Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

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anonymousboglehead
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Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by anonymousboglehead » Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:21 pm

Hi all,

I recently received my first speeding ticket for going 12 mph over the highway speed limit. The officer kindly reduced my ticket, and it is listed that I was going 5 mph over the speed limit. I have no issue with paying the associated fine, but if the ticket affects my family's car insurance policy, it's likely my parents won't let me continue to drive. Ultimately, I would like to avoid having this sent to my insurance company. On the ticket, there are three actions listed which I can take: pay the fine, attend a mitigation hearing, or attend a contested hearing. I have no plan to pursue the latter option, as I don't contest the ticket itself. I'm wondering if anyone has experience with mitigation hearings; if I schedule one and attend, will I be able to explain the circumstances (this is my first offense & I was passing a car while in the left lane) and have the ticket wiped off my record? Or will this be a pointless exercise? I'm also open to any other suggestions people may have for minimizing the effect of a speeding ticket. Thank you in advance for your help!

Danny

Grt2bOutdoors
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:26 pm

If you contest it and the officer shows up at traffic court, you might lose. If you pay it, it will go in drivers record. Some states offer a drivers ed/accident prevention course that will negate points and/or reduce liability insurance premiums when presented to insurance company for up to two-three years, provided you don’t get nailed for speeding again.
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Sandtrap
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:59 pm

You have nothing to lose by contesting the ticket. They cannot raise the offense if you lose.
If the officer does not show up then it will get thrown out.
There may also be a court representative that will go through the cases and settle for less to reduce the court workload, even if the officer shows up, but before the case is called up that day.
So in doing the above you at least give yourself a chance at getting completely off or less than where you are now.
It you pay it then you get what you get.
It will be a good experience for you to see how the system works. And be more careful next time.
The objective here is to make it go away completely.
j :D

NotWhoYouThink
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:38 pm

What state are you in? In Missouri, you would contact the Traffic Law Center, or some such business. They would work with the local court to get the offense changed to illegal parking, excessive vehicle noise, or some other non-moving violation which would not get reported to your insurance company and would not add points to your license. You would send TLC a credit card number and they would take care of the rest.

takeshi
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by takeshi » Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:39 pm

anonymousboglehead wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:21 pm
I'm also open to any other suggestions people may have for minimizing the effect of a speeding ticket.
A skilled and experienced traffic attorney is my preferred solution. Haven't needed one in a long time but the one I used was very effective. Ask others in your area if you want to go that route.

killjoy2012
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by killjoy2012 » Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:46 pm

I'd do the 2nd or 3rd option. Often, if you contest the ticket and have good record, they'll often change the ticket to one that is more expensive, but no points. Around here, 5 MPH over commonly get changed to impeding traffic.

Now, that said, just because the state may not assess points to your drivers license doesn't mean your insurance company doesn't assign their own points to the alternate infraction (e.g. impeding traffic). DL points and insurance points are not the same, and many insurance companies are wise to the racket that local law enforcement common follow -- money grab in exchange for an alternate infraction w. a higher priced ticket.

Katietsu
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by Katietsu » Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:59 pm

Personally, I do not know anyone who has had their insurance rates increased for a single 5 mph speeding ticket unless they also needed to make a change to their insurance policy. So, this would not be a good time to change deductibles or ask for a good student discount. Concentrate on not getting anymore tickets. I am sure there are situations where insurance companies are more aggressive with checking driving records and raising rates but it is not an automatic assumption.

