After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
gotester2000
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by gotester2000 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 1:30 am

Myth or Fact?

IT industry which causes burnouts and stress alongwith unstable jobs seems to be the pioneer and main reason for people losing motivation for work. In fact lot of FI stuff is geared towards this industry with many people writing about FI come from this industry as well.

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6miths
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by 6miths » Thu Dec 07, 2017 1:54 am

As has been said, didn't really lose motivation to work but had a marked decreased tolerance for bulls#%t and that is what eventually led to retirement. Now I do the things that I enjoy and think will make a difference. Teach the next generation and spend time in low resource places trying to make a difference. Have been in Malawi for the last two weeks trying to may a positive contribution. Exhausted but it is a good tired.
'It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so!' Mark Twain

Thesaints
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by Thesaints » Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:50 am

Financial independence will make one lose interest in his job, unless he wants more of it.

flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Dec 07, 2017 8:54 am

gotester2000 wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 1:30 am
Myth or Fact?

IT industry which causes burnouts and stress alongwith unstable jobs seems to be the pioneer and main reason for people losing motivation for work. In fact lot of FI stuff is geared towards this industry with many people writing about FI come from this industry as well.
People in IT usually have high salary and young. That makes FI and younger possible. In my opinion, burnouts and stress come as the by-products since money comes so easy.

flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Dec 07, 2017 8:56 am

Y.A.Tittle wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:31 pm
I just hit my number and yes, my motivation to work has waned considerably.

In my case it's not so much because I acheived financial independence, but because I don't like my job or industry anymore. I am hoping to find a sunset career or avocation after I offically retire that will stimulate my working spirits.
Before FI, we are motivated by the need to make money with the work. After FI, that need is less pressing.

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cockersx3
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by cockersx3 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 9:33 am

soccerdad12 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:36 am
WildBill wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:16 am
Howdy

I was FI many years before I retired. I never lost any motivation for working, as the work was challenging and fulfilling.

However, my threshold for tolerating corporate and colleague BS steadily declined, to about zero at age 45 and was very negative by retirement. I was not actively resistant or expressive of this intolerance: if I did not agree with or want to participate in the various forms of BS I just ignored it.

Interestingly enough, those years of decling and negative tolerance and aggressive ignorance and non compliance were also by far my most successful professionally. Go figure.

W B
That was the exact same experience that my father-in-law had. He worked for mega corp and after his retirement was secured with 30+ years there he became much more vocal about real business issues and subsequently earned a couple of substantial promotions for it and became an executive. He said he wasn't scared to do the right thing for the company no matter the politics, b/c the worst case scenario was that he retired. I remember him saying, "What are they going to do? Fire me?" It's funny how those things work out.
Yeah, me three. I'm only at "bare bones" FI, working towards "comfortable FI" (halfway there or so) and have had this experience as well. I've found that I tend to not get nearly as frustrated as I used to with all of the work politics, since like you said - the worst thing that happens is that they fire me. Who cares! I've also been more outspoken about some of the issues I see that are important to me, but in a more respectful way since it just isn't as big of a deal anymore to me either way. I've also tended to let my less-important tasks slide a bit in order to allow myself to focus on other higher-visibility work tasks that I found more important and meaningful.

But like you said - even though I feel like Im accomplishing less at work, my perceived value from my management is now significantly higher than it was pre-FI. My name is now being floated as a possible promotion candidate (my director has identified me as her primary replacement in her succession plans) and am on track for a higher raise and bonus for the year. Like you said - go figure. I find it strange and totally not what I had expected - nice to be sure, but just weird.

MandyT
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by MandyT » Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:17 pm

CyclingDuo wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:53 pm
One can choose to either let those beefs eat at you, or you can choose to ignore it and carry on. Whenever I hear the same sort of frustrations voiced from colleagues, I choose to not engage in the discussion and deflect the topic, or manage to wiggle free and walk away into a more positive space on campus. We get this journey one time, and one time only. My legacy is not going to be remembered as moaning about it.
Respectfully, I feel that your comments are well-meaning but not necessarily on point. Sometimes, changes in priorities (and the funding that comes with it) from the administration mean that there is more work to do and fewer people to do it, and one is left with the choice of either cutting corners or letting one's duties monopolize too much of one's time and energy. This happened to me, regardless of my participation in campus gossip or lack thereof. I guess you would say that I should have sought counseling to deal with being so exhausted that I literally cut out leisure time activities that I enjoyed because I was so desperate for down time.

Anyway, I am now 56 with a pension that covers my modest expenses for now, and (fingers crossed) enough savings and investments to consider myself to be financially independent. I realize that I had it better, job and career-wise, than a lot of people, but I could see stress getting to me; when some of my colleagues started seeing it also, it was time to go. I wouldn't say financial independence made me lose motivation, but it let me retire before I would have lost motivation as a result of burnout.

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