of work that I do. I grew up in a very blue-collar, economically depressed area, and living there as a kid, I never in a million years thought I would be doing what I do now on a daily basis. I find my job intellectually challenging, and enjoy the relationships that I have with wonderful co-workers. It is a side benefit that they pay me well, but I often think of Tim Russert, the late Meet the Press host who once quipped that he couldn't believe he got paid to do his job -- I feel the same way. I have never thought of work as a means to make money so I could buy bigger and nicer "stuff" -- it is only recently that I have started splurging on some nicer things, but most of these are just convenience items -- nicer car instead of a beater, better clothes instead of old ill-fitting things with noticeable wear, etc. But I have never woke up in the morning and said "I have to go work today so I can afford some nicer clothes" -- I wake up in the morning and say "I am going to work because I love my job" and everything else takes care of itself.
I feel sorry for you. (I used to have the same feeling, but not anymore).
You "feel sorry" for someone who's contributing socially and enjoys what they're doing with their time?
I feel sorry for you.
One may "like" his/her job. But "loving" his/her job is too much in my opinion.
The response doesn't make much sense to what was intended to be a serious reply in a thread that I found very interesting to read. But, do you feel sorry for Tom Brady? Steve Jobs? The Pope? The people who are the best at what they do, the most successful, and who change the world also love their jobs (usually).
I don't feel sorry for DC, but I don't think his/her situation is "typical". People who (claim to) love their work always think it's as simple as finding a job you love. Well for some people, that's total BS nonsense, and there is no job that they will ever love. Even if I took my favorite hobby and turned it into a job, I know for certain I would be sick of it within a year, simply for the fact that I was obligated to do it.

EnjoyIt
Posts: 1580
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 8:06 pm

Re: Why do we work?

Post by EnjoyIt » Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:32 am

mak1277 wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:01 am
DC3509 wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:59 am
flyingaway wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:38 am
JoMoney wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:35 am
flyingaway wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:18 am


I feel sorry for you. (I used to have the same feeling, but not anymore).
You "feel sorry" for someone who's contributing socially and enjoys what they're doing with their time?
I feel sorry for you.
One may "like" his/her job. But "loving" his/her job is too much in my opinion.
The response doesn't make much sense to what was intended to be a serious reply in a thread that I found very interesting to read. But, do you feel sorry for Tom Brady? Steve Jobs? The Pope? The people who are the best at what they do, the most successful, and who change the world also love their jobs (usually).
I don't feel sorry for DC, but I don't think his/her situation is "typical". People who (claim to) love their work always think it's as simple as finding a job you love. Well for some people, that's total BS nonsense, and there is no job that they will ever love. Even if I took my favorite hobby and turned it into a job, I know for certain I would be sick of it within a year, simply for the fact that I was obligated to do it.
Exactly. It is one thing to enjoy your work. It is a very rare thing to find nothing more enjoyable than your work. People like Warren Buffet and Elon Musk started their own business and very likely take lots of pride in what they built. To them it is very likely part of their identity and stopping simply doesn't make any sense. Most of us do not own their own business and work for someone else. There is a lot less passion in that for most people except a very select few like DC above. There is also a small subset of people who think they love work but because they don't realize all the great things life has to offer outside of work.

Me personally, I enjoy my work but enjoy it the most when I work part time on a schedule that I want.

MiddleGround
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2017 1:22 pm

Re: Why do we work?

Post by MiddleGround » Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:01 am

OP,

Thanks for the great question. I enjoy the layers of thought here. Mine has changed over the years.

1--High School--right of passage, per se
2--Navy--set the stage for appreciating working as a civilian
3--Mega-Corp years, drink the kool aid and pretend you are part of the special machine and place value on awards that sit on a desk or hang on a wall
4--Small Business, 401k and health insurance are over-rated, my DW's company can pick up the slack
5--Mega-Corp again, learn from 'all your mistakes from 1-4' and maximize all benefits

I"m at the end of 5 now. We have fought the urge to buy a newer home. We have cars that are over 9 years old. We spend heavier on travel.
6, once updated, will probably segue us to FI and early retirement, hopefully.