TropikThunder
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by TropikThunder » Mon Jan 08, 2018 10:13 pm

anonymousboglehead wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:21 pm
Hi all,

I recently received my first speeding ticket for going 12 mph over the highway speed limit. The officer kindly reduced my ticket, and it is listed that I was going 5 mph over the speed limit. I have no issue with paying the associated fine, but if the ticket affects my family's car insurance policy, it's likely my parents won't let me continue to drive. Ultimately, I would like to avoid having this sent to my insurance company. On the ticket, there are three actions listed which I can take: pay the fine, attend a mitigation hearing, or attend a contested hearing. I have no plan to pursue the latter option, as I don't contest the ticket itself. I'm wondering if anyone has experience with mitigation hearings; if I schedule one and attend, will I be able to explain the circumstances (this is my first offense & I was passing a car while in the left lane) and have the ticket wiped off my record? Or will this be a pointless exercise? I'm also open to any other suggestions people may have for minimizing the effect of a speeding ticket. Thank you in advance for your help!

Danny
Please be very careful getting advice on an anonymous web forum where the commenters know nothing about how things work where you live, or give advice that may have worked 30 years ago. In law, as in real estate, what matters in Location! Location! Location! Washington state has the same or similar three options you listed: pay it, mitigate it, or contest it, but there may be other differences with your state. For example, in Washington state, the officer doesn't have to show up to a contested hearing unless you subpoena him, and if you don't then his lack of attendance is not grounds for dismissal. So if your state is similar, then telling you "if the officer does not show up then it will get thrown out" is mal-practicing law without a license.

Also, in Washington state, you can get a deferred finding for a speeding ticket (pay a fine, don't get another for x years, and the ticket will not count against your record or insurance) but is some counties you can NOT get deferred if you contest the charge and then lose. In others you can still get a deferred finding following a contested hearing loss but you have to have asked for deferral when requesting the hearing (not after you hear you lost). So, step one is to go to the website of the authority that wrote the ticket and read their guidelines. Deferred is a good way to go if our conscience prevents you from contesting the ticket (pay a fee, stay ticket-free for a year, etc).

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StevieG72
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by StevieG72 » Mon Jan 08, 2018 11:26 pm

In my state it doesn't hurt to go to court.

My last speeding ticket was dismissed after going to traffic school and behaving for 6 months.

If you have not already told your parents , you may want to do that as well. I would be more lenient on my kiddo if she told me about a ticket vs. me finding out from my insurance company.
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sawhorse
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by sawhorse » Mon Jan 08, 2018 11:36 pm

killjoy2012 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:46 pm
I'd do the 2nd or 3rd option. Often, if you contest the ticket and have good record, they'll often change the ticket to one that is more expensive, but no points. Around here, 5 MPH over commonly get changed to impeding traffic.
That's what happened for me. I hired an attorney and got mine changed to a violation that didn't accrue points.

carolinaman
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by carolinaman » Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:30 am

There are attorneys who specialize in traffic tickets. I hired one to help my son get some older traffic citations off his record. I was amazed at how well this turned out. The attorney got tickets reduced or eliminated in 2 counties and was able to get DMV to remove some records. In your case, an attorney might get your speeding ticket reduced to some charge that does not affect insurance. They know all the people involved in traffic court and know how to get things like this handled. If your record is otherwise clean, I would think a good traffic attorney could handle this for you.

Also, a first offense like the one you mentioned may not affect your insurance. If you are underage driver on your parents' insurance, that may not apply.

Jack FFR1846
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:41 am

The state matters. In mine (Massachusetts), the first hearing is before a magistrate and either party can appeal the ruling. So you can prove your case and the police representative can appeal it and you then are either found responsible (and pay the fine and hearing cost) or you elect to go to court. The court date is then set. That's where the officer has to show up, but in our state, all of the contested tickets for an officer are bundled, so they almost always show up.

My son rolled through a stop sign and was pulled over by an officer at 11pm literally parked in the woods with all of his lights off. He was represented by an attorney and the case was dismissed before even walking into the courtroom. The attorney worked with the prosecutor long ahead of time. He takes care of the attorney's dogs and sometimes babysits, so did this for no money to pay off the $700 normal charge. Had he just paid the ticket, my insurance would have gone up $1000 for the next 6 years.
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nickjoy
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by nickjoy » Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:22 am

In Maryland, if it's your first ticket and you're young, if you go to court you'll get PBJ and be done with it.

PBJ is Probation before Judgement. Basically probation for X months or X years and if you go that long without another ticket you're golden. If you do get another ticket in that time, you get the ticket you just earned, and the PBJ ticket that you'll have to pay.

It can't hurt to contest the ticket ever. They won't ever increase the fine unless you're a complete ass in there and start getting lippy with the judge and start whining about being profiled and such. Just be nice and say sorry, I won't do it again, blah, blah blah.

I did this for mine around 2008-2009 and got a 1 year PBJ and no court costs.

barnaclebob
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by barnaclebob » Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:23 am

My advice is to hire a traffic lawyer and contest the ticket. They will usually at least get it reduced to a charge that doesn't affect your insurance but you will still pay the same fine + the fees to the lawyer.

bob60014
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by bob60014 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:25 am

Many locale have a diversion program aka traffic school, for first timers with minor offenses. Check if your's has this, the ticket will usually be dismissed with no record/insurance hit after a short probationary period. YMMV !!

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dm200
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by dm200 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:59 am

While my wife and I have contested other types of tickets (about half successful, half not), we have never contested a speeding ticket like this.

I suspect if the ticket is just paid, the net costs will be less than the oost on the record (possible insurance) - than paying a bundle to a lawyer. Perhaps the "mitigation hearing" would be a low/cost way of dealing with it?

In some jusisdictions, as well, if you contest it in court- and lose, you may have "court costs" as well.

Where would you get the money to pay an attorney? Not cheap..

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Doom&Gloom
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by Doom&Gloom » Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:35 pm

You could consider giving your insurance agent a call and asking about the effect of the speeding ticket. DW got a speeding ticket for 47 in a 35 IIRC, and called our agent as she was considering taking the optional 3-hour lecture to avoid the cost of the ticket but unsure of the potential effect on our insurance rates. Our agent pooh-poohed the ticket and said the company would almost certainly ignore one speeding ticket of that nature. He told her that the insurance company was far more concerned with tickets such as running a stop light, failing to yield, reckless driving, etc. YMMV, of course.

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Ethelred
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by Ethelred » Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:40 pm

1. Tell your parents.
2. What state are you in? Almost none of the advice here will be correct for all states.

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dm200
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by dm200 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:43 pm

About 2-3 years ago, my wife got a ticket for not stopping at a stop sign. She swears she stopped and the police officer made a mistake. She contested the ticket and went to court. We sat through dozens of contested tickets over many hours. With this particular judge, a pattern emerged (that helped my wife). Where the ticket for not stopping at a stop sign was written as just something a passing police officer just noticed or happened to see, the judge threw out the ticket. This was the case of my wife and the judge threw out her ticket as well. Some such tickets, however, were written where the police specifically watched an intersection and gave tickets to those who did not stop. In these cases, the judge upheld the tickets in every case.

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BolderBoy
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by BolderBoy » Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:46 pm

IANAL.

Do a Google search in your state to see if a '5 mph over the limit' ticket carries any points. If it does not, then pay the ticket and consider it a lesson learned (stay inside the speed limit).

If you choose to contest the ticket, do you have any WRITTEN evidence that you can show the court? The cop will show up with written evidence on his side. If you don't, then the Court will likely side with the cop (he said / she said + evidence).