Cheers to all on this thread! :sharebeer
"Fund your future, every month." ---Me

furikake
Posts: 232
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2015 10:13 am

Re: Why do we work?

Post by furikake » Mon Jun 11, 2018 7:49 pm

Health insurance. I've cut back quite a bit. I find that most of my friends do not have time to go out with me at all during work hours, they can't because they have to work. So now I focus on my personal health and my gardening, can I count those as work? If I can then it's because I like to stay healthy and plant my own vegetables, it's fulfilling.

basspond
Posts: 1073
Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 4:01 am

Re: Why do we work?

Post by basspond » Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:28 pm

Why did I? So I could live, support my family, support charities, and retire with dignity.

anoop
Posts: 690
Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2014 1:33 am

Re: Why do we work?

Post by anoop » Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:42 pm

Like many have said already, I too work because I need to.

If I didn't need to, I might still work, but my attitude to it would be very different.

Also, this question becomes very interesting in the context of no dependents.

AerialWombat
Posts: 184
Joined: Tue May 29, 2018 1:07 pm

Re: Why do we work?

Post by AerialWombat » Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:52 pm

EnjoyIt wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:07 pm
The goal posts are different for every person. For some living in a small desolate cabin in the middle of nowhere
This. I work so I can buy rental properties so I can disappear into the woods in a few years.

JGoneRiding
Posts: 1155
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2014 3:26 pm

Re: Why do we work?

Post by JGoneRiding » Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:29 pm

I cut back on work when I had a child last year (totally best decision) and then in then last 2 months I have had to increase work again-mostly due to demands from boss. But I also got back some of the money I had given up and think I hit the sweet spot in terms of time and rewards.

Life is a balance. I was bored at home with nothing to do but stare at my child, though of course i suffer guilt to.

DC3509
Posts: 277
Joined: Wed Jul 12, 2017 7:25 am

Re: Why do we work?

Post by DC3509 » Thu Jun 14, 2018 8:00 am

EnjoyIt wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:32 am
mak1277 wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:01 am
DC3509 wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:59 am
flyingaway wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:38 am
JoMoney wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:35 am

You "feel sorry" for someone who's contributing socially and enjoys what they're doing with their time?
I feel sorry for you.
One may "like" his/her job. But "loving" his/her job is too much in my opinion.
The response doesn't make much sense to what was intended to be a serious reply in a thread that I found very interesting to read. But, do you feel sorry for Tom Brady? Steve Jobs? The Pope? The people who are the best at what they do, the most successful, and who change the world also love their jobs (usually).
I don't feel sorry for DC, but I don't think his/her situation is "typical". People who (claim to) love their work always think it's as simple as finding a job you love. Well for some people, that's total BS nonsense, and there is no job that they will ever love. Even if I took my favorite hobby and turned it into a job, I know for certain I would be sick of it within a year, simply for the fact that I was obligated to do it.
Exactly. It is one thing to enjoy your work. It is a very rare thing to find nothing more enjoyable than your work. People like Warren Buffet and Elon Musk started their own business and very likely take lots of pride in what they built. To them it is very likely part of their identity and stopping simply doesn't make any sense. Most of us do not own their own business and work for someone else. There is a lot less passion in that for most people except a very select few like DC above. There is also a small subset of people who think they love work but because they don't realize all the great things life has to offer outside of work.

Me personally, I enjoy my work but enjoy it the most when I work part time on a schedule that I want.
I agree that people who own their own businesses tend to view work as part of their identity and thus are more passionate about it and tend to enjoy work more. But I don't think that's only true of people who own their own businesses. There are lots of successful professionals for whom work is part of their individual identity and brand and in turn they enjoy and even love work -- I believe many successful doctors, attorneys, business executives, athletes, government officials, media people, financial professionals, wall street players, real estate agents, etc. fall into this bucket.

When you are at the top of your field, you usually get there by enjoying your job. It doesn't even feel like "work." If work is drudgery, it is much more difficult to fake it and be successful at it.

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