Truly, if 5 mph over the limit = no points, pay it and move on. All other options will cost you a lot more $$$.
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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:51 pm

Usually a first offense is a good candidate for traffic school. You can call and ask about that. It will cost some money, but probably less than an attorney. I think most places allow taking it online, which is better than when I did it. You had to go sit in class for hours.
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dm200
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by dm200 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 4:05 pm

Earl Lemongrab wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:51 pm
Usually a first offense is a good candidate for traffic school. You can call and ask about that. It will cost some money, but probably less than an attorney. I think most places allow taking it online, which is better than when I did it. You had to go sit in class for hours.
Yes - look into it. No harm in checking it out.

runner3081
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by runner3081 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:36 pm

TropikThunder wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 10:13 pm
anonymousboglehead wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:21 pm
Hi all,

I recently received my first speeding ticket for going 12 mph over the highway speed limit. The officer kindly reduced my ticket, and it is listed that I was going 5 mph over the speed limit. I have no issue with paying the associated fine, but if the ticket affects my family's car insurance policy, it's likely my parents won't let me continue to drive. Ultimately, I would like to avoid having this sent to my insurance company. On the ticket, there are three actions listed which I can take: pay the fine, attend a mitigation hearing, or attend a contested hearing. I have no plan to pursue the latter option, as I don't contest the ticket itself. I'm wondering if anyone has experience with mitigation hearings; if I schedule one and attend, will I be able to explain the circumstances (this is my first offense & I was passing a car while in the left lane) and have the ticket wiped off my record? Or will this be a pointless exercise? I'm also open to any other suggestions people may have for minimizing the effect of a speeding ticket. Thank you in advance for your help!

Danny
Please be very careful getting advice on an anonymous web forum where the commenters know nothing about how things work where you live, or give advice that may have worked 30 years ago. In law, as in real estate, what matters in Location! Location! Location! Washington state has the same or similar three options you listed: pay it, mitigate it, or contest it, but there may be other differences with your state. For example, in Washington state, the officer doesn't have to show up to a contested hearing unless you subpoena him, and if you don't then his lack of attendance is not grounds for dismissal. So if your state is similar, then telling you "if the officer does not show up then it will get thrown out" is mal-practicing law without a license.

Also, in Washington state, you can get a deferred finding for a speeding ticket (pay a fine, don't get another for x years, and the ticket will not count against your record or insurance) but is some counties you can NOT get deferred if you contest the charge and then lose. In others you can still get a deferred finding following a contested hearing loss but you have to have asked for deferral when requesting the hearing (not after you hear you lost). So, step one is to go to the website of the authority that wrote the ticket and read their guidelines. Deferred is a good way to go if our conscience prevents you from contesting the ticket (pay a fee, stay ticket-free for a year, etc).
I used this when I lived there. It was pretty sweet, but a little costly with their fees :)

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MP123
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by MP123 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:49 pm

It sounds like OP may be a minor. Worth adding that in WA at least a second violation will suspend his/her license until 18. It's state specific but keeping the first off the record may be very important if driving is necessary, job, school, and so on.

m1collector
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by m1collector » Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:29 pm

First of all, use Waze on your phone when driving so you can be more aware of police while driving. Second, insurance companies may not know you got a speeding ticket, because it costs a lot of money to order a driving record report so they might not order one at policy renewal.

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Pajamas
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by Pajamas » Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:26 pm

anonymousboglehead wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:21 pm
Ultimately, I would like to avoid having this sent to my insurance company. On the ticket, there are three actions listed which I can take: pay the fine, attend a mitigation hearing, or attend a contested hearing. I have no plan to pursue the latter option, as I don't contest the ticket itself. I'm wondering if anyone has experience with mitigation hearings; if I schedule one and attend, will I be able to explain the circumstances (this is my first offense & I was passing a car while in the left lane) and have the ticket wiped off my record? Or will this be a pointless exercise? I'm also open to any other suggestions people may have for minimizing the effect of a speeding ticket. Thank you in advance for your help!
You should attend the mitigation hearing and explain that it is your first offense and that you have been losing sleep over it and that it won't happen again because you have learned your lesson and that you have already signed up for a driver's ed class and you hope that the judge will approve that class and dismiss the ticket after you complete it.

What you shouldn't do is try to explain the circumstances in such a way as to make it seem that you are trying to justify it or weren't aware that you were breaking the law or were careless. Saying "I was speeding because I was passing a car while in the left lane" might not go over well with the judge, depending on the context and how you say it.

I have been there and done that and you really should learn a lesson from it and not speed or otherwise break the law or take chances when driving. It really doesn't get you where you are going much faster and is dangerous. Forget about your insurance costs and your parents and your ability to drive, but think about how you might feel if you killed someone through recklessness or carelessness.

MotoTrojan
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by MotoTrojan » Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:28 pm

Traffic court if applicable, that is a no-brainer, and then you won't have any points on your record.

I paid a lawyer $250 to make a ticket into a ~$100 non-moving violation in Nevada a couple years ago; probably saved myself many $1000's given that I had a ticket, an accident, and a no-fault comprehensive claim at the time.

anonymousboglehead
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by anonymousboglehead » Thu Jan 11, 2018 5:15 pm

Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:26 pm
If you contest it and the officer shows up at traffic court, you might lose. If you pay it, it will go in drivers record. Some states offer a drivers ed/accident prevention course that will negate points and/or reduce liability insurance premiums when presented to insurance company for up to two-three years, provided you don’t get nailed for speeding again.
Ok, thanks for the advice!
Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:59 pm
You have nothing to lose by contesting the ticket. They cannot raise the offense if you lose.
If the officer does not show up then it will get thrown out.
There may also be a court representative that will go through the cases and settle for less to reduce the court workload, even if the officer shows up, but before the case is called up that day.
So in doing the above you at least give yourself a chance at getting completely off or less than where you are now.
It you pay it then you get what you get.
It will be a good experience for you to see how the system works. And be more careful next time.
The objective here is to make it go away completely.
j :D
I will definitely be more careful in the future. Thanks!
NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:38 pm
What state are you in? In Missouri, you would contact the Traffic Law Center, or some such business. They would work with the local court to get the offense changed to illegal parking, excessive vehicle noise, or some other non-moving violation which would not get reported to your insurance company and would not add points to your license. You would send TLC a credit card number and they would take care of the rest.
As some other posters guessed, this occurred in Washington state. I'm in the process of looking at the specific rules for the county in which it occurred to see how much of the advice I've received here is relevant.
killjoy2012 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:46 pm
I'd do the 2nd or 3rd option. Often, if you contest the ticket and have good record, they'll often change the ticket to one that is more expensive, but no points. Around here, 5 MPH over commonly get changed to impeding traffic.

Now, that said, just because the state may not assess points to your drivers license doesn't mean your insurance company doesn't assign their own points to the alternate infraction (e.g. impeding traffic). DL points and insurance points are not the same, and many insurance companies are wise to the racket that local law enforcement common follow -- money grab in exchange for an alternate infraction w. a higher priced ticket.
Good to know. Thanks!
Katietsu wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:59 pm
Personally, I do not know anyone who has had their insurance rates increased for a single 5 mph speeding ticket unless they also needed to make a change to their insurance policy. So, this would not be a good time to change deductibles or ask for a good student discount. Concentrate on not getting anymore tickets. I am sure there are situations where insurance companies are more aggressive with checking driving records and raising rates but it is not an automatic assumption.
My understanding is that because I'm a minor, this ticket has a much higher likelihood of increasing insurance rates than if I were an adult.
TropikThunder wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 10:13 pm
anonymousboglehead wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:21 pm
Hi all,

I recently received my first speeding ticket for going 12 mph over the highway speed limit. The officer kindly reduced my ticket, and it is listed that I was going 5 mph over the speed limit. I have no issue with paying the associated fine, but if the ticket affects my family's car insurance policy, it's likely my parents won't let me continue to drive. Ultimately, I would like to avoid having this sent to my insurance company. On the ticket, there are three actions listed which I can take: pay the fine, attend a mitigation hearing, or attend a contested hearing. I have no plan to pursue the latter option, as I don't contest the ticket itself. I'm wondering if anyone has experience with mitigation hearings; if I schedule one and attend, will I be able to explain the circumstances (this is my first offense & I was passing a car while in the left lane) and have the ticket wiped off my record? Or will this be a pointless exercise? I'm also open to any other suggestions people may have for minimizing the effect of a speeding ticket. Thank you in advance for your help!

Danny
Please be very careful getting advice on an anonymous web forum where the commenters know nothing about how things work where you live, or give advice that may have worked 30 years ago. In law, as in real estate, what matters in Location! Location! Location! Washington state has the same or similar three options you listed: pay it, mitigate it, or contest it, but there may be other differences with your state. For example, in Washington state, the officer doesn't have to show up to a contested hearing unless you subpoena him, and if you don't then his lack of attendance is not grounds for dismissal. So if your state is similar, then telling you "if the officer does not show up then it will get thrown out" is mal-practicing law without a license.

Also, in Washington state, you can get a deferred finding for a speeding ticket (pay a fine, don't get another for x years, and the ticket will not count against your record or insurance) but is some counties you can NOT get deferred if you contest the charge and then lose. In others you can still get a deferred finding following a contested hearing loss but you have to have asked for deferral when requesting the hearing (not after you hear you lost). So, step one is to go to the website of the authority that wrote the ticket and read their guidelines. Deferred is a good way to go if our conscience prevents you from contesting the ticket (pay a fee, stay ticket-free for a year, etc).
This did indeed take place in Washington state, so I will probably attempt to pursue a deferred finding if that's applicable (especially because I attend college out of state without a car, so the likelihood of getting another speeding ticket in the foreseeable future is effectively zero).
StevieG72 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 11:26 pm
In my state it doesn't hurt to go to court.

My last speeding ticket was dismissed after going to traffic school and behaving for 6 months.

If you have not already told your parents , you may want to do that as well. I would be more lenient on my kiddo if she told me about a ticket vs. me finding out from my insurance company.
Already told the parents, and they've tasked me with figuring out the best way to handle it. Good advice, though!
carolinaman wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:30 am
There are attorneys who specialize in traffic tickets. I hired one to help my son get some older traffic citations off his record. I was amazed at how well this turned out. The attorney got tickets reduced or eliminated in 2 counties and was able to get DMV to remove some records. In your case, an attorney might get your speeding ticket reduced to some charge that does not affect insurance. They know all the people involved in traffic court and know how to get things like this handled. If your record is otherwise clean, I would think a good traffic attorney could handle this for you.

Also, a first offense like the one you mentioned may not affect your insurance. If you are underage driver on your parents' insurance, that may not apply.
I'll definitely ask around and see if a traffic attorney may be the best route. Thanks!
Jack FFR1846 wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:41 am
The state matters. In mine (Massachusetts), the first hearing is before a magistrate and either party can appeal the ruling. So you can prove your case and the police representative can appeal it and you then are either found responsible (and pay the fine and hearing cost) or you elect to go to court. The court date is then set. That's where the officer has to show up, but in our state, all of the contested tickets for an officer are bundled, so they almost always show up.

My son rolled through a stop sign and was pulled over by an officer at 11pm literally parked in the woods with all of his lights off. He was represented by an attorney and the case was dismissed before even walking into the courtroom. The attorney worked with the prosecutor long ahead of time. He takes care of the attorney's dogs and sometimes babysits, so did this for no money to pay off the $700 normal charge. Had he just paid the ticket, my insurance would have gone up $1000 for the next 6 years.
Interesting. Thanks for the advice!
nickjoy wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:22 am
In Maryland, if it's your first ticket and you're young, if you go to court you'll get PBJ and be done with it.

PBJ is Probation before Judgement. Basically probation for X months or X years and if you go that long without another ticket you're golden. If you do get another ticket in that time, you get the ticket you just earned, and the PBJ ticket that you'll have to pay.

It can't hurt to contest the ticket ever. They won't ever increase the fine unless you're a complete ass in there and start getting lippy with the judge and start whining about being profiled and such. Just be nice and say sorry, I won't do it again, blah, blah blah.

I did this for mine around 2008-2009 and got a 1 year PBJ and no court costs.
Got it. Thanks!
bob60014 wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:25 am
Many locale have a diversion program aka traffic school, for first timers with minor offenses. Check if your's has this, the ticket will usually be dismissed with no record/insurance hit after a short probationary period. YMMV !!
I will definitely try to pursue this route. I don't care as much about ticket cost/time commitment, I just don't want my insurance rates to increase.
dm200 wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:59 am
While my wife and I have contested other types of tickets (about half successful, half not), we have never contested a speeding ticket like this.

I suspect if the ticket is just paid, the net costs will be less than the oost on the record (possible insurance) - than paying a bundle to a lawyer. Perhaps the "mitigation hearing" would be a low/cost way of dealing with it?

In some jusisdictions, as well, if you contest it in court- and lose, you may have "court costs" as well.

Where would you get the money to pay an attorney? Not cheap..
Presumably the cost of an attorney would be lower than the cost of a cumulative insurance increase over the next x years. At least, that's the way my parents are viewing the incident.
Doom&Gloom wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:35 pm
You could consider giving your insurance agent a call and asking about the effect of the speeding ticket. DW got a speeding ticket for 47 in a 35 IIRC, and called our agent as she was considering taking the optional 3-hour lecture to avoid the cost of the ticket but unsure of the potential effect on our insurance rates. Our agent pooh-poohed the ticket and said the company would almost certainly ignore one speeding ticket of that nature. He told her that the insurance company was far more concerned with tickets such as running a stop light, failing to yield, reckless driving, etc. YMMV, of course.
Got it. I'll definitely see if my parents can reach out to our insurance agency to determine the possible effects of the ticket.
Ethelred wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:40 pm
1. Tell your parents.
2. What state are you in? Almost none of the advice here will be correct for all states.
Washington state. And I already told my parents. Thanks!
BolderBoy wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:46 pm
IANAL.

Do a Google search in your state to see if a '5 mph over the limit' ticket carries any points. If it does not, then pay the ticket and consider it a lesson learned (stay inside the speed limit).

If you choose to contest the ticket, do you have any WRITTEN evidence that you can show the court? The cop will show up with written evidence on his side. If you don't, then the Court will likely side with the cop (he said / she said + evidence).

Truly, if 5 mph over the limit = no points, pay it and move on. All other options will cost you a lot more $$$.
Good point. I will definitely check and see. Thanks!
MP123 wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:49 pm
It sounds like OP may be a minor. Worth adding that in WA at least a second violation will suspend his/her license until 18. It's state specific but keeping the first off the record may be very important if driving is necessary, job, school, and so on.
I'm already 18 so that specific license suspension possibility doesn't apply, but I get what you mean. I'd rather have it off my record than on.

Thanks to everyone for all the pointers. Here's hoping I never have to ask for advice on speeding tickets ever again! ;)

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Phineas J. Whoopee
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Re: Minimizing effect of first speeding ticket

Post by Phineas J. Whoopee » Fri Jan 12, 2018 8:42 pm

It seems the question isn't about the ticket, but about the parents' permission.

I'd tell them what you did, including all details, pay the fine out of your own funds, promise not to speed anymore, offer, if you have enough money, to pay any increase in the insurance premium, and if they let you continue to drive keep your promise.

I don't see any other good way forward, if the situation is you need your parents' permission to drive and you're afraid they'll withdraw it.
anonymousboglehead wrote: ...
My understanding is that because I'm a minor, this ticket has a much higher likelihood of increasing insurance rates than if I were an adult.
...
I'm already 18 so that specific license suspension possibility doesn't apply, but I get what you mean. I'd rather have it off my record than on.
...
If you're already 18 you're no longer a minor.

PJW

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